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8900.1 CHG 229

VOLUME 3  GENERAL TECHNICAL ADMINISTRATION

CHAPTER 6  ISSUE A CERTIFICATE OF WAIVER OR AUTHORIZATION FOR AN AVIATION EVENT

Section 2  Requirements for Air Race Class Accreditation and Letters of Authorization (LOA) for Air Race Organizations Prior to Issuance of a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization for an Air Race Event

3-163    PROGRAM TRACKING AND REPORTING SUBSYSTEM (PTRS) ACTIVITY CODES. Issue a Certificate of Waiver. Enter “1230” in the “Activity Code” box, and in the “National Use” box enter “AR” for an air race.

3-164    OBJECTIVE. Accredit air race class(es), associated with an air race organization, granting authority to issue air race pilot certificates. Additionally, authorize associated organization to submit an application for issuance of a Federal AvAdministration (FAA) Form 7711-1, Certificate of Waiver or Authorization for an air race event (and be the responsible person) after a successful evaluation of its practices. This task will result in either the successful completion of accreditation for air race class(es) and issuance of a letter of authorization (LOA) for the air race organization or an unsuccessful completion and denial of an application.

NOTE:  There are two types of air races, closed-course and cross-country; both require the issuance of a waiver for an aviation event. If the air race applicant plans to conduct cross-country air races, no further action is required with this task.

NOTE:  Cross-country air races are normally proficiency type races and require a waiver typically for altitude and speed at checkpoints along the route. Refer to the guidance outlined in Volume 3, Chapter 6, Section 1, Issue a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization for an Aviation Event, and this section.

3-165    GENERAL.

A.    Overview. The purpose of this section is to provide a means by which prospective air race organization applicants become accredited in order to conduct business in a manner which complies with all applicable regulations and FAA directives. The process is designed to preclude the accreditation of applicants who are unwilling or unable to comply with the regulations or to conform to safe operating practices. Noncompetitive demonstration races are to be handled like competitive events. The structure and existence of a credible air racing organization provides an internal level of safety that would not otherwise exist.

B.    Guidance for the Process. This section delineates the accreditation process in detail and standardizes the process. It will result in the applicant’s compliance with applicable regulations and FAA directives. The applicant will not be accredited until it demonstrates to the Accreditation Team representing the General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS-800) that it is capable of complying with this order and safe operating practices.

C.    Introduction. Since closed-course air races are an aviation event, this section should be used in addition to Volume 3, Chapter 6, Section 1. Closed-course air races can be held in conjunction with other aviation events, such as an air show, requiring compliance with those applicable sections.

D.    The Accreditation Process. The accreditation process is a series of steps outlined in five phases:

·    Preapplication.

·    Formal Application.

·    Document Compliance.

·    Demonstration and Inspection.

·    Accreditation.

E.    Complexity. Complexity is based on the applicant’s basic understanding of what is required for accreditation and the proposed operation. Because of the variety in proposed operations and differences in applicant knowledge, the process must be thorough enough and flexible enough to apply to all possibilities.

3-166    PHASE ONE—PREAPPLICATION. Initial inquires about accreditation may come from individuals or organizations in the form of informal meetings with AFS-800, National Aviation Events Specialist (NAES). Informal meetings may include teleconference or meeting in person.

A.    Initial Inquiry. During the initial contact, the applicant will usually have specific questions about the accreditation requirements. Field offices, if contacted first, should direct applicants to AFS-800, NAES. Application for any of the following requires submission of Letter of Intent and Request for Accreditation (see Figure 3-148). Application must be made at least 90 days prior to closed-course air race event.

·    Initial accreditation.

·    Renewal.

·    Reinstatement for cancellation, suspension, or revocation.

·    Change to course location and course review or course design.

·    Addition of a racing class.

·    Change of management personnel (Board of Directors).

1)    The NAES should explain to the applicant all appropriate requirements and discuss pertinent parts of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR), FAA Order 8900.1, and advisory circulars (AC). The applicant will be told how to obtain current copies of these documents. Applicant should review them carefully before submitting a Letter of Intent and Request for Accreditation (see Figure 3-148).
2)    At this point, it should be determined if the applicant is sufficiently aware of the accreditation process. The experience level of the organization members should be gauged in order to determine the depth of assistance needed from AFS-800 Accreditation Team.
3)    Based on the complexity and uniqueness of air race operations, the applicant must provide a Letter of Intent for Accreditation to begin the review. The letter of intent must include, at a minimum, a brief narrative of proposed operation with pictorial diagram(s) as necessary (see Figure 3-148). As a minimum, the letter of intent must include:

·    Air race organization name.

·    Street Address (including city, state, ZIP code, and phone number).

·    Date.

·    Notification of intent to become an accredited air race class or authorized organization in accordance with this section.

·    Date of proposed operations and location of venue (only one location required) or proposed locations (if known).

·    Date of proposed Accreditation Team validation.

·    Location of headquarters (HQ) (address).

·    Proposed number and type of aircraft in class and proposed number of pilots in each class.

·    Name and phone number of person assigned to manage air race operations (attach résumé).

·    Proposed Schedule of Events (SOE) for accreditation.

·    Official Management Team (Board of Directors) (attach résumé).

·    The applicant may present the letter of intent and request for accreditation by mail, in person or electronically.

B.    Accreditation Team Assignment. The AFS-800 division manager will assign sufficient subject matter experts (SME) to assist the NAES with the accreditation process (Accreditation Team). Recommendations of SME will come from the NAES. Team members must strive at all times to maintain a professional and responsive relationship with the applicant. Upon convening, the Accreditation Team handles all matters pertaining to the applicant.

C.    Duties and Responsibilities of the NAES.

1)    Coordinates accreditation matters with the applicant and ensures that the AFS-800 division manager is kept fully informed of the project’s current status.
2)    Serves as the primary point of contact with the applicant.
3)    Ensures each accreditation task is completed in an acceptable and timely manner, and that all tasks are thoroughly coordinated with each team member.
4)    Schedules and conducts preapplication and formal application meeting with the applicant.
5)    Notifies the AFS-800 division manager of any information that may significantly impact or delay accreditation or that may attract media or political interest. Periodic meetings will ensure everyone concerned is kept informed of the status of accreditation. If the NAES cannot attend a scheduled meeting, the NAES appoints a team member to fill in.
6)    Chairs the Accreditation Team on behalf of AFS-800.

D.    Accreditation Team. The Accreditation Team may consist of the following members (as a minimum):

1)    Regional Aviation Events Specialist.
2)    Regional Airworthiness inspector.
3)    Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) inspector-in-charge (IIC).
4)    FSDO aviation safety inspector (ASI)—Airworthiness.
5)    General Aviation (GA) ASI SME for air race—Operations.
6)    GA ASI SME for air race—Airworthiness.

E.    Preapplication Meeting. After its assignment to the project, the Accreditation Team will meet the applicant’s management team (Board of Directors). The NAES shall contact the applicant to arrange the meeting as soon as practicable.

NOTE:  The Board of Directors is a body of elected or appointed members who jointly oversee the activities of a company or organizations. A board’s activities are determined by the powers, duties, and responsibilities delegated to it or conferred on it by an authority outside itself (members). These matters are typically detailed in the organization’s bylaws.

F.    Guidelines of Meeting. The meeting should include, but not be limited to, the following:

1)    A review of the letter of intent requesting AFS-800 accreditation.
2)    Verify all information submitted is accurate and correct any changes that have occurred since initial inquiry.
3)    A review of applicable 14 CFR parts, ACs, and Order 8900.1.
4)    A review and discussion of the accreditation process, and precisely what is required to ensure that the applicant understands what is expected.
5)    An outline of the accreditation timeline that is practical and feasible. The applicant should understand that the timeline is not a tool by which the FAA is constrained. It is the applicant’s responsibility to satisfactorily accomplish all accreditation requirements.
6)    Air Race Accreditation Job Aid and Schedule of Events (see Figure 3-149) that will be given to the applicant.
7)    An introduction of which team members will conduct which aspects of the accreditation.

G.    Conclusion of the Preapplication Phase. The Preapplication Phase ends when the Accreditation Team is satisfied that the applicant is prepared to proceed with formal application. If the applicant is not ready, the NAES should advise the applicant of the discrepancies and the team should work with the applicant to arrive at solutions or terminate the accreditation process.

3-167    PHASE TWO—FORMAL APPLICATION. An applicant’s presentation of a package and the Accreditation Team’s review of it are considered the Formal Application Phase.

A.    Receipt of Formal Accreditation Package. Upon receipt of the formal accreditation package, the applicant will be informed of the time needed for the Accreditation Team to review, which is a minimum of 90 days. Discussions with the applicant of its acceptability should be avoided at this time to give appropriate feedback to applicant once review is complete. Further discussions at this point would not be productive until Accreditation Team has reviewed the formal package. The applicant should be advised that the Accreditation Team leader (NAES) will contact them within 30 working-days concerning the package’s acceptability and to arrange for a formal accreditation meeting. A formal meeting is arranged only if the team determines there is a need for the meeting.

B.    Accreditation Package Initial Review. Upon receipt of a formal application package, the Accreditation Team must initially review it and make a determination of its acceptability. The package will include as a minimum:

1)    Copies of the Letter of Intent for Accreditation.
2)    List of management officials or Board of Directors indicating who is assigned and responsible for:

·    President/Chief Executive Officer (CEO).

·    Safety Chairman.

·    Chief Instructor.

·    Operations Chairman.

·    Maintenance Chairman.

3)    Management officials (Board of Directors) qualification résumés.
4)    Application for a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (See FAA Order 8900.1 Volume 3, Chapter 6, Section 1) for proposed air race using FAA Form 7711-2, Application for a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (if known).
5)    Documentation that the applicant has or can obtain use of aircraft and appropriate facilities. Documentation includes, but is not limited to, a copy of registration, airworthiness certificates, etc.
6)    An operations manual that contains, but is not limited to:

·    Pilot training program including qualification standards, curriculums, currency, and examination procedures.

·    Safety operating rules and procedures.

·    Aircraft qualification standards.

·    Race format and description.

7)    All air racecourses proposed.
8)    A proposed SOE.

C.    Purpose of SOE. Due to the complexity of various closed-course pylon air race programs (e.g ., Reno type, Red Bull type, or hybrids); the accreditation process must be thoroughly reviewed with the applicant presenting a SOE to the FAA. The SOE should be established in “good faith” with the Accreditation Team considering the feasibility with respect to logic of sequence, timeliness of events, completeness of events, and inspector availability. A sample SOE can be found in Figure 3-149, Air Race Accreditation Job Aid and Schedule of Events.

1)    Many of the activities or events listed in the schedule must occur before other activities or events.
2)    The SOE must provide realistically sufficient time for the certification team to review the applicant’s various documents, manuals and proposals.
3)    The number of and kinds of submission made by the applicant for valuation and acceptance may vary according to the complexity of the proposed operation.
4)    Meeting the SOE is dependent upon availability of qualified FAA Accreditation Team members and their allotted travel budget.

D.    Management Personnel.

1)    Each air race organization must have sufficient qualified management and technical personnel to ensure the safety of its operations. As a minimum the air race organization must have qualified personnel serving in the following or equivalent positions:
a)    Safety Chairman.
b)    Chief Instructor.
c)    Operations Chairman.
d)    Maintenance Chairman.
2)    The individuals who serve in the positions required or approved under subparagraph 1), above, and anyone in a position to exercise control over the air race operations must:
a)    Be qualified through training, experience, and expertise.
b)    To the extent of their responsibilities, have a full understanding of the following material with respect to air racing:

·    Aviation safety standards and safe operating practices;

·    Title 14 CFR part 91;

·    The air race organization operations manual; and

·    All appropriate maintenance and airworthiness requirements of 14 CFR parts 1, 21, 23, 25, 43, 45, 47, 65, and 91.

c)    Discharge their duties to meet applicable legal requirements and to maintain safe operations.
3)    Each air race organization must:
a)    State in the operations manual the duties, responsibilities, and authority of personnel required or approved under subparagraph 3-167D1), respectively;
b)    List in the manual the names and business addresses of the individuals assigned to those positions;
c)    Address event management in accordance with Volume 3, Chapter 6, Section 1, subparagraph 3‑144B1); and
d)    Notify the NAES via a typed letter or electronic message within 10 business-days of any change in personnel or any vacancy in any position listed. A phone call or voice mail is not a sufficient way to meet this requirement.

E.    Formal Application Meeting. If the Accreditation Team determines the need for a formal application meeting, all members of the Accreditation Team should be available. During the meeting the Accreditation Team and the applicant review the application package and resolve any discrepancies.

F.    Resolving Discrepancies.

1)    Following the formal application meeting, if mutual agreements cannot be reached on any discrepancies, the team should terminate the meeting and inform the applicant (within 5 business-days) that the accreditation package is not acceptable. The package must then be returned via mail (returned receipt) to the applicant with a letter explaining the reasons for the rejection.
2)    When agreement has been reached on corrective action for deficiencies, the team will conclude the formal application meeting and encourage the applicant to present questions concerning the certification.

G.    Application Rejection. Rejection of an accreditation is a sensitive issue since the applicant may have already expended funds and resources. It is important for the team to document thoroughly the reasons for the rejection. The reasons should clearly indicate that to proceed with the accreditation process would not be productive unless the applicant is willing to make the team’s suggested corrections. Reasons for rejection might include lack of agreement on appropriate courses of action or evidence that the applicant does not understand regulatory requirements and the certification process. In the event of rejection, all documents submitted are returned to the applicant with a letter of rejection.

H.    Conclusion of the Formal Application Phase. When the application is acceptable, the accreditation process continues with an in-depth examination of the package during the document compliance phase. In some cases, telephone confirmation to the applicant is sufficient; however, written confirmation, via email is recommended. A letter accepting an application is necessary. Acceptance of the application does not constitute acceptance of any attached documents. Attachments will be reviewed, and the applicant will be expected to take corrective action, if required. Acceptance of each attachment should be indicated separately. If the Accreditation Team accepts the package, the Formal Application Phase ends, and the Document Compliance Phase begins.

3-168    PHASE THREE—DOCUMENT COMPLIANCE. The document compliance phase is that part of the accreditation process where the applicant’s manual(s) and other documents are reviewed and either accepted or rejected. The Accreditation Team conducts this phase offsite at their respective FAA offices.

A.    Acceptance of Documents. During the Document Compliance Phase of the accreditation process, applicant documents are reviewed for acceptance. After initial accreditation, revisions or amendments to these documents may also be submitted for acceptance.

1)    Documents submitted for acceptance should relate to areas which are safety related or in which the FAA has a significant interest.
2)    Some documents submitted for acceptance may require coordination with other organizations within the FAA.
3)    The operations manual may require acceptance by operations, maintenance, and avionics. NAES ensures that all documents are accepted before accreditation.
4)    It may be necessary to accept a document in segments or indicate initial acceptance pending other required events. An initial acceptance should not continue for an extended period of time. The NAES should establish a plan to evaluate deficiencies and document reasons for not granting final acceptance.
5)    Documents submitted for acceptance by an applicant will be confirmed as being acceptable in the form of a letter from the NAES when all requirements have been met.

B.    Revisions or Amendments. When an accepted document is revised or amended, only that portion affected by the proposed change needs to be evaluated, provided there is no effect on other portions or other documents.

C.    Required Documents. Review of the applicant’s submissions should be accomplished by simultaneous reference to 14 CFR, ACs, the appropriate manual(s), or documents. The following are examples of typical submissions from applicants during the document compliance phase. This list is not all-inclusive.

1)    Management résumés.
2)    Operation manual.
3)    General Maintenance Manual (GMM) (as applicable).
4)    Aircraft qualification.
5)    Minimum pilot qualifications and experience.
6)    Pilot qualification (air race card) training program.
7)    Air race security plan.
8)    Safety operating rules and procedures which include Safety Management Systems (SMS) and/or risk management practices.
9)    All air racecourses proposed.
10)    Airport analysts and feasibility/airport requirements.
11)    Race format and description.
12)    Race control procedures.
13)    On-site surveillance plan for validation.
14)    Emergency response plan in accordance with Volume 3, Chapter 6, Section 1, subparagraphs 3-143A18) and H) and 3-144A1), B1), C12).
15)    Event management plan, in accordance with Volume 3, Chapter 6, Section 1, subparagraph 3-144B1).

D.    Document Deficiencies. If the team’s review reveals deficiencies in the applicant’s submitted documents, the Accreditation Team should negotiate resolution of the deficiencies. The team should be ready to offer suggestions on how to improve the product, but avoid “writing” the applicant’s manual. The Accreditation Team should remember that it is the applicant’s responsibility to develop manuals and procedures that ensure safe operating practices and compliance with the rules.

E.    Unacceptable Documents. If any of the documents are unacceptable, they are returned to the applicant. The team sends the applicant a letter of rejection stating the reasons for rejection and recommendations for obtaining acceptance.

F.    Participants Airman Profile. The team obtains a profile of participants (airmen) using the Enforcement Information System (EIS) and the Accident/Incident Data System (AIDS).

G.    Management Team (Board Member) Profile. Organizations may be disqualified from accreditation for any of the following reasons:

1)    Within the past 7 years, a board member of the applicant organization has:
a)    Been convicted of a violation of any local, State, or Federal law pertaining to drugs or alcohol.
b)    Been convicted of any misdemeanor or felony offenses (civilian or military).
c)    Been imprisoned, been on probation or is on parole (including civilian or military, felonies, firearms or explosive violations, misdemeanors, and all other offenses).
d)    Been discharged from the military with anything other than “Honorable.”
e)    Had an Airman Certificate (other than medical), rating or authorization (or foreign equivalent) suspended or revoked, or paid a civil penalty as a result of a violation that was not advertent or an indication of a lack of qualification.
2)    If the FAA becomes aware of a board member’s possible disqualification, the NAES will notify the air race organization of the matter. If the allegation is valid, the air race organization will be given 10 days to replace the individual. If the air race organization does not replace the board member, than the accreditation shall be suspended pending the replacement.

H.    Completing the Document Compliance Phase. When required documents are accepted, the Document Compliance Phase is completed. The accreditation process continues in the Demonstration and Inspection Phase. The Document Compliance Phase and the Demonstration and Inspection Phase may overlap.

3-169    PHASE FOUR—DEMONSTRATION AND INSPECTION. In the Demonstration and Inspection Phase, the Accreditation Team validates that the air race organization is following the policies, procedures, and practices outlined in the approved documents of Phase Three. For example, the team observes the applicant’s facilities, aircraft and equipment, pilot training, air racecourse, maintenance practices, pilot records, flight operations, etc. Emphasis in this phase is on compliance with regulations and safe operating practices.

NOTE:  For the purpose of completing this phase of accreditation, FAA Form 7711-1 may be issued by the jurisdictional FSDO for “purpose of qualifying pilots and accreditation demonstration,” after Phase Three is satisfactorily complete.

A.    Regulatory Compliance. During the evaluation the team shall determine the applicant’s ability to comply with applicable regulations and safe operating practices as delineated in the Operations Manual.

B.    Determination of the Acceptability. Throughout the demonstration and inspection phase, the team ensures that all aspects of the applicant’s required demonstrations are observed and that a determination of acceptability or unacceptability of each is made.

C.    Handling Deficiencies. If the applicant’s activities or other items are deficient, appropriate corrective action must be taken. If the deficiencies cannot be corrected, the team should advise the applicant that it is impractical to continue the accreditation process.

D.    Guidance. Additional guidance for this phase can be found in:

·     Volume 6, Chapter 11, Section 10, Surveillance of an Aviation Event; and

·     Volume 6, Chapter 11, Section 11, Monitor an Air Show/Air Race for Airworthiness Inspectors.

E.    Unsatisfactory Demonstration. If a demonstration of compliance is unsatisfactory, the Accreditation Team must discuss with the applicant how to correct the problem. Reinspection should be scheduled as necessary. The team may follow up with a letter indicating the nature of the failure and its corrective action. Deficiencies must be corrected before the process can continue.

F.    Satisfactory Demonstrations. If the applicant’s demonstrations are satisfactory, the Accreditation Team issues appropriate documentation.

G.    Conclusion of the Demonstration and Inspection Phase. When all demonstrations are satisfactorily completed, the Demonstration and Inspection Phase is ended, and the applicant is ready for issuance of the Accreditation Letter.

3-170    PHASE FIVE—ACCREDITATION. The NAES is responsible for ensuring the Accreditation Letter is issued to the applicant.

A.    Preparation of Letter. The Accreditation Letter is prepared for AFS-800 signature (see Figure 3-150, Sample Accreditation Letter for a Race Class or Air Race Organization with One Air Race Class) and may be issued up to, but may not exceed, 24 calendar-months, unless canceled, suspended, superseded, or revoked. The newly accredited Air Race Program cannot conduct any operations until the letter is issued. The letter maybe issued via electronic means, such as email, as long as the paper original is mailed to the address specified.

1)    Initial issuance of Accreditation Letter may be issued for 12 calendar-months, when deemed necessary.
2)    The initial race location should be identified in letter if approved, changed, or new location will require a revised letter documenting Accreditation Team approval of course design and location. The expiration date will remain the same.

B.    Accreditation File. The Accreditation Team assembles a file (maintained by the NAES) which consists of the following:

·    A copy of the letter requesting AFS-800 accreditation and statement of intent.

·    A copy of the completed accreditation job aid.

·    Copies of the Application for a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (FAA Form 7711-2) for proposed air race locations with site surveys and current area photo within 90 days.

·    List of aircraft and appropriate facilities including, but not limited to, registration, airworthiness certificates, etc.

·    A copy of any manuals.

·    A copy of the Accreditation Letter.

·    A copy of air racecourses.

·    A summary of any difficulties encountered during any phase of the accreditation process.

·    Recommendations for future surveillance (Accreditation Report).

·    EIS and AIDS profiles for the applicant and the pilots.

·    Copies of leases, agreements, proof of insurance, and contracts.

·    Any correspondence between the applicant and the FAA.

C.    Post-Accreditation Surveillance Plan. After the Accreditation Letter is issued, the Accreditation Team, led by the NAES, establishes a post-accreditation plan using the National Work Program Guidelines (NPG) as a basis for inspection and surveillance.

1)    When developing the post-accreditation plan, the team may direct additional surveillance during the first few months the air race program operator is in business.
2)    The team is responsible for assembling an Accreditation Report, including the names and titles of each team member. The report shall be signed by the NAES and have a summary of difficulties, if any, encountered during the accreditation process, and any recommendations made by the team. The report may assist in preparing surveillance plans. (See Figure 3-151, Sample LOA for Race Organizations with Multiple Race Classes).

3-171    POST-ACCREDITATION.

A.    Accreditation Information. Either for organizations which have just completed accreditation, or for those already accredited, the race organization will work directly with the specific FSDO associated with the geographic location of the air race and will include all accreditation information upon submitting an application for a certificate of waiver for the event. The FSDO will notify the NAES, through the Regional Aviation Events Specialist (RAES), upon receipt of the application for a certificate of waiver from the race organization and follow the guidance outlined in Volume 3, Chapter 6, Sections 1 and 2. Any modifications to the program must be approved by AFS-800 prior to the Certificate of Waiver being issued by the FSDO. AFS-800 must be notified a minimum of 90 days prior to the proposed race date.

B.    Processing the Application for Waiver. The IIC will review the race organization Accreditation Letter and associated documents before issuing a waiver for an event that includes closed-course air races. A current list of each accredited air race program with associated class of aircraft can be found at: https://my.faa.gov/org/linebusiness/avs/offices/afs/programs/airshows.html. Typical classes of aircraft are as follows:

·    International Formula One,

·    Unlimited Division,

·    AT-6/SNJ Racing Association, Inc.,

·    Formula V Air Racing Association,

·    Professional Race Pilots Assn. (Biplane),

·    Sport Class, and

·    Jet Class.

C.    Reaccreditation. All air race organizations that receive accreditation by the FAA must be reaccredited every 24 calendar-months unless canceled, suspended, superseded, or revoked. The air race organization must submit a letter of intent to the NAES in accordance with paragraph 3-166, Phase One—Preapplication.

D.    Renewal. Renewal must be made at least 90 days before the accreditation expires. Application is made by submitting a Letter of Intent for Accreditation and following the guidance in paragraph 3-166A3). The NAES should ensure all information is updated and a team is selected (see paragraph 3-166). An applicant must meet the same requirements for renewal as for original accreditation. Therefore, upon the receipt of a letter of intent for the renewal, the Accreditation Team should follow the same process as required for original accreditation. However, if the Accreditation Team is very familiar with the applicant’s operation, there may be no need for an extensive review. AFS-800 always has the option of a full accreditation review. When all requirements are met, a new Accreditation Letter is issued and valid for an additional 24 calendar-months.

E.    Reinstatement of Accreditation Due to Suspension, Revocation, or Cancellation.

1)    Accreditation can be suspended or cancelled by the organization at any time, by submitting a letter via electronic means, such as email, as long as the paper original is mailed to an address specified.
2)    The FAA can suspend, cancel or revoke accreditation on any grounds that would be a cause for denying the original accreditation. In such a case the Accreditation Letter must be surrendered to the FAA in a manner prescribed by AFS-800.
3)    Reinstatement of accreditation starts when the organization submits a Letter of Intent for Accreditation. Application is made by submitting a Letter of Intent for Accreditation and following the guidance in subparagraph 3-166A3). The NAES should ensure all information is updated and a team is selected (see paragraph 3-166).

F.    Adding Race Classes. If an organization wants to add an additional class, they must submit a Letter Intent to AFS-800 at least 90 days prior to first event. Application is made by submitting a Letter of Intent for Accreditation and following the guidance in subparagraph 3-166A3). The NAES should ensure all information is updated and a team is selected (see paragraph 3-166).

NOTE:  Upon approval, the Accreditation Letter will be reissued by AFS-800 with the same expiration date.

G.    Adding New Location and Course Review, or New Course Design. If an organization wants to add a new location requiring course review, or new course design, they must submit a Letter Intent to AFS-800 at least 90 days prior to event. Application is made by submitting a Letter of Intent for Accreditation and following the guidance in subparagraph 3-166A3). The NAES should ensure all information is updated and a team is selected (see paragraph 3-166).

NOTE:  Upon approval, Accreditation Letter will be reissued by AFS-800 with the same expiration date.

H.    Change of Management Personnel or Board of Directors. The accredited organization must notify the NAES within 30 days if there is a change to management personnel via letterhead. The letterhead can be mailed or delivered by electronic means. AFS-800 will review the personnel change within 10 days and notify the accredited organization of its approval or disapproval for accreditation purposes. If approved, no further action is required. If disapproved, the accredited organization may elect to suspend accreditation until a review can be conducted or select another qualified person.

3-172    GENERAL INFORMATION.

Indicates new/changed information.

A.    Typical Racecourses. Both demonstration and competitive events are normally conducted over a fixed, short-distance racecourse, usually located on or adjacent to an airport. It is the sponsor’s responsibility to design the course so that hazards to spectators and other persons on the surface are prevented. The formulas below should help the applicant design the racecourse for submission. Diagrams of typical air race sites are shown in Figure 3-153, Generic Air Race Site #1, and Figure 3-154, Generic Air Race Site #2. The following subparagraphs discuss the method of determining the various distances used.

1)    Racecourse Design. A satisfactory pylon air racecourse design involves the shape of the course and its relationship to the area around the course, especially the spectator areas. These factors depend upon the maximum speed of the racing aircraft, the maximum altitude of the racing aircraft, and the maximum “g” loading (acceleration forces) that the aircraft are expected to encounter when flying the racecourse in a normal manner. The critical requirement is that no racing aircraft is permitted to cross over a show line during the race or exceed the tolerances allowed for the maximum speed, altitude and/or “g” loading established for the racecourse. These parameters must be clearly marked on each racecourse design submitted to AFS-800 for approval.
2)    Maximum “g” Loading. The maximum “g” loading for a race aircraft flying the course in a normal manner must be set for each racecourse design. The maximum “g” loading must be clearly documented on each racecourse submitted for FAA approval.
a)    In actual racing, where maneuvering and turbulence is encountered, momentary “g” loadings in excess of this figure are acceptable.
Indicates new/changed information.
b)    The angle of a turn (the change in course required to negotiate the turn) should be planned to avoid forcing a race aircraft to make the turn too sharply. A maximum turn angle that does not exceed 65 degrees has been found to be satisfactory. The formula for the minimum turn radius for a given “g” loading and speed is shown below. Minimum turn radius is a criterion used to define the limits of a satisfactory racecourse.

Minimum Turn Radius Formula

Minimum Turn Radius Formula

3)    Racecourse Show Line. During the race, aircraft occupy a raceway around the racecourse. The edge of this raceway closest to the primary spectator area is the show line, over which no aircraft is permitted to cross while racing. There can be more than one primary spectator area.
Indicates new/changed information.
a)    The raceway width may vary in the various racing classes so that there is adequate room for the aircraft to pass one another. Criteria for passing aircraft during a sanctioned race or pylon racing school are established in accordance with the FAA-accredited or FAA-recognized Air Race Operations Manual/Rules of Competition. The critical requirement is that no racing aircraft is permitted to cross over the show line during the race.
Indicates new/changed information.
b)    The minimum turn radius, the maximum turn angle, and the raceway width define the limits of a satisfactory racecourse. The racecourse relationship to the primary and secondary spectator areas or other populated area must also be defined. All racing classes require a minimum safety distance of 500 feet between the primary spectator area and the show line.
c)    An additional safety area, as defined below in 3-172A7), is required to ensure that spectators are protected in the event that debris leaves a race aircraft. Should this occur while the aircraft is in a turn, the debris will follow a path tangential to the turn from the moment it departs the aircraft.
4)    Scatter Distance and Maximum Racecourse Altitude(s). The maximum racecourse altitude will be based on course design as it relates to scatter distance with a 50 percent safety factor. Any altitude flown below the computed maximum altitude should be acceptable. The scatter distance is the theoretical straight-line distance to a point on the ground that the debris will follow (ignoring air resistance), depending upon aircraft speed and altitude. The critical requirement is that no racing aircraft is permitted to cross over the show line during the race. A maximum racing altitude(s) is required to be established for each racecourse design and must clearly be documented on each racecourse submitted for FAA approval. The scatter distance formula for each racing class is shown below.
Indicates new/changed information.

Scatter Distance Formula

S = V times the square root of 2A over 32.2

S = Scatter distance (feet)

V = Aircraft speed in ft/sec

Indicates new/changed information.

(V = knots × 1.689)

A = Maximum aircraft altitude (AGL)

32.2 = Acceleration of gravity (ft/sec2)

a)    Limited deviations above the maximum race altitude can be encountered if such maneuvering is deemed to be in the interest of flying safety by the pilot in command and judged to be for that reason after review in accordance with the FAA-accredited or FAA-recognized Air Race Operations Manual/Rules of Competition. In the interest of safety, such altitude deviations may be followed by a safe return to the racecourse.
b)    Reasons for maneuvering above the maximum race altitude include, but are not limited to, the following: maneuvering out of the jet/prop wash or wake turbulence; as required for safe passing due to an unforeseen change in position of the aircraft being passed; or due to momentary loss of situation awareness.
c)    A planned excursion above the maximum altitude solely for the purpose of passing is not acceptable.
5)    Scatter Radius Formula. The theoretical location of all possible debris impact points from an aircraft in a turn is a circle whose radius is the square root of the sums of the squares of the turn radius and the scatter distance. This radius is the scatter radius.

Scatter Radius Formula

Scatter Radius Formula.

6)    Safety Radius Formula. To provide an acceptable margin of safety, the difference between the turn radius and the scatter radius is multiplied by a safety factor of 1.5 and added to the turn radius to define the safety radius.

Safety Radius Formula

Indicates new/changed information. Safety Radius Formula.

7)    Safety Area. The critical turn with respect to the safety radius is the turn that enters the portion of the race closest to the spectators. The safety area is constructed as follows:
a)    Bisect the course change angle for the critical turn;
b)    Mark off the minimum turn radius for the class of aircraft racing, as shown in Figure 3-153, from the pylon position to a point on the angle bisector; and
c)    Draw an arc, whose radius is the safety radius, from the point described in subparagraph 3-172A3)c)3. No spectators can be within this arc (see Figure 3-154).
8)    Spectator Area. In some cases, it may be expedient to design the racecourse around the spectator area. While spectator area-to-show-line distances are unchanged (500 feet minimum), the safety zone is now outside the spectator area and is no longer a factor. Roads to this kind of a racecourse layout must be completely closed off to the spectator area during the race.
9)    Course Modifications. Racecourses are normally flown in a counterclockwise direction (left turns). Problem sites may require flying the course in a clockwise direction (right turns). Other modifications of the racecourse, such as changing the angular relationship of the spectator line to move the crowd away from a turn pylon, or lengthening the racecourse to move the turn pylon away from the crowd, may also be necessary.
10)    K-Rails. Concrete K-rails should replace the metal fencing in the box seating area and possibly in the pits.

B.    Essential Personnel. Only persons and vehicles authorized by the participating race organization and FAA IIC will be permitted beyond the crowd line during racing operations. Authorized persons may include media, aircraft support crews, judges, and officials at the start line. These persons must clear the runway and move back to at least the runway “hold short” line 1 minute before the launch for standing starts. No one will be permitted in front of the first row of aircraft after this time except the starter flag team. Pylon crews, media, and vehicles, except the home pylon flag crews, will remain inside the pylon course during races in designated areas. Race timing teams are permitted in the area between the crowd line and the show line during racing.

Indicates new/changed information.

C.    Aircraft Demonstration, Major Changes/Alterations, and Maintenance. Prior to being approved to race by the air race organization(s), in accordance with the procedures established in the FAA-accredited or FAA-recognized air race operations manual/rules of competition, the race pilot must establish with the air race organization(s) the race aircraft will be operated in compliance with any operating limitations. All race aircraft must be designed to acceptable structural design criteria to meet the limiting load factors as specified by the appropriate race class. The pilot in command (PIC) of an aircraft is directly responsible for the safe operation of that aircraft and is the final authority.

1)    As required by the air race organization rules of competition or operations manual, a flight flutter analysis, test plan, and test results will be submitted to verify that the aircraft will safely operate within the structural limits and not be in the flutter region at anticipated race speeds and load factors within the anticipated race flight envelope. When required, the geographically responsible FSDO(s), with the support of the Regional Aircraft Certification Office (ACO), will ensure the proposed engineering evaluation, including flight demonstrations and analysis within the anticipated flight envelope for the aircraft, will meet the eligibility requirements for the air race.
2)    All primary race pilots must submit a written certification to the air race organization(s) stating that, at the anticipated density altitude of the race, the intended race aircraft has demonstrated a true airspeed (TAS) of 105 percent of its projected qualifying speed while demonstrating a turn capability of 150 percent of the approved racecourse maximum designed “g” load of his/her race class prior to being eligible to race. During qualification, any aircraft that exceeds this speed will be required to demonstrate, at the anticipated density altitude of the race, a TAS of 105 percent of the new qualifying speed while demonstrating a turn capability of 150 percent of the approved racecourse maximum designed “g” load. The primary race pilot must submit a new written certification prior to being permitted on the racecourse.

NOTE:  Alternate race pilots must certify they accept the primary race pilot’s flight demonstration certification, or submit a new certification, prior to being permitted on the racecourse.

3)    The air racing flight demonstration specified in written certification may be based on historic flight data (e.g., previous air race) for the same aircraft/primary pilot combination and if the aircraft has received no major changes or alterations after the flight demonstration date.
Indicates new/changed information. Indicates new/changed information.
4)    A statement will be provided to the Air Race Organization and retained by the air race pilot and the Air Race Organization as a record of accomplishment prior to the pilot being permitted on the racecourse (See Figure 3-155, Air Race Flight Demonstration Statement).
5)    The FAA will audit tech inspection records prior to an aircraft being allowed on the racecourse. Any discrepancies must be corrected prior to release of the aircraft for racing.
6)    Any flight-critical aircraft maintenance performed during race week (e.g., engine change, cylinder change, or flight control removal/replacement) will be documented, reinspected and validated in accordance with the procedures established in the FAA-accredited or FAA-recognized air race operations manual/rules of competition to ensure that the affected aircraft is once again in a condition for safe flight before recommencing race operations.
7)    Each race class will be required to keep an active log that identifies those flight-critical corrective actions initiated/completed on each race aircraft in the class. The log will include the aircraft race number, date/time, the discrepancy discovered and the corrective action taken place or in progress. The logs will be retained by the race class and made available to the race organization and FAA to review daily during the air race and to support any incident/accident investigation.
Indicates new/changed information.
8)    Shoulder harness restraint systems must be verified by the appropriate technical inspector to be adequately designed to restrain the pilot in high g situations. Shoulder harness design considerations are available in the current edition of AC 43.13-2, Acceptable Methods, Techniques, and Practices—Aircraft Alterations.

D.    Participants.

1)    A fundamental principle of air race safety, including demonstration events, is that all of the participants need to be associated with an accredited program. Race pilots must possess a current race pilot authorization in the class in which that pilot is racing (issued within the previous 12 calendar-months) and issued by the accredited air racing organization responsible for the air race. The race pilot authorization must include the expiration date.
2)    If an airman receives any type of compensation (e.g., fuel, oil, lodging, or rental cars) for air racing or any flight activities at an aviation event, that airman must hold at least a commercial pilot certificate and second-class medical certificate. The aircraft must be certificated for operations that allow compensation or hire. Additionally, if passengers or property are carried for compensation or hire, the aircraft must be certificated to allow for those types of operations.
Indicates new/changed information.

E.    FAA Form 7711-1. The FAA Form 7711-1 is sued for the air race must include special provision(s) requiring compliance with the FAA-accredited or FAA-recognized air race operations manual/rules of competition. These new special provisions will state:

1)    The rules of competition manual is depicted and described on attachment # [insert number] of this Certificate of Waiver and becomes a special provision thereof. Any action contrary to the terms, controls, procedures, and conditions pertaining to safety set forth in the FAA-approved procedures, is grounds for cancellation of this waiver.
Indicates new/changed information.
2)    The maximum number of aircraft listed in the rules of competition manual attachment # [insert number] for each FAA-approved racecourse shall not be exceeded.
3)    The maximum altitude listed for each FAA-approved race course in attachment # [insert number] shall not be exceeded, except as authorized in the rules of competition manual attachment # [insert number].
4)    Prior to the event, the primary race pilot must submit written certification to the race or ganization [Insert name, establishing the race aircraft has demonstrated at the anticipated density altitude of the race a TAS of 105 percent of its projected qualifying speed while demonstrating a turn capability of 150 percent of the approved racecourse maximum designed “g” load of the applicable race class. This aircraft has received no major changes or alterations after the flight demonstration date.
5)    Any flight-critical aircraft maintenance performed during the race (e.g., engine change, cylinder change, or flight control removal/replacement) will be documented and reinspected as authorized in the rules of competition manual attachment # [insert number] and the [insert FSDO] to ensure that the affected aircraft is once again in a condition for safe flight before recommencing race operations. Each race class is required to keep an active log that identifies those flight critical corrective actions initiated/completed on each race aircraft in the class.

NOTE:  The list of all special provisions can be found online at http://www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/airshow/waiver/.

3-173    PREREQUISITES AND COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS.

A.    Prerequisites. This task requires knowledge of regulatory requirements in part 91 and FAA policies and qualification as an ASI.

1)    The inspector assigned to this task is responsible for determining whether an air racing organization should be accredited in order to be issued a Certificate of Waiver.
2)    The inspector assigned this task and the subsequent surveillance must have completed on-the-job training (OJT) and participated in surveillance of an air racing organization.

B.    Coordination. This task requires coordination with the air racing organization throughout the accreditation process and subsequent surveillance.

3-174    REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References (current editions):

·    Title 14 CFR Parts 1, 61, 91, and 139.

·    AC 91-45, Waivers: Aviation Events.

B.    Forms. Accreditation Report (see Figure 3-152).

C.    Job Aids. Sample letters and figures.

3-175    GENERAL PROCEDURES.

A.    Determine if a Waiver is Required. There are two types of air races: closed-course and cross‑country. Both require waivers for an aviation event.

1)    If the air race applicant plans to conduct cross-country air races, no further action is required with this task.

NOTE:  Cross-country air races are normally proficiency type races and require a waiver typically for altitude and speed at checkpoints along the route. Refer to the guidance outlined in Volume 3, Chapter 6, Sections 1 and 2.

2)    If the air race applicant plans to conduct closed-course air races then accreditation is required prior to issuing a waiver. A current list of each accredited air race programs with associated class of aircraft can be found at: https://my.faa.gov/org/linebusiness/avs/offices/afs/programs/airshows.html.

·    If the air race applicant holds a current Accreditation Letter on file with the FAA, the IIC will review the race organization Accreditation Letter and associated documents before issuing a waiver for an event that includes closed-course air races. The IIC will follow the guidance outlined in Volume 3, Chapter 6, Sections 1 and 2.

·    If the air race applicant does not have an Accreditation Letter on file with the FAA, or it has expired or been suspended, or the letter requires modification or additional approvals, the air race organization must submit a letter of intent to the NAES in accordance with paragraph 3-166, “Preapplication Phase.”

B.    PTRS. Open the PTRS File. Enter “1230” in the “Activity Code” box of the PTRS transmittal form, and enter “AR” in the “National Use” box for an air race. Upon Accreditation, enter “1231” in the “Activity Code” box, and enter “WI” in the “National Use” box if a waiver will be issued and “NW” if no waiver will be issued for the operation requested.

C.    Phase One—Preapplication. Upon initial inquiry, explain to the applicant the accreditation process and discuss pertinent parts of 14 CFR, Order 8900.1, and ACs. The applicant will be told how to obtain current copies of these documents. Applicant should review them carefully before submitting a Letter of Intent and Request for Accreditation (see Figure 3-148). Advise the applicant that a certificate of waiver will not be issued until accreditation process is satisfactorily completed.

1)    Application for any of the following requires submission of Letter of Intent and Request for Accreditation (see Figure 3-148). Application must be made at least 90 days prior to closed-course air race event.

·    Initial accreditation.

·    Renewal.

·    Reinstatement for cancellation, suspension, or revocation.

·    Change to course location and course review or course design.

·    Addition of a racing class.

·    Change of management personnel (Board of Directors).

D.    Select the Accreditation Team. Upon receiving a letter of intent from the air race applicant, select an Accreditation Team.

E.    Preapplication Meeting. After assignment of an Accreditation Team, meet with the applicant’s Board of Directors.

F.    Phase Two—Formal Application.

1)    Upon receipt of a formal application package, the Accreditation Team must initially review it and make a determination of its acceptability. The SOE should be established with the Accreditation Team considering the feasibility with respect to logic of sequence, timeliness of events, completeness of events, and inspector availability.
2)    When the application is acceptable, the accreditation process continues with an in-depth examination of the package during the document compliance phase.

G.    Phase Three—Document Compliance.

1)    The document compliance phase is that part of the accreditation process where the applicant’s manual(s) and other documents are reviewed and either accepted or rejected.
2)    The team obtains a profile of participants (airman) using the EIS and the AIDS.
3)    When required documents are accepted, the Document Compliance Phase is completed. The accreditation process continues in the Demonstration and Inspection Phase. The Document Compliance Phase and the Demonstration and Inspection Phase may overlap.

H.    Phase Four—Demonstration and Inspection.

1)    In the Demonstration and Inspection Phase, the Accreditation Team validates that the air race organization is following the policies, procedures, and practices outlined in the approved documents of Phase Three.
2)    A Certificate of Waiver (FAA Form 7711-1) may be issued by the jurisdictional FSDO for “purpose of qualifying pilots and accreditation demonstration.” Follow the guidance outlined in Volume 3, Chapter 6, Section 1, Issue a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization for an Aviation Event and this section.
3)    When all demonstrations are satisfactorily completed, the Demonstration and Inspection Phase is ended, and the applicant is ready for issuance of the Accreditation Letter.

I.    Phase Five—Accreditation. The NAES is responsible for ensuring the Accreditation Letter is issued to the applicant.

1)    The Accreditation Letter is prepared for AFS-800 signature (see Figure 3-150) and may be issued up to, but may not exceed, 24 calendar-months.
a)    Initial issuance of Accreditation Letter may be issued for 12 calendar-months, when deemed necessary.
b)    Revised Accreditation Letters documenting Accreditation Team approval of course design and location, course redesign, additional race classes, or change in management personnel are issued without a change to the expiration date.
2)    The letter may be issued via electronic means, such as email, as long as the paper original is mailed to an address specified.
3)    The Accreditation Team completes Accreditation Report and assembles a file which is maintained by the NAES and can be found at: https://my.faa.gov/org/linebusiness/avs/offices/afs/programs/airshows.html.

J.    PTRS. Make the appropriate PTRS entries throughout the accreditation process.

3-176    TASK COMPLETION.

A.    Complete the Task. Completion of this task results in one of the following:

·    Accreditation of air race organization;

·    Denial of accreditation of air race organization;

·    Renewal of air race organization;

·    Reinstatement for cancellation, suspension, or revocation;

·    Change to course location and course review or course design;

·    Addition of a racing class; or

·    Change of management personnel (Board of Directors).

B.    Accredited. If accredited the following will be sent to the air race organization and associated race classes via postal service (mail). An electronic version can be sent as well for expediency.

·    Completion of accreditation report.

·    Results letter of the FAA Accreditation Team.

·    Authorization letter to air race organization.

·    Racecourse(s) approval letter.

·    Approved racecourse diagram(s).

·    Race class Accreditation Letter (or letters if associated with an air race organization).

3-177    FUTURE ACTIVITIES.

·    Surveillance of the air race organization.

·    Issuance of a DD Form 7711-1, Waiver or Authorization for Aviation Event.

·    Reinstatement, suspension, renewal, reissuance of an Accreditation Letter.

·    Change to course location and course review or course design.

·    Addition of a racing class.

·    Change of management personnel (Board of Directors).

Figure 3-148.   Sample Letter of Intent and Request for Accreditation

<AIR RACE ORGANIZATION NAME>

<STREET ADDRESS>

<CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE>

<PHONE NUMBER>

<DATE>

Federal Aviation Administration

General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS-800)

800 Independence Ave., S.W.

Washington, D.C. 20591

To Whom It May Concern:

This is to notify the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of our intent to become an accredited air race organization in accordance with FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 3, Chapter 6, Section 2.

We are prepared to begin operations on <Date> at <proposed location of venue (only one location required) or proposed air race locations (if known)> and are ready for your Accreditation Team to begin the accreditation process at this time. Our operations is headquartered and located at <address of location>. We plan to operate <number and types of aircraft classes> and <number of pilots in each class>.

Air race operations will be managed by <name and phone number> whose résumé is enclosed with the letter. Also enclosed is our proposed accreditation Schedule of Events and list of management officials (Board of Directors) with résumés.

Sincerely,

<Name>

President

Enclosures:

Operations Chairman résumé

Accreditation Schedule of Events

Management Officials (Board of Directors) résumés

Figure 3-149. Air Race Accreditation Job Aid and Schedule of Events

PTRS Code/Input

II. Formal Application Phase

Date Received

Date Returned for Changes

Date Accepted

Inspector Initials

 

A. Review Applicant’s Submissions

1. Formal Accreditation Request Letter

 

 

 

 

 

a. Full and Official Name (Legal)

 

 

 

 

 

b. Mailing Address

 

 

 

 

 

c. Primary Operating Location

 

 

 

 

 

d. Name and Address of Applicants Agent for Service

 

 

 

 

 

e. Board of Director Names

 

 

 

 

 

2. Formal Application Attachments

 

 

 

 

 

a. Schedule of Events (SOE)

 

 

 

 

 

b. Application for Certificate of Waiver (FAA Form 7711-2) for all proposed air race locations

 

 

 

 

 

c. Aircraft and facilities documents

 

 

 

 

 

d. Operations Manual which outlines: 1) Pilot Training Program 2) Safety/Security operating standards 3) Aircraft qualification standard 4) Race Format Description 5) Aircraft qualification 6) Race Format and Description 7) Race control procedures

 

 

 

 

 

e. All proposed racecourses

 

 

 

 

 

f. Board of Directors qualification Résumés

 

 

 

 

 

g. Airport analysis and feasibility

 

 

 

 

Figure 3-149.   Air Race Accreditation Job Aid and Schedule of Events (Continued)

 

B. Evaluate Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Resource Capability based on SOE

 

 

 

 

Remarks:

 

 

C. Formal Application Meeting

1. Schedule Meeting

Date:____Time:_____

2. Discuss Each Submission

3. Resolve Discrepancies/Open Items/IOUs

4. Review Accreditation Process

5. Review Impact if SOE not met

 

 

 

 

 

D. Issue Letter Accepting/Rejecting Application

 

 

 

 

Remarks:

 

 

III. Document Compliance Phase

 

 

 

 

 

A. Evaluate Applicable Training Programs

 

 

 

 

 

a. Pilot Qualification School, Training Program Overview and Pilot Application

 

 

 

 

 

1) Minimum experience requirement

 

 

 

 

 

2) Minimum qualification requirements

 

 

 

 

 

3) Medical Requirements

 

 

 

 

 

b. Initial Training and Examination Overview

 

 

 

 

 

1) Ground Training

 

 

 

 

 

2) Flight Training

 

 

 

 

 

3) Examination and Certificate

 

 

 

 

 

c. Recurrent Training

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3-149.   Air Race Accreditation Job Aid and Schedule of Events (Continued)

 

d. Race Certificate Privileges and duration

 

 

 

 

 

e. Emergency Training

 

 

 

 

 

f. Instructor Training

 

 

 

 

 

g. Maintenance Personnel

 

 

 

 

 

B. Evaluate Management Qualifications

 

 

 

 

 

1. President/CEO

 

 

 

 

 

2. Safety Chairman

 

 

 

 

 

3. Chief Instructor

 

 

 

 

 

4. Operations Chairman

 

 

 

 

 

5. Maintenance Chairman

 

 

 

 

 

C. Evaluate Applicable Manuals

 

 

 

 

 

1. Operations Manual

 

 

 

 

 

a. Safety/Security Operating standards

 

 

 

 

 

b. Aircraft qualification standard

 

 

 

 

 

c. Race Format Description

 

 

 

 

 

d. Emergency Plan/Accident Notification

 

 

 

 

 

e. Air Racecourses (format and description)

 

 

 

 

 

f. Airport analysis and feasibility

 

 

 

 

 

2. General Maintenance Manual (as applicable)

 

 

 

 

 

3. FAA-Approved Airplane Flight Manual (if applicable)

 

 

 

 

 

4. Aircraft Checklists (as applicable)

 

 

 

 

 

a. Normal

 

 

 

 

 

b. Abnormal

 

 

 

 

 

c. Emergency

 

 

 

 

 

5. MEL (as applicable)

 

 

 

 

 

6. Fueling/Refueling Procedures

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3-149.   Air Race Accreditation Job Aid and Schedule of Events (Continued)

 

7. Race Control Procedures that includes Flight Locating (Telemetry-as applicable))

 

 

 

 

 

8. Weight and Balance Limitations (as applicable)

 

 

 

 

Remarks:

 

 

D. Other Evaluations (as applicable)

 

 

 

 

 

1. Environmental assessment

 

 

 

 

Remarks:

 

 

IV. Demonstration & Inspection Phase

 

 

 

 

 

A. Evaluate Applicant Conducting Training

 

 

 

 

 

1. Training Facilities

 

 

 

 

 

2. Training Schedules

 

 

 

 

 

3. Air Race Pilot Training

 

 

 

 

 

a. Ground Training

 

 

 

 

 

b. Emergency Training

 

 

 

 

 

c. Flight Training

 

 

 

 

 

d. Recurrent Training

 

 

 

 

 

4. Instructor Training

 

 

 

 

 

5. Maintenance Training

 

 

 

 

 

a. Mechanics/Repairmen

 

 

 

 

 

b. Inspection Personnel

 

 

 

 

 

c. Ground Handling/Servicing

 

 

 

 

 

6. Station Personnel

 

 

 

 

Remarks:

 

 

B. Evaluate Applicant Conducting Examination

 

 

 

 

Remarks:

 

 

C. Aircraft Inspections

 

 

 

 

 

D. Racecourse layout

 

 

 

 

 

E. Race facilities

 

 

 

 

 

1) Aircraft Maintenance

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3-149. Air Race Accreditation Job Aid and Schedule of Events (Continued)

 

2) Course Layout (to include pylons, markers, observation location for spectators and applicant personnel, etc.)

 

 

 

 

 

3) Control point

 

 

 

 

 

4) Communication

 

 

 

 

 

F. Recordkeeping

 

 

 

 

 

1. Pilot Training

 

 

 

 

 

2. Qualifications and Résumés

 

 

 

 

 

G. Maintenance:

 

 

 

 

 

1. Aircraft records

 

 

 

 

 

2. Personnel Training

 

 

 

 

 

H. Emergency Duties and Procedures

 

 

 

 

Remarks:

 

 

V. Accreditation Phase

 

 

 

 

 

A. Present Accreditation Letter to Air Race Organization

 

 

 

 

 

B. Prepare Accreditation Package

 

 

 

 

 

1. A copy of the letter requesting AFS-800 accreditation and statement of intent

 

 

 

 

 

2. A copy of the completed accreditation job aid

 

 

 

 

 

3. Copies of Application for Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (FAA Form 7711-2) for proposed air race locations with site surveys

 

 

 

 

 

4. List of aircraft and appropriate facilities including, but not limited to, registration, airworthiness certificates, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

5. A copy of any manuals

 

 

 

 

Figure 3-149. Air Race Accreditation Job Aid and Schedule of Events (Continued)

 

6. A copy of the Accreditation Letter

 

 

 

 

 

7. A copy of air racecourses

 

 

 

 

 

8. A summary of any difficulties encountered during any phase of the accreditation process

 

 

 

 

 

9. Recommendations for future surveillance (Accreditation Report)

 

 

 

 

 

10. EIS and AIDS profiles for the applicant and the pilots

 

 

 

 

 

11. Copies of leases, agreements, proof of insurance and contracts

 

 

 

 

 

12. Any correspondence between the applicant and the FAA

 

 

 

 

 

13. Suggestions to Improve Accreditation Process

 

 

 

 

 

C. Prepare the Accreditation Report

 

 

 

 

 

D. Distribute the package to applicable FSDOs

 

 

 

 

 

E. Develop Post‑Accreditation Surveillance Program

 

 

 

 

Remarks:

Figure 3-150.   Sample Accreditation Letter for a Race Class or Air Race Organization with One Air Race Class

U.S. Department of Transportation

Federal Aviation Administration

<DATE>

<NAME OF PRESIDENT>

<AIRCRAFT CLASS NAME> RACING CLASS

<STREET ADDRESS>

<CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE>

Dear: <NAME>:

I wish to thank you and the members of the <AIRCRAFT CLASS NAME> Racing Class for the high safety standards and professionalism that you bring to the sport of air racing. We have reviewed your qualification, training, testing and currency program for pilots racing in the <AIRCRAFT CLASS NAME> Class.

As a result of this review, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recognizes the <AIRCRAFT CLASS NAME> Class as an accredited air racing organization. You now have the authority to issue air race pilot certificates for the <AIRCRAFT CLASS NAME> Class to pilots that comply with the qualification and currency requirements of your program. You are also authorized to sign those certificates as the class president. Unless sooner superseded or rescinded, this accreditation will remain valid until July 31, 2013. The current and valid <AIRCRAFT CLASS NAME> Class Race Pilot certificates issued by your organization shall be accepted by all FAA Flight Standards Offices as meeting the qualification required by FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 3, Chapter 6, Section 1.

We appreciate the cooperation you have extended to the FAA in the past and look forward to continue working with you and your entire team in assuring aviation safety.

Sincerely,

<SIGNATURE>

<NAME>

Manager, General Aviation and Commercial Division

Figure 3-151.     Sample LOA for Air Race Organization with Multiple Race Classes

U.S. Department of Transportation

Federal Aviation Administration

<DATE>

<NAME OF PRESIDENT>

<AIR RACE ORGANIZATION>

<STREET ADDRESS>

<CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE>

Dear: <NAME>:

During the period <date> to <date>, a team representing the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) met with representatives of the <Air Race Organization> and the race classes during <validation title of event>. The validation is an integral part of the process leading to the air races. Those race classes conduct their separate competitions during the <main event title> hosted and run by your organization.

As you know, the team’s purpose was to accomplish two tasks:

·    Determine qualification of <air race organization> to act as the responsible person when making application for a certificate of waiver to hold the <main event>.

·    Conduct validation of race class’ procedures for accreditation purpose. This accreditation would give each race class the authority to train, qualify, and issue race pilot authorizations enabling them to compete in the <main event>.

Included within these two purposes were four areas that needed examination as part of the process. The areas included:

1.   Safety of the racecourses used by the race classes for AFS-800 approval,

2.   Structure and content of <air race organization> operations, procedures, and manuals to plan, oversee, and manage the <main event>,

3.   Safety Management System (SMS) principals (which includes policy, risk management, assurance and promotion) that the <air race organization> and race classes could implement to continually improve upon beyond the <main event>, and

4.   Emerging technologies that could be incorporated to enhance monitoring of pilot and aircraft performance during race events.

The FAA team consisted of <name and office location>.

At the conclusion of the validation, the FAA team made the following determinations regarding the two tasks:

·    <air race organization> is qualified to be responsible person of an air race event and may apply for a waiver using FAA Form 7711-2, Application for Waiver or Authorization of an Aviation Event.

·    Race classes could be accredited to act as air race organizations for the purpose stated above.

The examination of the four areas resulted in the following:

<List satisfactory areas> and <recommendation on areas that could be improved>

The FAA Flight Standards Service, General Aviation and Commercial Division wants to extend to you our deep appreciation for the full access, responsiveness, and openness which all the representatives of <air race organization> and race classes. Your cooperation enabled the FAA Team to fulfill their assigned responsibilities and tasks. This cooperation and collaboration contributed to the successful completion of their mission and facilitated the process immeasurably.

Sincerely,

<SIGNATURE>

<NAME>

Manager, General Aviation and Commercial Division

Figure 3-152.     Accreditation Report

Indicates new/changed information.

ACCREDITATION REPORT

DATE________________:

 

AIR RACE ORGANIZATION NAME:_____________________________________

ADDRESS:__________________________(STREET)

__________________________ (CITY)

__________________________ (ZIP CODE)

 

DATE OF APPLICATION FOR ACCREDITATION:____________

 

DATE OF ACCREDITATION:_______________

ACCREDITATION TEAM:

 

NATIONAL AVIATION EVENT SPECIALIST:______________________________

(Print and Sign)

NAME

POSITION

OFFICE

1.

 

 

2.

 

 

3.

 

 

4.

 

 

5.

 

 

6.

 

 

AREAS OF DIFFICULTY OR CONCERNS DURING ACCREDIATION:

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEAM RECOMMENDATIONS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

POST ACCREDITATION REMARKS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3-153.   Generic Air Race Site #1

Figure 3-153. Generic Air Race Site #1

Graphic depicting the layout of the safety radius of a typical air race site.

Figure 3-154. Generic Air Race Site #2

3.0 MILE [5.0 KM] FORMULA ONE AIR RACECOURSE

Graphic showing layout of a 3.0 mile Formula One sample race course and the relationship (in feet) between each area of the site.

2.0 MILE FORMULA V AIR RACECOURSE

Figure 3-155.   Air Race Flight Demonstration Statement

Air Race Flight Demonstration Statement

I certify that I have completed an air racing flight demonstration in [insert registration number/serial number], at the anticipated density altitude of the race, at a true airspeed (TAS) of [insert speed] with a turning “g” load of [insert “g” load], and have found the aircraft has no hazardous characteristics or design features and is safe for air race operations. These parameters establish the race aircraft has demonstrated, at the anticipated density altitude of the race, a TAS of 105 percent of its projected qualifying speed while demonstrating a turn capability of 150 percent of the approved racecourse maximum designed “g” load of the [insert applicable race class] race class.

This aircraft has received no major changes or alterations after the flight demonstration date.

Flight Demonstration Date:_____________________

Primary Race Pilot Name:______________________________________________

Signature_________________________________________ Date _____________

**********************************************************************

Alternate Race Pilot(s) Name______________________________________________

I accept the conditions of the above statement

RESERVED. Paragraphs 3-178 through 3-180.