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VOLUME 2  Air Operator AND AIR AGENCY Certification and ApplicATION PROCESS

CHAPTER 9  CERTIFICATION OF A PART 141 PILOT SCHOOL

Section 1  Initial Certification or Renewal of a Part 141 Pilot School

2-1066    PROGRAM TRACKING AND REPORTING SUBSYSTEM (PTRS) ACTIVITY CODE.

A.    Initial Certificate. Enter 1240 in the activity code box of the PTRS Data Sheet.

B.    Renew Certificate. Enter 1374 in the activity code box of the PTRS Data Sheet.

C.    Reissue Certificate. Enter 1375 in the activity code box of the PTRS Data Sheet.

2-1067    OBJECTIVE. Determine whether an applicant for a Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 141 pilot school meets the rules concerning the operation of a pilot or provisional pilot school. Successful completion of this task results in the issuance, renewal, or denial of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Form 8000-4, Air Agency Certificate. These procedures are followed for the issuance of a provisional Pilot School Certificate, for added ratings (amendments), and for certificate renewal.

2-1068    GENERAL. Before beginning any certification process, inspectors should review Volume 3, Chapter 1, Section 1, The General Process for Approval or Acceptance of Air Operator Applications, and Volume 2, Chapter 1, Section 1, The Generic Process for Certificating Organizations. Definitions of the terms used in this chapter are contained in Volume 3, Chapter 53, Section 1, Introduction to Part 141 Related Tasks.

2-1069    PREAPPLICATION PHASE. For an initial certification, inspectors should discuss the following items with an applicant during an initial inquiry about a Part 141 Certificate. These items may also be reviewed during renewal or during amendment, as necessary.

A.    Pilot School Ratings. All inspectors must ensure that the pilot schools conform to the ratings as listed below.

1)    Certification and Rating Courses (Appendices A through J and M).

ˇ    Recreational pilot course,

ˇ    Private pilot course,

ˇ    Instrument rating course,

ˇ    Combined private pilot and instrument rating course,

ˇ    Commercial pilot course,

ˇ    Airline transport pilot (ATP) course,

ˇ    Flight instructor course,

ˇ    Flight instructor instrument course,

ˇ    Ground instructor course,

ˇ    Additional aircraft category or class rating course, and

ˇ    Aircraft type rating course.

2)    Special Curriculum Course under Part 141, § 141.57, Special Curricula, and Special Preparation Courses (Appendix K).

ˇ    Pilot refresher course,

ˇ    Flight instructor refresher course (FIRC),

ˇ    Ground instructor refresher course,

ˇ    Agricultural aircraft operations course,

ˇ    Rotorcraft external-load operations course,

ˇ    Special operations course,

ˇ    Test pilot course, and

ˇ    ATP Certification Training Program.

3)    Pilot Ground School Course (Appendix L).

B.    Recreational Pilot Course. The approval of one or more courses of training that result in the original issuance of a Recreational Pilot Certificate entitles the school to have a recreational pilot rating placed on its school certificate. The approval of one or all of the following certification courses entitles the school to a recreational pilot rating for the following courses, as appropriate:

ˇ    Airplane—single-engine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft—helicopter, and/or

ˇ    Rotorcraft—gyroplane.

C.    Private Pilot Course. The approval of one or more courses of training that result in the original issuance of a Private Pilot Certificate entitles the school to have a private pilot rating placed on its school certificate. The approval of one or all of the following certification courses entitles the school to a private pilot rating for the following courses, as appropriate:

ˇ    Airplane—single-engine,

ˇ    Airplane—multiengine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft—helicopter,

ˇ    Rotorcraft—gyroplane,

ˇ    Powered-lift,

ˇ    Glider,

ˇ    Lighter than Air (LTA) airship, and/or

ˇ    LTA balloon.

D.    Instrument Rating Course. The approval of one or more courses of training that result in the original issuance of an instrument rating entitles the school to have an instrument rating placed on its school certificate. The approval of one or all of the following certification courses entitles the school to an instrument rating for the following courses, as appropriate:

ˇ    Instrument—airplane,

ˇ    Instrument—helicopter, and/or

ˇ    Instrument—powered-lift.

E.    Commercial Pilot Course. The approval of one or more courses of training that result in the original issuance of a Commercial Pilot Certificate entitles the school to have a commercial pilot rating placed on its school certificate. The approval of one or all of the following certification courses entitles the school to a commercial pilot rating for the following courses, as appropriate:

ˇ    Airplane—single-engine,

ˇ    Airplane—multiengine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft—helicopter,

ˇ    Rotorcraft—gyroplane,

ˇ    Powered-lift,

ˇ    Glider,

ˇ    LTA airship, and/or

ˇ    LTA balloon.

F.    ATP Course. The approval of one or more courses of training that result in the original issuance of an ATP Certificate entitles the school to have an ATP rating placed on its school certificate. The approval of one or all of the following certification courses entitles the school to an ATP rating for the following courses, as appropriate:

ˇ    Airplane—single-engine,

ˇ    Airplane—multiengine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft—helicopter, and/or

ˇ    Powered-lift.

G.    Flight Instructor Course. The approval of one or more courses of training that result in the original issuance of a Flight Instructor Certificate entitles the school to have a flight instructor rating placed on its school certificate. The approval of one or all of the following certification courses entitles the school to a flight instructor rating for the following courses, as appropriate:

ˇ    Airplane—single-engine,

ˇ    Airplane—multiengine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft—helicopter,

ˇ    Rotorcraft—gyroplane,

ˇ    Powered-lift, and/or

ˇ    Glider.

H.    Flight Instructor Instrument Rating Course. The approval of one or more courses of training that result in the original issuance of a Flight Instructor Instrument Certificate entitles the school to have a flight instructor instrument rating placed on its school certificate. The approval of one or all of the following certification courses entitles the school to a flight instructor instrument rating for the following courses, as appropriate:

ˇ    Flight Instructor Instrument—airplane,

ˇ    Flight Instructor Instrument—helicopter, and/or

ˇ    Flight Instructor Instrument—powered-lift.

I.    Ground Instructor Course. The approval of one or more courses of training that result in the original issuance of a Ground Instructor Certificate entitles the school to have a ground instructor rating placed on its school certificate. The approval of one or all of the following certification courses entitles the school to a ground instructor rating for the following courses, as appropriate:

ˇ    Ground Instructor Instrument—basic,

ˇ    Ground Instructor Instrument—advanced, and/or

ˇ    Ground Instructor Instrument—instrument.

J.    Additional Aircraft Category or Class Rating Course. The approval of one or more courses of training that results in the issuance of an additional aircraft category or class rating to an existing Pilot Certificate entitles the school to have “Additional Aircraft Category or Class Rating” placed on its school certificate. The approval of one or all of the following additional aircraft rating courses entitles the school to the above listed rating.

ˇ    Airplane—single-engine,

ˇ    Airplane—multiengine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft—helicopter,

ˇ    Rotorcraft—gyroplane,

ˇ    Powered-lift,

ˇ    Glider,

ˇ    LTA airship, and/or

ˇ    LTA balloon.

K.    Aircraft Type Rating Course. The approval of one or more courses of training that result in the issuance of an aircraft type rating entitles the school to have aircraft type rating placed on its school certificate. The approval of one or all of the following aircraft type rating courses entitles the school to an aircraft type rating for the following courses, as appropriate:

ˇ    A type rating in an airplane category, single-engine class;

ˇ    A type rating in an airplane category, multiengine class;

ˇ    A type rating in a rotorcraft category, helicopter class; and/or

ˇ    A type rating in a powered-lift category.

L.    Special Preparation Course. The approval of one or more courses of training that prepares the graduate with the necessary skills, competency and proficiency to exercise safely the privileges of a certificate, rating or authorization for which the course is established entitles the school to have that special preparation course rating (e.g., pilot refresher course, agricultural aircraft operations course, etc.) placed on its school certificate. The approval of one or all of the following special preparation courses entitles the school to a pilot school rating for the following courses, as appropriate:

ˇ    Pilot refresher course,

ˇ    FIRC,

ˇ    Ground instructor refresher course,

ˇ    Agricultural aircraft operations course,

ˇ    Rotorcraft external-load operations course,

ˇ    Special operations course,

ˇ    Test pilot course, and/or

ˇ    ATP Certification Training Program.

M.    Pilot Ground School Course. The approval of one or more ground school courses under the provisions of part 141, appendix L entitles the school to have a pilot ground school rating placed on its school certificate.

N.    Special Curriculum Course. The approval of a special curriculum course under § 141.57 entitles the school to have “Special Curriculum Course” appear on its school certificate.

O.    Denied Ratings. An applicant may reapply at any time for an FAA Form 8000-4 or rating in the same manner as prescribed for initial application. At the inspector’s discretion, reinspection of previously approved areas may not be necessary. However, if more than 120 days have elapsed, a complete inspection should be accomplished before issuance of the certificate.

P.    Certification Team Assignment. As described in the procedures in Volume 2, Chapter 1, Section 1, the Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) manager assigns the applicant a certification team. The manager also designates one member of the team as the certification project manager (CPM).

2-1070    FORMAL APPLICATION PHASE.

A.    The Formal Application Meeting. If the certification team decides to have a formal application meeting, all members of the team should be present.

B.    Meeting Topics. The meeting should review, but not be limited to, the following:

ˇ    The application,

ˇ    The Schedule of Events (SOE), if applicable,

ˇ    The training course outline (TCO) and curriculum, and

ˇ    Personnel, aircraft, and facility requirements.

C.    Application Denial. Denial of an application must be substantiated with documentation of the reasons for denial.

2-1071    DOCUMENT COMPLIANCE PHASE.

A.    TCOs. TCOs must be submitted in duplicate. However, during initial approval of the TCO, the inspector may request only one copy for review. Once the TCO has met all the requirements, the applicant submits the required two copies.

B.    Commercially-Produced Syllabuses. Commercially-produced syllabuses should be submitted a minimum of 30 days before the expected training begins. Refer to §§ 141.53 and 141.55.

C.    Special Curriculums. A pilot school or provisional pilot school may apply for approval to conduct a special course of pilot training provided the training curriculum is not one that is prescribed in the appendixes of part 141. A special course of airman training must contain features that can be expected to achieve a level of pilot competency equivalent in scope and depth to that achieved by the curriculum prescribed in the appendixes of part 141 or the requirements of 14 CFR part 61. A Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE) may only conduct a practical test for pilot certification provided the applicant has completed the pilot school/provisional pilot school’s training course requirements and has received a graduation certificate. A pilot school may not apply for examining authority unless the training course meets the requirements set forth in the appropriate appendixes of part 141. A pilot school may not apply for a training course under § 141.55(d) or (e) unless that pilot school has held a Pilot School Certificate (emphasis added: Pilot School Certificate) for at least 24 calendar-months. If a pilot school applies for a special course of airman training with reduced training times, then that pilot school must comply with the provisions set forth in § 141.55(d) and (e). In accordance with § 141.55(d)(3) and (e)(4), a pilot school may not be approved for examining authority for a special course of airman training that has been approved for reduced training times. A provisional pilot school may not apply for a special course of airman training with reduced training times under § 141.55(d) and (e).

1)    Required Documentation. An original and one copy of a proposed special curriculum must be submitted along with a cover letter requesting FAA approval at least 60 days before the training is scheduled to begin. Approval or denial should be accomplished within 30 days, allowing the school sufficient time to develop a TCO based on the special curriculum.
2)    Special Curriculum Approved. When a special curriculum is approved, each page of the original and office copies should be dated and signed by the principal operations inspector (POI). The original copy of the special curriculum should be returned to the school.
3)    Special Curriculum Disapproved. When a special curriculum is disapproved, the original and copy submitted to the FAA should be returned to the applicant along with a letter clearly explaining why the materials were disapproved (Figure 2-62, Letter Disapproving Special Curriculums or TCOs). A copy of the letter is retained in the school’s file at the FSDO. If major changes to a special curriculum or TCO are necessary, the letter to the school should clearly state that additional time will be needed for review when resubmitted.

D.    Title 14 CFR Part 141 Appendices. It is imperative that when a school applicant applies for its ratings, the TCOs be reviewed carefully against the part 141 appendixes. For schools that submit TCOs and meet minimum time requirements of part 141, in accordance with § 141.55(d) or (e) (as appropriate), it is imperative that these schools’ TCOs cover all of the aeronautical knowledge areas and areas of operations required for the certificate and ratings. The following are the certification and rating courses, special preparation courses, and pilot ground school courses contained in these part 141 appendices.

1)    Certification and Rating Courses.
a)    Recreational Pilot Certification Course—Appendix A prescribes the requirements for the Recreational Pilot Certificate with the following ratings:

ˇ    Airplane single-engine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft helicopter, and

ˇ    Rotorcraft gyroplane.

b)    Private Pilot Certification Course—Appendix B prescribes the requirements for the Private Pilot Certificate for the following ratings:

ˇ    Airplane single-engine,

ˇ    Airplane multiengine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft helicopter,

ˇ    Rotorcraft gyroplane,

ˇ    Powered-lift,

ˇ    Glider,

ˇ    LTA airship, and

ˇ    LTA balloon.

c)    Instrument Rating Course—Appendix C prescribes the requirements for an instrument rating for the following:

ˇ    Instrument—airplane,

ˇ    Instrument—helicopter, and

ˇ    Instrument—powered-lift.

d)    Commercial Pilot Certification Course—Appendix D prescribes the requirements for the commercial pilot certificate for the following ratings:

ˇ    Airplane single-engine,

ˇ    Airplane multiengine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft helicopter,

ˇ    Rotorcraft gyroplane,

ˇ    Powered-lift,

ˇ    Glider,

ˇ    LTA airship, and

ˇ    LTA balloon.

e)    ATP Certification Course—Appendix E prescribes the requirements for the ATP Certificate for the following ratings:

ˇ    Airplane single-engine,

ˇ    Airplane multiengine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft helicopter, and

ˇ    Powered-lift.

f)    Flight Instructor Certification Course—Appendix F prescribes the requirements for the Flight Instructor Certificate for the following ratings:

ˇ    Airplane single-engine,

ˇ    Airplane multiengine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft helicopter,

ˇ    Rotorcraft gyroplane,

ˇ    Powered-lift, and

ˇ    Glider.

g)    Flight Instructor Instrument (for an Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor Rating, as Appropriate) Certification Course—Appendix G prescribes the requirements for the Flight Instructor Instrument Certificate for the following ratings:

ˇ    Flight Instructor Instrument—airplane,

ˇ    Flight Instructor Instrument—helicopter, and

ˇ    Flight Instructor Instrument—powered-lift.

h)    Ground Instructor Certification Course—Appendix H prescribes the requirements for the Ground Instructor Certificate for the following ratings:

ˇ    Ground Instructor—Basic,

ˇ    Ground Instructor—Advanced, and

ˇ    Ground Instructor—Instrument.

i)    Additional Aircraft Category or Class Rating Course—Appendix I prescribes the requirements for an additional aircraft rating for the following:

ˇ    Airplane single-engine,

ˇ    Airplane multiengine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft helicopter,

ˇ    Rotorcraft gyroplane,

ˇ    Powered-lift,

ˇ    Glider,

ˇ    LTA airship, and

ˇ    LTA balloon.

j)    Aircraft Type Rating Course, for Other Than an ATP Certificate—Appendix J prescribes the requirements for an aircraft type rating for the following:

ˇ    A type rating in an airplane category, single-engine class;

ˇ    A type rating in an airplane category, multiengine class;

ˇ    A type rating in a rotorcraft category, helicopter class; and

ˇ    A type rating in a powered-lift category.

k)    Combined Private Pilot Certification and Instrument Rating Course—Appendix M prescribes the minimum curriculum for a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course required under this part, for the following ratings:

ˇ    Airplane single-engine,

ˇ    Airplane multiengine,

ˇ    Rotorcraft helicopter, and

ˇ    Powered-lift,

2)    Special Preparation Courses—Appendix K prescribes the requirements for the following special preparation courses:

ˇ    Pilot refresher course,

ˇ    FIRC,

ˇ    Ground instructor refresher course,

ˇ    Agricultural aircraft operations course,

ˇ    Rotorcraft external-load operations course,

ˇ    Special operations course,

ˇ    Test pilot course, and

ˇ    ATP Certification Training Program.

3)    Pilot Ground School Course—Appendix L prescribes the requirements for pilot ground school courses.

E.    Part 61 Amendments. If ground or flight time requirements are amended in part 61, at the time of renewal of the part 141 Pilot School Certificate, affected TCOs must be amended to meet these new training time requirements.

2-1072    DEMONSTRATION AND INSPECTION PHASE.

A.    Facilities and Training Aids. A pilot school is required to have certain facilities in order to obtain and maintain an FAA Form 8000-4. Included in these facilities are the business office and main base of operations, pilot briefing areas, aeronautical knowledge training facilities, use of airports, and satellite bases.

1)    The applicant having ownership of the required facilities or by having a written agreement with the facility owners may show continuous use of facilities. A written agreement must state that the applicant has the required continuous use of the necessary facilities for at least 6 months from the date of the application for the initial certification or renewal of a school certificate.
2)    Each pilot school or provisional pilot school is required to maintain a principal business office with a mailing address the same as that on the school certificate. The purpose of a principal business office is to provide a specific location for the required school files and records, and a location where the operation of school business may be conducted. This requirement should not be construed to mean that all school functions, such as scheduling flights, training functions, etc., must be conducted at the principal business office.
a)    While part 141 does not require that a business office be a room with four walls and a door, the regulation does prohibit the sharing of a single business office by more than one pilot school. Therefore, walls or partitions to ensure separation from another pilot school’s activity should conspicuously isolate the business office.
b)    The business office should be situated so the required school files and student training records are kept up-to-date and available to students and instructors alike. This serves the purpose of providing on-the-spot information regarding training progress and other business interests.
c)    If the pilot school should choose to change the location of its business office or base of operations, the school is required to notify the jurisdictional FSDO in writing of the planned move at least 30 days prior to the change. Such written notice should be accompanied by a new application, FAA Form 8420‑8, Application for Pilot School Certificate, showing the change of address or the change in the base of operations as appropriate. In any case, the notice of a change of operating base must be accompanied by necessary amendments to approved TCOs.
d)    Primary category aircraft (PCA) are eligible for use for flight instruction.
3)    A school is required to have continuous use of a pilot briefing area at each airport where training flights originate. This does not include airports used as destinations for cross-country flight training. The briefing area must meet the requirements of § 141.43. Pilots not participating in the school’s training programs can use the briefing facilities, provided that orderly school functions are maintained. However, no other pilot school may use the area during the period it is to be used by the applicant. Briefing areas are subject to FSDO approval under the provisions of § 141.43.
a)    To meet the requirements of § 141.43, the equipment should include a chalkboard and tables of adequate size to lay out aeronautical charts.
b)    If a school offers instrument or commercial pilot courses, it needs to have access to a Flight Service Station (FSS). A telephone in the briefing room is acceptable.
c)    To preclude a disruption of schedules due to excessive travel time and a lack of communications between the flight line, business office, and briefing area, the area should be located near enough to the airport where training flights originate.
4)    The FAA recognizes that pilot training methods differ from other kinds of training. Pilot schools enroll students with widely varying backgrounds, goals, and varying degrees of motivations and aviation experience. For this reason, it is understandable that it is not always possible to schedule large classes for aeronautical knowledge training at one time. Individual instruction is often necessary for maximum benefit to a particular student. Therefore, it is anticipated that FAA-approved schools will use classrooms, small isolated rooms, training booths, or other areas with an instructor or a training aid, as appropriate. Each aeronautical knowledge training area is required to be heated, lighted, and ventilated to meet the applicable building code requirements for the area concerned. All ground instructional facilities are subject to approval by the jurisdictional FSDO under § 141.45.
5)    A certificate holder may use training aids to improve communication between instructors and students.
a)    Training aids are instructional aids defined by the National Education Association (NEA) as “devices that assist an instructor in the teaching and learning processes by presenting, supporting, or supplementing material, usually intermittently. They are not self-supporting.” The key factor is that such aids support, supplement, or reinforce.
b)    Identified in each course outline, training aids should be easily understood, readily visible, and compatible with the learning outcomes expected in the completion standards for the lesson. They must be accurate and appropriate to the course. The effectiveness of aids is judged by their organization, sequencing, pattern of logic, and their overall effectiveness when used in support of obtaining the objectives and standards prescribed by the training syllabus.
c)    Recent years have seen an abundance of excellent new material and techniques in training aids. The aids present many advantages for the school. Each school must keep in mind the teaching goals to be achieved, including the continuous monitoring of student progress necessary to develop effectively the knowledge of each student according to the training syllabus. Aids do not replace the instructor. It is not expected that students be sent off alone to learn from a training aid.
d)    Notwithstanding the complexity or design of a training aid, the chief instructor or an authorized, qualified representative must determine through personal review or testing that the standards for each lesson have been attained through use of the training aid. The purpose of this personal review or testing is to ensure that students meet the completion standards and understand missed questions, if a knowledge test is given. Only through such evaluation can the instructor make a sound determination that the student should progress to the next lesson or that the student requires review of subjects or procedures previously covered. This helps in determining the effectiveness of the training aid.
6)    An applicant for a pilot school or provisional Pilot School Certificate must show that it has the continuous use of each airport where training flights originate (airports where flights are dispatched or initiated, such as main or satellite bases).
a)    Airports that the applicant uses where flights originate must meet the requirements of § 141.38. Note that § 141.38(b) only applies for airports used for airplanes or gliders.
b)    Landing area outline lights, water area boundary lights, or temporary lighting such as flare pots or deployed portable electric runway lighting systems do not meet the requirements of § 141.38(e).
c)    Though the wind tee and tetrahedron may serve as landing direction or wind indicators, according to the FAA-H-8083-25, Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, pages 12-8 and 12-9, the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) cautions against using the tetrahedron as a wind indicator (AIM page 4-3-4). The wind tee, under certain circumstances, may be either an active runway or wind indicator.
d)    When required, the traffic direction indicator (refer to § 141.38(d)) must show the direction of traffic patterns for all runways regardless of landing or takeoff direction.

NOTE:  When referring to pilot schools approved for LTA balloons, the term “airport” should be taken to mean launch site. An important training element in balloon training is proper site selection. Before the launch of a balloon, an instructor authorized by the school must approve the site. The specific equipment requirements of § 141.37, (i.e., runway lights, traffic direction indicators, and wind direction indicators) are inappropriate for LTA balloon operations. Wind direction may be determined by means of a pilot balloon. The area downwind from the launch site should be free of obstructions for 100 feet for each knot of wind. For example, a 4-knot wind requires a 400-foot area free of obstruction downwind. Landing site selection will be determined by the pilot in command (PIC).

B.    Satellite Bases. A school may conduct aeronautical knowledge or flight training in an approved course of training at one or more satellite bases. An assistant chief instructor must be designated for each satellite base, and the airport, facilities, and personnel used at the satellite base must meet the requirements of part 141, including approval of the satellite base and its facilities in the approved TCOs for courses given at those bases.

1)    If a valid reason exists, training may be conducted for periods up to 7 days at a satellite base without approval of the jurisdictional FSDO. For example, runways may be closed at the main operations base for maintenance, or other activities may be underway on the airport. The jurisdictional FSDO must be notified in writing if training is conducted at a satellite base for more than 7 consecutive days.
2)    When the jurisdictional FSDO is notified that a school will conduct training at an unapproved satellite base for more than 7 consecutive days, an operations inspector should determine if the operations are of a temporary nature or if they will involve extended use of the unapproved base. If, in the opinion of the operations inspector, temporary use of the unapproved base will not derogate safety or the quality of training, temporary operations at that base may be authorized for a period of time not to exceed 30 days.
3)    If operations at the unapproved satellite base will exceed a period of 30 days, the school should apply to the jurisdictional FSDO for the approval of a satellite base on FAA Form 8420-8. Along with the application, two copies of the appropriate amendments for each approved training course to be given at the satellite base must be submitted.
4)    Each satellite base that approval is requested for is inspected to ensure that each meets the requirements of part 141 and training, as described in each approved course of training, can be effectively accomplished. (See Volume 6, Chapter 7, Section 1, Conduct Facility Inspection of a Part 141 Pilot School.)
5)    If a satellite base is located in an area under the jurisdiction of another FSDO within the same region, the FSDOs involved must coordinate directly with each other.
6)    If the applicant intends to conduct training at a satellite base located in another FAA region, the FSDO where the applicant’s principal business office and main operating base is located is responsible for inspection and approval of the satellite base.
a)    The jurisdictional FSDO should request assistance through the Regional Office (RO) to make arrangements through the region where the satellite base will be located in certificating and providing surveillance of operations at the satellite base. In some FSDOs, the geographic unit may be responsible for surveillance and inspection.
b)    If a region determines that it cannot provide such assistance because of inspector workload or other reasons, the region should make arrangements to allow the certificate-holding district office (CHDO) to cross-regional boundaries and conduct the necessary inspections and surveillance.
c)    When another region agrees to provide assistance in inspecting and surveying a satellite base, a copy of the school certificate and a list of approved courses, including a copy of each inspection report or any other action, must be furnished by the CHDO through regional channels.
d)    Coordination between all FSDOs where the school maintains a satellite base must be accomplished before issuance of the FAA Form 8000-4.
7)    The inspector completing FAA Form 8420-8, as shown in Figure 2-63, accomplishes approval of the satellite base. One copy of the form may be returned to the applicant, and one copy is placed in the school files at the FSDO. Amendments to each course of training to be given at the satellite base are approved individually, as appropriate.
8)    When an application is disapproved, the applicant should be notified in writing (Figure 2‑64, Letter Denying Satellite Base). This notification should include all of the reasons why the application was disapproved.
9)    When an operator plans to conduct training at a location other than the main base of operations for more than 7 consecutive days, the CHDO must notify the FSDO having jurisdiction over the area where training will be given. The new training location is not considered a separate school operating under the main base Operating Certificate number designation; a separate Operating Certificate is not issued. CHDOs should coordinate efforts to ensure that standardized certification of applicants within their FSDO area occurs and that the necessary work program functions are accomplished.
Indicates new/changed information. Indicates new/changed information.

C.    Aircraft, Flight Simulators, Flight Training Devices (FTD), and Aviation Training Devices (ATD) (§§ 141.39 and 141.41). Each aircraft used for pilot training by a school located in the United States is required to be a civil aircraft of U.S. registry. Training aircraft must have a valid standard airworthiness certificate, Special Airworthiness Certificate in the primary category, or a Special Airworthiness Certificate in the light-sport category. Aircraft used for a course of training specific to a special operation such as agricultural aircraft operations, external-load operations, and similar aerial work operations (e.g., banner towing and sky writing) may be certificated in the restricted category (14 CFR part 91, § 91.313 and 14 CFR part 21, § 21.25(b)). If an FAA-approved flight simulator, FTD, or ATD is used in an approved training course, the details of its utilization should be clearly stated in the training syllabus and the learning objectives should be well-defined. This is necessary to provide the instructor with proper guidance, and give the FAA a baseline from which to judge the adequacy of the device to be used. No other Special Airworthiness Certificate is acceptable.

1)    Each aircraft used by a school for flight training must be inspected and maintained in accordance with § 91.409(b) (applies to aircraft used to give flight instruction for hire), 91.409(c)(2), or 91.409(d) or (e).
a)    This requires aircraft used in an approved course of training to have 100-hour and annual inspections or to be maintained following a procedure prescribed under § 91.409(c)(2).
b)    It should be clearly understood that these inspection requirements include aircraft used for dual instruction, solo, and PIC flights.
c)    Aircraft to be used by pilot schools will be inspected by an airworthiness inspector.
2)    When a student enrolled in an approved school provides an aircraft for personal use in an approved course, that aircraft must meet the requirements of the training aircraft described in the appropriate TCO. In addition, that aircraft must meet the same inspection requirements as aircraft operated by the approved school.
3)    Aircraft used for instrument training should be equipped as follows to meet the requirements of part 141:
a)    If the approved training syllabus requires flights under instrument flight rules (IFR), the aircraft used must be one in which instrument flight is authorized by its operating limitations and by its equipment.
b)    If the approved training syllabus requires only simulated IFR operations, the aircraft must be equipped and maintained for IFR operations. However, IFR operations need not be authorized by its operating limitations.
c)    An aircraft not completely equipped for IFR operations may be used for instruction in the control and maneuvering of an aircraft by reference to instruments if it is approved in the TCO. For example, an airplane need only be equipped with appropriate flight instruments needed for the basic instrument portion of a course.
4)    The commercial pilot certification course (airplane), set forth in part 141, appendix D, requires flight instruction in an airplane with retractable gear, flaps, and controllable propeller.
a)    Single or multiengine airplanes may be used to fulfill this requirement. Use of an appropriately equipped multiengine airplane to meet the complex airplane requirements for a Commercial Single-Engine Airplane Certificate does not result in the issuance of a multiengine rating.
b)    If a school applies for a commercial pilot certification course (airplanes) with a seaplane‑class rating (using seaplanes for the entire course), a special curriculum should be submitted under § 141.57 that includes the general requirements of Appendix D, Commercial Pilot Certification Course. The complex airplane used in such a course must have flaps, a controllable propeller, and floats. The use of an amphibian airplane in a commercial pilot certification or course could qualify a student for both a land and sea‑class rating, provided the TCO was so approved.
5)    A variety of airplanes are used in pilot training. Some are uncomplicated while others are more complicated, and their checklists vary accordingly. The requirements for a checklist defined in the terms of “pretakeoff” and “prelanding” in § 141.75(a) are broad and allow less complicated aircraft to be equipped with relatively simple checklists. The FAA expects (because of good operating practices) that schools should expand checklists for aircraft that are more complicated.
6)    Under § 141.75, when the manufacturer provides a pilot’s operating handbook (POH) or Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM), it (or a copy) must be carried aboard the aircraft. The primary purpose of carrying the handbook (or a copy) aboard the aircraft is to provide the pilot with information such as performance data, servicing instructions, and Weight and Balance (W&B) information. Some handbooks contain checklists that may be useful in developing a standard checklist. They should be available to the pilot during emergency procedures training or an actual emergency, particularly when there is only one pilot aboard the aircraft.
7)    The training syllabus should clearly state the full extent that an approved training course uses an ATD, FTD, and/or full flight simulator (FFS). The objectives to be achieved in using the device or simulator should be well-defined.
8)    Section 141.41(a) prescribes the requirements that may be used to obtain the maximum flight training credit allowed for flight simulators in an approved pilot training course.
a)    Section 141.41(b) provides for the use of FTD that do not meet the more complex requirements of § 141.41(a). A large number of training devices currently being used by pilot schools do not meet all of the requirements proposed in § 141.41(a). In recognition of the fact that these devices can be used to provide effective instruction in certain operations, provisions for their use have been made. Once again, however, it is imperative that the training syllabus clearly defines their use and learning objectives.
b)    Because of limitations, full credit against flight time is not allowed for instruction in FTDs not meeting all of the requirements proposed in § 141.41(a). The provisions in part 141 allow credit for instruction in FTDs and ATDs for a certain percentage of the credit of the training time.
c)    Discretion must be used when approving a training syllabus that substitutes instruction in an FTD or flight simulator for the flight time required in a complex airplane. Any use of an FFS or FTD in lieu of flight time in a complex airplane must be justified with clearly stated objectives in the training syllabus that are applicable to the skills expected to be learned in a complex airplane. Approval of the TCO must be based on the ability of the FFS or FTD to provide effective training for a complex airplane.
d)    Guidance from the National Simulator Program Branch (AFS-205) in Atlanta, GA, may be needed to approve a school’s FFS or FTD. An ATD requires a letter of authorization (LOA) issued by General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS-800).
e)    In addition to the permitted use of FFSs and FTDs that are covered in the appendixes of part 141, part 61, § 61.4 also covers the approval of FFSs, FTDs and ATDs.
Indicates new/changed information.
f)    A pilot school may submit a course curriculum that exceeds the permitted time credits for ATDs, FTDs, or FFSs. In general, a training provider should not be discouraged from providing additional training in these devices. However, when a TCO contains time that exceeds the maximum credit allowed for an ATD, FTD, and/or FFS, only the time permitted by the appropriate appendix to part 141 or by the device’s LOA/approval, as appropriate, can be credited to meet the minimum aeronautical experience requirements for that certificate or rating. The FAA LOA may not exceed a regulatory limitation. For example, if the aeronautical experience requirements permit 5 hours in a training device to be credited, the device’s LOA/approval cannot be used to authorize crediting of more than 5 hours toward the minimum aeronautical experience requirements.

D.    Flight Instructor Responsibilities. Part 141 requires all flight instructors employed by a school to be qualified to teach each course of training they are assigned. Certain knowledge and proficiency tests, to be accomplished before being assigned to an approved course of training, are also prescribed. If the chief instructor or assistant chief instructor also flight instructs in the course they are assigned to, they must also comply with this section.

1)    The instructor must satisfactorily accomplish a flight check for each course of training taught.
a)    This flight check is given to the instructor by the designated chief instructor, assistant chief instructor, or check instructor.
b)    The instructor must accomplish a flight check every 12 months thereafter for each course of training the instructor participates in.
c)    The pilot school must maintain a record of these flight checks to show compliance with § 141.79(d).
2)    The instructor must satisfactorily accomplish a one-time practical test in each type of aircraft (e.g., Cessna 150, Cessna 172) before giving any flight instruction in the particular aircraft.
3)    The chief instructor, assistant chief instructor, or check instructor must brief all instructors teaching that course on the objectives and standards of the course.
a)    The pilot school must maintain a record verifying this briefing to show compliance with §§ 141.79(d) and 141.81(c).
b)    At any time, an inspector may ask an instructor to explain the objectives and standards of an approved course.
4)    The instructor must maintain records of instructor briefings and instructor practical tests in either a logbook or in the permanent school records at the home base of operations.
5)    Student pilots cannot be authorized to start a solo practice flight from an airport until an authorized flight instructor, who is present at the airport, has approved the flight. Solo cross-country flights, when properly dispatched from the originating airport, are considered to have approval for the entire flight (§ 141.79(b)).
a)    If unexpected weather or mechanical problems delay a student en route or a student intends to remain overnight, the school should either:

ˇ    Arrange for another instructor based at the point of delay to dispatch the flight, or

ˇ    Have a school instructor dispatch the flight by telephone.

b)    Cross-country flights should be made to specific airports that the school determines are suitable. The operator may wish to provide students with a list of these suitable airports or include the list in the appropriate TCO.

E.    Other School Personnel. Section 141.33 states that an applicant for a pilot school or provisional Pilot School Certificate must show that there are adequate personnel and authorized instructors, including a chief instructor, for each course of training. All instructors (flight or ground) must be qualified and competent to perform their assigned duties.

1)    In addition, each dispatcher, aircraft handler, line crewman, and serviceman to be used must have been instructed in the procedures and responsibilities of employment. The inspector should recommend that the pilot school keep a record of this instruction in the employee’s personnel file.
2)    A pilot school may elect to use verbal instructions, manuals, or any other means to ensure that dispatchers, aircraft handlers, line crewmen, and servicemen are knowledgeable and capable of performing their assigned duties. A school needs to provide only the employees necessary to conduct training adequately.

2-1073    CERTIFICATION PHASE.

A.    Ratings. FAA Form 8000-4 must list the various pilot school ratings for which a pilot school/provisional pilot school qualifies under §§ 141.11 and 141.57, if applicable. These ratings do not specifically address each approved course of training that a school may be authorized to give. Under the broad listing of pilot school ratings found in §§ 141.11 and 141.57, if applicable, a school could be authorized to conduct nearly a hundred different courses.

B.    Approved Courses. The certification team issues a list of approved courses of training, identifying each authorized course by its title, along with the FAA Form 8000-4. All courses must conform to the ratings listed in §§ 141.11 and/or 141.57.

1)    The list is typed on FAA stationery, in a format similar to that shown in Figure 2-65, Sample List of Approved Courses, and signed by the FSDO manager. The original is given to the school and a copy placed in the FSDO file.
2)    If a list of approved courses is amended, the original is returned to the jurisdictional FSDO. The list remains in effect until it is amended or the school certificate is expired, surrendered, suspended, or revoked.

2-1074    SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND GRADUATION.

A.    Enrollment. When a certificate holder enrolls or reenrolls a student in an approved course of training, § 141.93 requires the student be furnished the following information and materials:

1)    A certificate of enrollment containing the name of the course the student is enrolled in and the date of enrollment.
2)    A copy of the training syllabus required under § 141.55(c)(7).
3)    A copy of the safety procedures and practices developed by the school, such as procedures for the use of training aids, off-limit areas, handling of aircraft, parking instructions, and other safety instructions that the school deems necessary. These safety procedures must include the following:
a)    The weather minimums required for dispatching dual and solo flights. For example, minimum ceiling visibility and wind velocities for local flights and specific weather minimums for cross‑country flights;
b)    The procedures for starting and taxiing aircraft on the ramp;
c)    The precautions and procedures for aircraft fire;
d)    The redispatch procedures after unplanned landings on and off airports. This should include emergency security of the aircraft and a list of telephone numbers of persons to contact;
e)    The procedures for listing aircraft discrepancies and how corrective action is taken, including the importance of not using an aircraft with a listed discrepancy until a properly qualified person determines its airworthiness;
f)    The securing of aircraft when not in use;
g)    The fuel reserves necessary for local and cross-country flights;
h)    The avoidance of other aircraft in flight and on the ground;
i)    The minimum altitude limitations certain minimum altitudes may be specified for teaching and practicing stalls or other maneuvers;
j)    The instructions concerning simulated forced landings. Instructions should be clear on simulated emergency landings with respect to engine cooling down during prolonged glides, proper engine leaning, proper procedures for setting zero thrust, engine response with rapid throttle application, and a specific minimum altitude for terminating simulated emergency landings and other instructions deemed necessary by the school;
k)    The assigned practice areas, including descriptions and diagrams of the areas and special instructions with respect to how to operate in them, how to get to them, and minimum altitudes en route; and
l)    Any instructions or guidance that the school believes necessary to provide the highest standards of safety and operational control expected of an FAA-approved school.

B.    Credit for Previous Training. When a student transfers from one FAA-approved school to another approved school, course credits obtained in the previous course of training may be credited in accordance with § 141.77 by the receiving school. However, the receiving school must determine the amount of credits to be allowed by flight check or knowledge test or both. Credit for ground school only instruction may be determined by an oral examination.

1)    A student may not be credited with more training by the receiving school than was credited at the school the student transferred from.
2)    A student who enrolls in a course of training may receive credit for 25 percent of the curriculum requirement for knowledge and experience gained in a noncertificated flight school.
3)    The amount of credit for previous training allowed, whether received from an FAA‑approved school or other source, must be placed in the student’s enrollment record at the time of enrollment.
4)    Transferred documentation must be made a part of the receiving school’s permanent record.
5)    When a student transfers from one FAA-approved school to another, or terminates training for any reason, the student must be given, upon request, a transcript of the results of the student’s participation in that course of training. This transcript should be signed by the chief instructor of the course and should consist of at least the following:

ˇ    Name of the school that gave the training, including the school’s certificate number, if applicable;

ˇ    Kind of training given (dual, solo, aeronautical knowledge school, ATD, time, etc.);

ˇ    Course or courses taken;

ˇ    Result of each stage and final test given; and

ˇ    Statement that the student was enrolled in that school’s approved course of training before receiving the certified instruction and training.

C.    Training Records. Each pilot school and provisional pilot school must keep accurate and current records of each student’s participation and accomplishments in an approved course.

1)    A student’s personal logbook is not considered an acceptable record under § 141.101.
2)    For each student, the training record should include:

ˇ    The date of the student’s enrollment.

ˇ    A chronology of the student’s attendance, subjects, and flights.

ˇ    The names and grades of any tests taken.

ˇ    The date of graduation, termination of training, or transfer.

3)    The record should also show the credit allowed for a student transferring from another school, if applicable.
4)    Whenever a student graduates, terminates training, or transfers, the chief instructor must certify the record.
5)    Pilot schools must retain each student’s record for at least 1 year from the date the student graduates, terminates a course, or transfers to another school.
6)    On a student’s request, a pilot school must make a copy of a student’s record available to the student. The pilot school must also permit the FAA to view any or all student records upon request.

2-1075    RENEWAL, AMENDMENT, CANCELLATION.

A.    Renewal. A pilot school or provisional Pilot School Certificate, and any associated ratings or examining authority on that certificate, expires at the end of the 24th month after the month it was issued.

1)    Application for renewal of an FAA Form 8000-4 must be made at least 30 days before the certificate expires.
a)    Application is made by submitting two copies of FAA Form 8420-8, completed as shown in Figure 2-66.
b)    A school may apply for the renewal of any or all of the courses (TCOs) it holds, and/or it may apply for the addition of new courses.
c)    Examining authority should be renewed at the same time the school certificate is renewed.
d)    An institution of higher education that holds a valid LOA issued by AFS-800 that gives it the authority to certify its graduates meet the reduced aeronautical experience requirements for an ATP Certificate will have the LOA revalidated for content and currency.
2)    A school must meet the same requirements for renewal as for original certification. Therefore, upon the receipt of an application for the renewal of a school certificate, the jurisdictional FSDO should conduct the same evaluation of qualifications and inspection of facilities as required for original certification. However, if the FSDO is very familiar with the school’s operation or has recently inspected it, there may be no need for an extensive reinspection or for reexamination of instructors. The FSDO always has the option of a full inspection.
3)    When all requirements are met, a new FAA Form 8000-4 is issued and is valid for additional 24 calendar-months. The original certificate number is reissued and the provisional pilot school’s enhanced Vital Information Database (eVID) is appropriately updated.
a)    Renewal of Pilot School Certificates and ratings is discussed in § 141.27. If a pilot school does not meet the recent training ability and quality of training requirements of § 141.5(d) and (e), but otherwise meets the requirements of § 141.7 at the time of renewal, the FSDO may issue a provisional Pilot School Certificate and the eVID would be updated to reflect the change. However, a school with examining authority and/or reduced time courses loses examining authority and/or reduced time courses when downgraded to a provisional school.
b)    If, after another renewal period (24 calendar-months), the school still does not meet the requirements of § 141.5(d) or (e), the school must wait a period of 180 days before reapplying for certification as a provisional school. All training conducted during that 180 days must meet the requirements of part 61, including passing knowledge and practical tests for certificates or ratings.

NOTE:  In the event a provisional pilot school that is associated with an institution of higher education does not meet the requirements specified in § 141.5 at the time of certification expiration, the POI will notify the appropriate specialist in the regional technical branch of the pilot school’s status. The regional technical specialist will consult with AFS-800 to address, on a case by case basis, students enrolled in the curriculum that may qualify them for an ATP Certificate with reduced aeronautical experience. Refer to § 61.160.

4)    In the event any requirement for a specific rating or approved course of training is not met, the ratings for all requirements that are met may be renewed and a new certificate issued bearing only these ratings.
a)    If renewal of a rating is denied or a course of training does not meet the appropriate requirements, the applicant is notified in writing of the reasons for the denial of the rating.
b)    In addition, the school must be advised, in writing, that continued training in any course of training in question cannot be used to meet 14 CFR part 141 requirements until appropriate changes are made and the courses again meet the requirements of part 141 (Figure 2-67, Notice of Course Cancellation).
5)    A new list of approved courses should be issued with the same expiration date as the Air Agency Certificate (Form 8000-4).
6)    Any change in the overall status of the certificate for a provisional pilot school or pilot school (e.g., the need to reissue a provisional Pilot School Certificate) associated with an institution of higher education that has the authority to certify its graduates are eligible for a reduced aeronautical experience ATP Certificate, must be conveyed to the appropriate specialist in the regional technical branch. The technical specialist will consult with AFS-800 to determine if the school’s status change affects the authority of the institution of higher education.

B.    Amendment. Application for amendment of an FAA Form 8000-4 is made to the jurisdictional FSDO. The FAA can also initiate the amendment under Title 49 of the United States Code (49 U.S.C.) and 14 CFR part 13.

1)    Application for the approval of a course of training that results in the addition of a rating to an FAA Form 8000-4 is made by submitting two copies of FAA Form 8420-8 with the amendment checked as shown in Figure 2-68, FAA Form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certification, Filled Out for Amendment, two copies of the course of training, and a cover letter requesting approval of the course.
a)    After review of the course, an inspection of the school’s facilities and personnel should be made, as necessary, to ensure that training can be conducted in accordance with the proposed course, before it is approved.
b)    If the school inspection is satisfactory, a new FAA Form 8000-4 bearing the new ratings will be issued, along with an amended list of approved courses. The amended certificate should bear the original number, the original expiration date, and the reissue date.
2)    An application for the deletion of a rating from an FAA Form 8000-4 may be accepted in the form of a letter from the certificate holder.
a)    Such a letter must be signed by a person authorized to sign for the school, such as the person who signed the original application or a person in a similar position in the school.
b)    No inspection is required for deletion of a rating.
c)    The FSDO issues a new certificate bearing the original number, the original expiration date, and a reissue date. The deleted rating is omitted from the certificate and a new list of approved courses is issued. The old certificate should be retained in the FSDO school file for 2 years.
3)    A change in the ownership of a pilot school does not terminate that certificate if the new owner applies for an appropriate amendment to the certificate by submitting two copies of FAA Form 8420-8 within 30 days after the date that the change in ownership occurs. The new ownership may not involve a change in the facilities, instructor personnel, or training course.
4)    A change of ownership involving a change in the school facilities, instructor personnel, or training courses terminates the school certificate. The school may be issued another certificate when it demonstrates that it meets all the requirements for original certification.
5)    When a certificated school changes its name only, and the name change involves no change in ownership, facilities, instructor personnel, or training courses, a new certificate is issued in the new name, bearing the same certificate number, ratings, and original expiration date. An inspection is not required under such circumstances.
6)    An application for an amendment to a previously approved special curriculum or TCO is made by submitting two copies of the curriculum or outline pages to be amended to the jurisdictional FSDO.
a)    Each proposed amendment should be accompanied by a cover letter explaining the basic changes, the intent, and requesting FAA approval.
b)    Approval or disapproval is accomplished in the same manner as the original approval or disapproval.
c)    If a certificate amendment requires an inspection of the aircraft to be used, all specialists should sign FAA Form 8420-8 under the “Recommendations of Inspector(s)” block.
7)    Any changes to the pilot school that would cause the certificate holder to no longer be able to offer training for the instrument-airplane rating or the commercial pilot certificate in the airplane category must be conveyed to the regional technical specialist. The regional technical specialist will consult with AFS-800 for any additional action.

C.    Cancellation. An FAA Form 8000-4 can be canceled by the school or by the CHDO as the result of actions taken under 49 U.S.C. and part 13.

1)    The jurisdictional FSDO may suspend or revoke FAA Form 8000-4 on any grounds that would be a cause for denying an application for the original certificate. In such a case the certificate must be surrendered to the FAA in a manner prescribed by the regional counsel.
2)    The holder of an FAA Form 8000-4 may request cancellation of the certificate or any rating at any time. The request should be submitted in writing to the jurisdictional FSDO, accompanied by the FAA Form 8000-4 to be canceled. The request must be signed by the person or persons authorized to sign for the certificate holder.
a)    If there is no violation action pending or contemplated against the school, the FSDO may accept the certificate for cancellation.
b)    If enforcement action is pending or contemplated, the applicant should be advised that acceptance for cancellation must await the decision of the regional counsel and that the school will be notified of the action taken. The school’s request should then be forwarded to the regional counsel’s office with a summary of the circumstances under which it was submitted. Cancellation should be effective only after clearance is received from that office.
3)    If a request for the surrender of a rating or ratings on an FAA Form 8000-4 is accepted, a new certificate should be issued bearing the ratings that remain valid and the original expiration date.
Indicates new/changed information.
4)    A cancellation, suspension, or revocation of FAA Form 8000-4 issued to a pilot school associated with an institution of higher education that has the authority to certify its graduates are eligible for a reduced aeronautical experience ATP Certificate, must be conveyed to the regional technical specialist. The regional technical specialist will consult with AFS-800 for any additional action.

2-1076    PREREQUISITES AND COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS.

A.    Prerequisites. Requires knowledge of the regulatory requirements of part 141 and FAA policies, and qualification as an ASI (Operations).

B.    Coordination. Requires coordination with the airworthiness unit, the Aviation Data Systems Branch (AFS-620); Airman Testing Standards Branch (AFS-630); and possibly the National Simulator Program (AFS-205).

2-1077    REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References (current editions):

ˇ    14 CFR Parts 1, 11, 61, 91, 97, and 141;

ˇ    Advisory Circular (AC) 61-136, FAA Approval of Aviation Training Devices and Their Use for Training and Experience;

ˇ    AC 61-138, Airline Transport Pilot Certification Training Program;

ˇ    AC 61-139, Institution of Higher Education’s Application for Authority to Certify its Graduates for an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate with Reduced Aeronautical Experience;

ˇ    AC 120-40, Airplane Simulator Qualification; and

ˇ    AC 141-1, Pilot School Certification.

B.    Forms:

ˇ    FAA Form 8000-4, Air Agency Certificate (Figure 2-5), and

ˇ    FAA Form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certificate (Figures 2-63, 2-66, 2-68, and 2-69).

C.    Job Aids:

ˇ    Sample letters and figures, and

ˇ    Job Task Analysis (JTA): 3.4.7, 3.4.9, 3.4.11, 3.4.13, 3.4.17, 3.4.18, 3.4.20, 3.4.21, 3.4.22, and 3.4.23.

2-1078    PREAPPLICATION PHASE PROCEDURES.

A.    Initial Inquiry. Upon initial inquiry from an applicant, determine the following:

ˇ    The identity of applicant and address of the principal base of operations,

ˇ    Any intended satellite base,

ˇ    The type of ownership (private, corporate, etc.),

ˇ    The proposed curriculum,

ˇ    The types of aircraft,

ˇ    The intended chief instructor and that instructor’s experience level,

ˇ    The possible use of ATDs,

ˇ    The possible use of commercially-produced syllabuses,

ˇ    If the operator intends to request examining authority for renewing or amending only, and

ˇ    If the operator intends to use contract training.

B.    Applicant Resources. Ensure the applicant has current copies of parts 61, 91, and 141 and AC 141-1. If there is any question, explain:

ˇ    The general applicability and definition of terms.

ˇ    The certification requirements.

ˇ    The operating rules of part 141.

ˇ    The required records and reports.

C.    PTRS. Open PTRS file.

D.    Letter of Intent. Request a letter of intent from the applicant. (See subparagraph 2-1079E below for content of letter of intent and Figure 2-70 for a sample.)

E.    FSDO Review of Letter of Intent. Within 30 working-days of the FAA’s receipt of a letter of intent, review it to determine that it provides sufficient information for the certification process to continue. The letter of intent should contain the following:

ˇ    A statement of intent to become an approved pilot school under part 141;

ˇ    Company legal name and any doing business as (DBA) name, principal operations base address, primary airport address, mailing address (if applicable), and telephone numbers;

ˇ    Makes and models of aircraft, how many of each, and N-numbers;

ˇ    Estimated date when operations will begin;

ˇ    Training courses to be offered;

ˇ    Name and qualifications of the proposed chief instructor and any assistant chief instructors;

ˇ    Intent to use simulators/training devices;

ˇ    Intent to use personal computers for knowledge testing (for examining authority only); and

ˇ    Three three-letter designators (in order of preference).

F.    Application. Based on the review of the letter of intent, if the applicant appears to meet the basic eligibility requirements, give the applicant at least three copies of FAA Form 8420-8.

1)    Discuss how to complete these forms. Advise the applicant to review AC 141-1 and the regulations before completing and returning the application to the jurisdictional FSDO.
2)    Advise the applicant to submit the original and copies with original signatures.
3)    Explain the certification process to the applicant, including the requirements for:

ˇ    The Preapplication Phase,

ˇ    The Formal Application Phase,

ˇ    The Document Compliance Phase,

ˇ    The Demonstration and Inspection Phase, and

ˇ    The Certification Phase.

G.    Preapplication Meeting.

1)    Determine if a preapplication meeting is necessary, based on the following considerations about the applicant:
a)    Any previous part 141 operating experience;
b)    The size and scope of operation;
c)    The area of operation; and
d)    The applicant’s apparent ability to comply with requirements.
2)    If a preapplication meeting is not necessary, schedule a date and time for a formal application meeting.
3)    If a preapplication meeting is necessary, schedule a date and time. At the meeting, discuss the following:

ˇ    The area of operation (primary airport and any satellite bases);

ˇ    The operation as an individual, corporation, or partnership;

ˇ    Any previous experience with part 141 operations;

ˇ    The categories and classes of aircraft to be used in training courses;

ˇ    The number and types of training courses to be offered;

ˇ    The possible need for any waivers or exemptions;

ˇ    The qualifications and experience of instructors;

ˇ    The applicability of parts 61, 91, and 141;

ˇ    AC 141-1; and

ˇ    Any previous or pending enforcement actions against the applicant or proposed personnel.

H.    Establish a FSDO Working File. This file will form the basis for the eventual operator file if certification is successful. Place any correspondence, documents, etc., in this file.

I.    Other FSDO Actions. Follow office procedures to contact the Enforcement Information System (EIS) and Accident Incident Data System (AIDS) to determine the applicant’s enforcement and accident history as well as that of the proposed chief instructors and any other proposed management personnel.

1)    If a certificate suspension or revocation is in effect, inform the applicant in writing (Figure 2-71) that until the enforcement action is fulfilled, the applicant is ineligible for certification.
2)    Place the EIS/AIDS output in the file.

J.    Terminating the Preapplication Phase. This ends the preapplication phase. The formal application phase begins with the receipt of the completed application form.

2-1079    FORMAL APPLICATION PHASE PROCEDURES. Within 30 working-days of receiving an application, the certification team should review it and determine whether it is of sufficient quality to proceed with certification.

A.    Application Review. Review the application only to determine if it is of sufficient quality to continue with certification (i.e., the applicant supplied enough information on the application and/or letter of intent). Review it in depth during the document compliance phase. An example of a properly completed application for an initial certification is shown in Figure 2-69.

B.    Application Incomplete or Inaccurate. If the application is not complete or not accurate, notify the applicant in writing (Figure 2-72) of changes needed before certification can continue. Return the application for any necessary corrections.

C.    Need for Formal Application Meeting. Determine if the optional formal application meeting is necessary.

1)    If a formal application meeting is not necessary, schedule the certification inspections. Review the procedures required during the demonstration and inspection phase with the applicant.
2)    If a formal application meeting is necessary, schedule a date and time.

D.    Formal Application Meeting.

1)    Discuss the following items that would have been covered in a preapplication meeting, if none was conducted:

ˇ    The application.

ˇ    The SOE, if applicable.

ˇ    The TCOs and syllabuses.

ˇ    The personnel, aircraft, and facility requirements.

ˇ    The simulator/training device approval requirement.

ˇ    An inspection of facilities related to any contractual training agreements.

ˇ    Section 141.23, Advertising limitations.

2)    Discuss any discrepancies in the application and their corrective actions.
3)    Discuss the requirements that must be met during the demonstration and inspection phase.

E.    Terminating the Formal Application Phase. This completes the formal application phase. The next phase is the document compliance phase.

2-1080    DOCUMENT COMPLIANCE PHASE PROCEDURES. After accepting the application, the team ensures each document is complete and correct through an in-depth review.

A.    Document Review. The certification team evaluates the following items.

1)    Check the Application. (Note that the blocks on the application are not numbered.) Check that the application contains the following information (beginning with upper left corner):
a)    The legal name and any appropriate DBA of the proposed school, telephone number, address of the principal business office, location of the main operations base, and the location of any satellite bases;
b)    Whether the application is for original issuance, approval of satellite base, or change of name or ownership, appropriate boxes should be marked for issuance, renewal, or amendment of the certificate;
c)    An indication of the training courses for which approval is sought. Check the space provided on the reverse of the form for additional courses;
d)    The application is signed and dated in the last section by the applicant or authorized officer (original signatures on each application form):

ˇ    A person acting as an individual should personally sign the application.

ˇ    All partners should sign an application from a partnership.

ˇ    An officer who is authorized by the corporation by-laws and certified by the corporate secretary should sign an application from a corporation.

ˇ    The president or other such officer or director should sign an application from a company, club, or association, as authorized by the organization’s secretary.

e)    The next section is for FAA use only. Confirm that the applicant did not mark it.
2)    Check the qualifications of all proposed chief instructors, assistant chief instructors, and check instructors for each course that approval is sought for and the qualifications of all other instructors. Refer to §§ 141.35, 141.36, and 141.37.
a)    If not already accomplished, following office procedures, contact EIS to determine the chief instructor’s, assistant chief instructor’s, and other instructors’ enforcement, accident, and incident histories.
b)    Verify employment history pertaining to parts 61 and 141, and other related aviation experience.
3)    Evaluate the TCOs. (See Volume 3, Chapter 53, Section 2, Approve Training Course Outlines for a Part 141 Pilot School.)
4)    Evaluate any commercially-developed or FAA/Industry Training Standards-developed training syllabuses. Ensure that:

ˇ    The school fully understands the objectives and standards of the commercially-developed or FAA/Industry Training Standard-developed training syllabuses.

ˇ    The school can actually give the training in the manner described in the syllabus.

ˇ    The syllabus contains all required pilot operations for the related course.

ˇ    The syllabus and related training aids are on a current revision schedule.

5)    Evaluate the special curriculum. Special curriculums developed under § 141.57 must be evaluated with flexibility in mind. Special curriculums may be used in experimental curriculums under research and development. When approving special curriculums, the inspector must ensure that the curriculums cover the aeronautical knowledge areas and flight proficiency areas of operations listed in the appropriate appendixes of part 141. The inspector must determine that objectives, content, and completion standards are not less than those contained in the appropriate practical test standards.
6)    Check the aircraft checklists, minimum equipment lists, safety practices and procedures, etc., when applicable. (Refer to §§ 141.75 and 141.95.)
7)    Check the graduation certificates required by § 141.95 to ensure that they contain at least the information indicated in § 141.95(b).
8)    Ensure that the applicant can track enrollment information (i.e., that the student was enrolled in the school’s approved course of training before receiving the instruction and training that is certified).
9)    Review the maintenance program (airworthiness).

B.    Unsatisfactory Items. If there are any unsatisfactory items, advise the applicant in writing that they must be corrected before certification can continue.

1)    Place a reasonable time limit on when the corrections must be completed.
2)    If the applicant does not respond within 90 days of the time limit, send the entire application package back to the applicant with a cover letter stating that the certification process is terminated.
3)    Put appropriate work entry in PTRS.

C.    Terminating the Document Compliance Phase. When all documents are satisfactory, conclude the document compliance phase and arrange scheduling for the demonstration and inspection phase.

2-1081    DEMONSTRATION AND INSPECTION PROCEDURES. During the demonstration and inspection phase the team must ensure these steps are accomplished:

A.    Conduct Chief Instructor Practical Tests. Administer practical test to the chief instructors and any assistant chief instructors. (See Volume 5, Chapter 12, Section 1, Conduct a Chief/Assistant Chief Instructor Practical Test for Federal Aviation Regulations Part 141 Pilot School.)

B.    Recordkeeping Requirements. Inspect the applicant’s recordkeeping system for compliance with §§ 141.67, 141.77, 141.85, 141.93, and 141.101.

C.    Inspect Aircraft. The airworthiness inspector conducts the aircraft conformity inspection. Operations inspectors may examine each aircraft for the requirements of § 141.75.

D.    Conduct a Base Inspection. See Volume 6, Chapter 7, Section 1, Conduct Facility Inspection of a Part 141 Pilot School.

E.    Inspect Satellite Bases. See Volume 6, Chapter 7, Section 1, and § 141.91.

F.    Inspect Flight Simulators, FTDs, Training Aids, and Other Equipment. Refer to §§ 141.41 and 141.45. If a simulator must be approved, contact AFS-205.

G.    Terminating the Demonstration and Inspection Phase. When all demonstrations and inspections are complete, the demonstration and inspection phase is concluded.

1)    If any demonstrations are unsatisfactory, advise the applicant immediately of corrective actions. If necessary, confirm the discrepancies in writing (Figure 2-73). Reschedule the inspections accordingly.
2)    When all demonstrations and inspections are satisfactory, proceed with the certification phase.

2-1082    CERTIFICATION PHASE PROCEDURES. When all certification requirements have been met, obtain an Air Agency Certificate number. (See Volume 2, Chapter 1, Section 3, Safety Assurance System: Obtaining and Constructing Certificate/Designator Numbers.)

A.    Complete Inspection Reports and Job Aids.

1)    On the application, in the section marked, “For FAA Use Only,” indicate approval, provisional pilot school or pilot school, effective date of the certificate, and expiration date of the certificate. Indicate if the task was a renewal or amendment to a certificate, if applicable. Make any necessary comments and sign the application. The POI assigned to that pilot school will then sign and date the application.
2)    Ensure all items on the certification/inspection job aid are resolved. Initial the job aid and place in the FSDO file.

B.    Prepare and Issue the Air Agency Certificate. Use FAA Form 8000-4 (Figure 2-5).

1)    Enter the certificate holder’s full legal name directly below the words “This certificate is issued to.” Show other names (such as any DBA) on the certificate. If necessary, list DBAs on a separate, attached letter (Figure 2-74).
2)    Enter the address of the certificate holder’s base of operations directly below the certificate holder’s name. Use a post office box address only if the address reflects the physical location of the base of operations.
3)    Enter the certificate number, as obtained in Volume 2, Chapter 1, Section 3, on the certificate.
4)    Enter the date all requirements for certification are met.
5)    Enter the four-character, alphanumeric designator and city and state of the jurisdictional FSDO under the signature line of the form (for example, EA21, Richmond, VA).
6)    Submit the certificate to the FSDO manager for signature.
a)    Use the full title of the person signing the certificate.
b)    Enter the acronym of the region, the FSDO acronym and number in the “region/office” space (for example, WP FSDO 04).

C.    Prepare List of Approved Courses. Prepare a list of approved courses (Figure 2-65) and issue with the Air Agency Certificate.

D.    Certificate Denial. If any certification requirement is not met, issue a letter of denial (Figure 2-75). Specify reasons for denial. On the application, in the section “For FAA Use Only” indicate disapproval. Make any necessary comments and sign. Have the FSDO manager sign and date the application.

E.    Certification Report. Assemble a certification report containing the following:

ˇ    A copy of the letter of intent, if applicable,

ˇ    A certification job aid (Figure 2-76),

ˇ    The application,

ˇ    The SOE (Figure 2-77),

ˇ    A copy of the Air Agency Certificate issued, and

ˇ    A summary of any difficulty encountered during certification and its resolution.

F.    Minimum Equipment List (MEL). Issue an LOA to operate with an MEL, if applicable (See Volume 4, Chapter 4, Section 2, Approve a Minimum Equipment List for a 14 CFR Part 91 Operator).

G.    All Appropriate Information in the eVID Air Agency Basic File.

H.    FSDO File. The certification program manager must ensure an official office file is established after certification is complete. The file must contain at least the following:

ˇ    The material from any working file used up to this point, including the TCO and syllabuses,

ˇ    The certification report and attachments,

ˇ    The EIS/AIDS profile on applicant and personnel, including a negative report, if applicable,

ˇ    The approved MELs, if applicable,

ˇ    The surveillance reports, and

ˇ    All general correspondence relevant to the school or the FAA.

I.    PTRS. Make final PTRS work entry for this task.

2-1083    TASK OUTCOMES. Completion of the task results in either:

A.    Certificate. A certificate issued that authorizes operations under part 141.

B.    Record. A record on file consisting of the following:

ˇ    Written notification to the applicant denying the certificate, and

ˇ    Indication of the return of all documents to the applicant.

C.    Letter Confirming Termination. A letter to the applicant confirming termination of the certification process per the applicant’s request (Figure 2-78).

2-1084    FUTURE ACTIVITIES.

A.    Develop Post-Certification Plan. When developing a post-certification plan, perform additional surveillance or inspections during the first 90 days the organization is in business. This may require assistance from other FSDOs.

B.    Conduct Surveillance. According to the established post-certification program, conduct surveillance at appropriate intervals.

C.    Renewal of Certificate. Conduct a renewal certification every 2 years.

D.    Amendment of Certificate. Amend the Air Agency Certificate at the operator’s request or the FAA’s determination.

Figure 2-5.  FAA Form 8000-4, Air Agency Certificate

Figure 2-5, FAA Form 8000-4, Air Agency Certificate

Figure 2-62.  Letter Disapproving Special Curriculums or TCOs

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

Carolyn Brannon

Brannon Aviation

Fairfax Airport

P. O. Box 123

Fairfax, VA 23456

Dear Ms. Brannon:

We are unable to approve your [name of course] training course outline (TCO) [or special curriculum] for the following reasons:

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

All other TCOs [and/or special curriculums] have been approved and are reflected in your list of approved courses. If you wish to continue to seek approval for the [above course or special curriculum], you may reapply when appropriate corrections have been made.

Sincerely,

[POI’s Signature]

Figure 2-63.  FAA Form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certification

Figure 2-63. FAA form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certification

Figure 2-64.  Letter Denying Satellite Base

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Applicant’s Name and Address]

Dear [Name]:

We are unable to approve your application for a satellite base at [location] for the following reasons:

[List reasons]

When you feel your organization meets the certification requirements for a satellite base, you may reapply to this office.

Sincerely,

[POI’s Signature]

Figure 2-65.  Sample List of Approved Courses

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Name and Address of School]

Dear [Name]:

[Name of School] is authorized under Air Agency Certificate No. [Certificate Number] to conduct training courses under the following Pilot School Ratings:

[List each authorized Pilot School rating in bullet form] Examples follow:

ˇ    Private Pilot Course

ˇ    Commercial pilot course

ˇ    Instrument Rating Course

ˇ    Additional Aircraft category or Class Rating Course Special Curricula

The following are a list of authorized courses this school may conduct under each Pilot School Rating.

Rating:    [List Pilot School Rating]

Course:   [List each course authorized under this rating] Examples follow:

Rating:    Private Pilot Course

Courses:  Private Pilot Airplane, Single Engine land

Private Pilot Rotorcraft, Helicopter

Rating:    Commercial Pilot Course

Courses:  Commercial Pilot Airplane, Single Engine Land

Commercial Pilot Rotorcraft, Helicopter

Rating:    Instrument Rating Course

Course:   Instrument Rating Airplane, Single Engine land

Rating:    Additional Aircraft Category or Class Rating Course

Courses:  Private Pilot, Airplane Single Engine Sea

Commercial Pilot, Airplane Single Engine Sea

Commercial Pilot, Airplane Multi-Engine Land

Rating:    Special Curricula

Course:   Sport Pilot Course, Airplane Single Engine Land

This list of approved courses expires on [insert same expiration date as Form 8000-4], unless superseded, surrendered, suspended or revoked.

Sincerely,

[FSDO Manager’s Signature]

Figure 2-66.  FAA Form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certification, Filled Out for Renewal

Figure 2-66. FAA Form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certification, Filled Out for Renewal

Figure 2-67.  Notice of Course Cancellation

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Applicant’s Name and Address]

Dear [Name]:

After reviewing your application for renewal of your Pilot School Certificate and conducting the appropriate inspection, we require that you cease [name of course] training immediately for the following reasons:

[List reasons]

Failure to cease [Name of Course] training shall result in enforcement action against your certificate.

All other courses of training and pilot school ratings inspected at the time of renewal were acceptable, and you may continue to conduct training under them. When you feel that your organization meets the certification requirements for [name of course], you may apply for reinstatement of the course.

Sincerely,

[POI’s signature]

Figure 2-68.  FAA Form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certification, Filled Out for Amendment

Figure 2-68. FAA Form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certification, Filled Out for Amendment

Figure 2-69.  FAA Form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certification, Filled Out for Initial Certification

Figure 2-69. FAA Form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certification, Filled Out for Initial Certification

Figure 2-70.  Sample Letter of Intent

RUTHIE’S FLYING SCHOOL

888 CHANDELLE CIRCLE

BELLVILLE, IL 35454

(312) 555-1212

March 15, 2006

Federal Aviation Administration

Flight Standards District Office # 3

DuPage Country Airport

West Chicago, IL 60185

Gentlemen:

This is to notify the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of our intent to become an approved pilot school under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 141.

We are prepared to begin operations on July 1, 2006 and are ready for your certification inspection at this time. Enclosed are three copies (an original and two facsimiles) of FAA Form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certificate. Operations will be confined to the DuPage County Airport. We plan to operate: two Cessna 152s, one Cessna 172, and a Piper Comanche (PA24-250), that meets the complex aircraft requirements for commercial pilot certification.

Courses identified on FAA Form 8420-8 will be supervised by our chief instructor, Mr. Robert Cartwright, holder of ATP Certificate number 555121128. He meets the requirements of § 141.35 and his instructor résumé is available for verification when you conduct your certification inspection.

Also enclosed are three copies of each training course outline (TCO) for your review and approval. Our requested three-letter certificate designators are EPS, ELS, and SFS, in that order of preference.

Sincerely,

Ruth Vaght

President

Figure 2-71.  Letter Indicating Certification Process Cannot Continue Because of Pending Enforcement Action

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Name and Address of Applicant]

Dear [Name]:

This letter is to inform you that your application for a Pilot School Certificate cannot be processed because of enforcement action [pending/taken] against [cite the specific certificate—Airman, other air operator certificate, etc.]. Until such time that this enforcement action is fulfilled, you are ineligible for certification.

Enclosed with this letter is a copy of your application and the training course outlines (TCOs) you submitted for approval.

Should you wish to discuss this matter, please contact this office at [telephone number].

Sincerely,

[FSDO Manager’s Signature]

Figure 2-72.  Letter Indicating Application Is Unsatisfactory

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Name and Address of Applicant]

Dear [Name of Applicant]:

The enclosed FAA Form 8420-8, Application for Pilot School Certificate, is returned because

[cite discrepancies].

Enclosed are three blank application forms that you may use to reapply when the above items are corrected. In order to continue the certification process, the corrected applications must be received no later than [date, not longer than 30 days from the date of the letter]. If we do not hear from you by that date, we will consider the certification process terminated.

If you have any questions concerning this matter, please feel free to contact this office at [telephone number].

Sincerely,

[Certification Project Manager’s Signature]

Figure 2-73.  Letter Indicating Discrepancies Found During Inspection

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Name and address of school]

Dear [Name]:

These discrepancies were found during a Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 141 certification inspection conducted as part of your certification as an Air Agency under part 141.

[List each discrepancy]

[List methods of correcting the discrepancies, if appropriate]

[Indicate a reasonable length of time for the corrections to be made (not to exceed 90 days from the date of the letter)]

[Indicate that if no response is received within 90 days, the certification process will be terminated]

Sincerely,

[CPM’s Signature]

Figure 2-74.  Part 141 Letter Listing DBAs

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Air Agency’s Name and Address]

Dear [Name]:

This letter, accompanied by Air Agency Certificate No. [number] issued to [legal name of school] on [date of issuance], authorizes the following additional persons to exercise the privileges and limitations of the certificate.

[List all DBA names]

Sincerely,

[FSDO Manager’s Signature]

Figure 2-75.  Letter Denying Certificate

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Name and Address of Applicant]

Dear [Name of Applicant]:

Your application for a Pilot School Certificate is denied because of the following reasons:

[List specific items that have not been corrected in the document compliance phase or demonstration and inspection phase within a reasonable time, i.e., not to exceed 90 days from the time the applicant was notified of the discrepancy.]

[If applicable, cite any false or fraudulent information that was provided.]

[If applicable, indicate why TCOs were not approved.]

[If applicable, specifically list the lack of qualifications of personnel or deficiencies in facilities and equipment.]

If you have any questions concerning this matter, please contact this office at [telephone number].

Sincerely,

[FSDO manager’s signature]

Figure 2-76.  Part 141 Certification Job Aid

NAME OF SCHOOL:

CERTIFICATION TEAM

Name

Specialty

ADDRESS:

INSP. INITIAL

DATE

YES

NO

NA

1. Initial contact handled by

 

 

 

 

 

2. Letter of Intent

 

 

 

 

 

3. Preapplication meeting

 

 

 

 

 

4. Applicant provided resources/advised how to obtain

 

 

 

 

 

5. Formal application meeting

 

 

 

 

 

6. Application properly completed and submitted

 

 

 

 

 

7. TCOs submitted

 

 

 

 

 

a. TCO contains description of each room used for aeronautical knowledge training

 

 

 

 

 

b. TCO describes all training aids

 

 

 

 

 

c. TCO describes each training device/simulator used

 

 

 

 

 

d. TCO lists airports at which training flights originate

 

 

 

 

 

e. TCO describes minimum instructor qualifications

 

 

 

 

 

f. TCO describes trainee’s enrollment qualifications

 

 

 

 

 

g. TCO describes each lesson’s objectives and training standards

 

 

 

 

 

h. TCO describes tests and checks used to measure each stage of training

 

 

 

 

 

8. Verification of flight instructor’s qualifications (§ 141.33/141.35)

 

 

 

 

 

9. Chief instructor/assistant for ground school course has 1 year experience in approved school

 

 

 

 

 

10. Enrollment method meets the requirements of § 141.93

 

 

 

 

 

11. Safety procedures/practices developed (§ 141.93)

 

 

 

 

 

12. Graduation certificates appropriate (§ 141.95)

 

 

 

 

 

13. Method for student recordkeeping (§ 141.101)

 

 

 

 

 

14. MEL approved

 

 

 

 

 

15. School has use of aircraft appropriate for each course

 

 

 

 

 

a. U.S.-registered standard category

 

 

 

 

 

b. At least two-place with full-functioning dual controls

 

 

 

 

 

c. Maintained in accordance with parts 43 and 91

 

 

 

 

 

d. Inspected by Airworthiness inspector

 

 

 

 

 

(1) Optional equipment installation

 

 

 

 

 

(2) Airworthiness Directive records current

 

 

 

 

 

(3) In-house or contract maintenance observed

 

 

 

 

 

(4) Aircraft for IFR courses properly equipped/maintained

 

 

 

 

 

e. Electronic components/communications equipment inspected (Avionics)

 

 

 

 

 

f. Checklists required by § 141.75

 

 

 

 

 

16. Chief instructor/assistance for each course tested

 

 

 

 

 

a. Knowledge test

 

 

 

 

 

b. Skill test

 

 

 

 

 

17. Chief instructor’s method to test other instructors

 

 

 

 

 

18. Pilot briefing areas (§ 141.43)

 

 

 

 

 

19. Aeronautical knowledge training facilities (§ 141.45)

 

 

 

 

 

20. Airports

 

 

 

 

 

a. Continuous use where flights originate (§ 141.38)

 

 

 

 

 

b. One runway/takeoff area for normal takeoff at full gross weight (§ 141.38)

 

 

 

 

 

c. Wind direction indicator (§ 141.38)

 

 

 

 

 

d. Traffic direction indicator (if required by § 141.38)

 

 

 

 

 

e. Permanent runway lights (if required by § 141.38)

 

 

 

 

 

21. Flight simulator or FTDs

 

 

 

 

 

a. Cockpit meets requirements of § 141.41

 

 

 

 

 

b. Simulates rotation around three axes (§ 141.41)

 

 

 

 

 

c. Minimum instruments/equipment required by § 91.205141.41)

 

 

 

 

 

d. For visual flight instruction (VFR) instruction, a means of simulating visual flight conditions (§ 141.41)

 

 

 

 

 

e. For IFR instruction, a means of recording flight path (§ 141.41)

 

 

 

 

 

22. Training aids meet requirements of § 141.41

 

 

 

 

 

23. Certificate number obtained from AFS‑620

 

 

 

 

 

24. Air Agency Certificate prepared and issued

 

 

 

 

 

25. List of approved courses prepared

 

 

 

 

 

26. Certification report and district office file prepared

 

 

 

 

 

27. Surveillance plan developed

 

 

 

 

 

28. Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REMARKS:

Figure 2-77.  Part 141 Schedule of Events

NAME OF SCHOOL:

NAMES OF MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL

 

Name

 

Title

 

 

ADDRESS:

SCHOOL
DATE
READY

FAA
DATE
REC’D

FAA
RET’D

FAA
DATE
APP’D

INSP
INIT

1. Letter of Intent

 

 

 

 

 

2. Application (FAA Form 8420-8)

 

 

 

 

 

3. TCOs

 

 

 

 

 

4. Special curriculums (if applicable)

 

 

 

 

 

5. Recordkeeping procedures

 

 

 

 

 

6. Enrollment method

 

 

 

 

 

7. Safety procedures/practices

 

 

 

 

 

8. Graduation certificates

 

 

 

 

 

9. Instructors’ qualifications

 

 

 

 

 

10. Chief instructor/assistant practical test

 

 

 

 

 

11. Base inspection (including satellite bases)

 

 

 

 

 

12. Appropriate aircraft for each course

 

 

 

 

 

13. Aircraft conformity inspections (Airworthiness)

 

 

 

 

 

14. FFS, FTD, or ATD inspection

 

 

 

 

 

15. Training aids inspection

 

 

 

 

 

16. Pilot briefing areas

 

 

 

 

 

17. Aeronautical knowledge training facilities

 

 

 

 

 

18. Airports

 

 

 

 

 

19. Proposed date to start operations

 

 

 

 

 

20. Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2-78.  Letter Confirming Termination of Certification Process at Applicant’s Request

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Name and Address of Applicant]

Dear [Name of Applicant]:

This letter confirms your request to terminate the project to certificate you as an Air Agency under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 141.

All materials submitted for review are enclosed with this letter. Any attempt to reapply after the date of this letter will require reinitiating the entire certification process.

Sincerely,

[CPM’s Signature]

RESERVED. Paragraphs 2-1085 through 2-1100.