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8900.1 CHG 504

VOLUME 2  AIR OPERATOR AND AIR AGENCY CERTIFICATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS

CHAPTER 11  CERTIFICATION OF A PART 145 REPAIR STATION

Section 10  Safety Assurance System: Certificating/Renewing/Amending a Part 145 Repair Station Located Outside the Territories of the United States and Not Under a BASA/MIP

2-1327    REPORTING SYSTEM(S). Use Safety Assurance System (SAS) automation and the associated Data Collection Tools (DCT) for initial certification, renewal and updating Vitals configuration.

2-1328    GENERAL.

A.    Direction and Guidance. This section is to be used in conjunction with Volume 2, Chapter 11, Sections 1 through 6 and 13, for the certification/renewal and amendment of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 145 repair stations.

B.    Professional Conduct. Each aviation safety inspector (ASI) assigned to an International Field Office (IFO) must be conscious of sensitive issues associated with working in the international environment. Inspectors must conduct themselves with the highest degree of professionalism while assigned outside the United States. An inspector must be courteous and respectful when dealing with foreign nationals and the various officials of the foreign aviation authorities (AA). Inspectors should understand that, while working for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), their every action represents the U.S. Government. The FAA expects IFO employees to be fully aware that they are guests in a foreign country and they should recognize national culture within their working environment. The FAA expects IFO inspectors to observe the above guidance during all phases of the certification/renewal/amendment process.

2-1329    OBJECTIVE. This section contains additional requirements for certification/renewal/amendment, national certification, line station authorization surveillance, and geographic authorizations of a part 145 repair station located outside the United States in a country without a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) with Maintenance Implementation Procedures (MIP) with the United States (Peer Group G).

2-1330    PREREQUISITES AND COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS.

A.    Prerequisites:

    Knowledge of the regulatory requirements of part 145 and completion of FAA Course 21058, Certification and Surveillance of Part 145 Repair Stations.

    Successful completion of the Airworthiness Inspector Indoctrination course(s) or equivalent.

    Previous experience with certification or surveillance of part 145 repair stations.

Indicates new/changed information.

B.    Coordination. This task requires coordination between Maintenance and Avionics ASIs. Additionally, the Safety Standards office and IFO coordination may be required.

2-1331    REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References (current editions):

    Title 14 CFR Parts 43 and 145.

    Advisory Circular (AC) 187-1, Flight Standards Service Schedule of Charges Outside the United States.

Indicates new/changed information.

    FAA Order 8130.2, Airworthiness Certification of Aircraft.

    FAA Order 8130.21, Procedures for Completion and Use of the Authorized Release Certificate, FAA Form 8130-3, Airworthiness Approval Tag.

    Volume 2, Chapter 11, Sections 1 thru 6, and 13.

    Volume 10, Safety Assurance System Policy and Procedures.

    Volume 12, Chapter 14, Section 1, Policy.

    Volume 14, Chapter 1, Section 2, Flight Standards Service Compliance Action Decision Procedure.

    The applicable Maintenance Agreement Guidance (MAG).

B.    Forms:

    FAA Form 8000-4, Air Agency Certificate.

Indicates new/changed information.

    FAA Form 8000-4-1, Repair Station Operations Specifications.

    FAA Form 8130-3, Authorized Release Certificate, Airworthiness Approval Tag.

    FAA Form 8310-3, Application for Repair Station Certificate and/or Rating.

    FAA Form 8400-6, Preapplication Statement of Intent.

    MAG applicable forms.

Indicates new/changed information.

C.    Job Aids. For the Certification Job Aid and the Schedule of Events (SOE), see Volume 2, Chapter 11, Section 1, Figure 2-86, Five Phases of Certification and Requirements of the Gate System for Part 145; and Figure 2-87, Schedule of Events for Part 145 Repair Stations.

2-1332    INITIAL CERTIFICATION—PREAPPLICATION PHASE 1 AND FORMAL APPLICATION PHASE 2.

A.    General. This section provides the IFOs with additional requirements when they perform an initial certification of part 145 repair stations located outside the United States. Certificates for repair stations located outside the United States have a limited duration. Initial certification is limited to 12 months from the date the certificate is issued. Thereafter, the FAA will renew the certificate or rating for a 24-month period if the repair station has operated per the applicable requirements of part 145 within the preceding period.

B.    Perceived Need. Part 145, § 145.51(c)(1) requires that the applicant show the necessity for a part 145 Air Agency Certificate and rating(s). The applicant must have a current or future operational or economic need (a perceived need) for the maintenance, preventive maintenance, or alteration of aeronautical articles subject to FAA regulatory oversight. The applicant can express this perceived need by including a statement from an operator of a U.S.-registered aircraft; a foreign-registered aircraft operated under the provisions of 14 CFR part 121 or part 135; a company that maintains or alters articles to be installed on U.S.-registered aircraft, indicating that the repair station’s services are required; or documentation from a leasing company or supplier/distributor showing that the applicant’s services are necessary, provided the applicant can confirm in writing that the leasing company or supplier/distributor is doing business with operators of U.S.-registered aircraft.

C.    Fees. The applicant must show that the fee prescribed by 14 CFR part 187 has been paid. For fee collection for air agency actions, the IFO should follow the guidance in Volume 12, Chapter 13, Section 1, paragraph 12-689, Fee Collection. The certificate holder should deposit the fee per part 187, IFO procedures, AFS-001-000-W2, and AC 187-1. However, during the certification phase, the inspector will confirm that the appropriate FAA fee has been paid in full per part 187 and AC 187-1.

D.    Personnel Certification. The personnel certification requirements of 14 CFR part 65 do not apply to supervisors or personnel authorized to return an article for return to service in repair stations located outside the United States. However, they must ensure the personnel:

1)    Have been trained in or have 18 months practical experience with the methods, techniques, practices, aids, equipment, and tools used to perform the maintenance, preventive maintenance, or alterations; and
2)    Are thoroughly familiar with the applicable regulations and proficient in the use of the various inspection methods, techniques, practices, aids, equipment, and tools appropriate for the work being performed and approved or returned to service. The FAA reserves the right to interview the applicant’s supervisors, inspectors, and/or personnel responsible for final approval for return to service.

NOTE:  The FAA may accept the personnel certification requirements in the country where the repair station is located, provided the English language requirements are met.

E.    English Language Requirements for Technical Data. The FAA recognizes the national language of the country where the repair station is located. The repair station may convert technical data, such as operators’ instructions for continued airworthiness (ICA), manufacturers’ maintenance manuals, or type certificate holders’ (TCH) continuous airworthiness data, into the national language. The repair station may also convert internal documents, such as workcards, worksheets, and shop travelers.

NOTE:  The repair station must establish procedures in its Repair Station Manual (RSM) that ensure that its English language copies of technical data, and any internal documents developed from this technical data, are current and complete. The main base of the repair station should retain the English language copy of the technical data. The repair station must make the data available to the FAA upon request.

F.    National Certification. FAA policy requires the FAA to advise the country’s AA of FAA certification. The FAA need not obtain AA concurrence, but the FAA will take under consideration any safety information related to the applicant. Section 145.53(a) states, in part, “A person who meets the requirements…of this part is entitled to a repair station certificate.” The FAA will request a copy of the applicant’s Air Agency Certificate and limitations document. Some countries might not issue repair station certification, and in such instances, part 145 enables the FAA to issue a certificate.

G.    Geographic Authorization. A geographic authorization is an approval provided to an airframe‑rated facility located outside the United States to perform maintenance under contract for a U.S. air carrier or for an operator of U.S.-registered aircraft under 14 CFR part 129 at a location outside the country where the repair station is located. The FAA issues a geographic authorization (operations specification (OpSpec) B050) to respond to the maintenance needs of a U.S. air carrier, or of part 129 operators.

Indicates new/changed information.

NOTE:  The FAA normally does not issue this authorization during an initial certification.

2-1333    INITIAL CERTIFICATION—ADMINISTRATIVE PHASE 5.

A.    Processing and Payment of Fees.

1)    The IFO will notify the Approved Maintenance Organization (AMO), in writing, of the fee for processing the part 145 certificate. AC 187-1 establishes these fees. The AMO will send this fee in accordance with the IFO’s prescribed procedures.
2)    Refer to AC 187-1 for applicable fees.
3)    The IFO will issue a certificate and OpSpecs only after it receives payment of the prescribed fee. The IFO may grant additional time for the payment of fees.

B.    Prepare the Air Agency Certificate. When the applicant has met all regulatory requirements, the principal inspector (PI) will prepare the Air Agency Certificate in accordance with Volume 2, Chapter 11, Section 5. For repair stations located outside the United States, you will also include the following:

Indicates new/changed information.
1)    Insert the expiration date after the statement “This certificate unless canceled, suspended, or revoked, shall continue in effect.” The renewal of a repair station located outside the United States should be issued for an initial certification period of 12 months. Thereafter, the FAA may renew the certificate for a 24‑month period from the date of renewal (refer to § 145.55), unless coordinated through the International Field Management Branch (AFS-54).
2)    At the very bottom of the certificate, strike out the last line referring to “Any alteration of this certificate.”

C.    Certification Report. In addition to the items that compose the certification as contained in Volume 2, Chapter 11, Section 5, include the following:

1)    The document identifying the need or perceived need.
2)    Proof of fee paid for the certification.

2-1334    INITIAL CERTIFICATION—TASK OUTCOMES.

A.    Responsibilities for SAS Custom Data Collection Tool (C DCT) and Vitals Information Entries. The inspector will:

1)    Follow the certification process in Volume 10.
2)    Complete the appropriate SAS C DCT, as required.

B.    Complete the Task. Completion of the certification task will result in the following:

1)    Document in the Vitals Information tab the initial certification date.
2)    Issuance of the Air Agency Certificate and required OpSpecs authorizations.
3)    Notification to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) per Volume 2, Chapter 11, Section 13, when the FAA part 145 certification and Air Agency Certificate has been issued.
4)    Retain the original certification report in the IFO office file.
5)    Letter to the AA of the country where the repair station is located, advising it that the FAA certificate and OpSpecs have been issued. The letter should also request that the air agency advise the IFO anytime the AA takes certificate action or identifies serious concerns against that repair station.
6)    Letter to the applicant indicating the IFO denied the issuance of the certificate, if applicable.
7)    Letter to the applicant confirming termination of the certification process, if applicable.

2-1335    RENEWAL OF THE CERTIFICATE.

A.    Renewal Timeframe. A repair station located outside the United States must renew its certificate 12 months after its initial certification, and thereafter no more than 24 months from the date of its last renewal.

NOTE:  Although the regulation indicates a 24-month renewal period, inspectors must perform annual surveillance of repair stations, per current policy.

B.    Application Submission Timeframe. The repair station must submit a new application 30 days before the expiration date of its certificate.

C.    IFO. The IFO must track renewal dates to establish an effective yearly work program.

2-1336    RENEWAL—DESIGN ASSESSMENT PHASE 3.

A.    Documents. ASIs should ensure that all documents for the formal application package have been submitted and are complete. Verify the inclusion of:

1)    Completed FAA Form 8310-3.
2)    A document showing there is a continuing need for the repair station to maintain U.S.-registered aircraft or articles.
3)    A list of contractors, if changes have been made to the list since the repair station’s last renewal. A copy of those changes must be included in the package.
4)    The RSM/Quality Control Manual (QCM), if either of the manuals has been revised since the repair station’s last renewal. A copy of the revision must be provided with the application package.

B.    Application Package. Review the content of each submitted document for regulatory compliance. The documents to be reviewed include:

1)    The completed FAA Form 8310-3.
2)    A document showing the repair station meets the continuing need requirement of § 145.51(c)(1).
a)    Repair stations located outside the United States. must continue to show that their certificate is necessary to maintain U.S. aircraft or articles as required by § 145.51(c). The purpose for this requirement is to not burden the FAA’s resources in certificating and recertification of such repair stations if they are not going to be supporting U.S.-registered aircraft and products. Implicit is the concern over expending those FAA resources in surveillance of such repair stations. However, some flexibility is necessary in implementing this policy, and it must not be applied arbitrarily.
Indicates new/changed information.

NOTE:  The Assistant Chief Counsel for the Regulations Division (AGC-200) provided a legal interpretation of §§ 145.51(c) and 145.55(b) concerning the showing of need by a foreign repair station. The full text of the memorandum, dated December 9, 2008, is available at: https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/agc/practice_areas/regulations/interpretations/data/interps/2008/manager-sf-wp-03%20-%20(2008)%20legal%20interpretation.pdf.

b)    If the repair station cannot establish continuing need, the FAA will renew the repair station certificate based on the repair station’s previous continuing need statement. However, the FAA will advise the repair station in writing that if the repair station is still unable to show a continuing need at the time of its next renewal, the FAA may not renew the certificate.
c)    A renewal applicant does not have to submit an activity report for each article for which it is rated. A single document indicating that minor or no changes were made to its customer list will satisfy the need requirements. The need can be verified during the inspection phase.
3)    The repair station’s list of maintenance functions contracted to another entity, if changes have been made. Refer to § 145.217 and Volume 2, Chapter 11, Sections 1 and 5, for additional information.

C.    Review the RSM/QCM or Section. If revisions are made to these manuals, the revisions should be reviewed as they are submitted. In some cases, a repair station may elect to revise its manuals for its certificate renewal. Regardless of when they are submitted, the FAA must accept these revisions. The revision’s inclusion should not delay the renewal process. The FAA may elect to review the revisions and accept or reject them after the certificate renewal has been completed based on the old manuals. Acceptance of the revision must be accomplished per Volume 6, Chapter 9, Section 7.

NOTE:  Repair stations do not need to wait until the IFO accepts revisions to implement them. However, if the FAA finds a revision unacceptable, the repair station must have a procedure in place that describes how articles returned to service will be addressed.

D.    Document Any Deficiencies. Conduct a thorough and comprehensive review of all documents. If deficiencies are found in any document, return it to the applicant with a letter outlining the deficient areas. Inform the applicant that the certification process will not continue until all deficiencies are resolved or a corrective action plan (CAP) is agreed upon. The applicant must provide the FAA with a written response with an approximate date by which the applicant will correct the errors and resubmit the document. The inspector’s letter to the applicant must be as clear and complete as possible to avoid causing delays from documents being mailed back and forth without resolving issues.

E.    Review CAP. Continue with the renewal process if the repair station provides a CAP that satisfies the requirements of the application package.

1)    If the applicant fails to submit a CAP or correct the deficiencies within the specified time agreed to between them and the FAA, the FAA will terminate the application for renewal.
2)    If the FAA finds the written CAP acceptable, or if the applicant has corrected the deficiencies, it may continue renewing the repair station certificate. See subparagraph 2-1337D1).
3)    If a CAP exists from the previous year’s inspection/renewal, the PI must review that plan. During the demonstration and inspection phase of the renewal, the PI must verify that those deficiencies/findings have been corrected.

2-1337    RENEWAL—PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT PHASE 4.

A.    Renewal Procedures. When performing a certificate renewal inspection, follow the facility inspection procedures identified in Volume 6, Chapter 9, Section 20. Additionally, use the applicable System or Subsystem Performance Data Collection Tool (SP DCT).

B.    Line Station Authorization Surveillance. A repair station must conduct a quality control (QC) system audit to ensure compliance with its QC procedures. The ASI should review the audits of line stations to ensure the repair station has visited each of its line stations once per year. The QC audit should provide a report for each line station showing which station the inspector audited, the date of the audit, what the inspector audited, and findings and corrective action identified during the audit. Once a year, the ASI should perform a physical inspection of a minimum 10 percent sampling of line stations to confirm the effectiveness of the repair station’s QC procedures.

NOTE:  Line stations outside the geographic boundary of the country where the certificated facility is located will not receive a line station authorization. An authorization request for line stations outside these boundaries must follow the geographic authorization process. See Volume 2, Chapter 11, Section 8, paragraphs 2-1286 through 2-1292.

Indicates new/changed information.

C.    Geographic Authorization Surveillance. A geographic authorization may be issued to a repair station outside the United States to maintain U.S.-registered aircraft outside the country where the repair station certificate is held (see Volume 3, Chapter 18, Section 10).

Indicates new/changed information.
1)    A repair station QC system is required to audit its geographic authorization location annually to ensure compliance with the RSM and QC procedures. The ASI should review the audits to ensure compliance with the repair station’s accepted manuals.
2)    The ASI should coordinate surveillance of the geographic authorization with other IFOs and the air carrier CHDO to conduct risk-based sampling inspections, reduce the possibility of duplicate surveillance, and increase efficient use of resources.
3)    The inspector should coordinate surveillance of a geographic authorization with the U.S. air carrier certificate management office (CMO) to reduce the possibility of duplicate surveillance and increase the efficient use of resources.

D.    Findings/Deficiencies. Due to the distance, travel, expense, and short timeframe requirements associated with repair stations located outside the United States, the inspector should apply the following policy regarding deficiencies/findings noted during the document review and inspection phases:

1)    If the FAA discovers deficiencies in document review and inspection phase for renewal or after conducting an inspection (surveillance), the FAA may allow the applicant sufficient time after notification to correct the deficiencies or to submit a CAP, depending on the nature of the deficiencies.
2)    Once the applicant has submitted the CAP and prior to acceptance of the plan, the PI will review it and ensure it meets the following requirements:
a)    The timeframe for correcting the deficiencies/findings must be 90 days or less.
b)    The correction plan must adequately address the deficiencies/findings.
c)    The plan must require the applicant to advise the PI in writing when the deficiencies/findings have been corrected.
d)    The plan must also contain a procedure for the repair station to validate the process/procedure used to correct the deficiencies/findings. This validation should take place within 90 days or less after the correction was implemented.
3)    If the FAA finds the written CAP acceptable, it may renew the repair station certificate.
4)    If the part 145 repair station certificate expires either during the time between inspections or due to unusual circumstances, the FAA may need to issue a short-term certificate of up to 90 days if the applicant demonstrates an ability and willingness to correct the noted deficiencies. The FAA may not extend the certificate past the 24-month period.
5)    Depending on the nature of the deficiencies, the FAA may amend the repair station’s ratings. In any of the above situations, after the FAA is satisfied with all corrective action, it will reissue the certificate using the original renewal date. The repair station should not gain renewal time or an advantage by having additional time allowed for the correction of deficiencies.

2-1338    RENEWAL—ADMINISTRATIVE PHASE 5.

A.    Fees for Processing.

1)    The IFO will notify the AMO, in writing, of the fee for processing the part 145 certificate. AC 187-1 establishes these fees. The AMO will send this fee in accordance with the IFO’s prescribed procedures. The IFO should also follow Volume 12, Chapter 13, Section 1.
2)    Verify that the fees have been paid in full. Deposit the fee per part 187 and IFO procedures. It is permissible to issue a renewal certificate pending receipt of the fee. Due to normal corporate accounting practices, it may take a few weeks before the fee is transmitted.

NOTE:  All activities associated with surveillance related to a repair station certificate are chargeable as FAA fees per part 187. Calculate all fees per AC 187-1.

a)    If the IFO does not receive the fee within a reasonable period of time, it should advise the repair station in writing that certificate action may be required if the fee is not transmitted as soon as possible.
b)    The IFO should establish office policy regarding timeframes and procedures for fee payments. The IFO should be familiar with local mail and electronic transaction timeframes.

B.    Prepare the Air Agency Certificate. When the applicant has met all regulatory requirements, the PI will prepare the Air Agency Certificate in accordance with Volume 2, Chapter 11, Section 5. For repair stations located outside the United States you will also include the following:

1)    Insert the expiration date after the statement “This certificate unless canceled, suspended, or revoked, shall continue in effect.” The renewal of a repair station located outside the United States should be issued for an initial certification period of 12 months. Thereafter, the FAA will renew the certificate for a 24‑month period from the date of renewal (refer to § 145.55) unless coordinated through AFS-54.
2)    At the very bottom of the certificate strike out the last line referring to “Any alteration of this certificate.”
3)    The IFO will issue a certificate and OpSpecs only after it receives payment of the prescribed fee. The IFO may grant additional time for the payment of fees.

C.    Certification Report. In addition to the items that compose the certification as contained in Volume 2, Chapter 11, Section 5, include the following:

1)    A document identifying the need or perceived need.
2)    The proof of fee paid for the certification.

2-1339    RENEWAL—TASK OUTCOMES.

A.    Responsibilities for SAS C DCT and Vitals Information Entries. The inspector will:

1)    Complete the appropriate SAS C DCT as required.
2)    Update the SAS Configuration Module 1 Vitals Information.
3)    Document in the Vitals Information the renewal inspection date.

B.    Complete the Task. Completion of the certification task will result in the following:

1)    Issuance of an Air Agency Certificate and OpSpecs.
2)    Send a letter to:
a)    The AA of the country where the repair station is located, advising it that the FAA certificate and OpSpecs have been issued; the letter should also request that the AA advise the IFO anytime they take certificate action or identify serious concerns against that repair station; or
b)    The applicant, indicating the IFO denied the issuance of the certificate, as applicable; or
c)    The applicant, confirming termination of the certification process, as applicable.
3)    Retain the original certification report in the IFO.

2-1340    RENEWAL—FUTURE ACTIVITIES. The IFO must ensure an orderly transition from the certification process to certificate management. The ASI should perform followup inspections and surveillance inspections, as required.

2-1341    AMENDMENT TO OR TRANSFER OF CERTIFICATE.

A.    New Application. Section 145.57 requires that a repair station submit a new application in the following situations:

1)    The holder of a repair station certificate must apply for a change to its certificate if it changes the location of the repair station, or requests adding or amending a rating. The repair station certificate holder must notify the FAA in advance and the FAA may prescribe conditions that the repair station must follow when moving to a new address or location.
2)    If the holder of the repair station certificate sells or transfers its assets, the new owner must apply for an amended certificate in accordance with § 145.51. On occasion, repair station ownership changes without changing the facilities and personnel. An example of this type of change would be a stock transfer or a monetary takeover that does not change or affect the location, tools, equipment, or management personnel.

NOTE:  ASIs should contact their regional general counsel office when asked questions concerning whether limited liability corporations or changes in stockholder ownership constitute a transfer of repair station assets.

3)    If the repair station and/or its contractors or subcontractors are performing a job function concerning transportation of hazardous materials (hazmat), the repair station must train its employees to the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) hazmat standards. The repair station must also provide the FAA with a letter certifying that the appropriate employees have been trained to the ICAO standard, as described in Volume 2, Chapter 11, Section 1, subparagraph 2-1190E, Hazmat, unless the letter is already in the repair station certification file.

B.    Certificate Number. The inspector should recommend a new certificate number, due to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and liability issues. ASIs should inform prospective owners that they might be held liable for work performed under previous management. To retain the old number, new owners must stipulate in writing that they clearly understand the potential for release of information under the FOIA when retaining the old certificate number.

2-1342    AMENDMENT—APPLICATION—ADDING AN ADDITIONAL RATING. The ASI should follow the initial certification procedures in Volume 2, Chapter 11, Section 7.

A.    Preapplication Statement of Intent (PASI). A PASI is not required for a change or amendment to a certificate.

1)    An application meeting is not required for amending a Repair Station Certificate.
2)    The repair station must submit a completed application (FAA Form 8310-3).
3)    The repair station must submit a revised letter of compliance that covers the additional ratings.

B.    Change to Facility or Address Change.

1)    The repair station must submit a new application when a change to the facility affects the repair station certificate. Examples of facility changes include adding additional space or reducing the size of the facility.
2)    The repair station must submit a new application prior to moving to a new facility or changing its address. The FAA will review the application and may authorize continued work while the applicant moves to another facility.

C.    Change in Ownership. When a repair station sells or transfers ownership of its organization, the new owner must submit a new application.

1)    If the sale or transfer of ownership, normally called a financial takeover, does not affect the employees, facilities, equipment, or daily operation of the repair station, only a new application is required.
Indicates new/changed information.
2)    An applicant must submit a new application and manuals for an ownership change that affects the repair station’s daily operation, such as a management change or a facility or equipment change. The application process is the same as for a new application. (See paragraphs 2-1332 through 2-1334, for initial certification procedures.) However, applicants may continue to operate under the existing certificate while the FAA processes the new certification package, unless the ASI and the appropriate Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) determine that a safety concern prohibits continued operation.

2-1343    AMENDMENT—GEOGRAPHIC AUTHORIZATION.

A.    Criteria for Issuing Geographic Authorization. Geographic authorization is different from work away from the station or line station maintenance authorization. The repair station must fulfill the criteria listed below. The ASI should ensure that:

Indicates new/changed information.
1)    The repair station has an airframe rating for the make/model/series of the complete aircraft, such as a Boeing 777-300.
2)    The make/model/series aircraft is operating into the requested location. The aircraft being operated into the requested location need not be the aircraft with a part 129 authorization.
3)    The FAA will not issue a geographic authorization at a location where an appropriately rated repair station already exists, unless the U.S. operator shows why the additional geographic authorization is necessary. For example, legitimate reasons for issuing the rating may be that locally rated repair stations cannot meet operator schedules or cannot deal with additional workload.
4)    Each geographic authorization is included in the repair station’s internal self-evaluation program. The program must include an annual evaluation and report of each geographic authorization location. This report must be made available to the FAA on request.

NOTE:  Geographic authorization may not be issued to a location within the United States and its territories. The FAA has determined that ample certificated repair stations (CRS) are located within the United States to provide service. The intent of a geographic authorization is to give U.S. operators and foreign operators holding a part 129, § 129.14 authorization the ability to meet the requirements of their maintenance programs in locations where appropriately rated FAA‑certificated repair stations are not available.

B.    Geographic Authorization Procedures. The IFO will:

1)    Receive notice of the air carrier’s need. The process starts when the air carrier notifies its CHDO that it needs the services of a repair station at a location where a geographic authorization is required for the repair station.

NOTE:  An operator under § 129.14 will use the IFO that issued the § 129.14 authorizations.

2)    Receive a letter from the repair station requesting geographic authorization. The letter should explain how the repair station will meet the criteria in subparagraph 2-1343A, and include a copy of the RSM procedures section addressing geographic authorizations and responsibilities.
3)    When eligibility for geographic authorization is established, coordinate closely with the air carrier CHDO to ensure that duplicate efforts do not occur.

NOTE:  Certification and surveillance of geographic authorization is the responsibility of the IFO. However, this does not relieve the CHDO of its responsibilities for surveillance of the air carrier’s adherence to part 121, § 121.369. The CHDO’s coordination with IFOs outside the United States is an efficient method of surveillance of air carrier operations in areas normally requiring the CHDO to use resources better used in other areas. Geographic authorization is limited to line-maintenance-type operations.

Indicates new/changed information.
4)    Receive a copy of the contract from the air carrier’s CHDO. Communicate and discuss with the air carrier’s CHDO about the request, type of aircraft, location, and air carrier’s procedures; and ensure the CHDO does not have any technical objections to the request for geographic authorization at this location.
5)    Provide the CHDO with a copy of the repair station’s commitment to meet subparagraph 2-1343A criteria.
6)    Receive a copy of the repair station’s self-evaluation report, if applicable. If this is an initial or an added geographic authorization location, the repair station must give the FAA a copy of its self-evaluation report, in which it expresses its ability to function at the requested location.
7)    Review the self-evaluation report to ensure that the repair station has trained personnel, tooling, equipment, manuals, and inspection processes to support the requested geographic authorization.
Indicates new/changed information.
8)    Review the training documentation from the air carrier indicating all required training for the repair station’s personnel is complete. (If not complete, request an estimated time of completion). The air carrier must: authorize the repair station and its employees to perform maintenance, accept the repair station training, deliver air carrier training, or any other qualifications that must be completed.
9)    Revise repair station OpSpec B050 to include the initial or new geographic authorization location. The OpSpec must list each authorization by location address, make, and model of aircraft. Additionally, list the air carrier customer name and the section of its appropriate air carrier manual by which maintenance will be performed.
Indicates new/changed information.
10)    On an initial geographic authorization, revise the repair station certificate to list the geographic authorization directly below the airframe rating.
Indicates new/changed information.
11)    Forward the revised certificate and OpSpecs to the repair station and send a copy to the CHDO.

NOTE:  Do not delay sending a copy of the revised certificate and OpSpecs to the repair station. Delays may adversely affect air carriers meeting their operational schedules.

C.    Surveillance Requirement for Geographic Authorization.

Indicates new/changed information.
1)    It is not necessary for the IFO or the CHDO to conduct onsite surveillance for a request to add a new location if the repair station provided a self-evaluation report. A repair station may add an additional location without further showing.
Indicates new/changed information.
2)    When conducting repair station certificate renewal or off-year surveillance, the ASI must review the repair station’s geographic authorization self-evaluation reports to ensure that the FAA has evaluated the report for each location within the previous year.
3)    The IFO must establish an office policy requiring inspectors performing surveillance in a city or country to visit the locations where a repair station has a geographic authorization, provided the visit does not require additional travel within the country or create expenditure of added travel resources. This means the inspector must travel to the locations using ground transportation and must complete the visit within their normal workday, unless otherwise authorized by their supervisor.
4)    Forward an explanation of the fees to the repair station’s ASI for inclusion in the repair station certificate’s renewal cost, which include all times and costs associated with surveillance of a geographic authorization.
5)    A CHDO may not charge the repair station for any surveillance of geographic authorization it performs as part of its air carrier surveillance.
6)    Close coordination must occur between the CHDO, the IFO where the geographic authorization is located, and the certificate holder’s IFO to reduce the possibility of multiple surveillance activities. All findings associated with a geographic authorization must be coordinated between offices involved with the geographic location.
7)    The IFO that retains the repair station certificate is also responsible for compliance and/or enforcement activity. It must communicate findings with the air carrier CHDO. Any additional compliance and/or enforcement action relating to the air carrier is the responsibility of the air carrier CHDO.

2-1344    AMENDMENT—APPLICATION PHASE. Repair stations adding ratings or changes to a certificate will use the same process as renewal of a certificate discussed in paragraphs 2-1335 through 2-1339, but must also include:

    A copy of FAA Form 8310-3, including a list of functions that the applicant intends to contract to another facility;

    A revised letter of compliance that addresses the items changed, such as added rating or address change;

    A document showing the need for the certificate, as described in subparagraph 2-1332B; and

    If applicable, a revised letter certifying employees have been trained to ICAO hazmat standards, as described in Volume 2, Chapter 11, Section 1, subparagraph 2-1190E.

2-1345    AMENDMENT—DESIGN ASSESSMENT PHASE. Follow the same renewal process as indicated in paragraphs 2-1336 through 2-1339. The ASI should review any manual revision required by the application for an added rating or change to the certificate for compliance with part 145. Repair stations should process manual revisions and documentation findings as discussed in paragraph 2-1332.

2-1346    AMENDMENT—PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT PHASE. This phase should follow the same requirements as indicated in paragraphs 2-1332 through 2-1334, as appropriate to the requested change to the repair station certificate and OpSpecs.

2-1347    AMENDMENT—ADMINISTRATIVE PHASE. Amendments to a repair station certificate and OpSpecs must be accomplished as indicated in this section and must reflect the applicant’s requested change.

2-1348    AMENDMENT—TASK OUTCOMES. This should follow the same requirements as indicated in paragraphs 2-1332 through 2-1334, as appropriate.

2-1349    AMENDMENT—FUTURE ACTIVITIES. The IFO must ensure that an orderly transition occurs from the certification process to continued oversight surveillance. Perform followup inspection and surveillance inspections, as required by the SAS oversight process.

RESERVED. Paragraphs 2-1350 through 2-1354.