12/28/16

 

8900.1 CHG 504

VOLUME 2  AIR OPERATOR AND AIR AGENCY CERTIFICATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS

Indicates new/changed information.

CHAPTER 11  CERTIFICATION OF A PART 145 REPAIR STATION

Section 8  Safety Assurance System: Initial, Renewal, Amendment, and Approval of a Part 145 Repair Station Located in the United States Applying for an EASA Part-145

2-1283    REPORTING SYSTEM. Use Safety Assurance System (SAS) automation and the associated Data Collection Tools (DCT).

2-1284    OBJECTIVE. This section guides aviation safety inspectors (ASI) on how to certificate a Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 145 repair station, located in the United States (U.S.), that is applying for a European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) Part-145 approval. ASIs must use this section in conjunction with the Maintenance Annex Guidance (MAG). However, the MAG supersedes this section if conflicts exist between the two documents. The MAG, section B pertains to U.S.-based repair stations with EASA approval.

2-1285    BACKGROUND.

A.    U.S./European Union (EU) Aviation Safety Agreement.

1)    The Agreement signed on June 30, 2008 is between the U.S. and the EU to cooperate in the regulation of civil aviation safety. The Agreement’s official title is “Agreement Between the United States of America and the European Community on Cooperation in the Regulation of Civil Aviation Safety.” The Agreement contains two annexes. Annex 1 pertains to airworthiness and environmental certification; while Annex 2 pertains to maintenance. This section focuses on Annex 2.
2)    The Agreement allows the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and EASA to rely on each other’s surveillance systems, minimize the duplication of efforts, increase efficiency, and conserve resources to the greatest extent possible. The Agreement calls for successful completion of regularly scheduled FAA inspections. The FAA and EASA must be satisfied that repair stations located in the U.S. and EU-based Approved Maintenance Organizations (AMO) meet the conditions of Annex 2.
3)    Annex 2 of the Agreement allows EASA and the FAA to accept each other’s standards, systems, and approvals relating to repair stations located in the U.S. and EU-based AMOs that maintain civil aviation products. Annex 2 also explains how to establish points of communication and cooperation when urgent or unusual situations develop.

B.    MAG. The MAG is the general term for the document’s official title, which is “Maintenance Annex Guidance Between the Federal Aviation Administration for the United States of America and the European Aviation Safety Agency for the European Union.” The MAG, which is a separate document from the Agreement, explains how to implement the Agreement and its Annex 2.

NOTE:  Both the MAG and the Agreement are located at http://www.faa.gov/aircraft/repair.

2-1286    INITIAL/AMENDMENT—PREREQUISITES AND COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS.

A.    Prerequisites. This task requires:

·    Knowledge of the regulatory requirements of 14 CFR parts 43 and 145;

·    Knowledge of the MAG requirements;

·    Successful completion of the Airworthiness Inspector Indoctrination course(s) or equivalent;

·    Successful completion of FAA Course 21058, Certification and Surveillance of Part 145 Repair Stations;

·    Successful completion of FAA Course 27100066, Understanding the U.S./EU Aviation Safety Agreement, for maintenance; and

·    Previous experience with certification or surveillance of part 145 repair stations.

B.    Coordination. This task requires coordination with the following:

·    Applicant repair station;

·    Applicant repair station’s ASI, which could include the principal maintenance inspector (PMI) or principal avionics inspector (PAI);

·    EASA;

·    FAA regional EASA coordinator; and

·    FAA Regional Offices (RO) and district offices, as appropriate.

2-1287    INITIAL/AMENDMENT—REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References (current editions):

·    Title 14 CFR Parts 43 and 145.

·    Agreement Between the United States of America and the European Community on Cooperation in the Regulation of Civil Aviation Safety (the Agreement).

·    Maintenance Annex Guidance Between the Federal Aviation Administration for the United States of America and the European Aviation Safety Agency for the European Union (the MAG).

·    Volume 2, Chapter 11, Section 1-5, Safety Assurance System: Certification Process Documents (CPD).

B.    Forms:

·    FAA Form 8000-4, Air Agency Certificate.

·    FAA Form 8000-4-1, Repair Station Operations Specifications.

·    EASA Form 1, Authorised Release Certificate.

·    EASA Form 3, Maintenance Organisation Approval Certificate.

·    EASA Form 9, FAA Recommendation.

·    EASA Form 16, Application Form.

NOTE:  Access EASA Part-145 documents and forms at https://www.easa.europa.eu/easa-and-you/aircraft-products/continuing-airworthiness-organisations/foreign-part-145-organisations-in-us.

C.    Job Aids. The MAG includes job aids as appendices.

2-1288    INITIAL/AMENDMENT CERTIFICATION, DOCUMENT REVIEW, AND PREPARATION.

A.    Receipt of Preliminary Inquiry. Upon receiving a preliminary inquiry from a repair station applying for initial EASA Part-145 approval, the ASI should follow the process and procedures contained in this section and the MAG. The ASI should also inform the FAA regional EASA coordinator of the initial contact.

B.    Line Stations. EASA uses the term “line stations” while the FAA uses the term “line maintenance authorization” in relation to part 145. This is to advise the ASI that these terms are synonymous when applied under the terms of the Agreement. The EASA certificate shall only cover line stations under the surveillance of the FAA, except those located in one of the EU Member States.

C.    Fees. The repair station will comply with EASA fees and charges regulations found at http://www.easa.europa.eu/document-library.

D.    MAG Forms and Accessibility. The MAG contains EASA Form 9, EASA Form 16, and surveillance information to complete the task. The forms are also available on the EASA website. (See the EASA website address in paragraph 2-1287, Initial/Amendment—References, Forms, and Job Aids.)

E.    Prerequisite for Applicants. A repair station seeking approval under EASA Part-145 must hold a valid repair station certificate issued under part 145 and be located in the U.S. and its territories. A repair station may not apply concurrently for a repair station certificate and EASA approval.

F.    Evidence of Need. The repair station must submit written confirmation of the need for an EASA Part-145 approval. This may be in the form of a Letter of Intent (LOI), a work order, or a contract with details of the relevant customer. A relevant customer may be an EASA Part-145 AMO, a European operator, or a distributor (refer to the MAG).

G.    EASA Supplement Requirements. Before inspecting the facility, the ASI must first review the submitted repair station’s EASA supplement to ensure the supplement meets the requirements in the MAG, and the sample supplement (see Volume 12, Chapter 8, Section 1). The ASI accepts the supplement in the same manner as the FAA accepts the Repair Station Manual (RSM)/Quality Control Manual (QCM).

H.    Reasons for Amendments. Per the MAG, an EASA certificate must be reissued when a repair station changes the following:

·    Name, including doing business as (DBA) names;

·    Address of the approved facility (not including the mailing address); and

·    Repair station number.

I.    Unimpeded Access. For the purposes of surveillance and inspection, the FAA and EASA and aviation authorities (AA), will help each other gain unimpeded access to repair stations/AMOs subject to its jurisdiction. It is incumbent upon the repair station/AMO to provide unimpeded access to EASA and the FAA to all work areas having civil aviation application. The repair station/AMO should ensure that, where possible, there is clear delineation between work areas with civil and military applications within the repair station/AMO.

J.    Exchange of Safety Data. Article 9 of the Agreement stipulates that the FAA and EASA will provide each other, on request and in a timely manner, with any information regarding accidents/incidents involving civilian aeronautical products or regulated entities, and to exchange other safety information. Per the Agreement, the FAA agrees to share Safety Performance Analysis System (SPAS) data with EASA that is restricted to:

·    The repair station’s profile (attached to EASA Form 9); and

·    Information documented in Program Tracking and Reporting Subsystem (PTRS) related to repair station findings on EASA Form 9. (EASA Form 9 is used during certification, amendment, or renewal of a repair station located in the U.S. that is seeking or has received EASA approval.)

2-1289    INITIAL/AMENDMENT—DEMONSTRATION AND INSPECTION PHASE.

A.    Review for Initial Approval.

1)    The ASI will inspect the repair station for compliance with parts 43 and 145 and the EASA supplement. If an ASI has inspected the repair station within the past 6 months, he or she is not required to reinspect it for compliance with parts 43 and 145.
2)    The ASI must review the repair station’s compliance with those items specified on EASA Form 9, as applicable.
3)    The ASI will also perform the following:
a)    Confirm that the repair station’s EASA supplement is available throughout the facility.
b)    Verify that the repair station has established an effective internal quality audit system, has established a schedule to perform the audit, and has corrected any findings or discrepancies identified. An ASI accomplishes an initial inspection by reviewing the EASA manual supplement and ensuring the internal quality system meets the requirements of the MAG.
c)    If the repair station holds a D107 operations specification (OpSpec) for line maintenance authorization, verify, as applicable, that the EASA supplement lists each EASA location, including make, model of aircraft, and European customer. (The repair station’s internal quality system/internal quality audit system includes line stations, as applicable.) ASIs accomplish this by reviewing records of the quality monitoring system/internal quality audit system (refer to the MAG for the requirements). However, ASIs should be aware that if the office is unable to provide proper surveillance of the line station’s locations outside its geographic boundaries or unable to delegate the surveillance to another office, they should consult with the RO for additional options before rejecting the supplement or revision.

NOTE:  The certificate holder, under the provisions of the Aviation Safety Agreement between the U.S. and EU, is authorized to perform line maintenance functions that apply to certificate holders conducting air carrier operations for foreign air carriers or foreign persons operating non-U.S.-registered aircraft in common carriage under 14 CFR part 129, and listed in OpSpec D107, Table 1—Line Maintenance Authorization.

4)    When reviewing the findings of the repair station’s internal quality system/internal quality audit findings, the ASI should regard the findings as a self-disclosure and should not process violations on these findings. The ASI should recommend to the repair station that it submit the identified findings per FAA voluntary disclosure procedures. EASA recognizes the FAA self-disclosure process when the repair station meets the guidance provided in Advisory Circular (AC) 00-58, Voluntary Disclosure Reporting Program. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) restrictions would not apply in the case of EASA receiving notification of the corrective action plan because the findings may directly impact the repair station’s certificate. The ASI should complete EASA Form 9 to identify the findings and attach the CAP.

B.    Inspect Repair Stations Seeking Amendment. Depending on the nature of the proposed amendment, the FAA may need to perform a limited inspection of the repair station seeking an amendment.

C.    Analyze and Document Any Deficiencies.

1)    If deficiencies are noted, the ASI must brief an appropriate representative of the repair station at the end of the inspection, confirm any findings, notify the repair station in writing, and, if appropriate, meet with the repair station to review the deficiencies in detail.
a)    For an initial application, the repair station must correct all deficiencies noted by the ASI, per the MAG.
b)    If the repair station has a noncompliance concerning parts 43 and 145, the ASI will advise EASA of the issues and the associated FAA action with EASA Form 9, but the ASI cannot withhold a positive recommendation. The final decision for EASA approval lies with the EASA.
2)    The repair station must notify the ASI when it has corrected all deficiencies. The ASI must document and record each deficiency and corrective action in the repair station’s certification file. The ASI must notify the FAA regional EASA coordinator of:

·    All deficiencies that the repair station has not corrected;

·    Any problems that may deny initial EASA approval;

·    Any issues that require consultation with the EASA; or

·    Any other actions the repair station must coordinate with the EASA.

NOTE:  ASIs should coordinate all nonrecommendations for EASA approval (initial/renewal/amendment) with the FAA regional EASA coordinator, who should act as the point of contact (POC) between the FAA and EASA.

2-1290    INITIAL/AMENDMENT—EASA APPROVAL. To recommend EASA Part-145 approval of a repair station, the ASI should be satisfied with the proposed EASA supplement, any amendments (if applicable), evidence of need, the EASA Form 16 application (in accordance with the MAG), and any inspections the FAA has performed. The ASI will recommend acceptance of the repair station to the EASA by preparing EASA Form 9. Refer to the MAG for details and completion instructions.

A.    Prepare EASA Form 9.

1)    On EASA Form 9, ASIs must check each block “Yes,” “No,” or “N/A,” as applicable.

NOTE:  The principal inspector (PI) should check “Yes” in the last block of the EASA supplement status indicating the FAA has accepted the EASA supplement.

2)    For an initial certification and only after the repair station corrects all its findings/discrepancies, the ASI must forward to EASA all of the following:

·    EASA Form 9. (For initial certification, complete Form 9 for the main facility, and for each additional fixed location, and line station under this approval. For renewal and amendment, complete only one Form 9 that includes line items 1 and 2 as seen in the MAG.).

·    A copy of the repair station profile from SPAS (attached to EASA Form 9).

·    Any accompanying material.

3)    ASIs must not use a pending compliance and/or enforcement action to delay submitting EASA Form 9 with a nonrecommendation.

B.    Process the Recommendation for EASA Part-145 Approval. Follow the process and procedures contained in the MAG.

NOTE:  The ASI may email the certification package to the EASA at foreign145@easa.europa.eu.

C.    Receive a Copy of EASA Part-145 Approval. EASA will follow the process and procedures contained in the MAG. The FAA regional EASA coordinator will forward a copy to the appropriate ASI for the office records.

2-1291    INITIAL/AMENDMENT—TASK OUTCOMES.

A.    Complete the SAS Custom DCT (C DCT). The ASI will complete the SAS C DCT.

B.    Complete the Task. Completion of the task will result in the following action.

1)    Once EASA issues the EASA Part-145 certificate to the repair station, the ASI will:
a)    Revise OpSpec A001 of a new repair station’s OpSpecs to include the following (or equivalent) language: “The repair station specified on these OpSpecs is performing maintenance and/or alteration of aircraft and/or aeronautical products to be installed on aircraft under the terms and conditions of the U.S./EU Safety Agreement and associated Annex 2.”
b)    Update the Vitals Information by completing all relevant data fields to indicate that the repair station is EASA-approved.
c)    Return one copy of the EASA supplement to the repair station.
d)    File a copy of the EASA supplement, a copy of the evidence of need document, EASA Form 16, and EASA Form 9 in the repair station’s file.
2)    For a repair station that terminated the process or failed an inspection, the ASI will return to the repair station all copies of the EASA supplement and EASA Form 16 with a letter explaining all deficiencies.

C.    Document the Task. File all supporting paperwork in the repair station’s file and add EASA supplement aspects to all future FAA inspections of the repair station’s facility. A copy of the applicant’s EASA supplement, together with its part 145 RSM/QCM, will be maintained at the Flight Standards District Office (FSDO).

NOTE:  The EASA does not require a copy of either the repair station’s manual or EASA supplement.

2-1292    INITIAL/AMENDMENT—FUTURE ACTIVITIES. When the EASA Part-145 approval process is complete, the ASI must revise surveillance planning and scheduling for the repair station to include surveillance and inspections for compliance with part 145 and EASA Special Conditions. The ASI should coordinate FAA facility inspections to accomplish EASA renewal facility inspections.

2-1293    SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS AND ENFORCEMENT ACTION.

A.    Reporting Findings on EASA Form 9. The ASI will use EASA Form 9 to report any changes to the status of the repair station part 145 certificate (such as surrender, suspension, or revocation) and any serious failure of the repair station to comply with part 145 that could result in certificate action. To report uncorrected findings or discrepancies, the ASI will leave the “date closed” column blank. Revocation of a repair station’s part 145 certificate automatically invalidates its EASA approval.

1)    For recommendations, refer to the MAG, section B, part II, paragraph 4.2.
2)    For nonrecommendations, refer to the MAG, section B, part II, paragraph 4.3.

NOTE:  Withdrawal of FAA certification will result in the withdrawal of EASA approval since EASA certification is based on compliance with part 145 and EASA Special Conditions. The Agreement obligates the FAA to inform the EASA of findings, which allows the EASA to determine what action to take.

B.    Compliance and Enforcement Actions. ASIs are still responsible for processing the most appropriate action in accordance with Volume 14, Chapter 1, Sections 1 and 2, to correct deviations from part 145 regulatory requirements, even if they notify the EASA of a part 145 noncompliance. An ASI, however, cannot process compliance or enforcement action if the basis for the action is a deviation from EASA Special Conditions, but not a noncompliance of part 145.

2-1294    RENEWAL APPROVAL—PREREQUISITES AND COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS. See paragraph 2-1286, Initial/Amendment—Prerequisites and Coordination Requirements.

2-1295    RENEWAL APPROVAL—REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS. See paragraph 2-1287.

2-1296    RENEWAL APPROVAL—EASA PART-145 RENEWAL APPROVAL PROCESS. The MAG contains the procedures for the EASA Part-145 renewal.

2-1297    RENEWAL APPROVAL—DOCUMENT COMPLIANCE PHASE.

A.    Review Completed EASA Form 16. The ASI should verify that the repair station has submitted a completed EASA Form 16. Guidance for evaluating an EASA supplement is in the MAG, section B, appendix 1. The evidence of need may be an LOI, contract, or work order from an EASA AMO, European operator, or a distributor.

NOTE:  The repair station must submit to the ASI for review and acceptance any revisions to its EASA supplement that reflect changed procedures, but do not change the nature of its EASA Part‑145 approval. Once the repair station has submitted the revision to the FAA, it may implement the revision unless notified otherwise by the FAA. Submission of EASA Form 16 is not required for such revisions.

B.    FSDO Copy of EASA Form 3 Approval Certificate. ASIs should ensure that the repair station provides them a copy of the EASA Form 3 approval certificate once the repair station receives it from EASA.

2-1298    RENEWAL APPROVAL—DEMONSTRATION AND INSPECTION PHASE.

A.    Review/Inspect the Repair Station for EASA Renewal Approval. Refer to the MAG, section B for the process and procedures for EASA renewal approval. In addition, the ASI should complete the following tasks:

1)    Inspect the repair station for compliance with parts 43 and 145 and the EASA supplement. ASIs may accomplish this when they complete their normal annual work program.
2)    Review the repair station’s compliance with those items specified on EASA Form 9.
3)    Confirm that the repair station EASA supplement is available throughout the facility.
4)    Confirm whether the repair station has performed any work for an EASA customer since the last inspection. If the repair station has performed or is currently performing work for an EASA customer, the ASI will verify the following:
Indicates new/changed information.
a)    Relevant maintenance records are clear and complete.
b)    Hangar space is available for base maintenance. A repair station may perform line maintenance, per the MAG.
c)    The repair station has an independent quality monitoring system.
d)    If the repair station holds a D107 OpSpec for line maintenance authorization, verify, as applicable, that the EASA supplement lists each EASA location, including make and model of aircraft and European customer. (Line stations, as applicable, are included in the repair station’s independent quality monitoring system.) The ASI should review audit records to verify that the repair station has performed audits of its EASA-accepted line stations as identified in the EASA supplement.
e)    Submit to the EASA, on EASA Form 9, any findings documented under an ASI’s review of the repair station’s independent quality monitoring system or findings under the repair station’s self-disclosure process (refer to AC 00-58).

B.    Analyze and Document Any Deficiencies.

1)    If the ASI notes deficiencies, he or she will brief an appropriate representative of the repair station at the end of the inspection and confirm any findings in writing within 2 weeks.
2)    The ASI may require the repair station to submit a CAP, depending on the nature of the deficiencies. If the plan is satisfactory, the ASI will submit the CAP along with the completed EASA Form 9 recommending the repair station for EASA approval. If the repair station fails to correct the deficiencies or to provide a CAP prior to the expiration of its EASA approval, the ASI will end the repair station renewal approval process and submit EASA Form 9 to EASA with a nonrecommendation for renewal approval.
3)    In the event of unusual circumstances (e.g., a short period of time between the inspection and the expiration date), the ASI should contact the regional EASA coordinator if an extension of approval is necessary. The regional EASA coordinator will advise the EASA of the circumstances and obtain EASA concurrence with the FAA recommendation to extend the renewal date. The EASA may extend the duration of the repair station EASA approval for a reasonable period of time.

NOTE:  ASIs should coordinate all nonrecommendations for EASA approval (initial/renewal/amendment) with the FAA regional EASA coordinator, who should act as the POC between the FAA and EASA.

2-1299    RENEWAL APPROVAL—EASA APPROVAL.

A.    Prepare EASA Form 9. To recommend EASA Part-145 renewal approval, the ASI, by completing EASA Form 9, verifies that the repair station complies with the appropriate sections of the MAG, section B.

1)    For a repair station seeking EASA Part-145 renewal approval, the ASI must ensure that the repair station SAS required inspections were accomplished during the preceding 2-year period to determine compliance with part 145 and EASA Special Conditions. The ASI should identify the dates of the previous year’s surveillance, such as SP 1.0, SP 4.0, or any other DCTs, on EASA Form 9 (part 1) and the date of the current year’s surveillance in the recommendation or non-recommendation block.

NOTE:  EASA Form 9 is not due annually. For renewals, EASA Form 9 is only required on the renewal year. It may also be required for changes to the certificate, see the MAG for requirements.

NOTE:  If any repair station elects not to pursue an EASA renewal approval, the ASI will complete the nonrecommendation block by writing “Nonrenewal” and will forward EASA Forms 3 and 9 to EASA.

2)    EASA Form 9 must have the applicable blocks marked “Yes,” “No,” or “N/A.” If the ASI has marked a block “No,” he or she must identify the finding and/or corrective action in the findings/discrepancies block. If the ASI checks “Yes” in part 2, this indicates the FAA has accepted the EASA supplement.
3)    If the repair station has a noncompliance concerning parts 43 and 145, the ASI will advise the EASA of the compliance and/or enforcement action using EASA Form 9. The ASI cannot withhold a positive recommendation. The final decision for EASA approval lies with the EASA.

B.    Follow EASA Policy for EASA Form 9 Reporting Requirements.

1)    The ASI will report on EASA Form 9 any change to the status of the repair station part 145 certificate, such as surrender, suspension, revocation, any change in ratings, change of address, etc. For findings that the repair station has not corrected, the ASI will leave the “date corrected” column blank and attach to EASA Form 9 any plans for corrective action.
2)    If the EASA does not issue a renewal approval for any reason other than an enforcement action, such as nonpayment of fees, the EASA will inform the repair station and the ASI if the approval will remain valid until the EASA determines the validity of the issue.

C.    Recommendation Package. The recommendation package will consist of the following:

·    EASA Form 9. (For initial certification, complete Form 9 for the main facility, and for each additional fixed location, and line station under this approval. For renewal and amendment, complete only one Form 9 that includes line items 1 and 2 as seen in the MAG).

·    EASA Form 16.

·    A copy of the repair station profile from SPAS (attached to EASA Form 9).

·    A copy of the repair station’s FAA certificate and OpSpecs.

·    Any line station appendix from the EASA supplement, if appropriate.

D.    Process the Recommendation for EASA Part-145 Approval. The ASI will submit the recommendation package to the EASA at least 30 days before the renewal due date. The ASI will submit the package using one of the methods below:

·    Mail: European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), Programmes Department, Applications and Certifications Manager, Postfach 10 12 53, D-50452 Köln, Germany;

·    Fax: 011 49 221 89990 9505; or

·    Email: foreign145@easa.europa.eu.

E.    Receive a Copy of EASA Part-145 Renewal Approval. The EASA will process the renewal package in accordance with the MAG. The FAA regional EASA coordinator will forward a copy of the EASA paperwork to the appropriate ASI. The EASA will include the repair station in the list of approved EASA Part‑145 organizations, which is available on its website at http://easa.europa.eu/easa-and-you/aircraft-products/continuing-airworthiness-organisations/foreign-part-145-organisations-in-us.

F.    Appeal of Revocation of EASA Part-145 Approval. Any repair station contesting the revocation of its EASA Part-145 approval may appeal to the EASA within 21 days subject to evidence being submitted at the time of the appeal. The repair station cannot appeal to the FAA when the EASA revokes or limits a repair station’s EASA Part-145 approval. Repair stations should address any appeal to the EASA to the attention of the Executive Director of the EASA to initiate a conflict resolution process. The repair station’s EASA approval will remain in temporary suspension awaiting the outcome of any appeal. Should a special audit be necessary, the repair station will incur a separate fee for the cost of this audit.

2-1300    RENEWAL APPROVAL—TASK OUTCOMES.

A.    Complete the SAS C DCT Domestic Repair Station EASA Form 9. The ASI will complete the SAS C DCT Domestic Repair Station EASA Form 9 in the SAS record as required.

B.    Complete the Task. Completion of the task will result in the following:

1)    For a successful application, the ASI will:
a)    File EASA Form 3, issued by the EASA, in the appropriate repair station file.
b)    Update all the Vitals Information in SAS to indicate that the repair station is EASA-approved.

NOTE:  When updating the Vitals Information tab in SAS, the ASI will calculate the next renewal approval due date using 2-year intervals from the initial approval date. This date should coincide with the EASA approval date.

c)    File a copy of EASA Forms 9 and 16, a copy of the evidence of need, and supporting information in the repair station’s file.
2)    For an unsuccessful renewal, the ASI will:
a)    Notify the FAA Regional Coordinator if there is a situation that caused the nonrecommendation for renewal approval.
b)    Retain a copy of EASA Forms 9 and 16, a copy of the evidence of need, and supporting information in the repair station’s file.
Indicates new/changed information.

2-1301    RENEWAL APPROVAL—FUTURE ACTIVITIES. In regards to EASA Sampling Inspection System (SIS) team visits, the ASI will follow the MAG and Volume 6, Chapter 9.

RESERVED. Paragraphs 2-1302 through 2-1306.