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8900.1 CHG 462

VOLUME 5  AIRMAN CERTIFICATION

CHAPTER 1  DIRECTION, GUIDANCE, AND PROCEDURES FOR TITLE 14 CFR PARTS 121/135 AND GENERAL AVIATION

Section 2  Aviation Safety Inspector (Operations) Qualifications and Status

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5-26    INSPECTOR STATUS DURING PRACTICAL TESTS.

A.    Pilot-in-Command (PIC) Status. An aviation safety inspector (ASI) conducts a practical test to observe and evaluate an applicant’s ability to perform the procedures and maneuvers required for the pilot certificate or rating.

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1)    The inspector is not the PIC of the aircraft during the practical test unless acting in that capacity for the flight, or a portion of the flight, by prior arrangement with the applicant or other PIC. To administer a practical test for an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Certificate or a class or type rating on that certificate, or to administer a Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 121 proficiency flight check, an inspector occupying a pilot seat must be fully qualified and current to act as the PIC in that aircraft.
2)    Regardless of the type of aircraft used during a practical test, the applicant and the inspector are not, with respect to each other (or other occupants authorized by the inspector), subject to the requirements or limitations for the carriage of passengers specified in 14 CFR part 61.

B.    Policy Concerning Giving Flight Training, Demonstration, Advice, or Assistance During a Practical Test.

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NOTE:  As implementation of the Airman Certification Standards (ACS) expands, the term “certificate test” may be used in certain situations because it more fully aligns with the integrated ACS approach to training and testing for airman certification purposes. The terms “practical test” and “certification test” are synonymous for the purposes of this guidance.

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1)    It is inappropriate for an ASI to provide flight training and/or to teach techniques to an applicant during a practical test. The role of an ASI during the practical test is to evaluate an applicant’s performance based on compliance with the appropriate ACS or practical test standards (PTS). However, this policy does not preclude an ASI from acting as a student manipulating the controls during the practical test for a flight instructor certification test when the purpose is for evaluating the flight instructor applicant’s teaching ability; nor does this policy prevent an ASI when administering a practical test from trying to relax or otherwise reduce the stress level of an applicant during the test. Providing such help does not change the status of an ASI. Before beginning the practical test, an ASI should discuss these issues with the applicant as part of the overall practical test briefing described in Volume 5, Chapter 1, Section 4.
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2)    If an ASI has to take over the flight controls or assist in the manipulation of the flight controls during a practical test, such action is disqualifying, and the test is therefore failed. The ASI must issue Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application, to the applicant. An exception to this policy is where, through no fault of the applicant, the ASI has to take over the flight controls or assist in the manipulation of the flight controls during the practical test if the ASI determines life or property is at risk (to avoid another aircraft, to avoid weather, to avoid a violation of airspace rules, or take corrective action as a result of an aircraft maintenance problem, etc.). In this case, once the situation is resolved, the practical test will resume.

C.    Physical Location of Inspector.

1)    With certain exceptions, an inspector accompanies an applicant in the aircraft during the practical test. However, the inspector may observe, from the ground, an applicant’s performance of autorotations to touchdown during flight instructor certification practical tests in helicopters if the applicant is the sole occupant of the aircraft. Similarly, the inspector may observe, from the ground or from another airplane, the performance of aerial maneuvers by an applicant flying a single-control aircraft (e.g., a gyroplane).
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NOTE:  There are specific considerations regarding autorotations in the Introduction section of the current edition of FAA-S-8081-7, Flight Instructor Practical Test Standards for Rotorcraft (Helicopter & Gyroplane).

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2)    During practical tests given on aircraft requiring a flightcrew of two or more, the inspector should give the practical test from a designated forward observer’s seat or place in the cabin from which the flight, crew coordination, and Crew Resource Management (CRM) can be adequately observed. An industry pilot who is qualified to act as PIC in that type aircraft must then occupy the other seat.
a)    This arrangement allows the inspector to devote full attention to the practical test rather than be involved with performing the duties of a flightcrew member. It also allows the inspector to assess the command ability of the applicant and to observe flightcrew coordination.
b)    However, this is not intended to preclude an inspector from exercising discretion in deciding which seat to occupy during the practical test. Such factors as aircraft seating configuration, the inspector’s personal knowledge of the person proposing to occupy the pilot seat, and the inspector’s skills, limitations, recent experience, and qualifications should be considered.
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c)    When operators request that one of their qualified pilots occupy the pilot seat during the test for valid reasons (e.g., for insurance purposes), that request should be honored unless the inspector has reason to believe the pilot furnished by the operator lacks the experience and skill to conduct the test prescribed by the inspector. Any disagreement over the conduct of the test should be referred to the regional Flight Standards division (RFSD) for final decision.
3)    Inspectors may observe free balloon flight tests from the ground.
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5-27    ASI (OPERATIONS) QUALIFICATION AND CURRENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR CONDUCTING CERTAIN TESTS, CHECKS, AND JOB FUNCTIONS. In general, ASIs (Operations) must possess at least a Commercial Pilot Certificate and Flight Instructor Certificate in the aircraft category, class, and type, if applicable, for which they conduct practical tests that result in certification or the addition of a pilot type rating. If conducting a practical test at the ATP certification level, then an ASI (Operations) must possess at least an ATP Certificate and Flight Instructor Certificate in the aircraft category, class, and type, if applicable, for which they conduct practical tests that result in certification or the addition of a pilot type rating. Exceptions to this requirement are outlined in subparagraph 5-27D.

A.    Prerequisites. Throughout this order, each job task normally describes ASI qualification prerequisites as “qualification as an ASI (Operations).” Before performing pilot certification or in-flight surveillance tasks without supervision, the requirements of the current edition of AA Aircraft Management Program, and the requirements outlined in this section must be met. Inspectors must also have completed on‑the‑job training (OJT) in the task as outlined in the current edition of FAA Order 3140.20, Flight Standards Service National Training Program, and the office OJT program. Unless otherwise specified in this order, one of the following conditions must be met in order for an ASI (Operations) to be considered qualified to perform specific job functions without supervision:

    Satisfactory completion of an FAA Academy or out-of-agency course on that job function;

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    Satisfactory completion of all OJT requirements for that job function, in accordance with Order 3140.20; or

    Specific written authorization from the RFSD or the Flight Standards Service (AFS) Regulatory Support Division (AFS-600), as appropriate.

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NOTE:  If an inspector only performs pilot certification or surveillance tasks in a full flight simulator (FFS), the currency requirements for those inspectors are addressed in Volume 1, Chapter 3, and this section.

B.    Training Requirements. Before performing airmen certification and/or testing functions unsupervised, the ASI must have completed the courses outlined in the current edition of the Air Carrier and/or General Aviation Operations String document, as applicable to the job function. These documents can be found at https://avssp.faa.gov/avs/afs500/TNA/New%20Courses/Forms/AllItems.aspx. These documents are controlled by the Program Implementation Branch (AFS-520).

C.    Operations Inspector Currency Requirements. This guidance is for inspectors and managers at all levels of AFS for the management of flight training course quotas and the qualification of ASIs (Operations). Inspector qualifications involve meeting the following:

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1)    Before performing airmen certification and/or testing functions, an ASI (Operations) must have completed either the Air Carrier or General Aviation (GA) indoctrination course, as appropriate. The ASI (Operations) must have completed OJT pertaining to the job function being conducted. The ASI (Operations) must hold a valid pilot certificate with the appropriate ratings that relate to the inspector’s job function.
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2)    Aircraft flight training, FFS training or annual proficiency checks are accomplished in accordance with this order and the current edition of the AFS Flight Program Flight Operations Manual (FOM).

D.    Air Carrier/Air Operator Testing/Checking. An ASI is not required to hold a Flight Instructor Certificate for performing 14 CFR part 91 subpart K (91K), 121, 125, or 135 proficiency/competency checks/tests. In general, an ASI (Operations) may perform a proficiency/competency check/test in any aircraft in which they hold that same aircraft rating on their pilot certificate. Below are some further examples about the qualifications required of an ASI (Operations) to conduct the following kinds of part 91K, 121, 125, or 135 competency/proficiency checks or testing or checking activity:

1)    A Flight Instructor Certificate is not required to conduct any part 91K, 121, 125, or 135 competency/proficiency checks/tests regardless of whether those checks/tests result in the issuance of a type rating or pilot certificate.
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2)    A Flight Instructor Certificate is not required to conduct a testing or checking activity in a flight simulation training device (FSTD) under 14 CFR part 142, or any activity pertaining to an air carrier’s training program qualification module.
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3)    To conduct a part 135 competency/proficiency check/test that results in the addition of a pilot type rating on an applicant’s ATP Certificate (e.g., LR-60), an ASI (Operations) would be required to possess an ATP Certificate with that type rating.
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4)    To conduct a part 121 PIC proficiency check/test in an FFS (e.g., B737), an ASI (Operations) must possess at least an ATP Certificate with an Airplane Multiengine Land (AMEL) rating and the appropriate pilot type rating.
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E.    GA Practical Tests. In accordance with part 61, 61.1(b), a practical test “means a test on the areas of operations for an airman certificate, rating, or authorization that is conducted by having the applicant respond to questions and demonstrate maneuvers in flight, in a flight simulator, or in a flight training device.”

1)    ASIs (GA—Operations) who administer practical tests for an airman certification, rating, or authorization must hold either a Commercial Pilot Certificate or ATP Certificate, and Flight Instructor Certificate with the appropriate aircraft category and class rating for the kind of practical test being administered.
2)    ASIs (GA—Operations) who administer certain proficiency/competency checks must hold either a Commercial Pilot Certificate or ATP Certificate with the appropriate aircraft category and class rating for the kind of practical test being administered. However, they do not necessarily need to hold a Flight Instructor Certificate with the appropriate aircraft rating. This reflects a change in policy concerning the Pilot and Flight Instructor Certificate qualifications of ASIs (GA—Operations) for conducting certain proficiency/competency checks.
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NOTE:  Some RFSDs may have applied this guidance inconsistently, resulting in some proficiency/competency checks being conducted outside this policy guideline. We have determined there was no compromise of safety in the conduct of these checks and have decided to adopt the practice of allowing an ASI (GA—Operations) without a Flight Instructor Certificate to conduct certain tests and checks.

F.    Qualifications to Administer Practical Tests. Below are some further explanations about the qualifications required of an ASI (GA—Operations) to conduct the following kinds of practical tests for an Airman Certificate, rating, or authorization under part 61:

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1)    To conduct a practical test in a single-engine seaplane for a Commercial Pilot Certificate applicant, an ASI (GA—Operations) must hold either a Commercial Pilot Certificate or ATP Certificate, with an Airplane Single-Engine Sea (ASES) rating and a Flight Instructor Certificate with an Airplane Single Engine (ASE) rating.
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2)    To conduct a flight instructor practical test for a rotorcraft-helicopter rating, an ASI (GA—Operations) must hold either a Commercial Pilot Certificate or ATP Certificate with a rotorcraft-helicopter rating and Flight Instructor Certificate with the rotorcraft-helicopter rating.
3)    A Flight Instructor Certificate is not required to administratively renew a Flight Instructor Certificate on the basis of 61.197(a)(2).
4)    In general, if the practical test involves the issuance of a Temporary Airman Certificate (FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate), the ASI (GA—Operations) must hold either a Commercial Pilot Certificate or ATP Certificate, and Flight Instructor Certificate with the appropriate ratings for the kind of practical test being conducted.
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G.    ATP Certificates. Practical tests for the issuance of ATP Certificates should be given only by inspectors who possess an ATP Certificate with appropriate category, class, and type ratings. An ASI with a “VFR ONLY” limitation on their ATP Certificate may only conduct practical tests that result in a “VFR ONLY” limitation for the applicant.

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H.    Required Crewmember. Inspectors conducting practical tests must meet the applicable recency of experience requirements of 61.56, 61.57, and 61.58 if they are acting as a required crewmember for the duration of the practical test. To act as a required crewmember during a practical test, an inspector must possess at least a valid third-class medical certificate. When acting as a required pilot flightcrew member on an ATP practical test, including tests for added ratings, inspectors must observe the requirements of part 91, 91.109(c). Before performing duties as PIC or a required crewmember during a practical test, an inspector should meet the requirements of Volume 1, Chapter 3.

I.    Safety Pilot. Before an inspector may act as a PIC, safety pilot, or required crewmember in any airplane or rotorcraft, he or she must first be current according to 61.57 and 61.58. Managers are discouraged from allowing inspectors to act as PIC or safety pilot while conducting a flight check in any aircraft (airplane or helicopter) that requires a type rating, or in any aircraft that requires two pilots.

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J.    AFS-600. Although the FAA always attempts to make sure its ASIs (Operations) hold the appropriate aircraft category, class, and type ratings (if class and type rating is appropriate), AFS-600 is responsible for maintaining a listing of the “best qualified” ASIs (Operations) and issues letters of authorization (LOA) to conduct practical tests where there is not an inspector who meets the appropriate qualifications. For further guidance about AFS-600’s listing of “best qualified,” see paragraph 5-34 below.

K.    Crewmember Status: Additional Training and Currency Requirements. The Operations Inspector Qualifications and Currency Requirements Matrix was developed as a job aid/tool for ASIs to reference qualification and currency requirements they must meet to conduct certain job functions. The matrix does not include all ASI job functions. Each row of the matrix represents a job function, and the columns represent the qualifications the ASI must possess and the currency requirements the ASI must meet in order to perform the job function. The matrix includes references to this order where applicable guidance related to qualifications and currency should be reviewed.

NOTE:  The Operations Inspector Qualification and Currency Requirements Matrix must be used in conjunction with the applicable AFS policy division guidance in this order to determine if an ASI can perform the listed job function. (See Volume 1, Chapter 3, for a copy of the matrix.)

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5-28    PROCEDURES FOR ASIs TAKING KNOWLEDGE AND/OR PRACTICAL TESTS IN THE FIELD. Inspectors may be required or want to be administered either a knowledge or practical test for the issuance of an Airman Certificate or rating in the field. The procedures described here are offered as a means of ensuring that the certification tasks are completed in a timely and acceptable manner and that any impropriety, or the appearance thereof, is avoided.

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A.    Inspector Training. Inspectors are normally scheduled into formal training courses in accordance with the needs of the FAA, availability of training courses, and national policy. However, there are occasions under which an inspector may acquire qualifications for additional FAA certifications or ratings through an other‑than‑FAA-sponsored formal training course and the inspector is not scheduled for agency qualifications required by their FAA position as a result of that course. In some circumstances in the past, where the knowledge or practical test for an additional certificate or rating was given by an inspector in a field office or RFSD in which the applicant was also assigned certification duties, the objectivity of some of these certifications have been questioned by outside sources. Although there is no objection to an inspector accomplishing the necessary training and certification requirements locally for the addition or reinstatement of a certificate or rating through personal training, the procedures outlined below are to be followed (to include when attending agency formal training courses that result in the addition of a certificate, category, class, type rating, or authorization such as Category (CAT) II, CAT III, etc.) except where it is considered impractical and/or would impose undue hardship on the inspector as an applicant. The inspector’s office manager will correspond with the RFSD manager via memorandum to submit the request. This will help ensure objectivity in the training and certification process for our inspector workforce.

1)    Knowledge tests, if required, may be accomplished at any available computer-testing designee knowledge testing location after advising the RFSD manager or his or her designated representative (regional branch manager).
2)    Practical tests for basic certification areas and for additional certificates, category, class, type ratings, and authorizations (such as CAT II, CAT III, etc.) must be authorized in writing by the RFSD manager or his or her designated representative (regional branch manager). Being assigned an FAA-sponsored formal training course is considered having any practical test that occurs during the training course being approved in writing.
3)    The RFSD, as appropriate, will appoint an examining inspector from a district office other than that of the applicant, or from qualified inspectors within the region’s jurisdictional area after complying with subparagraph 5-28B below.
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NOTE:  Exceptions to the above guidance made necessary by either unique circumstances, such as where a qualified inspector in a unique aircraft type is not readily available within a reasonable timeframe, must have written concurrence of the jurisdictional RFSD. This could include the use of a “best qualified” inspector as designated by AFS-600 or the use of an appropriately qualified designee. Every effort should be made to make the request early enough to facilitate the appointment of an appropriately qualified ASI to conduct the practical test.

B.    Selection of FAA ASI to Conduct the Practical Test. The RFSD will coordinate the selection of the ASI who will be administering the practical test to the applicant (inspector) with the manager of the Central Administration of AFS-600. The ASI who administers the practical test may not be from the same Flight Standards District Office (FSDO), unless there are special circumstances and the jurisdictional RFSD has approved it.

5-29    TURBOPROP AIRPLANE INITIAL QUALIFICATIONS. No inspector should conduct a practical test (certification, pilot examiner, proficiency check, etc.) in a turboprop airplane unless one of the following qualifications is met:

A.    Type Ratings. The inspector must hold a type rating in a large turboprop airplane. In addition, the inspector must receive a briefing on the subjects specified below in subparagraph 5-32G.

B.    FAA Form 4040-2, FAA Crewmember Check Record. The inspector must have an official flight check recorded on FAA Form 4040-2. This flight check can be taken in any type of small (less than 12,500 pounds) turboprop airplane. The flight check must be conducted by a qualified inspector, a qualified industry instructor, or a qualified instructor from the FAA Academy. The initial flight check must comply with the provisions of subparagraph 5-32G.

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C.    Academy Course. Inspectors assigned to flightcrew member, safety pilot, or airmen certification job functions in turboprop airplanes must have completed the FAA Academy Turboprop C90GTx Initial Flight course or Turboprop Initial – Flight (Integrated Avionics) course and have successfully completed a flight check. This requirement does not apply to inspectors who hold a type rating in a turbopropeller-powered airplane. RFSDs may submit requests for a waiver to AFS-600 when an inspector has logged at least 200 hours as a pilot in a turbopropeller-powered airplane within the last 5 years.

5-30    TURBOJET AND TYPE RATING INITIAL QUALIFICATIONS.

A.    Qualifications. No inspector will conduct a practical test in a turbojet aircraft or an aircraft requiring a type rating unless all the following qualifications are met:

1)    The inspector must hold a type rating for that aircraft.
2)    The inspector has initial turbojet qualification training conducted by the FAA at the Aeronautical Center or from an out-of-agency training course. If the initial turbojet training was conducted out-of-agency, the inspector must have in-agency recurrent training.
3)    The inspector must successfully complete a turbojet or type rating recurrent training course, arranged by the FAA, in that type of aircraft, regardless of pre-employment qualification.
4)    In all cases, the course must include, or the inspector must be briefed on, the provisions of subparagraph 5-32G.
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5)    For a flight program participant under a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), either with an air carrier or a part 142 training center, all training and checking is completed in accordance with the MOU and the AFS Flight Program FOM.

B.    Additional Type Ratings. Inspectors who meet the above requirements for initial qualification and subsequently obtain additional type ratings through other than FAA-arranged courses may conduct type rating tests in the appropriate aircraft, provided the recurrent training requirements of paragraph 5-32 are met.

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NOTE:  For a flight program participant under an MOU, either with an air carrier or a part 142 training center, all training and checking is completed in accordance with the MOU and the AFS Flight Program FOM.

5-31    PRIORITY OF TRAINING. Managers should categorize each inspector as a “line” inspector or a “staff” inspector for the purpose of recurrent training priorities.

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A.    Line Inspector. A line inspector is an inspector assigned to a FSDO or certificate management office (CMO) in a program involving airman certification and surveillance events. Line inspectors assigned to airmen certification duties as a required flightcrew member/safety pilot will be scheduled and be given “the first and highest priority” for flight/FFS training. RFSDs will reprogram training quotas to ensure that line inspectors who have not received recurrent flight/FFS training within the past 24 calendar-months, or 12 months for inspectors assigned to aircraft requiring a type rating, are given the first priority for any flight training available in order of their last training date.

1)    RFT and proficiency checks are accomplished in accordance with Order 4040.9 and the AFS Flight Program FOM.
2)    Managers must plan on using programmed training quotas, since it is unlikely that funds will be available for special flight requests.
3)    Line inspectors should be scheduled for RFT every 12 months as resources permit. When current, line inspectors may perform airman certification duties. Line inspectors may also perform en route surveillance while traveling. See Volume 6, Chapter 2, Section 9, for guidance for inspectors performing en route inspections.
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B.    Staff Inspectors. A staff inspector is an inspector assigned to the RFSD, national headquarters (HQ), or to management or supervisory duties at the FSDO level. First level supervisors and RFSD and HQ staff inspectors will not normally be assigned to airmen certification duties. In the rare event that this becomes necessary, those inspectors will be given second priority for any available training after all line inspectors have received the minimum flight training described in paragraph 5-31A above. Staff inspectors should be scheduled for RFT every 12 months as resources permit.

1)    When current, staff inspectors may perform airman certification duties. Staff inspectors may and should perform en route surveillance while traveling.
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2)    Staff inspectors should be given second priority for available training quotas. A staff inspector should not be scheduled for flight training until all line inspectors have been scheduled.

C.    Initial Qualification. Managers should ensure that initial aircraft qualification training is allocated to those line inspectors who require specific type ratings to complete their programs.

1)    An inspector should not be scheduled to attend a type rating course until he or she is selected to fill a position for which that type rating is required.
2)    A staff inspector who does not possess a type rating should be scheduled for a course only when there are no line inspectors available for the course.
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3)    Both line and staff inspectors may be scheduled for type rating courses in conjunction with Flight Standardization Board (FSB) requirements with the concurrence of the General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS-800) or the Air Transportation Division (AFS-200), as applicable.
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5-32    RECURRENT TRAINING. ASIs assigned to flightcrew member, safety pilot, or airmen certification duties in a FFS or aircraft will receive recurrent training in order to conduct practical tests.

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A.    All Aircraft. Inspectors assigned to flightcrew member, safety pilot, or airmen certification duties in an FFS or aircraft, other than those requiring type ratings by type design, must complete one flight/FFS training course each 24 months in each aircraft category used for the job function. In order to perform checks in an aircraft category, an inspector must meet the flight time requirements and also be current as a PIC according to Order 4040.9 and Volume 1, Chapter 3, as applicable.

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B.    Qualification in One Turbojet or Aircraft Requiring a Type Rating. Inspectors assigned to flightcrew member, safety pilot, or airmen certification duties in an FFS, airplane, or rotorcraft requiring type ratings must complete at least one flight/FFS training course each 12 months in a type of aircraft for which that inspector is assigned. Flight/FFS training courses should be scheduled in rotation for those inspectors who are assigned to more than one aircraft requiring a type rating. However, these inspectors should not be scheduled for more than one course every 12 months in an aircraft category.

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C.    Qualifying in More than One Type Rating.

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1)    To qualify in more than one turbojet aircraft or aircraft requiring a type rating, an inspector must have a recurrent course that includes aircraft and FFS time in at least one of the aircraft every 24 months. Training should be scheduled so that aircraft types are rotated. For alternating annual intervals, a course that is conducted entirely in an FFS is acceptable.
2)    The inspector must meet the requirements of 61.56, 61.57, and 61.58, as applicable to the aircraft used. The flight training course requirements of this order do not supersede or contradict the requirements of 61.58 with respect to aircraft certificated for more than one required pilot crewmember.

D.    Turbojets. For each turbojet airplane, the inspector must have a recurrent training course every 24 months in order to perform job functions requiring flight.

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E.    FFS Unavailable. When FFSs are not available for a specific aircraft, training should be conducted in that aircraft.

F.    Training Source. In order to meet the requirements of this paragraph, a training course must meet one of the following requirements:

1)    A formal course at the FAA Academy;
2)    An out-of-agency course with a specified FAA course number;
3)    A formal course sponsored by the RFSD with a specified FAA course number; or
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4)    With RFSD approval, an FAA Form 4040-2 checkout is acceptable in lieu of formal training described above under the following circumstances:
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a)    For non-turbojet aircraft only, FAA Form 4040-2 checkout is acceptable for alternating annual periods. However, if this option is exercised, the next required recurrent training must be in accordance with subparagraph 5-32F1) above.
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b)    Inspectors assigned to airmen certification duties in gyroplanes, gliders, lighter-than-air, or light-sport categories of aircraft may satisfy the 24-month flight training requirements by completing a PIC proficiency check in the appropriate aircraft category under Order 4040.9. For gliders, gyroplanes, balloons, and light-sport aircraft, an FAA Form 4040-2 check conducted by a qualified inspector or industry pilot is acceptable. Under these circumstances, if the inspector being checked in accordance with Order 4040.9 fails any of the required maneuvers or pilot operations required to complete the check, the person giving the check will give additional proficiency flight time and practice to the inspector during the course of the check. At the completion of a check where an inspector required additional proficiency flight time but was unsuccessful in completing the check, the person giving the check will forward a report to the manager requesting the flight check with the pertinent details of the check and a recommendation for any further action.
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NOTE:  For training courses not meeting the requirements specified above, written approval is required from AFS-600.

G.    Training Content. FAA Academy courses and FAA Form 4040-2 checkouts must cover the following subjects. Out-of-agency courses will be modified, whenever possible, to emphasize the following topics:

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    Practical test procedures, including use of ACS or PTS, as appropriate, the provisions of this order, and other relevant guidance, such as the practical test briefing;

    Issues any special emphasis items, such as legal cases affecting the administration of practical tests, safety issues, and new equipment and procedures; and

    Conducting practical tests while occupying a pilot station and serving or not serving as a required flightcrew member.

H.    Aircraft Applicability. The following guidelines must be observed when scheduling required recurrent training:

1)    Performance of job functions involving flight in turbojets or airplanes requiring a type rating requires recurrent training in such aircraft.
2)    Performance of job functions involving flight in small turboprop aircraft requires recurrent training in such aircraft or, at alternating annual intervals, turbojet or large turboprop airplanes. The training does not need to be in the make or model in order to conduct job functions in that make and model.
3)    Performance of job functions involving flight in small piston-powered airplanes requires recurrent training in such aircraft or, at alternating annual intervals, in turbine-powered airplanes.
4)    Performance of job functions involving flight in helicopters or gyroplanes requires recurrent training in such aircraft, as appropriate.
5)    Performance of job functions involving flights in gliders or lighter-than-air aircraft requires at least an FAA Form 4040-2 checkout within the preceding 12 months in the category and, if appropriate, class.
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NOTE:  For aircraft training combinations not meeting the requirements specified above, written approval is required from AFS-600.

I.    Special Currency Requirements. Notwithstanding the other provisions of this section, an inspector who conducts a practical test in a small aircraft while occupying a pilot station, regardless of the inspector’s status as required flightcrew member, must have made at least three takeoffs and landings in that category and class of aircraft within the preceding 90 days. If the practical test is in a tailwheel airplane, the takeoffs and landings must be in a tailwheel airplane unless rental is impractical. If rental of such aircraft is impractical, a qualified inspector approved by the RFSD may conduct practical tests in tailwheel aircraft under the provisions of subparagraph 5-34B below.

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J.    Inspectors Performing Job Functions Not Requiring Flight. The need to keep all operations inspectors familiar with current flight test policies, advances in technology, the operating environment, and other areas are crucial to the credibility of the AFS inspection force. The recurrent training provisions of this paragraph should be observed by GA operations inspectors assigned to RFSDs, HQ, and other administrative positions. Such inspectors must receive at least one recurrent training course or approved alternative training every 24 months, unless otherwise approved by the Director of Flight Standards Service (AFS-1).

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5-33    WAIVER AUTHORITY. An RFSD manager may request individual inspector waivers to the flight training requirements from AFS-600. The waiver will only be issued when the training has been requested but the courses are unavailable and a current and qualified inspector is not available. The waiver will be valid for a maximum of 6 months and will not be reissued. Waivers are strongly discouraged and will only be issued after all efforts to obtain the required training have been exhausted. If circumstances warrant the issuance of a waiver, the inspector must be granted sufficient official duty time, not to exceed 8 hours, to refresh himself or herself on aircraft systems and procedures. All waivers should expressly prohibit the inspector from occupying a required flightcrew member seat while performing duties under the authority of the waiver. The waiver provisions of this paragraph apply to all aircraft categories. However, the provisions of paragraph 5-32 may not be waived.

A.    Overdue Training. Managers should limit waivers of training to a period of no longer than 6 months since the last training. An inspector’s manager will schedule an inspector who has not completed RFT in the past 12 months for recurrent training as soon as practical.

B.    Retirement or Termination. Inspectors who have indicated an intention to retire or terminate their service within the 6 calendar-months after the month in which their recurrent training is due should not be sent to recurrent training. Inspectors in this category may be placed on a waiver to this requirement for up to 6 months.

5-34    INSPECTOR AVAILABILITY.

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A.    Regional Coordination. When it becomes necessary to provide type rating service for an airman within the United States, the region with an assigned qualified type rating inspector should provide the services. When a region requests the services of a type rating inspector from another region, the division manager (or designated representative) should request the services of the type rating inspector through the other RFSD manager.

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B.    LOA. If an application is received for a practical test in an aircraft that requires a type rating in accordance with 61.31(a) for which a rated and current inspector is not available, AFS-600 may issue an LOA in lieu of a type rating to an inspector who is best qualified in an aircraft with similar characteristics after coordinating with the applicable RFSD. This provision is limited to those cases in which an appropriately rated inspector does not exist. The LOA must name the applicant to be checked. If an application is received for a practical test in an aircraft where no inspector meets the requirements of the Operations Inspector Qualifications and Currency Requirements Matrix, the guidance in this section will be followed.

1)    The LOA must name the applicant(s) to be checked, the ASI authorized to conduct the check, the aircraft make, model, series, and type (if applicable) in which the check is to be conducted, the specific check to be accomplished, and the validity period of the LOA. Blanket authorizations to individual inspectors should not be issued. Each flight test must be handled on a case-by-case basis.
2)    Inspectors issued such an LOA should conduct the practical test from an approved forward observer’s seat unless circumstances, such as those described in subparagraph 5-26C, preclude it. In such cases, specific permission to conduct the practical flight test from a pilot seat must be granted in the LOA issued by AFS-600.
3)    The LOA should not be used as a means to circumvent the recurrent training requirements of paragraph 5-32.

RESERVED. Paragraphs 5-35 through 5-50.