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VOLUME 4 AIRCRAFT EQUIPMENT AND OPERATIONAL AUTHORIZATION

Chapter 2 ALL WEATHER TERMINAL AREA OPERATIONS

Section 6 Safety Assurance System: Category II Operations

4-300    OVERVIEW. This section contains concepts, direction, and guidance to be used by principal inspectors (PI) for evaluating and approving or denying requests for authorization to conduct Special Authorization (SA) Category (CAT) I, CAT II, CAT II (Runway Visual Range (RVR) 1000), and SA CAT II operations. This includes all SA CAT I, CAT II, CAT II (RVR 1000), and SA CAT II operations at airports and runways new to an operator/program manager, even though previously approved aircraft, airborne equipment, ground‑based equipment, concepts, and procedures are being used in these operations. Although SA CAT I is not a CAT II operation, it is included in this section because it requires CAT II authorization using an approved CAT II or III Head‑Up Display (HUD) to decision height (DH). Additional information may be found in Volume 4, Chapter 2, Section 1.

4-301    APPLICABILITY. The intent is that the PI will use the general information provided in this section, along with the specific information provided in Volume 4, Chapter 2, Section 2 for domestic operators and Volume 4, Chapter 2, Section 8 for Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 129 foreign air carriers, when evaluating requests for SA CAT I, CAT II, and SA CAT II operations. This process is only applicable for operator requests for instrument landing system (ILS)‑based CAT II operations. Requests for other than ILS‑based CAT II should be forwarded to the Regional Flight Standards Division (RFSD) Next Generation (NextGen) Branch (AXX–220). Volume 4, Chapter 2, Section 3, contains the requirements to authorize a small Category A aircraft for CAT II operations.

4-302    REPORTING SYSTEMS.

A.    Safety Assurance System (SAS). For parts 121 and 135 operations the PI will utilize SAS Data Collection Tools (DCT) 2.2.2, Category II & III Ops, and 2.3.1, Appropriate Operational Equipment.

B.    Program Tracking and Reporting Subsystem (PTRS). For parts 91, 91 subpart K (91K), 125, and 129 operations the PI will utilize Program Tracking and Reporting Subsystem (PTRS) activity codes.

·    CAT II/III ILS Operations Phase I Approval: 1430.

·    CAT II/III ILS Operations Phase II Approval: 1431.

·    CAT II/III ILS Operations Phase III Approval: 1432.

·    CAT II/III ILS Operations Phase IV Approval: 1433.

·    CAT II/III ILS Operations Phase V Approval: 1434.

4-303    REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References (current editions):

·    Title 14 CFR parts 91, 97, 119, 121, 125, 129, and 135.

·    Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Order 6750.24, Instrument Landing System and Ancillary Electronic Component Configuration and Performance Requirements.nstrument Landing System and Ancillary Electronic Component Configuration and Performance Requirements.

Indicates new/changed information.

·    FAA Order JO 7110.65, Air Traffic Control.

·    FAA Order JO 7210.3Y, Facility Operation Administration.

·    FAA Order 8260.49, Simultaneous Offset Instrument Approach (SOIA).

·    FAA Order 8400.13, Procedures for the Evaluation and Approval of Facilities for Special Authorization Category I Operations and All Category II and III Operations.rocedures for the Evaluation and Approval of Facilities for Special Authorization Category I Operations and All Category II and III Operations.

Indicates new/changed information.

·    Advisory Circular (AC) 25-7, Flight Test Guide for Certification of Transport Category Airplanes.

·    AC 97‑1, Runway Visual Range (RVR).

·    AC 120‑28, Criteria for Approval of Category III Weather Minima for Takeoff, Landing, and Rollout.

·    AC 120‑29, Criteria for Approval of Category I and Category II Weather Minima for Approach.

Indicates new/changed information.

·    AC 120‑57, Surface Movement Guidance and Control System.

·    AC 120‑71, Standard Operating Procedures for Flight Deck Crewmembers.

·    Technical Standard Orders (TSO).

·    U.S. Flight Information Publications (FLIP).

B.    Forms. None.

C.    Job Aids. None.

4-304    DEFINITIONS.

A.    CAT II Runway Visual Range (RVR) 1000. Order 8400.13 authorizes CAT II approaches with a DH as low as 100 feet and visibility minimums of RVR 1000 to runways which meet all CAT II equipment, performance, and lighting requirements. The operator must use either autoland or HUD approved to touchdown.

B.    Special Authorization (SA) Category (CAT) I. Order 8400.13 authorizes SA CAT I approaches to a radio altimeter (RA) DH as low as 150 feet and a visibility minimum as low as RVR 1400 to runways that do not have touchdown zone (TDZ) or runway centerline (RCL) lighting when the approach is flown using an aircraft with an approved CAT II or III HUD to DH.thorizes SA CAT I approaches to a radio altimeter (RA) DH as low as 150 feet and a visibility minimum as low as RVR 1400 to runways that do not have touchdown zone (TDZ) or runway centerline (RCL) lighting when the approach is flown using an aircraft with an approved CAT II or III HUD to DH.

C.    SA CAT II. Order 8400.13 authorizes CAT II approaches with a DH as low as 100 feet and visibility minimums of RVR 1200 at runways which do not meet all of the lighting requirements (Approach Lighting System with Sequenced Flashing Lights (ALSF))‑2, TDZ, RCL lights) for standard CAT II. The operator must use either autoland or HUD approved to touchdown.

D.    Standard CAT II Operations. CAT II operations are approach and landing operations conducted with a DH of less than 200 feet (60 meters) but not less than 100 feet (30 meters), and an RVR of not less than 1,200 feet (350 meters).

4-305    APPROVAL METHOD.

A.    Part 91. A part 91 (including part 91 subpart F (part 91F)) large aircraft operator is issued a letter of authorization (LOA) for SA CAT I.

B.    Part 125 Letter of Deviation Authority (LODA) Holders (Part 125M in the Web-Based Operations Safety System (WebOPSS) Database). A part 125 LODA holder is issued an LOA for SA CAT I using C052 in WebOPSS, and issued CAT II (RVR 1200), CAT II (RVR 1000), and/or SA CAT II (RVR 1200) using C059 in WebOPSS.

C.    Part 91 Subpart K (part 91K). A part 91K operator is issued a management specification (MSpec) for SA CAT I using C052 and an MSpec for CAT II (RVR 1200), CAT II (RVR 1000), and/or SA CAT II (RVR 1200) using C059 in WebOPSS.

D.    Part 121, 125, 129, and 135. Part 121, 125, 129, or 135 operators are issued operations specification (OpSpec) C052 for SA CAT  I and OpSpec C059 for CAT II (RVR 1200), CAT II (RVR 1000), and SA CAT II (RVR 1200) in WebOPSS. Issue OpSpec H108 for CAT II helicopter operations.

4-306    GENERAL.

A.    Objective. The essential difference between CAT I and II operations is that a CAT II operation places greater reliance on the guidance provided by the airborne and ground‑based equipment. This equipment must be capable of delivering the aircraft to a position from which the flightcrew can accomplish a transition from instrument to visual flight at a height above touchdown (HAT) of 100 feet and complete the landing in the reduced (CAT II) seeing‑conditions. The primary objective of CAT II operations is to provide a level of safety equivalent to CAT I precision instrument approach operations, even though the seeing‑conditions in CAT II operations can be much worse than those encountered in CAT I operations. This objective (the equivalent level of safety) is achieved by the following:

·    Enhanced reliability and precision in the airborne and ground‑based equipment to increase the precision of flightpath control;

·    Enhanced flightcrew training and qualifications to increase the precision of flightpath control;

·    Additional airport visual aids to enhance seeing‑conditions;

·    Additional criteria to ensure obstacle and terrain clearance;

·    Additional criteria to ensure ILS signal protection;

·    Special operational procedures; and

·    Special air traffic control (ATC) procedures, limitations, or both.

B.    Operational Approval Basis. CAT II operations are approved for an operator by the issuance of an OpSpec/MSpec/LOA that authorizes the conduct of CAT II instrument approach procedures (IAP) at specified airports. The basis for this approval depends on the operating rules applicable to the operation (part 91K, 121, 125, or 135), the complexity of aircraft (turbine‑powered, reciprocating, or helicopter), the passenger capacity of the aircraft, and/or the size of the aircraft (large or small). The operator evaluation and approval process for reduced visibility flight operations, including CAT II/III operations, is covered in depth in Volume 4, Chapter 2, Section 2.

4-307    CAT II OPERATIONAL CONCEPTS. The weather conditions in a CAT II operation restrict seeing‑conditions so that the external visual references necessary to manually control the aircraft are not acquired until the aircraft reaches a very low altitude (typically 100 to 200 feet above ground level (AGL)). Therefore, the flightcrew must operate and control the aircraft by referring to instruments throughout most of the approach and to a combination of instrument and external visual information during the final stages of the approach, flare (deceleration for helicopters), and landing. Because of the reduced maneuvering capability resulting from CAT II seeing‑conditions, the precision of the flight guidance system and the overall precision of flightpath control must ensure that the aircraft can be flown to a position that is closely aligned with the RCL and the desired glidepath. The increased reliability and precision required of the airborne and ground‑based equipment is necessary to ensure that when the aircraft arrives at DH it is on a flightpath that permits the pilot to complete the landing without any significant runway alignment maneuvers. All CAT II operations are conducted in accordance with the DH and RVR concepts used in CAT I operations. However, because of the limited seeing‑conditions available in CAT II weather conditions, the additional requirements outlined under the objective of CAT II operations are necessary to ensure that an adequate level of safety is maintained when an aircraft is being operated in these conditions. Technologies such as HUD and automatic landing systems have resulted in additional operational capability of airborne avionics systems and the potential for additional landing minimums credit. These airborne systems, coupled with modern reliable ILS and more restrictive performance requirements associated with procedures developed for low visibility operations, CAT II or lower-than-standard CAT I operations can now be authorized to approved runways that were originally programmed to just support basic CAT I operations (Order 8400.13).

A.    Function of Visual Reference. Because of the limitations in the airborne equipment used in CAT II operations and the available instrument guidance, the pilot must have sufficient visual references to manually control and maneuver the aircraft from the DH to a full stop on the runway. These external visual references are required below DH for the pilot to control and maneuver the aircraft, align the aircraft with the RCL, touch down within the TDZ, and then roll out on the runway.

B.    Purpose of CAT II Operating Minimums. CAT II operating procedures and minimums have been established to ensure that the desired level of safety is achieved when CAT II seeing‑conditions exist. These operating minimums are based on the DH and RVR concepts. The established operating minimums (DH and RVR) determine the minimum safe heights for instrument flight and the minimum RVR at which the landing can be safely completed by external visual reference in a particular aircraft. These operating minimums are based on established CAT II operational concepts and on the required CAT II airborne equipment, ground‑based visual and electronic equipment, operating procedures, and pilot training and qualification. These operating minimums, when combined with other CAT II requirements, ensure that the combination of information available from external visual sources and the aircraft instruments and equipment are sufficient to enable properly qualified pilots to safely operate the aircraft along the desired flightpath.

C.    Establishing Operating Minimums.

1)    Several sets of operating minimums are established for CAT II operations. For standard CAT II operations, minimums are DH 150/RVR 1600, DH 100/RVR 1600, and DH 100/RVR 1200. For operations based on autoland or Head‑Up‑Guidance System (HGS), minimums can be as low as DH 100/RVR 1000 (at foreign airports and domestic ILS Type III facilities), and an SA for CAT II operations can be approved for RVR 1200 at specially approved ILS facilities that do not meet International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards for ALSF/TDZ/RCL lighting systems. Most runways that support CAT II operations permit the use of DH 100/RVR 1200 operating minimums. Operating minimums at some runways, however, are restricted to DH 150/RVR 1600 because of limitations in the ground equipment (such as a single RVR reporting system), localizer signal reliability, limitations imposed by the pre‑threshold terrain (RA not authorized), and/or obstacle clearance limitations in the final approach surface, the approach light surface, the touchdown area, and the missed approach area.
2)    Order 8400.13 sets forth standards for a specific facility to be modified and approved for the SA CAT II operations. For an approved facility, there will be a CAT II procedure developed to conform to the standard Terminal Instrument Procedures (TERPS) CAT II development criteria and published as a part 97 Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAP). In addition to the standard note, “CAT II SPECIAL AIRCREW AND AIRCRAFT AUTHORIZATION REQUIRED,” that appears on the chart, an additional note will be included: “This CAT II does not meet ICAO standard for ALSF/TDZ/RCL light systems. Specific OpSpec/MSpec/LOA to conduct this approach using autoland or HGS to touchdown are required.” The CAT II operating minimums for individual operators and specific aircraft are established in accordance with the criteria in AC 120‑29, this order, Order 8400.13, and U.S. TERPS.

D.    CAT II Flight Guidance and Control Systems. Standard CAT II operations are based on the use of special airborne and ground‑based equipment that have capability, reliability, and redundancy superior to the equipment required for CAT I operations (see AC 120‑29). Although CAT II airborne equipment provides increased capability, reliability, and redundancy, the flight control guidance systems used in these operations are not necessarily capable of automatically detecting all potential failures that could significantly disturb the aircraft’s flightpath (e.g., single‑channel flight control systems). If such failures occur, the flightcrew must be able to quickly detect the failure and to intervene manually to continue safely to the approach and landing or execute a missed approach. In other words, CAT II operations without autoland are based on the use of single‑channel flight directors (FD), single‑channel autopilots, or combinations of both. Even though some CAT II operations are based on dual independent FDs, each of these systems is usually a single‑channel system that is not capable of detecting all potential failures. Therefore, even with dual independent FDs, the flightcrew must be able to detect failures and manually intervene in certain cases. CAT II operations are also based on the use of redundant ILS ground equipment; dual ILS airborne equipment; RAs (to identify DH); instrument failure detection and warning systems; special missed approach guidance equipment; and rain removal equipment. SA CAT II operations are based on procedures developed for use on specific approved facilities and that the aircraft are certified for CAT III operations; i.e., autoland or HUD to touchdown (Order 8400.13).

E.    Autoland or HUD to Touchdown at CAT I Runways. Volume 4, Chapter 2, Section 5, contains guidance about the use of autoland or HUD to touchdown at CAT I runways.

F.    Airworthiness of CAT II Airborne Equipment.

1)    Throughout the history of CAT II operations, two processes have existed for showing that the airborne equipment of the aircraft is Airworthy for CAT II operations. One process is the type design approval process in which approval is obtained during aircraft certification testing. The other is the operational demonstration and approval process in which approval is obtained after the operator/program manager demonstrates satisfactory airworthiness of the equipment in actual flight operations. Currently, the most prevalent process is the type design approval process in which approval is contained in the FAA‑approved Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM). Aircraft that have CAT II type design approval are not required to undergo an operational airworthiness demonstration. The operator/program manager is responsible for providing official written FAA documentation that the aircraft is CAT II certified.
2)    For aircraft that do not have CAT II type design approval, an operational demonstration of CAT II airworthiness in accordance with AC 120‑29 is required. Generally, this operational demonstration program includes a requirement that the operator conduct at least 300 approaches to 100 feet in CAT I or better weather conditions using the proposed CAT II system. RFSD NextGen Branch (AXX–220) concurrence is required before any operational demonstration and approval program may be initiated.
3)    Special design requirements and special maintenance programs are necessary to achieve the airborne system reliability required for the conduct of CAT II operations. The special maintenance programs necessary for CAT II operations are extensive and expensive and are usually the largest factors affecting an operator’s decision of whether to conduct these operations.

G. Airports and Runways. U.S. operators with the CAT II OpSpec/MSpec/LOA are approved to conduct CAT II operations for any U.S. airport/runway (excluding special terrain CAT II/III airports/runways) for which a CAT II IAP has been published.

H. Foreign CAT II IAP.

1)    Operations. All CAT II operations by U.S. operators at foreign airports must be authorized in accordance with the guidance and direction in this order. All foreign runways approved for CAT II operations by U.S. operators must also meet the requirements of this order and the current edition of Order 8260.31, Foreign Terminal Instrument Procedures (FTIP).
2)    Foreign Equivalence. Although it is recognized that the CAT II ground‑based systems and procedures at foreign airports may not be in exact accordance with U.S. standards, it is critical for the foreign airports to provide the information and functions that are necessary for CAT  II operations in a manner consistent with the intent of U.S. CAT II standards.
3)    General. The FAA region that has surveillance responsibility for a particular foreign airport has the responsibility for evaluating any runway at that airport that supports CAT II operations. The controlling region is also responsible for evaluating these CAT II runways in accordance with Order 8260.31 and for recommending approval or disapproval of CAT II operations to those runways. The controlling region’s recommendations must be forwarded to the Flight Technologies and Procedures Division (AFS–400) for further evaluation and final approval or disapproval.d for recommending approval or disapproval of CAT II operations to those runways.

NOTE:  Foreign runways that have been determined to be equivalent to U.S. CAT II standards and approval for CAT II operators are identified in the list of runways maintained by AFS–400. Operators desiring CAT II approvals at foreign airports that are not on this approved list should submit a request for evaluation and approval through their principal operations inspector (POI) to the RFSD NextGen Branch. The controlling region’s NextGen Branch will conduct an evaluation. Upon successful completion of the evaluation, the NextGen Branch will notify AFS–400 for final approval and addition to the approved list.

4)    Determining Equivalence. The major factor that is considered by the controlling region in approving foreign runways in accordance with Order 8260.31 for CAT II operations by U.S. operators is the degree of equivalence with U.S. CAT II standards. This determination evaluates the equivalence of:

·    High intensity approach lights;

·    High intensity runway edge lights;

·    TDZ and RCL lights;

·    Taxiway edge lights;

·    High‑intensity taxiway centerline lights;

·    Runway markings;

·    The quality and integrity of the approach and landing ground‑based guidance system;

·    The RVR reporting capabilities and procedures;

Title: Change bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information.

·    ILS‑critical areas, including signs and markings;

·    Obstacle clearance protection in the approach and missed approach, including the obstacle‑free zone;

·    Airport surface traffic control;

·    Terminal area ATC; and

·    Procedures for regulating the ground movement of aircraft and vehicles during CAT III operations.

5)    Authorizing Foreign CAT II Runways. All CAT  II operations conducted in foreign countries must be conducted in accordance with the operator’s CAT II OpSpecs. The only means of approving these operations is through the issuance of OpSpecs, which specify the foreign runways and minimums authorized for each aircraft used by the operator. OpSpecs C059 and H108 specify the CAT II IAPs, runways, operating minimums, limitations, and aircraft authorized for CAT II operations for a particular operator. These paragraphs also specify the CAT II airborne equipment, RVR equipment, pilot qualification, and missed approach requirements that apply to the operator’s CAT II operation. If the flightcrew is properly qualified and the aircraft is properly equipped and maintained, an operator can, in general, be authorized to conduct CAT II All Weather Terminal Area Operations (AWTA) to any foreign runway approved for CAT II operations. The exception to this are those runways specified as restricted CAT II runways. The criteria in AC 120‑29 and this order establish the lowest approach and landing minimums that can be authorized, under any circumstances, for CAT II operations. The lowest minimums for each kind of CAT II operation for a particular operator are specified in OpSpecs C059 and H108, as appropriate. FAA inspectors shall not authorize an operator to use minimums lower than these values. Additionally, inspectors shall not authorize the use of CAT II minimums for any foreign runway unless the provision of this order and Order 8260.31 are met.

I.     CAT II Operations to Airports/Runways with Special (Irregular) Terrain.

1)    Certain airports/runways with CAT II/III IAPs are built on irregular terrain (Spokane International Airport (KGEG)) or have irregular terrain prior to the threshold (Pittsburgh International Airport (KPIT), Seattle‑Tacoma International Airport (KSEA), Denver International Airport (KDEN), Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (KCVG)) that has potential impact on autoland/HUD to touchdown capabilities. Every new aircraft type/model must be evaluated by a lead operator on each of these runways in CAT I conditions or better before autoland/HUD to touchdown operations can be conducted in CAT II conditions. After review and approval by RFSD and AFS–400, that runway and aircraft type/model will be added to the approved list located on the AFS–400 Web site. The process for conducting special terrain evaluation is described in detail in AC 120‑28 and summarized in Volume 4, Chapter 2, Section 2.
2)    Every subsequent operator requesting CAT  II autoland/HUD to touchdown at any of the special terrain airports/runways using an aircraft type/model listed on the AFS-400 Web site must conduct 15 landings in CAT I conditions or better to verify that their autoland procedures and maintenance will permit safe autoland operations at that runway. The process for subsequent operators conducting special terrain operations is described in detail in AC 120‑28 and summarized in Volume 4, Chapter 2, Section 2.

J.    Regional and Headquarters’ (HQ) Review and Concurrence. All initial approvals for CAT II operations that are based on ILS facilities for each type of aircraft operated by an operator/program manager require review and concurrence by the RFSD NextGen Branch (AXX–220) before an OpSpec/MSpec/LOA may be issued for that operation. Unless specified otherwise in the RSFD review and concurrence, subsequent reductions in CAT II operating minimums for each aircraft type do not require further RFSD concurrence before the revised OpSpec/MSpec/LOA authorizing the lower minimums can be issued to the operator.

4-308    STANDARD CAT II OPERATIONS. Standard CAT II operating minimums (DH 100/RVR 1200) are based on the building block approach. The building‑block approach is based on CAT I operations, including standard CAT I requirements, and includes the special aeronautical knowledge, experience, skill, training, and qualifications as well as the special airborne and ground‑based equipment specified in AC 120‑29. The assumptions and criteria used in aircraft certification and CAT II IAP design must be compatible with the operational concepts in this order. These assumptions and criteria ensure that flightcrews and aircraft that meet the requirements of this order and AC 120‑29 can be used to safely conduct CAT II operations using standard CAT II minimums. Any special equipment or procedures necessary for the safe conduct of CAT II operations must be specified in the airworthiness certification basis of the aircraft (type certificate (TC) or Supplemental Type Certificate (STC)) or in the FAA‑approved AFM. Any aircraft that cannot be safely operated to standard CAT II operating minimums using flightcrews that meet the minimum requirements of this order and AC 120‑29 shall not be certificated or otherwise approved for CAT II operations. The OpSpec/MSpec/LOA establishes the lowest operating minimums that can be used in any CAT II operation, even if the established IAP specifies minimums lower than those values. Special airborne equipment, special ground‑based equipment, and special flightcrew training required for CAT II operations are specified in this order, AC 120‑29, and the FAA‑approved AFM.

A.    OpSpec/MSpec/LOA for Standard CAT II. OpSpec/MSpec/LOA C059 authorizes standard CAT II for parts 91, 91K, 121, 125, 129, and 135 operators. Guidance on authorizing C059 is contained in Volume 3, Chapter 18, Section 5, and in Volume 12, Chapter 2, Section 5, for part 129.

B.    Standard CAT II Operating Minimums. The standard CAT II operating minimums for all aircraft are DH 100 and RVR 1200. The DH is typically based on the use of radio (radar) altimetry. Procedures that have “Radio Altitude minimums Not Authorized (RA NA)” (for example, due to irregular underlying terrain) typically use the first indication of arrival at the inner marker (IM) as a means to establish decision altitude (DA)/decision height (DH). However, an operator may elect to use first indication of arrival at either the IM or the barometric altitude DA, whichever comes first, as the means for minimums determination.

C.    Higher‑Than‑Standard CAT II Operating Minimums. The higher‑than‑standard CAT II minimums for all aircraft are DH 100 and RVR 1600. These minimums are usually applied as interim minimums (restricted to higher-than-standard CAT II minimums) for a 6‑month demonstration period for operators/program managers new to CAT II operations. The first 6 months are used to validate the effectiveness of the operator’s/program manager’s maintenance program and operational procedures in order to support issuance of the standard CAT II minimums. These minimums are also applied when there are RVR sensor limitations (only one installed), irregular underlying terrain, obstacle clearance requirements, or pre‑threshold terrain limitations (RA not authorized—RA NA), which preclude the use of standard CAT II minimums.

4-309    SA CAT I OPERATIONS. SA CAT I operations are based on the use of a CAT II or III HUD to maintain a more precise lateral and vertical track, reduce Flight Technical Error (FTE), and avoid division of attention between flight instruments and visual identification of the landing area. SA CAT I procedures allow increased capacity in reduced visibility conditions using existing airport infrastructure. A runway may be eligible for SA CAT I if it meets the criteria in Order 8400.13 and is equipped with a suitable ILS that provides localizer and glideslope guidance to the runway threshold.

A.    Operator Requirements for SA CAT I. To conduct SA CAT I operations, the operator must be authorized for either CAT II or III operations using an approved CAT II or CAT III HUD to DH.

1)    If the operator is not approved for CAT II or III operations using an approved HUD, then the operator must first complete the CAT II/III approval process in Volume 4, Chapter 2, Section 2.
2)    If the operator is approved for CAT II or III operations using an approved HUD, completion of the CAT II/III approval process is not required for SA CAT I.

B.    OpSpec/MSpec/LOA for SA CAT I. SA CAT I authorization is contained in selectable text in OpSpec/MSpec/LOA C052 for parts 91K, 121, 125, 129, and 135 operators, and in LOA C059 for part 91 operators. Guidance on authorizing C052 and C059 is contained in Volume 3, Chapter 18, Section 5, and in Volume 12, Chapter 2, Section 5, for part 129.

C.    SA CAT I Operating Minimums. SA CAT I approaches have an RA DH as low as 150 feet and a visibility minimum as low as RVR 1400 to runways that do not have TDZ or RCL lighting and require that the approach is flown using an aircraft with a HUD to DH.

4-310    CAT II RVR 1000 OPERATIONS. Order 8400.13 authorizes CAT II RVR 1000 operating minimums using autoland or HUD approved to touchdown at runways that meet all equipment, monitoring, and infrastructure requirements for standard CAT II. The runway must also have an approved Surface Movement Guidance and Control System (SMGCS) operation that provides a taxi routing from the landing runway to the parking area.thorizes CAT II RVR 1000 operating minimums using autoland or HUD approved to touchdown at runways that meet all equipment, monitoring, and infrastructure requirements for standard CAT II. The runway must also have an approved Surface Movement Guidance and Control System (SMGCS) operation that provides a taxi routing from the landing runway to the parking area.

A.    Operator Requirements for CAT II RVR 1000. To conduct CAT II RVR 1000 operations, the operator must be authorized for either CAT II or III operations using autoland or an approved HUD that provides guidance to touchdown.

1)    If the operator is not approved for CAT II or III operations using autoland or an approved HUD that provides guidance to touchdown, then the operator must first complete the CAT II/III approval process in Volume 4, Chapter 2, Section 2. The operator is eligible for CAT II RVR 1000 when RVR 1200 minimums using autoland or an approved HUD that provides guidance to touchdown are authorized through the CAT II/III approval process.
2)    If the operator is approved for CAT II or CAT III operations using autoland or an approved HUD that provides guidance to touchdown, completion of the CAT II/III approval process is not required for CAT II RVR 1000.

B.    OpSpec/MSpec/LOA for CAT II to RVR 1000. CAT II RVR 1000 authorization is contained in selectable text in OpSpec/MSpec/LOA C059 for parts 91, 91K, 121, 125, 129, and 135 operators. Guidance on authorizing C059 is contained in Volume 3, Chapter 18, Section 5, and in Volume 12, Chapter 2, Section 5, for part 129.

C.    CAT II RVR 1000 Operating Minimums. The CAT II RVR 1000 operating minimums for all aircraft are DH 100 and RVR 1000. The RVR 1000 minimum is indicated in a chart note, referenced to the standard CAT II line of minimums, which states, “Requires specific OpSpec, MSpec, or LOA approval and use of autoland or HUD to touchdown.” The use of autoland or HUD to touchdown is required. The DH is typically based on the use of radio (radar) altimetry. Another acceptable method at runways where an IM is available is to use both the IM and barometric altimeter. In these situations, the decision to continue for landing or execute a missed approach takes place at the first indication of the IM or at the published barometric DA, whichever occurs first.

4-311    SA CAT II OPERATIONS. SA CAT II operating minimums for all aircraft are not less than DH 100 and visibility of not less than RVR 1200 using autoland or HUD approved to touchdown. The intent of SA CAT I is to achieve lower landing minimums on runways that have the ILS facilities capable of supporting CAT II or CAT III approaches, but lack the instrument approach and/or runway lighting for CAT II or CAT III. Autoland or HUD approved to touchdown provides the equivalent level of safety as a standard CAT II approach. Specific details on SA CAT II can be found in FAA Order 8400.13.

A.    Operator Requirements for SA CAT II. To conduct SA CAT II operations, the operator must be authorized for either CAT II or III operations using autoland or an approved HUD that provides guidance to touchdown.

1)    If the operator is not approved for CAT II or III operations using autoland or an approved HUD that provides guidance to touchdown, then the operator must first complete the CAT II/III approval process in Volume 4, Chapter 2, Section 2. The operator is eligible for SA CAT II when RVR 1200 minimums are authorized through the CAT II/III approval process.
2)    If the operator is approved for CAT II or III operations using autoland or an approved HUD that provides guidance to touchdown, completion of the CAT II/III approval process is not required for SA CAT II.

B.    OpSpec/MSpec/LOA for SA CAT II. SA CAT II authorization is contained in selectable text in OpSpec/MSpec/LOA C059 for parts 91, 91K, 121, 125, 129, 135 operators. Guidance on authorizing C059 is contained in Volume 3, Chapter 18, Section 5, and in Volume 12, Chapter 2, Section 5, for part 129.

C.    SA CAT II Operating Minimums.The SA CAT II operating minimums for all aircraft are DH 100 and RVR 1200. The DH is based on the use of radio (radar) altimetry. Barometric altimetry is not an acceptable means of establishing the DH for SA CAT II operations.

4-312        OPERATIONAL CREDIT FOR CAT III EQUIPMENT.

A.    Purpose of Program Validation. In standard CAT II operations, the objective of the requirement for an operator to validate the CAT II maintenance program for at least 6 months with minimums restricted to DH 100 and RVR 1600 is to ensure that the required level of airborne equipment reliability is achieved. This is to ensure that frequent malfunctions will not occur in standard CAT II operations (DH 100 and RVR 1200). The design features of CAT III airborne equipment significantly reduce the potential for failures that could adversely affect standard CAT II operations. As a result, validation of the CAT II maintenance program before conducting operations to DH 100/‌RVR 1200 is not necessary if these operations are conducted under a restriction that requires the airborne equipment to operate to CAT III standards (e.g.,  fail passive (FP) or fail operational (FO) automatic landing).

B.    Opting Out of Program Validation. If the operator requests to eliminate the 6‑month restriction (DH 100 and RVR 1600) based on operational credit for the use of CAT III systems to conduct CAT II operations, the operator OpSpec/MSpec/LOA must include a limitation that specifies all CAT  II operations using DH 100 and RVR 1200 must be conducted with the airborne equipment operating to CAT III standards. This limitation should read FP autoland only, or FP/FO autoland only, as appropriate, for aircraft equipped with CAT  III automatic landing systems, or FP HUD only for aircraft equipped with CAT  III HUD. For DH 100 and RVR 1200 operations, these restrictions must remain in the operator OpSpecs/MSpecs/LOA until the CAT II maintenance program for that aircraft is successfully validated.

RESERVED. Paragraphs 4-313 through 4-330.