3/19/15

 

8900.1 CHG 199

Volume 4  AIRCRAFT EQUIPMENT AND OPERATIONAL AUTHORIZATIONS

CHAPTER 6  AIRPLANE AUTHORIZATIONS AND LIMITATIONS

Section 5  Widespread Fatigue Damage Requirements for Parts 121 and 129

4-6-5-1    PROGRAM TRACKING AND REPORTING SUBSYSTEM (PTRS) ACTIVITY CODES. Maintenance: 3634.

4-6-5-3    OBJECTIVE. The widespread fatigue damage (WFD) rule; Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 121, § 121.1115; and 14 CFR part 129, § 129.115 require affected air carrier certificate holders or foreign operators of U.S.-registered airplanes to incorporate into their Continuous Airworthiness Maintenance Program (CAMP) or Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved maintenance program a limit of validity (LOV) for airplanes that they operate. The LOV corresponds to the period of time, stated as a number of total accumulated flight cycles, flight-hours or both, during which it is demonstrated that WFD will not occur in the airplane. WFD is the simultaneous presence of fatigue cracks at multiple structural locations that are of sufficient size and density such that the structure will no longer meet the residual strength requirements of 14 CFR part 25, § 25.571(b). The means of incorporating the LOV into a certificate holder’s CAMP is subject to approval by the certificate holder’s principal maintenance inspector (PMI) or other designated Airworthiness inspector.

4-6-5-5    GENERAL. For certain existing airplanes, 14 CFR part 26, § 26.21 requires design approval holders (DAH) to evaluate their airplanes to establish LOVs. The requirements for a LOV applies to transport category, turbine-powered airplanes certificated after January 1, 1958, that have a maximum takeoff gross weight (MTGW) greater than 75,000 pounds, or a later Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) that increases MTGW to greater than 75,000 pounds.

A.    New Airplanes and LOVs. For new airplanes, the rule requires all applicants for type certificates (TC) to establish an LOV. DAHs and applicants must demonstrate that the airplane will be free from WFD up to the LOV. The demonstration may be supported by test evidence, analysis and, if available, service experience and teardown inspection results of high-time airplanes of similar structural design, accounting for differences in operating conditions and procedures. Structural fatigue characteristics of airplanes are understood only up to the point where analyses and testing of the structure are valid. The LOV will be part of the airworthiness limitations (AL) of the new airplane.

B.    Existing Airplanes and LOVs. For existing airplanes, the rule requires that type certificate holders (TCH) demonstrate that WFD will not occur up to the LOV. TCHs may perform the demonstration using the same criteria as a new airplane. The Airworthiness Limitation Section (ALS) of the manufacturer’s instructions for continued airworthiness (ICA) will list the LOV as an AL. Operators of any affected airplane must incorporate the LOV into the maintenance program for that airplane.

C.    Flying Beyond the LOV. Operators may not fly an airplane beyond its LOV, unless the FAA Oversight Office approves an extended LOV.

NOTE:  For the purposes of this part, the FAA Oversight Office is the Aircraft Certification Office (ACO) or office of the Transport Airplane Directorate (ANM-100) with oversight responsibility for the relevant TC, STC, or manufacturer as determined by the Administrator.

D.    Inspector Approval. The PMI or other designated airworthiness inspector will approve the operator’s incorporation of the LOV for each airplane model affected into the maintenance program.

4-6-5-7    PROCEDURES. For each affected airplane model in an operator’s fleet, the operator should review the FAA Oversight Office-approved LOVs that are applicable.

A.    Incorporating an LOV. Once made available by a TCH, the operator must incorporate the LOV into its CAMP no later than the compliance date listed in Figure 4-6-5A, Table 1—Airplanes Subject to § 26.21. (Refer to §§ 121.1115 and 129.115.) The LOV may be contained in an individual document or as part of the time limitations document published by an operator. However, the LOV must be clearly distinguishable in the CAMP.

NOTE:  There may be a series of maintenance actions (modifications/ replacements) that may be required in order to fly until the established LOV. These actions will be mandated by Airworthiness Directive (AD).

B.    Failure to Make LOVs Available. If a TCH fails to make an LOV available, the operator may use the default LOVs in Figure 4-6-5A.

C.    Operating Airplanes Excluded From § 26.21. If an operator chooses to operate an airplane that § 26.21 excludes from its requirements, an operator must use the LOVs listed in Figure 4-6-5B, Table 2—Airplanes Excluded from § 26.21. (Refer to §§ 121.1115 and 129.115.)

4-6-5-9    EXTENDED LOV. If the FAA Oversight Office approves an extended LOV, an amended TC or STC will be issued. ALs that may require additional inspections or modifications to operate to the extended LOV may accompany the LOV. An operator may not operate beyond the extended LOV unless the FAA Oversight Office approves a further extension.

A.    Incorporating LOVs into a CAMP. The operator must incorporate the extended LOV into the operator’s CAMP and be clearly distinguishable.

B.    ALs and Extended LOVs. The operator must incorporate any ALs with the extended LOV.

C.    Approval of LOVs. Approval of the extended LOV will be the same as the initial LOV. The PMI will approve the incorporation of the extended LOV into the CAMP along with any airworthiness limitation items (ALI) that have been established for the new LOV.

4-6-5-11    FAA PMI APPROVAL OF CERTIFICATE HOLDER’S INCORPORATION OF LOV.

A.    OpSpec/MSpec D072, Aircraft Maintenance—Continuous Airworthiness Maintenance Program (CAMP) Authorization. OpSpec/MSpec D072 provides for a listing of all aircraft and requires “Each aircraft and its component parts, accessories, and appliances must be maintained in an Airworthy condition in accordance with the time limits for the accomplishment of the overhaul, replacement, periodic inspection, and routine checks of the aircraft and its component parts, accessories, and appliances. Time limits or standards for determining time limits shall be contained in a document approved by the Administrator and referenced in these operations specifications.”

B.    Approval Process. The PMI or designee assigned to the certificate-holding office is responsible for approving the means by which the LOV is incorporated into an operator’s CAMP. As operators use various methods and documents for controlling time-limited items, the approval process to incorporate these changes into the time limits section of the CAMP should be in accordance with those established procedures within the operator’s program. Typically, approval of initial incorporation of the LOV, or an extended LOV, is by sending the certificate holder a letter indicating the date, document, manual or revision number, and an approval statement.

4-6-5-13    REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References (current editions):

·    AC 120-104, Establishing and Implementing Limit of Validity to Prevent Widespread Fatigue Damage,

·    Title 14 CFR part 43, § 43.16,

·    Title 14 CFR part 91, § 91.403(c),

·    Title 14 CFR part 121, § 121.1115, and

·    Title 14 CFR part 129, § 129.115.

B.    Forms. None.

C.    Job Aids. None.

Indicates new/changed information.

Figure 4-6-5A. Table 1—Airplanes Subject to § 26.21

Airplane model

Compliance date months after January 14, 2011

Default LOV [flight cycles (FC) or flight hours (FH)]

Airbus–Existing1 Models Only:

 

 

A300 B2–1A, B2–1C, B2K–3C, B2–203

30

48,000 FC

A300 B4–2C, B4–103

30

40,000 FC

A300 B4–203

30

34,000 FC

A300–600 Series

60

30,000 FC/67,500 FH

A310–200 Series

60

40,000 FC/60,000 FH

A310–300 Series

60

35,000 FC/60,000 FH

A318 Series

60

48,000 FC/60,000 FH

A319 Series

60

48,000 FC/60,000 FH

A320–100 Series

60

48,000 FC/48,000 FH

A320–200 Series

60

48,000 FC/60,000 FH

A321 Series

60

48,000 FC/60,000 FH

A330–200, –300 Series (except WV050 family) (non enhanced)

60

40,000 FC/60,000 FH

A330–200, –300 Series WV050 family (enhanced)

60

33,000 FC/100,000 FH

A330–200 Freighter Series

60

See NOTE.

A340–200, –300 Series (except WV027 and WV050 family) (non enhanced)

60

20,000 FC/80,000 FH

A340–200, –300 Series WV027 (non enhanced)

60

30,000 FC/60,000 FH

A340–300 Series WV050 family (enhanced)

60

20,000 FC/100,000 FH

A340–500, –600 Series

60

16,600 FC/100,000 FH

A380–800 Series

72

See NOTE.

Boeing–Existing1 Models Only:

 

 

717

60

60,000 FC/60,000 FH

727 (all series)

30

60,000 FC

737 (Classics): 737–100, –200, –200C, –300, –400, –500

30

75,000 FC

737 (NG): 737–600, –700, –700C, –800, –900, –900ER

60

75,000 FC

747 (Classics): 747–100, –100B, –100B SUD, –200B, -200C, –200F, –300, 747SP, 747SR

30

20,000 FC

747–400: 747–400, –400D, –400F

60

20,000 FC

757

60

50,000 FC

767

60

50,000 FC

777–200, –300

60

40,000 FC

777–200LR, 777–300ER

72

40,000 FC

777F

72

11,000 FC

Bombardier–Existing1 Models Only:

 

 

CL–600: 2D15 (Regional Jet Series 705), 2D24 (Regional Jet Series 900)

72

60,000 FC

Embraer–Existing1 Models Only:

 

 

ERJ 170

72

See NOTE.

ERJ 190

72

See NOTE.

Fokker–Existing1 Models Only:

 

 

F.28 Mark 0070, Mark 0100

30

90,000 FC

Lockheed–Existing1 Models Only:

 

 

L–1011

30

36,000 FC

188

30

26,600 FC

382 (all series)

30

20,000 FC/50,000 FH

McDonnell Douglas–Existing1 Models Only:

 

 

DC–8, –8F

30

50,000 FC/50,000 FH

DC–9 (except for MD–80 models)

30

100,000 FC/100,000 FH

MD–80 (DC–9–81, –82, –83, –87, MD–88)

30

50,000 FC/50,000 FH

MD–90

60

60,000 FC/90,000 FH

DC–10–10, –15

30

42,000 FC/60,000 FH

DC–10–30, –40, –10F, –30F, –40F

30

30,000 FC/60,000 FH

MD–10–10F

60

42,000 FC/60,000 FH

MD–10–30F

60

30,000 FC/60,000 FH

MD–11, MD–11F

60

20,000 FC/60,000 FH

Maximum Takeoff Gross Weight Changes:

 

 

All airplanes whose maximum takeoff gross weight has been decreased to 75,000 pounds or below after January 14, 2011 or increased to greater than 75,000 pounds at any time by an amended type certificate or supplemental type certificate

30, or within 12 months after the LOV is approved, or before operating the airplane, whichever occurs latest

Not applicable.

All Other Airplane Models (TCs and amended TCs) not Listed in Figure 4-6-5B (Table 2)

72, or within 12 months after the LOV is approved, or before operating the airplane, whichever occurs latest

Not applicable.

1Type certificated as of January 14, 2011.

NOTE:  Airplane operation limitation is stated in the ALS.

Figure 4-6-5B. Table 2—Airplanes Excluded from § 26.21

Airplane model

Default LOV
[flight cycles (FC)
or flight hours (FH)]

Airbus:

 

Caravelle

15,000 FC/24,000 FH

Avions Marcel Dassault:

 

Breguet Aviation Mercure 100C

20,000 FC/16,000 FH

Boeing:

 

Boeing 707 (-100 Series and –200 Series)

20,000 FC

Boeing 707 (–300 Series and –400 Series)

20,000 FC

Boeing 720

30,000 FC

Bombardier:

 

CL–44D4 and CL–44J

20,000 FC

BD–700

15,000 FH

Bristol Aeroplane Company:

 

Britannia 305

10,000 FC

British Aerospace Airbus, Ltd.:

 

BAC 1–11 (all models)

85,000 FC

British Aerospace (Commercial Aircraft) Ltd.:

 

Armstrong Whitworth Argosy A.W. 650 Series 101

20,000 FC

BAE Systems (Operations) Ltd.:

 

BAe 146–100A (all models)

50,000 FC

BAe 146–200–07

50,000 FC

BAe 146–200–07 Dev

50,000 FC

BAe 146–200–11

50,000 FC

BAe 146–200–07A

47,000 FC

BAe 146–200–11 Dev

43,000 FC

BAe 146–300 (all models)

40,000 FC

Avro 146–RJ70A (all models)

40,000 FC

Avro 146–RJ85A and 146–RJ100A (all models)

50,000 FC

D & R Nevada, LLC:

 

Convair Model 22

1,000 FC/1,000 FH

Convair Model 23M

1,000 FC/1,000 FH

de Havilland Aircraft Company, Ltd.:

 

D.H. 106 Comet 4C

8,000 FH

Gulfstream:

 

GV

40,000 FH

GV–SP

40,000 FH

Ilyushin Aviation Complex:

 

IL–96T

10,000 FC/30,000 FH

Lockheed:

 

300–50A01 (USAF C 141A)

20,000 FC

Indicates new/changed information

4-6-5-15 through 4-6-5-29 RESERVED.