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VOLUME 2  AIR OPERATOR AND AIR AGENCY CERTIFICATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS

CHAPTER 2  GENERAL INFORMATION FOR AIR CARRIER CERTIFICATION AND FRACTIONAL OWNERSHIP APPLICATION

Section 2  Air Carrier Commercial Operator Certificate Determinations, Types of Certificates, and Applicable Rules

2-126    PURPOSE. This section provides direction and guidance for the issuance of air carrier certificates and operating certificates. Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 119 consolidates the certification and operations specifications (OpSpecs) requirements for persons who operate in common carriage under 14 CFR parts 121 and 135. Part 119 also contains definitions pertinent to operations that do not involve common carriage. The following paragraphs are intended to enhance an inspector’s understanding of the basis for issuance of a particular type of certificate (air carrier or operating) and the kinds of operations authorized under those certificates and OpSpecs.

2-127    COMMON CARRIAGE VS. OPERATIONS NOT INVOLVING COMMON CARRIAGE.

A.    Common Carriage. The first step in evaluating an application is determining whether an applicant will be engaged in common carriage. An applicant is engaged in common carriage if the applicant “holds out” to the public (by advertising or other means) to transport persons or property for compensation or hire.

B.    Not Common Carriage. An applicant is not engaged in common carriage if he or she does not meet the above requirement. Operations not involving common carriage include the following definitions or exceptions. These definitions or exceptions are contained in part 119 and in sections of 14 CFR part 91.

1)    Non common carriage involves the carriage of persons or property for compensation or hire, but there is no holding out. Non common carriage operations require the issuance of an operating certificate. Operations would be conducted under 14 CFR part 125 or part 135, depending on the type of aircraft, seating configuration, and payload capacity.
2)    Private carriage involves the carriage of persons or property for compensation or hire with limitations on the number of contracts. The carriage of persons or property for compensation or hire under a contractual business arrangement between the operator and another person or organization, which did not result from the operator’s holding out or offering service is considered to be private carriage. (In this situation, the customer seeks an operator to perform the desired service and enters into an exclusive, mutual agreement as opposed to the operator seeking customers). Private carriage operations require the issuance of an operating certificate. Operations would be conducted under part 125 or part 135, depending on the type of aircraft, seating configuration, and payload capacity.

NOTE:  The current edition of Advisory Circular (AC) 120-12 provides additional guidelines for determining whether or not a transportation operation is common carriage. If an inspector cannot clearly determine whether an operation is common carriage or an operation not involving common carriage, the facts of the situation shall be presented to the regional Flight Standards division (RFSD). The RFSD shall coordinate the matter with both Regional Counsel and the Air Transportation Division (AFS-200) or the General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS-800) (as applicable) for an appropriate determination.

3)    Part 119 defines a direct air carrier as a person who provides or offers to provide air transportation and who has control over the operational functions performed in providing that transportation. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issues certificates to these direct air carriers. Title 49 of the United States Code (49 U.S.C.) expands the definition of an air carrier to include a person who acts “indirectly.” The FAA does not issue certificates to indirect air carriers. An indirect air carrier is a company that contracts aircraft and crew services from an air carrier or commercial operator but may not engage in control over the operational function of any flight. Examples of indirect air carriers include freight forwarders, brokers, or public charter operators. An indirect air carrier will act as an agent for either the customer or the air carrier, and their advertising must make it clear that a certificated air carrier or commercial operator provides the transportation.
4)    Operations in which persons or cargo are transported without compensation or hire are conducted under part 91 and do not require a certificate.
5)    Exceptions from the certification requirements of part 119 and the operating rules of parts 121 and 135 are summarized in the following paragraphs. Refer to the cited regulations for the complete regulatory content.
a)    Part 91 subpart F applies to large and turbine-powered, multiengine airplanes and fractional ownership program aircraft. Part 91, § 91.501 lists certain operations not involving common carriage that may be conducted under part 91 instead of part 121 or part 135. These operations involve the transportation of persons or property and may involve compensation. Section 91.501 sets conditions on the amount and types of compensation for some of these operations. Examples include:

·    Ferry or training flights.

·    Aerial work operations.

·    Sales demonstration flights (limited compensation for expenses).

·    Personal transportation for operator or guests (no charge, assessment, or fee).

·    Carriage of officials, employees, guests, and property of a company on an airplane operated by that company, parent, or subsidiary (Carriage is incidental to business and limited compensation for ownership, operating, and maintenance costs or no charge for guests when not within the scope of business of company).

·    Time shares, interchange agreements, and joint ownership.

·    Carriage of property (except mail) incidental to business (limited compensation for expenses).

·    Carriage of group (with common purpose) when there is no charge, assessment, or fee.

·    Carriage of persons for purpose of selling land, goods, or property when there is no charge, assessment, or fee.

·    Fractional ownership.

b)    Part 119, § 119.1(d) states that part 119 certification requirements do not apply to fractional ownership, or operations conducted under 14 CFR part 129, 133, 137, or 139.
c)    Section 119.1(e) lists operations that do not require air carrier or commercial operator certification. Examples include:

·    Student instruction.

·    Certain nonstop sightseeing flights conducted within a 25 statute mile (sm) radius of the airport.

·    Ferry or training flights.

·    Aerial work.

·    Sightseeing flights in hot air balloons.

·    Nonstop flights within 25 sm for intentional parachute operations.

·    Limited helicopter flights within 25 sm.

·    Part 133 (rotorcraft external load) or part 375 (certain foreign civil aircraft operations within the United States).

·    Emergency mail service (49 U.S.C. § 41906).

·    Carrying candidates in elections (§ 91.321).

2-128    TYPES OF CERTIFICATES UNDER PART 119. There are two, basic types of air operator certificates (AOC) issued to U.S. applicants who will conduct operations in common carriage. See Table 2-4, Certification for a summary of certificate requirements.

A.    An Air Carrier Certificate. This certificate is issued to applicants that plan to conduct interstate, foreign, or overseas transportation, or to carry mail.

B.    An Operating Certificate. This certificate is issued to applicants that plan to conduct intrastate transportation.

2-129    DETERMINING APPROPRIATE OPERATING RULE AND KIND OF OPERATION FOR PART 119.

A.    Step One. Once you determine the type of certificate, the next step is to determine the appropriate operating rule and kinds of operation. There are two operating rules that are appropriate for air carriers and commercial operators. An applicant will operate under part 135, part 121, or both depending on whether the operation is scheduled and the size and type of aircraft used. There are five kinds of operations: domestic, flag, and supplemental operations (applying to operations conducted under part 121) and commuter and on-demand operations (describing operations under part 135). To determine the appropriate operating rule and kind of operation, first determine if the applicant will conduct scheduled or nonscheduled operations.

1)    Scheduled operations include passenger operations in which the departure location and time and the arrival location are offered in advance by the operator. Scheduled operations can also carry cargo. However, an all‑cargo operation is defined as nonscheduled.

NOTE:  Scheduled operations do not include public charter operations under 14 CFR part 380.

2)    Nonscheduled operations include:
a)    Passenger-carrying operations in which the departure time and the departure and arrival locations are specifically negotiated with the customer or the customer’s representative.
b)    All-cargo operations.
c)    Scheduled passenger operations in aircraft (other than turbojet-powered airplanes) that have nine or fewer passenger seats and a 7,500-pound payload or less that operate with a frequency of less than five round trips a week on at least one route between two or more points according to a published flight schedule.
d)    Passenger operations conducted as a public charter under part 380.

B.    Step Two. Once it is determined whether the operation is scheduled or nonscheduled, the next step is to determine the appropriate operating rule and kinds of operation. An operator can conduct operations under part 121, 135, or both. However, the applicant will only be issued one certificate. The OpSpecs will detail the operating rules and kinds of operations. The definitions for kinds of operations are contained in § 119.1 and Volume 2, Chapter 2, Section 1, paragraph 2-103. Table 2-4 summarizes the appropriate operating rule and kinds of operation based on the aircraft type, size, seating configuration, and payload capacity, as well as the Area of Operations.

1)    Kinds of scheduled operations:
a)    Part 121 flag. An operator who has flag authority will also receive domestic and supplemental authority.
b)    Part 121 domestic. An operator who has domestic authority will also receive supplemental authority.
c)    Part 135 commuter. An operator who has commuter authority will also receive on-demand authority.
2)    Kinds of nonscheduled operations:
a)    Part 121 supplemental.
b)    Part 135 on-demand.

C.    Special Considerations for Aircraft With Modified Payload Capacities and/or Passenger Seat Configurations. There have been a number of instances where a Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) or other approved technical amendment to the type certification data results in a limitation or reduction of the maximum payload capacity for a particular make, model, and series (M/M/S) airplane. This reduction is achieved through a reduction of the maximum zero fuel weight (MZFW) or other means. One instance involves the Boeing Business Jet (BBJ), but other airplanes have also been modified.

1)    Part 119 defines, for air carriers and commercial operators, which operating rule will apply to the operation of their aircraft. Part 119 references passenger seat configuration and payload capacity to determine the applicable operating rules. In general, on-demand operation of airplanes having a passenger seat configuration of 30 seats or fewer, excluding each crewmember seat, and a payload capacity of 7,500 lb or less are conducted under part 135. On-demand operations of multiengine airplanes with a passenger seat configuration of more than 30 seats or a payload capacity of more than 7,500 lb are conducted under part 121.
2)    Part 125 prescribes rules governing the operations of U.S.-registered airplanes that have a seating configuration of 20 or more passenger seats, or a maximum payload capacity of 6,000 lbs or more when common carriage is not involved.
3)    Flight Standards Service (AFS) policy states that the passenger seat configuration and (maximum) payload capacity, as defined in parts 119, 121, 125, and 135 determine the applicable operating rule. If the passenger seating configuration or maximum payload capacity is modified, restricted, or limited through FAA-approved means (i.e., STC and Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM) revision), the amended passenger seat configuration and payload capacity can be used to determine the applicable operating rules.
4)    For example, a BBJ receives an FAA-approved reduction of the MZFW that results in a maximum payload capacity of 7,500 lb or less. This airplane also has a seating configuration of 30 or fewer passenger seats. Since it meets the applicability requirements of part 119, this airplane would be permitted to operate under part 135 instead of under part 121. The same logic would hold true if the payload capacity had been modified to 6,000 lb or less and a passenger seat configuration of 20 seats or fewer. In this instance, the airplane would be permitted certain operations under part 91 instead of under part 125.

2-130    ECONOMIC AUTHORITY FOR PART 119—DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (DOT) CERTIFICATES AND EXEMPTIONS. DOT is responsible for issuing economic authority for air carriers. No economic authority is required for commercial operators conducting intrastate transportation under part 121 or 135 or for operators conducting private or non common carriage under part 125 or 135. The type of economic authority is generally based on whether the operation is scheduled or charter, passenger or cargo, and the aircraft seating and payload capacity. It should be noted that the DOT definitions and terminology are not identical to those contained in part 119 and used for FAA certification. Actions that must be taken to obtain DOT economic authority are summarized in Table 2-5, Actions to Obtain DOT Authority. The following economic authorities are issued:

·    Title 49 U.S.C. § 41102.

·    Title 49 U.S.C. § 41103.

·    Commuter Air Carrier Authorization (scheduled passenger with small aircraft).

·    Air taxi operator authority (nonscheduled passenger or cargo with small aircraft).

·    Exemption authority under 49 U.S.C. § 40109.

A.    Large Airplanes. DOT defines large airplanes as originally designed to have more than 60 passenger seats or more than 18,000-pound payload. An operator with these airplanes is required to hold economic authority under 49 U.S.C. § 41102 or § 41103. These certificates may also be issued to companies operating smaller aircraft. An applicant must be found “fit, willing, and able” to conduct the operations before issuance of this certificate authority.

1)    Section 41102 authority may be issued for scheduled or charter operations that serve domestic or foreign points and that carry passengers, cargo and mail, or that carry cargo and mail only. Evidence of the authority consists of a certificate, with terms, conditions, and limitations. The DOT’s Show Cause and Final Orders also provide evidence of this authority.
2)    Section 41103 authority is provided to all-cargo operations. Evidence of this authority consists of a certificate with terms, conditions, and limitations. DOT’s Show Cause and Final Orders also provide evidence of this authority.

B.    Commuter Air Carrier. A commuter air carrier is defined as a company which operates airplanes designed to have no more than 60 passenger seats that provides scheduled passenger service of five or more round trip flights per week on at least one route according to published flight schedules. In accordance with 14 CFR part 298, a commuter air carrier must be found fit, willing, and able prior to being authorized to operate its scheduled passenger service. Evidence of this authority consists of a Commuter Air Carrier Authorization with terms, conditions, and limitations. DOT’s Show Cause and Final Orders also provide evidence of this authority.

C.    Air Taxi Operator. An air taxi operator is defined as a company which operates aircraft originally designed to have no more than 60 passenger seats or a cargo payload of 18,000 lbs and carries cargo or mail on either a scheduled or charter basis, and/or carries passengers on an on-demand basis or limited scheduled basis (i.e., four or fewer round trips a week on at least one route according to published flight schedules) only. An air taxi operator must register under part 298 (DOT Office of the Secretary of Transportation (OST) Form 4507, Air Taxi Operator Registration and Amendments under Part 298 of the Regulations of the Department of Transportation). The Technical Programs Branch (AFS-260) maintains the part 298 registrations. The OST Forms 4507 and 6410, U.S. Air Carriers‑Certificate of Insurance: Policies of Insurance for Aircraft Accident Bodily Injury and Property Damage Liability, are to be submitted whenever changes occur in the information reported on the forms. Every air taxi operator who plans to commence operations under part 135 must register with AFS-260 not later than 30 days prior to commencement of such operations. The registration of an on-demand air carrier shall remain in effect until it is amended by the carrier or canceled by the Administrator. Evidence of this authority is the DOT registration (OST Form 4507).

NOTE:  An airplane, for which the passenger seating configuration or maximum payload capacity is modified, restricted, or limited in order to operate under part 135 is subject to a DOT fitness determination if it was originally designed for more than 60 passengers or a maximum payload of 18,000 lbs.

D.    Exemption Authority. A company may also provide certain operations pursuant to exemption authority from the DOT. Generally, exemption authority is issued only to companies which already hold some type of § 41102 certificate authority from DOT and wish to provide operations outside of the authority granted by that certificate. Evidence of exemption authority may consist merely of a DOT confirmation of oral action taken, or it may take the form of a DOT order or written notice granting such authority.

NOTE:  If an inspector is unsure of the type of operations authorized by the registration, certificate, or exemption evidence presented by an air carrier, the inspector should contact DOT’s Air Carrier Fitness Division at 202-366-9721 to confirm the authority held.

E.    DOT Queries. DOT staff, in support of DOT fitness determinations, may occasionally query field inspectors concerning accident, incident, and enforcement histories and qualifications of an applicant or an applicant’s management personnel. Other than responding to these queries, a field inspector should not be involved in an applicant's efforts to obtain DOT economic authority. It is solely the responsibility of an applicant to obtain DOT economic authority. Field inspectors, however, shall not issue an FAA air carrier certificate unless an applicant can show proof that appropriate DOT economic authority has been obtained.

F.    Additional Information. For more information, go to the OST website: http://ostpxweb.ost.dot.gov/aviation/certific/Certificated%20packet2.pdf.

Table 2–4, Certification

TYPE OF CERTIFICATE

SEATING CAPACITY

PAYLOAD CAPACITY

14 CFR OPERATING PART

KIND OF OPERATION

AIR CARRIER CERTIFICATE

Scheduled Operations (common carriage passenger operation; departure, location, and time and arrival location offered in advance by the operator)

Common Carriage (holding out to transport persons or property for compensation or hire):

• Interstate,

• Foreign,

• Overseas, or

• Carriage of mail.

·          Turbojets.

·          Multiengine airplanes with 10 or more passenger seats, OR more than a 7,500-pound payload capacity.

·          Within or between the 48 contiguous U.S. states, entirely within a state, territory, or possession, or special authorizations.

121

Domestic

 

·          Turbojets.

·          Multiengine airplanes with 10 or more passenger seats, OR more than a 7,500-pound payload capacity.

·          Entirely outside U.S., takeoff or landing outside the 48 contiguous states, or between Alaska, Hawaii, and U.S. territories.

121

Flag

Indicates new/changed information.

Airplanes, other than turbojet‑powered airplanes, with nine or fewer passenger seats, excluding each crewmember seat, AND a 7,500-pound or less payload capacity, or any rotorcraft used in any scheduled operation with a frequency of operations of at least five round trips per week on at least one route between two or more points according to the published flight schedules.

135

Commuter

 

Airplanes, other than turbojets, with nine or fewer passenger seats AND a 7,500-pound or less payload capacity, or any rotorcraft used in scheduled passenger‑carrying operations with a frequency less than five round trips per week on at least one route between two or more points according to the published flight schedules.

135

On-demand

AIR CARRIER CERTIFICATE (continued)

Nonscheduled operations (negotiated departure time, departure location, and arrival location; or all-cargo or 14 CFR part 380 public charter)

 

Passenger operations with multiengine airplanes with more than 30 passenger seats OR more than a 7,500-pound payload capacity.

 

NOTE: A multiengine airplane with 10 to 30 seats or a turbojet listed in OpSpecs for part 121 domestic or flag operations must be operated under part 121 supplemental for on-demand operations.

121

Supplemental

 

Passenger operations with airplanes with 30 or fewer passenger seats AND a 7,500‑pound or less payload capacity, or any rotorcraft.

 

NOTE: A multiengine airplane with 10 to 30 seats or a turbojet that is listed in OpSpecs for part 121 domestic or flag operations cannot be operated under part 135 on‑demand rules, but that specific airplane must be operated under part 121 supplemental rules for nonscheduled operations.

135

On-demand

 

All-cargo operations with airplanes having a payload capacity of more than 7,500 lb.

121

Supplemental

 

All-cargo operations with airplanes having a payload capacity of 7,500 lb or less, or with rotorcraft.

135

On-demand

OPERATING CERTIFICATE

Scheduled operations (common carriage passenger operation, departure, location, and time and arrival location offered in advance by the operator)

Common Carriage in intrastate operations (publicly offering to transport persons or property for compensation or hire).

·          Turbojets.

·          Multiengine airplanes with 10 or more passenger seats, OR more than a 7,500-pound payload capacity.

·          Within or between the 48 contiguous U.S. states, entirely within a state, territory, possession, or special authorizations.

121

Domestic

 

Airplanes with nine or fewer passenger seats AND a 7,500‑pound or less payload capacity, or any rotorcraft.

135

Commuter

 

Nonscheduled operations (negotiated departure time, departure location, and arrival location; or all-cargo or part 380 public charter).

 

Multiengine airplanes with more than 30 passenger seats OR more than a 7,500-pound payload capacity.

 

NOTE: A multiengine airplane with 10 to 30 seats or a turbojet listed in OpSpecs for part 121 domestic or flag operations must be operated under part 121 supplemental for on-demand operations.

121

Supplemental

 

Airplanes with 30 or fewer passenger seats AND a 7,500‑pound or less payload capacity, or any rotorcraft.

 

NOTE: A multiengine airplane with 10 to 30 seats or a turbojet that is listed in OpSpecs for part 121 domestic or flag operations cannot be operated under part 135 on-demand rules, but that specific airplane must be operated under part 121 supplemental rules for nonscheduled operations.

135

On-demand

OPERATING CERTIFICATE

(continued)

 

Operations not involving common carriage (non common carriage or private carriage; see part 119 definition).

Airplanes with 20 or more passenger seats and a 6,000-pound or more payload capacity.

125

N/A

 

Airplanes with less than 20 seats and less than a 6,000-pound payload capacity and any rotorcraft.

135

 

On-demand

Table 2–5, Actions to Obtain DOT Authority

FAA Type of Operation

FAA Operating Rule

DOT Type of Operation and Required Authority

Operator

Responsibility

DOT

Responsibility

Airplanes with more than nine seats or more than a 7,500‑pound payload in scheduled passenger operations.

Title 14 CFR part 121 domestic or flag.

Title 49 U.S.C. § 41102 Certificate.

·          Airplanes with more than 60 seats or an 18,000-pound payload.

·          Section 41102 Certificate or Commuter Air Carrier Authorization (with 14‑CFR part 298 exemption).

·          Airplanes with 60 seats or less and an 18,000-pound payload or less.

Section 41102 or Commuter Authorization.

·          Apply for fitness determination.

·          Submit requested info and proof of insurance.

·          Register with DOT (for commuter only; OST Form 4507).

Section 41102 or Commuter Authorization.

·          Post application to docket for public viewing.

·          Conduct fitness determination.

·          Issue a show cause order inviting comments on why operation should not be authorized.

·          Issue final order with a § 41102 Certificate or Commuter Authorization (the effectiveness of which is conditioned upon receipt of appropriate FAA authority).

·          Issue registration (for commuter only).

Airplanes with more than 30 seats or a 7,500-pound payload (nonscheduled or all-cargo).

Part 121 supplemental.

Section 41102 Certificate.

·          Airplanes with more than 60 seats or an 18,000-pound payload.

·          Section 41102 or part 298 exemption/registration.

·          Airplanes with 60 seats or less or an 18,000-pound payload or less.

Section 41102 Certificate.

·          Apply for fitness determination.

·          Submit requested info & proof of insurance.

·          Part 298 exemption.

·          Register with AFS-260 (OST Form 4507) & show proof of insurance (OST Form 6410).

Section 41102 Certificate.

·          Post application to docket for public viewing.

·          Conduct fitness determination.

·          Issue a Show Cause Order, inviting comments on why operation should not be authorized.

·          Issue Final Order with § 41102 Certificate (the effectiveness of which is conditioned upon receipt of appropriate FAA authority).

·          Part 298 exemption.

·          Issue registration.

NOTE: DOT certificates or registrations are written evidence of official economic authority issued by the DOT.

FAA Type of Operation

FAA Operating Rule

DOT Type of Operation and Required Authority

Operator

Responsibility

DOT

Responsibility

Airplanes with nine seats or fewer or a 7,500-pound payload or less or rotorcraft in scheduled passenger operations (five or more round trips a week in at least one market).

Part 135 commuter.

Section 41102 certificate or Commuter Air Carrier Authorization (with part 298 Exemption for Operations).

·          Airplanes with 60 seats or fewer and an 18,000-pound payload or less.

Section 41102 or Commuter Authorization.

·          Apply for fitness determination.

·          Submit requested info and proof of insurance.

·          Register with DOT (for commuter only; OST Form 4507).

Section 41102 or Commuter Authorization.

·          Post application to docket for public viewing.

·          Conduct fitness determination.

·          Issue a Show Cause Order, inviting comments on why operation should not be authorized.

·          Issue Final Order with § 41102 Certificate or Commuter Authorization (the effectiveness of which is conditioned upon receipt of appropriate FAA authority).

·          Issue registration (for commuter only).

Airplanes with 30 seats or fewer and a 7,500-pound payload or less or rotorcraft in on-demand passenger and/or cargo operations.

Part 135 on‑demand.

Part 298 Exemption for Nonscheduled Operations.

·          Airplanes with 60 seats or fewer and an 18,000-pound payload or less.

Part 298 exemption.

·          Register with AFS-260 (OST Form 4507) and show proof of insurance (OST Form 6410).

Part 298 exemption.

·          Issue registration.

2-131    PREREQUISITES AND COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS.

A.    Prerequisites. This task requires knowledge of the task background and qualification as an aviation safety inspector (ASI) or an aviation safety technician (AST).

B.    Coordination. This task requires coordination with the Aviation Data Systems Branch, AFS-620.

2-132    REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References. Appropriate certification chapters.

B.    Forms. FAA Form 8400-6, Preapplication Statement of Intent.

C.    Job Aids. None.

2-133    OBTAINING PRECERTIFICATION/DESIGNATOR NUMBERS AND FINAL NUMBERS.

Indicates new/changed information.

A.    General. The RFSD is responsible for obtaining precertification/designator numbers for part 91 subpart K (part 91K), 121, 125, 135, 142, 145, and 147 applicants. Upon receipt of a Preapplication Statement of Intent (PASI) (FAA Form 8400-6), the appropriate division staff specialist will determine which district office will be assigned responsibility for the certification project. The assigned certificate-holding district office (CHDO) will then contact AFS‑620 via email at 9-AMC-AFS-620-Team@faa.gov, stating “the purpose of the contact is to request a precertification/designator number” and provide the following information:

·    Full official name of the company.

·    The location address of the proposed principal base of operations or location where the business will be conducted.

·    Names of proposed management personnel (last, first, and middle initial).

·    Proposed type of certificate (Air Carrier Certificate, Operating Certificate, or Air Agency Certificate) and applicable 14 CFR (part 121, 125, 135, 142, 145, 147, or 91K management specification (MSpec)).

·    Proposed startup date.

·    Identification of any current or previous certificate held by the applicant.

·    The designator of the district office assigned responsibility.

B.    Assignment of Designator Element. AFS-620 will provide the division staff specialist with a precertification/designator number. The alpha suffix of the precertification/identification number will always be the letter “P.” The division staff specialist will complete Section III of the PASI and return or forward it to the appropriate Flight Standards District Office (FSDO), if applicable.

C.    Release of Precertification/Identification Number. If the certification process is terminated before completion, terminate the task in the enhanced Vital Information Database (eVID).

D.    Finalization of Certificate/Designator Number. When a district office is ready to prepare the certificate and OpSpecs for issuance to an operator about to be certificated, the responsible inspector will coordinate with AFS-620 to obtain a final certificate/designator number. The responsible inspector shall state that “the purpose of the contact is to obtain a final certificate/designator number” and provide AFS-620 with the precertification/identification number. AFS-620 will finalize the alpha suffix and provide the complete final certificate/designator number to the responsible district office inspector. The responsible inspector must confirm that there has been no change in the type of certificate or type of operation from the time the precertification/identification number was issued to the time the certificate/designator is to be issued. The type element code must be consistent with the type certificate/designator to be issued and the appropriate operating regulation. If a change has occurred, AFS-620 must be advised so that AFS-620 can change its records and issue a corrected certificate/designator number.

NOTE:  For information regarding identification numbers for fractional ownership programs under part 91K, refer to Volume 2, Chapter 5.

RESERVED. Paragraphs 2-134 through 2-150.