2/19/14

 

8900.1 CHG 133

Volume 4  AIRCRAFT EQUIPMENT AND OPERATIONAL AUTHORIZATIONS

CHAPTER 6  AIRPLANE AUTHORIZATIONS AND LIMITATIONS

Section 4  Safety Assurance System: Supplemental Inspection for Parts 121 and 129

4-1066    PROGRAM TRACKING AND REPORTING SUBSYSTEM (PTRS) ACTIVITY CODES. The following PTRS activity codes should be used for Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) parts 121 and 129 operators (U.S.-registered) to track and document the initial incorporation and ongoing surveillance activities of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)-approved damage-tolerance (DT)-based inspections and procedures for airplane baseline structure in the operator’s maintenance program.

·    3315;

·    3316;

·    3634; and

·    3647.

4-1067    SAFETY ASSURANCE SYSTEM (SAS) FOR PART 121 AIR CARRIERS. As stated in paragraph 4-1066, initial incorporation will be tracked and recorded using the PTRS codes provided. Ongoing surveillance activities of the air carrier’s supplemental structural inspection program will be accomplished using SAS Element 4.2.1, (AW) Maintenance/Inspection Requirements.

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4-1068    OBJECTIVE. The Aging Airplane Safety Final Rule (AASFR)—part 121, § 121.1109 and part 129, § 129.109 (U.S.-registered aircraft)—requires affected air carrier certificate holders to incorporate into their Continuous Airworthiness Maintenance Programs (CAMP) an FAA Oversight Office-approved “means” for addressing the adverse effects that repairs and alterations may have on Fatigue Critical Structure (FCS) by December 20, 2010. This includes existing and new repairs, existing and new alterations/modifications, and repairs to alterations that affect FCS. The adverse effects of the repairs and alterations must be addressed by the application of a Damage Tolerance Evaluation (DTE). The certificate holder’s methods to incorporate Damage Tolerance Inspections (DTI) data into their CAMP is subject to approval by the certificate holder’s principal maintenance inspector (PMI) or responsible Airworthiness inspector. The FAA Oversight Office-approved “means” include lists of FCS, DTI for existing/future repairs and alterations that affect FCS, and a process for assessing existing repairs (e.g., Repair Evaluation Guidelines (REG)). DTI are the inspections developed as a result of a DTE. The DTI includes the areas to be inspected; the inspection method; the inspection procedures, including acceptance and rejection criteria; the threshold; and any repeat intervals associated with those inspections. The DTI may specify a time limit when a repair or alteration needs to be replaced or modified. If the DTE concludes that DT-based supplemental structural inspections are not necessary, the DTI contains a statement to that effect.

4-1069    GENERAL.

A.    Compliance Documents. The compliance document developed by a design approval holder (DAH) provides the basic guidance (including identification of the FCSs), DT data, and implementation schedule information. It is the means by which a certificate holder may incorporate DTI and procedures. The integration of the compliance document processes, data, and requirements into the operator’s existing maintenance program may be accomplished in a way that best fits the certificate holder’s programs. The FAA recommends that operators develop an Operator Implementation Plan (OIP) using the guidance contained in the current edition of Advisory Circular (AC) 120-93, Damage Tolerance Inspections for Repairs and Alterations. The PMI or responsible Airworthiness inspector can then approve the OIP for each airplane model affected.

B.    Procedures. For each affected airplane model in an operator’s fleet, the operator should review the applicable FAA Oversight Office-approved compliance documents. The compliance document will identify all FCSs, the DT data for the FCSs, and implementation schedule information for incorporating DT data into the operator’s maintenance program. (See Figure 4-58D, Sample Operators Implementation Plan.)

NOTE:  As stated in §§ 121.1101(b) and 129.101(b), the “FAA Oversight Office” is the Aircraft Certification Office (ACO) or the office of the Transport Airplane Directorate with oversight office responsibility for the relevant type certificate (TC) or Supplemental Type Certificate (STC), as determined by the Administrator.

1)    The operator should review any additional FAA Oversight Office-approved compliance documents associated with a given model aircraft for repairs and repairs to alterations or modifications and third party approved repairs. These may be applicable to the entire model fleet or to individual aircraft within a given fleet type. These compliance documents will also identify all FCSs for that fleet type, the DT data for the FCSs, and implementation schedule information for incorporating DT data into the operator’s maintenance program.
2)    The following figure (Figure 4-58C, Operator Implementation Plan Approval Process) shows how an operator can develop an OIP for airplanes in its fleet using the compliance document. The OIP is air carrier-specific and incorporates processes and procedures that may include administrative procedures for applying elements contained in the DAH compliance documents. Certificate holders should consider the guidance in the following flowchart when developing an OIP.

Figure 4-58C, Operator Implementation Plan Approval Process

Type Certificate Holder:

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Oversight Office-approved compliance document (for a particular airplane model)

 

Non-Type Certificate Holder:

FAA Oversight Office-Approved compliance document(s) for repairs and repairs to alterations, or modifications and third party approved repairs (either model- or airplane-specific)

 

Operator’s Implementation Plan

List of Fatigue Critical Baseline Structure (FCBS) and/or Fatigue Critical Alteration Structure (FCAS)

List of repairs and alterations affecting Fatigue Critical Structures (FCS)

Survey plan

Obtaining damage-tolerance (DT) data

Assessment of repairs and alterations

Incorporation of Damage Tolerant Inspections (DTI)

Acquisition of airplanes

Reporting requirements

 

 

 

Principal Maintenance Inspector (PMI) Approval

 

4-1070    INCORPORATION OF DT DATA FOR NEW AND EXISTING REPAIRS. After the reviews of the applicable compliance document are complete, the certificate holder should include the following in an OIP:

A.    New Repairs. A process to ensure that the certificate holder will evaluate all new repairs to an FCS for DT and implement DTI or other procedures, if necessary.

B.    Existing Repairs. A process to ensure that the certificate holder evaluates all existing repairs to an FCS for DT and that he or she implements DTI or other procedures. This process would include:

1)    A process to determine if DT data for an FCS have been incorporated throughout the life of the airplane. If so, no further action is required for existing repairs.
2)    A process to survey existing repairs to an FCS and determine DTI for those repairs. Derive these processes from the compliance document applicable to those airplanes. Incorporate them into the maintenance program within the timeframe given in the compliance document.

C.    Schedule. An implementation schedule following guidance provided in the compliance documents.

D.    Implementation Techniques. Use one of the two techniques below to implement DTI for repairs:

1)    The first technique involves incorporation of DT data directly into the operator’s maintenance program.
2)    The second technique involves an alternative to tracking individual repairs. In this approach, incorporate the DTI as part of an operator’s routine maintenance program. This approach is well suited for operators of large fleets and would entail evaluating repairs at predetermined, planned maintenance visits as part of the maintenance program. This technique would require the operator to choose an inspection method and interval using an FAA‑approved DTE. Use the regular CAMP for repairs where the inspection requirements use the existing inspection methods and intervals. Repairs added between the predetermined maintenance visits should have a threshold greater than the predetermined maintenance visit. The operator may also individually track it to account for the unique inspection method used and the interval requirements of the repair. This would ensure the airworthiness of the structure until the next predetermined maintenance visit, when the operator would evaluate the repair as part of the repair maintenance program.
3)    The air carrier cannot exceed DTI thresholds and repeat intervals for individual repairs without FAA approval. Once it incorporates DTI thresholds and repeat intervals into its maintenance program, it cannot escalate the DTI intervals without specific approval from the FAA Oversight Office.

4-1071    REPAIRS, ALTERATIONS, AND REPAIRS TO ALTERATIONS. The following is an overview of the certificate holder’s tasks that are further developed in the current edition of AC 120-93, Damage Tolerance Inspections for Repairs and Alterations.

A.    Review the Applicable Compliance Documents. These documents are developed by the type-certificate holder (TCH) and STC holder and are approved by the FAA Oversight Office. Upon approval, the TCH and STC holder are required to make the compliance documents available to operators.

B.    Additional Data. Obtain or develop additional DT data for alterations not addressed by the applicable compliance document.

1)    Identify alterations that exist in the operator’s fleet that affect the Fatigue Critical Baseline Structure (FCBS).
2)    Identify and contact the TCH or STC holder for the applicable alteration and request the DT data for that alteration. If the TCH or STC holder no longer exists or is unable to make the data available, it becomes the responsibility of the operator to develop or obtain the DT data using the guidance contained in AC 120-93, Chapter 4, Operator Tasks for Repairs and Alterations. For alterations not developed by a TCH or STC holder, it is the responsibility of the operator to obtain the necessary DT data for that alteration.

C.    Required Information. The OIP should contain the information described in AC 120-93, paragraph 402, Contents of an OIP. The information in the OIP should provide the basis for operator compliance with §§ 121.1109 and 129.109. The OIP will provide the means by which the operator will comply with §§ 121.1109 and 129.109. It will be necessary for the operator to coordinate development of the OIP with its PMI.

D.    Incorporate the REG in the OIP to Include:

1)    A process to conduct airplane surveys to enable identification of repairs that affect an FCBS.
2)    A process to determine how to obtain DTI for those repairs that affect the FCBSs that the operator identifies in the survey.
3)    A process to determine schedules of airplane surveys and incorporating necessary DTI into an operator’s maintenance program.

E.    Submit the OIP to the PMI for Approval.

F.    Incorporate the OIP into the Maintenance Program.

G.    Reporting Requirements. There are no added reporting requirements associated with the AASFR. However, the FAA encourages operators to report significant findings to the TCHs to ensure that prompt fleet action is taken. Existing reporting requirements under §§ 121.703 and 121.707 still apply.

H.    Recordkeeping Requirements. Once the operator receives approval for the implementation plan, existing part 121 recordkeeping requirements are still applicable, as defined in § 121.380.

I.    Amendment 25-45 Certifications. For particular airplane models certified to Amendment 25-45 or later, the TCH or STC holder may not need to develop additional DT data. For such cases where additional DT data is not necessary, the TCH or STC holder will still need to substantiate this conclusion for the FAA Oversight Office and develop a compliance document. The airplane model-specific compliance document would include a statement that operators do not need additional DT data from the TCH or STC holder to support compliance with the AASFR. In these cases, the information provided in the TCH’s or STC holder’s compliance document will support an operator’s demonstration to its PMI that its existing maintenance program meets the intent of the AASFR, relative to alterations that affect an FCBS.

J.    Transfer of Airplanes after December 20, 2010. After December 20, 2010, before adding an airplane to an air carrier’s OpSpecs or operator’s fleet, the following should apply:

1)    For airplanes previously operated under a CAMP, the new operator should continue implementation of the previous PMI-approved OIP. The operator may use either the previous operator’s schedule or the new operator’s schedule, whichever would result in an earlier accomplishment date for the repair evaluation.
2)    For airplanes not previously operated under a CAMP, the operator develops and implements an OIP. If the operator exceeds the airplane’s design service goal (DSG) and compliance times, accomplish any outstanding DTI according to a schedule approved by the PMI.

K.    Operation of Leased Foreign-Owned Airplanes. Acquisition of a leased, foreign-owned airplane for use in operations under part 121 or 129 (U.S.-registered aircraft) will require the certificate holder to develop and implement an OIP.

4-1072    MAINTENANCE PROGRAM CHANGES. When revising a maintenance program containing DTI for repairs and alterations affecting an FCBS, the certificate holder should evaluate any impact of the change on the DTI. This evaluation should be made in accordance with the operator’s Continuing Analysis and Surveillance (CAS) Program and FAA-approved REG. If the evaluation shows that a DTI needs to be revised, the certificate holder must submit any revision to a DTI through the PMI to the FAA Oversight Office for approval.

NOTE:  After initial approval of the OIP, the only time that re-approval is required is if changes are made to the processes for obtaining DT data for existing or new repairs and alterations/modifications. New or revised DTI are a product of these processes and do not require separate approvals via the OpSpec.

4-1073    FAA PMI APPROVAL OF CERTIFICATE HOLDER’S IMPLEMENTATION PLAN. The certificate holder’s PMI or responsible Airworthiness inspector is responsible for approving the means for incorporation of the DT data for repairs into a certificate holder’s CAMP. An OpSpec revision will show approval of the plan.

4-1074    PREREQUISITES AND COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS. Prerequisite knowledge of the regulatory requirements of part 121/129.

4-1075    REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References (current editions):

·    AC 120-93.

·    Operator’s manuals.

B.    Forms. FAA Form 8400-8, Operations Specifications 1.

C.    Job Aids. Automated OpSpecs checklists and worksheets.

D.    Complete the PTRS Record.

E.    Complete the Task. Successful completion of this task will result in the following:

1)    An approved OIP,
2)    Revision of the operator’s manual system to include the OIP, and
3)    OpSpec paragraph D097.

4-1076    TASK OUTCOMES. If not already accomplished, document that the operator has successfully incorporated the FAA-approved DT-based inspections and procedures for airplane baseline structure into its maintenance program by approving the incorporation of D097 OpSpecs from the automated Web-Based Operations Safety System (WebOPSS) database by December 20, 2010.

A.    Complete the PTRS for Part 121 Air Carriers and U.S.-Registered Part 129 Operators. Open a new PTRS record using the PTRS codes listed in paragraph 4-1066. Enter “DT Insp” in the “National Use” block of section I. In section IV, the “Comment” block, annotate the following:

1)    Document that the operator has incorporated the applicable FAA-approved DT-based inspections and procedures for airplane baseline structure into its maintenance program.
2)    Record the date the D097 OpSpecs was signed.
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B.    Ongoing Surveillance, Part 121 Air Carriers. To ensure that air carriers continue to comply with FAA-approved DT-based inspections and procedures for airplane baseline structure, surveillance activities should be accomplished as scheduled using the supplemental inspection design and performance assessment questions incorporated into SAS Element 4.2.1, (AW), Maintenance/Inspection Requirements. This will enable certificate management offices (CMO) to evaluate supplemental structural inspections during normal risk-based evaluations of air carrier maintenance programs in accordance with SAS policy and guidance.

C.    Ongoing Surveillance, U.S.-Registered Part 129 Operators. To ensure that the operators continue to comply with their FAA-approved DT-based inspections and procedures for airplane baseline structure, surveillance activities should be accomplished and recorded using the PTRS codes listed in paragraph 4-1066, using “DT Insp” in the “National Use” block. The findings should be entered in the PTRS database in accordance with existing procedures.

Figure 4-58D, Sample Operators Implementation Plan

Image of turbopropellor airplane

Savino Airlines

Image of jetliner

1. Operator Implementation Plan (OIP).

To meet the requirements of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 121, § 121.1109, Savino Airlines will implement the following processes to ensure that it obtains and applies damage-tolerance (DT) data. Savino Airlines developed the procedures detailed in this OIP in accordance with the guidance contained in Advisory Circular (AC) 120-93, Damage Tolerance Inspections for Repairs and Alterations. Where processes already exist within the General Maintenance Manual (GMM) that complies with AC 120-93, this OIP will reference the pertinent portions of the GMM containing the process. Savino Airlines will incorporate new processes developed in this OIP into the respective areas of the GMM.

2. Fatigue Critical Structure (FCS).

Savino Airlines will obtain the list of Fatigue Critical Baseline Structure (FCBS) from type-certificate holders (TCH) of airplanes in our fleet. Savino Airlines will also obtain a list of Fatigue Critical Alteration Structure (FCAS) from the design approval holder (DAH) of alterations affecting or containing FCS on airplanes in our fleet. Savino Airlines will incorporate these lists into the GMM, chapter 6, Repairs and Alterations. Procedures within this chapter will state that any repairs to FCS accomplished in the future will have a damage-tolerance analysis (DTA) performed and Damage Tolerant Inspections (DTI) developed, if necessary. The procedure will require that the FAA, or its designees, approve the DTA and any DTI. Repairs or alterations will use repair authorization form SA-BR549 to accomplish and record the repair or alteration.

3. List of Repairs and Alterations Affecting FCS.

If Savino Airlines has removed alterations from an airplane but altered structure remains, it will include these alterations in the list of alterations. Savino Airlines will list, in the major repair report for the individual airplanes, repairs identified during the survey that affect FCS. This list will be made available to the FAA upon request. Savino Airlines will use form SA-BR549-R for compiling the list of repairs identified in the surveys. Savino Airlines will develop this list using the list of FCBS and FCAS provided by the DAHs.

Figure 4-58D, Sample Operators Implementation Plan (Continued)

4. Obtaining DTI for New Repairs and Alterations.

A.      Process to obtain DTI for new repairs:

1)          Savino Airlines will not install any future repairs to FCBS or FCAS that is not DT.
2)          Savino Airlines will obtain the DTI for new repairs by following one of the three following methods:
a)          Using Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) DT data previously approved such as Structural Repair Manual (SRM) or service information.
b)          Using third party developed FAA-approved DT data such as Designated Engineering Representative (DER) or Organization Designation Authority (ODA) approvals for a particular repair.
c)          Savino Airlines may obtain DT data using the three-step process contained in AC 120-93, appendix 5, and it will track individual repairs using the TRAX system (see GMM, chapter 4) to assure that it does not exceed the 12-month limitation for individual repairs.

B.        Savino Airlines will obtain from the DAH any DTI for new alterations that affect FCBS, and will incorporate such DTI into the regularly scheduled maintenance program. If DTI are not applicable to a new alteration, Savino Airlines will obtain a statement to that effect and place it in the aircraft records. (See GMM, chapter 4.)

5. Assessment of Existing Repairs and Alterations.

Savino Airlines will use the Repair Evaluation Guidelines (REG) developed by the individual OEMs (appendix A) to assess currently installed repairs and alterations on the following schedule.

A.      Savino Airlines will survey DC-8 Airplanes using JPC 120.93-DC-8 per the following schedule:

1)          N415-435 before the airplane reaches 37,500 cycles.
2)          N436-440 at the next “D” check or before December 2016 or 50,000 cycles, whichever is later.
3)          N441-449 at the next “D” check or before December 2016.

Figure 4-58D, Sample Operators Implementation Plan (Continued)

B.        Savino Airlines will survey B-757 Airplanes using JPC 120.93-B-757 per the following schedule:

1)          N342-350 before the airplane reaches 37,500 cycles.
2)          N351-360 at the next “D” check or before December 2016 or 50,000 cycles, whichever is later.

C.      Savino Airlines will survey A-330 Airplanes using JPC 120.93-A-330 prior to reaching 24750 cycles or 75000 flight-hours.

6. Obtaining DTI for Repairs and Alterations.

A.      Savino Airlines will review aircraft records and its maintenance schedule to determine if DTI exist for those repairs and alterations installed on Savino Airlines’ fleet. Savino Airlines will perform surveys to identify repairs and alterations that it did not identify through record reviews.

B.        Savino Airlines will use the following information for obtaining DT data for repairs and alterations identified during the surveys that do not have DTI:

1)          Using OEM DT data previously approved such as SRM or service information.
2)          Using third party developed FAA-approved DT data such as DER or ODA approvals for a particular repair.
3)          Savino Airlines will obtain DT data using the three step process contained in AC 120-93, appendix 5, and it will track individual repairs using the TRAX system (see GMM, chapter 4) to assure that it does not exceed the 12-month limitation for individual repairs.
4)          If DAH DT data and DTI are not available, Savino Airlines will contract with FAA‑approved DERs to develop the needed DTI. (See GMM, chapter 6.)

7. Incorporation of DTI.

A.      Savino Airlines will incorporate required DTI for repairs and alterations that have been made available by DAHs into its maintenance schedule per the maintenance revision process contained in GMM, chapter 6. Savino Airlines will specifically identify each required DTI within the maintenance schedule. Aircraft Records will control the last accomplished and next due dates through the TRAX system. (See GMM, chapter 4.) Incorporation of these DTI will be in accordance with the following schedule:

Figure 4-58D, Sample Operators Implementation Plan (Continued)

1)          If the DTI for a repair specifies a threshold of less than the next “C” check due date, Savino Airlines will accomplish inspection of the repair at the “C” check, or
2)          If the threshold for the inspection is later than the next “C” check due date, Savino Airlines will inspect the repair at that threshold or earlier.
3)          Savino Airlines will accomplish repetitive inspections at the time limits specified in the DTI.

B.        Savino Airlines will incorporate the required DTI for alterations for which DTI has not been made available into its maintenance schedule per the maintenance program revision process contained in the GMM, chapter 5. As for repairs, Savino Airlines will specifically identify alterations within the maintenance schedule. Aircraft Records will control, through the TRAX system, the last accomplished and next due dates. (See GMM, chapter 4.) Incorporation of these DTI will be in accordance with the following schedule:

1)          Alterations identified during the records reviews or alterations developed by persons other than TCHs or Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) holders for Savino Airlines’ airplanes will submit DT data developed for these alterations to the FAA no later than December 20, 2012, for airplanes that have exceeded 75 percent design service goal (DSG). Savino Airlines will incorporate the DTI no later than 6 months from the date of FAA approval.
a)          DC-8, 37,500.
b)          B-757, 37,500.
c)          A-330, 24750 cycles or 75,000 flight hours.
2)          Alterations identified during the survey that do not have DT data developed will use the process in GMM, chapter 6 for performing a DTE on these alterations within 12 months of discovery during the survey. Savino Airlines will submit the DT data developed from the DTE to the FAA Oversight Office through the PMI. Savino Airlines will incorporate the DTI developed into the maintenance program per the GMM, chapter 5, within 6 months of the date of FAA approval.
3)          Savino Airlines may use DT data developed for an alteration that is applicable to more than one airplane in a specific fleet for all of those airplanes without further evaluations and approval.

Figure 4-58D, Sample Operators Implementation Plan (Continued)

C.      Savino Airlines will enter into the Maintenance Tracking System each airplane and its survey due date. As Savino Airlines surveys its airplanes, it will update TRAX to show completion and times required for obtaining DTI and any DTI that it must track separately from normal maintenance requirements. Aircraft Records will submit a report to the chief inspector of airplane survey due dates and completion dates. Aircraft Records will also notify the chief inspector of any airplanes that have not been surveyed but are within 60 days of the survey due date. The chief inspector will notify maintenance scheduling to schedule the airplane for its survey within 30 days. For repairs and alterations that require obtaining DTI, Aircraft Records will track each repair and alteration and notify the chief inspector 60 days prior to the due date for obtaining the DTI. The chief inspector will assure that DTI are obtained prior to the due date. If the DTI cannot be obtained, the chief inspector will remove the affected airplane from service until the DTI is obtained and incorporated into the maintenance schedule.

8. Acquisition Airplanes.

Airplanes added to Savino Airlines’ operations specifications (OpSpecs) that have been operated previously by a part 121 air carrier will bridge the previous operators OIP into Savino Airlines’ OIP in accordance with Savino Airlines’ bridging document, chapter 2. Airplanes that have not previously been operated under an approved part 121 program will receive a complete survey for repairs and alterations in accordance with this OIP prior to being placed into service. Savino Airlines will not lease or operate any airplanes of foreign registry.

9. Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements.

Savino Airlines will report, per § 121.703, damage to FCBS and FCAS, in accordance with procedures in GMM, chapter 3. Savino Airlines will retain records of all repairs and alterations identified as affecting FCBS and FCAS in accordance with GMM, chapter 4.

10. Program Approval and Program Revisions.

Savino Airlines will submit this OIP and future proposed revisions to the PMI for review and approval. The PMI will indicate approval of this OIP and accompanying revisions to the GMM to incorporate the OIP processes by issuing OpSpecs D097. Savino Airlines will submit to the PMI for acceptance any revisions to manuals listed in the GMM, chapter 1, that this OIP affects, prior to December 20, 2010. Savino Airlines must submit revisions to the OIP to the PMI for approval. Upon approval, OpSpec D097 will be revised to reflect the revision by date. Savino Airlines will substantiate revisions to the maintenance program that incorporated new or revised DTI using data developed under its CASS program per GMM, chapter 10.

RESERVED. Paragraphs 4-1077 through 4-1082.