6/27/17

 

8900.1 CHG 451

VOLUME 5  airman certification

Chapter 1  DIRECTION, GUIDANCE, AND PROCEDURES FOR title 14 CFR PARTS 121/135 AND GENERAL AVIATION

Section 3  Phases of Certification

5-51    GENERAL. Any certification function that might affect a pilot certificate or rating requires the airman requesting the action (e.g., a practical test for a pilot certificate or rating or the removal of a limitation) to fill out Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application.

5-52    INTEGRATED AIRMEN CERTIFICATION AND/OR RATING APPLICATION (IACRA). The FAA’s IACRA system is authorized for use, and may be used, by aviation safety inspectors (ASI) and examiners for processing applications at the request of the airman applicant. For instructions on the use of IACRA, see Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 4, and http://iacra.faa.gov/. When an examiner uses the IACRA, nothing will be mailed to the managing FAA office. The process is completely electronic. The examiner destroys the superseded certificate by punching a hole in the FAA symbol with a hole punch. If a letter of discontinuance is issued, the IACRA has the capability to print FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate, or FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application; the examiner completes it and issues it to the applicant. The applicant presents the knowledge test to the examiner, who then checks in the IACRA to see if it is valid and attests that he or she has verified the test. The IACRA creates a written test document directly from the written test data and sends that to the Airmen Certification Branch (AFS-760) with the application and all other required electronically generated documents. If extenuating circumstances do not allow the use of the IACRA, follow the instructions in this section for completing FAA Form 8710-1 or FAA Form 8710-11, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application – Sport Pilot, as applicable.

NOTE:  Pilot examiners and ASIs must have the capability to use the IACRA if the airman applicant elects to use the IACRA.

NOTE:  At the time of publication, the IACRA is not able to process applications for a restricted privileges Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Certificate. Future updates to the IACRA may allow for the processing of a restricted privileges ATP Certificate online. Until such an upgrade, FAA Form 8710-1 must be utilized for the application file.

5-53    COMPLETING FAA FORM 8710-1.

A.    Instructions. Instructions for accurate completion of this form (see Figure 5-1, FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application) are included on a tear-off sheet at the top of the form.

B.    Special Emphasis Items. Particular attention should be paid to the following items:

1)    In section I, the block for “Airline Transport—Restricted” should only be utilized if the applicant is applying for an ATP Certificate with restricted privileges in accordance with Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 61, § 61.160. The applicant must meet the minimum eligibility requirements and provide the appropriate documentation for which the airman is applying for an “Airline Transport—Restricted” pilot certificate. In addition to completing FAA Form 8710-1 according to the instructions page, the FAA inspector or aviation safety technician (AST) should ensure that the applicant has completed the following sections and the following documentation is presented or submitted by the applicant (see Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 18, Figure 5-83, Letter of Discontinuance, for a job aid):
a)    Military-trained:

    Section I, “Airline Transport—Restricted,” block is marked.

    The applicant must be at least 21 years old at the time of application.

    Section II, “U.S. Military Competence or Experience,” is completed.

    Form DD-214, Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty, indicating that the person was honorably discharged from the U.S. Armed Forces, or an official U.S. Armed Forces record that shows the pilot is currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.

    An official U.S. Armed Forces record that shows the person graduated from a U.S. Armed Forces undergraduate pilot training school and received a rating qualification as a military pilot.

    Section III, “Record of Pilot Time,” includes the minimum aeronautical experience required.

    The attachments must include the following and the corresponding blocks marked:

    A valid knowledge test report.

    If the knowledge test was passed after July 31, 2014, a copy of the ATP Certification Training Program (CTP) graduation certificate.

b)    Graduates of a bachelor’s or associate’s degree program with an aviation major:

1.    Section I, “Airline Transport—Restricted,” block is marked.

2.    Section I, “Other (Specify),” is marked and completed with one of the following:

    “Bachelor’s Degree, 60” – This will ensure that the application is processed in accordance with § 61.160(b).

    “Bachelor’s Degree, 30” – This will ensure that the application is processed in accordance with § 61.160(d).

    “Associate’s Degree, 30” – This will ensure that the application is processed in accordance with § 61.160(c).

3.    The applicant must be at least 21 years old at the time of application.

4.    Section III, “Record of Pilot Time,” includes the minimum aeronautical experience required.

5.    The attachments must include the following and the corresponding blocks marked:

    Official college transcript and a certifying statement on the transcript or other FAA‑accepted document;

    A valid knowledge test report; and

    If the knowledge test was passed after July 31, 2014, a copy of the ATP or CTP graduation certificate. The remarks from the inspector or examiner must include a valid institution of higher education where the applicant has graduated from and the graduation date.

2)    In section I, the blocks for “Flight Review” and “Instrument Proficiency Check” are not mandatory in meeting the experience requirements of §§ 61.56 and 61.57; however, airmen are encouraged to file the information with the FAA, and it can be used to substantiate past aeronautical experience in the case of a lost logbook.
3)    In section I, block A of the application, ensure the correct order of the applicant’s legal name is last, first, middle (e.g., Brown, Michael William; or Gonzalez Rodrigues, Raul Michael).
4)    In section I, block B of the application, the U.S. Social Security Number (SSN) is optional for U.S. citizens. If the applicant’s SSN is entered, ensure it is the correct one. If the applicant chooses not to use their SSN, ensure the words “Do Not Use” are entered. If the applicant does not have a U.S. SSN, ensure the word “None” is entered.
5)    In section I, block C of the application, ensure the month and day are in the correct order for the applicant’s date of birth (DOB) (e.g., 08/30/1978 for August 30, 1978).
6)    In section I, block D of the application, if the applicant’s place of birth is outside the United States, ensure the applicant has identified the city and country (e.g., Mexico City, Mexico).
7)    In section I, block F of the application, if the applicant claims dual citizenship, ensure the applicant’s primary country is listed in this section. The Temporary Airman Certificate will show the second country in the limitation field (e.g., “Dual citizenship includes France”). To claim dual citizenship, the applicant must present documentation of citizenship for each country to an FAA inspector or AST.
8)    In section I, block H of the application, the applicant must indicate height in inches; no fractions, use whole inches only. Foreign applicants must convert to U.S. measurements (e.g., 1 in = 2.54 cm; 1 cm = 0.3937 in).
9)    In section I, block I of the application, the applicant must indicate weight in pounds; no fractions, use whole pounds only. Foreign applicants must convert to U.S. measurements (e.g., 1 lb = 0.4536 kg; 1 kg = 2.20 lbs).
10)    In section III of the application, “Record of Pilot Time,” the applicant must list at least the aeronautical experience required for the Airman Certificate and rating sought.
a)    Graduates of 14 CFR part 141 pilot schools or 14 CFR part 142 training centers must provide their aeronautical experience in section III, even though the graduation certificate is evidence of having completed the course of training.
Indicates new/changed information.
b)    If an applicant is removing a restriction or limitation from his or her pilot certificate after obtaining the minimum experience requirements, the pilot’s record of flight time must be entered on FAA Form 8710-1, and it must satisfy the minimum experience or flight time requirements specified in the applicable 14 CFR part. For example, an applicant was issued a certificate with the following limitation, “The [name of additional type rating] is subject to pilot-in-command limitations” because he or she did not use an aircraft during the practical test and did not meet the applicable experience requirements of § 61.64(b)(e). If the applicant has now met the § 61.64(g) experience requirement, the FAA Form 8710-1 application is completed, and the applicant will need to record the 25 hours in section II, row A, block 2b, or complete section III, listing pilot in command (PIC) time. The “Limitation Removal” box should be checked and the “Specify other:” field should also identify “Remove SOE Limitation.” It is also highly recommended to indicate this same information in the “Certificate or Rating Being Applied For” in the “Aviation Safety Inspector or Technician Report” section on the back side of the FAA Form 8710-1.

1.    A designee authorized to issue a pilot certificate also has the authority to remove a limitation from that same grade of pilot certificate. The designee must have received training on evaluating an applicant to determine eligibility for removal of a limitation. For example, for a designee to be eligible to remove a limitation from an ATP Certificate in the airplane category with a multiengine land rating, the designee must be authorized to issue an ATP Certificate in the airplane category with a multiengine land rating and have received training on determining eligibility and the process for removal of the limitation.

2.    A Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE) may remove a limitation from a certificate he or she is authorized to issue, provided he or she can verify the minimum eligibility requirements.

3.    See Volume 13, Chapter 1, Section 1 for additional information regarding removal of a limitation by a Training Center Evaluator (TCE) or aircrew program designee (APD).

c)    If aeronautical experience has no bearing on the airman certification action sought, it is unnecessary for an applicant to complete section III. For flight instructor renewal applications, ground instructor qualification applications, pilot type rating applications, and some instances through the utilization of a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA), there are a few examples when aeronautical experience would not have a bearing on the airman certification action; thus, the applicant would not be required to complete section III of the application.
d)    All applicants are encouraged to complete section III for official record purposes, since the application remains on file with the FAA and can be used to substantiate past aeronautical flight experience in order to recreate a lost logbook.
11)    The instructor’s recommendation on the application should be accepted as meeting the required endorsements prescribed under § 61.39(a)(6). The instructor’s recommendation is required on all applications that require testing, except for the ATP Certificate or for type ratings, unless the applicant has previously failed a test for the ATP Certificate or type rating in accordance with § 61.49.
12)    In the “Aviation Safety Inspector or Technician Report” section, the inspector checks “Approved” or “Disapproved,” as appropriate, if they are the certifying officials that are issuing the Temporary Airman Certificate (FAA Form 8060-4).
13)    The inspector indicates the certificate or rating (level, category, class and/or type rating, if applicable) for which the applicant was tested or applying for the type of aircraft used, and its registration number. If more than one aircraft was used, all aircraft must be listed and all registration numbers provided.
14)    The inspector must check all applicable boxes on the application. Inspectors must include the location of the test (i.e., name of facility or airport, city, and state) and the duration of both ground and flight tests.
Indicates new/changed information.
15)    In the “Aviation Safety Inspector or Technician Report” section of the application, the ASI or AST dates and signs the application and enters his or her own pilot certification number (required for ASIs) and district office acronym (required for ASIs and ASTs). If the ASI or AST is accepting the recommendation of a Designated Examiner (DE), ensure the “Designated Examiner or Airman Certification Representative Report” is completed in its entirety and mark the “Examiner’s Recommendation and Accepted/Rejected” boxes.

NOTE:  The date that the Temporary Airman Certificate (FAA Form 8060-4) was issued must match the date indicated within the ASI, AST, or DE report section.

16)    In the “Attachments” section, the inspector must mark all applicable boxes on the application.

NOTE:  If the application was not printed on a duplex printer, on a two-page application, the applicant’s name, DOB, and certificate number (if applicable) must be furnished in this section. The telephone number and email address are optional.

a)    Applicants for an ATP Certificate in the airplane category with a multiengine class rating who complete the knowledge test after July 31, 2014, must present a graduation certificate certifying the completion of the ATP CTP to take the practical test. The graduation certificate must contain the following:

1.    The full name, address, and FAA certificate number of the training provider authorized to conduct the course.

2.    The full name, certificate number, and address of the graduate.

3.    The statement: “The applicant named above has successfully completed the Airline Transport Pilot Certification Training Program as required by § 61.156, and therefore has met the prerequisite required by § 61.35(a)(2) for the Airline Transport Pilot Airplane Knowledge Test.” If the statement is unclear on the graduation certificate, the principal operations inspector (POI) of the endorsing entity should be contacted to validate that the applicant has produced a valid graduation certificate.

4.    The date of issuance.

5.    The signature of the authorized instructor who completed the academic portion of the course.

6.    A sequential number on the certificate starting with the first four identifiers of the training provider’s certificate number.

b)    An applicant applying for an ATP Certificate with restricted privileges in accordance with § 61.160(b), (c), or (d) should present their official college transcript and the following certifying statement: “The [insert institution’s name] certifies that the recipient of this degree has successfully completed all of the aviation coursework requirements of § 61.160[(b), (c), or (d)] and therefore meets the academic eligibility requirements of § 61.160[(b), (c), or (d)].”

C.    Revisions. AFS-760 is advised to accept FAA Form 8710-1 with either clearly legible pen and ink changes to the boxes provided on the form or a legible attachment to the form that shows the required flight experience and is certified by the applicant initials. This includes the entries for second-in-command (SIC) time. ASIs should ensure that DEs are made aware of this procedure.

D.    Clarification Criteria and to Highlight Changes to FAA Form 8710-1.

1)    FAA Form 8710-1 was updated in 2013 to incorporate information required for the ATP Certificate with restricted privileges by the Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations, Final Rule. This included amendments to the form and addition of several blocks in section I, section III, and the “Attachments” section.
Indicates new/changed information.
2)    DEs are required to check the block in the “Designated Examiner or Airman Certification Representative Report” section of FAA Form 8710-1, which states, “I have personally reviewed this applicant’s pilot logbook and/or training record, and I certify that the individual meets the applicable requirements of 14 CFR Part 61 for the certificate or rating sought,” for applicants with part 141 school graduation certificates. Checking this block confirms that the DE has validated the part 141 pilot school or part 142 training center graduate’s compliance with § 61.71.
Indicates new/changed information.
3)    Under the provisions of § 61.71, an applicant who graduates from an approved training program under part 141 or part 142 meets the applicable aeronautical experience, aeronautical knowledge, and areas of operation requirements of part 61, if the applicant presents the graduation certificate and passes the required practical test within the 60 calendar-day period after the date of graduation.
4)    The DE’s review of the records of practical test applicants with part 141 pilot school or part 142 training center graduation certificates is equivalent to the DE’s personal verification that the instructor’s signature on FAA Form 8710-1 correctly indicates that the applicant meets all applicable requirements.
Indicates new/changed information.
5)    Flight Standards District Offices (FSDO) should remind district DEs of the requirement to check all applicable blocks in the “Designated Examiner or Airman Certification Representative Report” section of FAA Form 8710-1 for practical test applicants with part 141 pilot school and part 142 training center graduation certificates. FSDOs should also ensure that DEs understand the format changes in the current edition of FAA Form 8710-1.

5-54    VERIFICATION OF APPLICANT’S IDENTITY. The FAA recognizes the need for increased scrutiny of applicant identification. All inspectors should require positive identification from each person presenting FAA Form 8710-1. This ensures the actual identity of the pilot certificate applicant and helps the inspector establish the applicant’s eligibility.

A.    Deficiencies. The FAA Drug Enforcement Assistance Act of 1988 identified the following deficiencies with regard to issuance of Airman Certificates:

    The use of fictitious names and addresses by applicants for certification;

    The use of stolen or fraudulent identification in applying for certificates and ratings;

    The use of a post office box or mail drop as a return address for the purpose of evading identification of the applicant’s address;

    The use of counterfeit and stolen Airman Certificates; and

    The absence of information concerning physical characteristics of holders of certificates.

B.    Applicant Identification Procedures. To ensure proper identification of pilot certificate applicants, and to address deficiencies specified in the Drug Enforcement Assistance Act, the FAA has implemented the following procedures for field offices and DPEs:

1)    All applicants for airman certificates must apply in person and present positive identification at the time of application. Such identification must include an official photograph of the applicant, the applicant’s signature, and the applicant’s residential address, if different from the mailing address. This information may be presented in more than one form of identification.
2)    An inspector or examiner should not accept a post office box, rural route, flight school address, personal mail box (PMB), a business or other commercial address, or other mail drop address on an airman certificate application from an applicant as the applicant’s mailing address, unless the applicant also provides their physical residential address. If a physical residential address does not exist, the applicant must provide the geographic location of his or her residence on a separate piece of paper and attest by signature. This can be in the form of a map or written directions to the applicant’s physical residential address. In the case of an applicant who resides on a boat, the boat document number or vessel registration number must be provided. If the applicant resides in a recreational vehicle (RV), the tag number, vehicle identification number (VIN), and registration number must be provided. The inspector or examiner attaches these papers to FAA Form 8710-1.
3)    FAA Form 8710-1 provides a space for the inspector or examiner to record the type of identification and number submitted (e.g., Virginia driver’s license number A12345678).
4)    When an airman cannot provide a permanent residential address (e.g., in the case where the person resides in a motor home, is attending an institution of higher education, or is in the process of moving), it is permissible to allow the airman to use his or her parent’s permanent residential address as his or her permanent residential address. However, the airman should be reminded of the requirements of § 61.60 for change of address requirements.

C.    Acceptable Methods of Identification. Acceptable methods of identification include, but are not limited to, unexpired U.S. driver’s licenses, government-issued identification cards, passports, and other forms of identification that enable the inspector to verify the applicant’s identity. The identification method used must be current and valid.

D.    Alternative Methods of Identification. Some applicants may not possess suitable identification as described above. In the case of an applicant under age 18, the applicant’s parent or guardian may have to accompany the applicant and identify themselves as described above. The parent or guardian may then attest to the applicant’s identity. If the parent or guardian does attest to the applicant’s identity, the parent or guardian’s identification information should be placed on the “Airman’s Identification” block of the “Attachments” section of FAA Form 8710-1, and a remark added indicating this practice. For all other applicants, the identification procedures employed must be such that the inspector or examiner can positively identify the applicant in a manner acceptable to the Administrator. In such cases, the identification procedures employed must be disclosed by the inspector or examiner on the application, or, if necessary, in a separate statement. Furthermore, if the applicant appears before a DE, the examiner must obtain approval from the supervising FAA district office for the identification procedure employed. If necessary, applicants may need to apply in person at the FAA field office, complete the required identification procedures, and then obtain an authorization to appear before the examiner for the practical test.

E.    Flight Instructor Renewals. If a certificated flight instructor (CFI) is unable to appear in person before a representative of the Administrator, that instructor may establish his or her identity before either a notary public, a consular official of the U.S. State Department, or the airman’s U.S. Armed Forces commanding officer (CO). The procedure described in the following paragraphs is not meant to preclude the FAA from exercising its prerogative to require an instructor applicant to demonstrate his or her qualifications to hold the certificate, if deemed appropriate.

1)    The applicant and certifying official must complete an appropriate identification affidavit, and the affidavit must be attached to FAA Form 8710-1. Care must be taken to use the same document(s) for identification on both the affidavit and the bottom of the reverse side of FAA Form 8710-1.
2)    The applicant must send FAA Form 8710-1, the identification affidavit, a valid flight instructor refresher clinic (FIRC) graduation certificate, and an unexpired flight instructor certificate to the FSDO of the applicant’s choice. The renewal action in accordance with § 61.197 must be accomplished before the expiration date shown on the applicant’s flight instructor certificate. The documents must arrive at the FSDO before the flight instructor certificate expires to be accepted for renewal.
3)    The receiving FSDO will process the application for renewal in the normal fashion. FAA Form 8710-1, the identification affidavit, the superseded flight instructor certificate, and the Temporary Airman Certificate (FAA Form 8060-4) will be forwarded to AFS-760. Provided that the application package is complete, and the FAA has no reason to require a demonstration of proficiency by the airman, the flight instructor certificate will be issued and mailed to the applicant. The FSDO will return the FIRC graduation certificate and the temporary certificate to the applicant.

F.    Applicant Identification Anomalies. When pilot or instructor certificate applicants present forms of identification that are unacceptable, inspectors and examiners should be alert for any indication of fraudulent or altered forms of identification or other irregularity that may indicate an attempt by the applicant to falsely represent his or her identity. Any such indication should be reported immediately to the nearest Civil Aviation Security Field Office (CASFO) or Regional Civil Aviation Security Division. Title 49 of the United States Code (49 U.S.C.) § 46306 was amended to make willful or fraudulent misrepresentation for the purpose of applying for any FAA certificate grounds for criminal penalties of fines under Title 18 of the United States Code (18 U.S.C.) § 38, imprisonment for not more than 5 years, or both; or, if connected with transportation of controlled substances by aircraft, fines under 18 U.S.C., imprisonment for not more than 5 years, or both.

G.    Notification of Examiners. Regional Flight Standards Division Managers (RFSDM) should ensure that all FSDOs provide copies of this information to all DEs. District offices should also brief examiners on these procedures during regular examiner surveillance, annual examiner meetings, or other examiner contacts.

H.    Public Notification. Public notice of these procedural changes should be made by FAA headquarters (HQ). Field offices are authorized to describe the contents of this information to the public. Any questions that cannot be resolved may be directed to FAA HQ, Airmen Certification and Training Branch (AFS‑810).

5-55    DRUG CONVICTIONS AND APPLICATION. FAA Form 8710-1 asks in section I, block O, “Have you ever been convicted for violation of any Federal or state statutes relating to narcotic drugs, marijuana, or depressant or stimulant drugs or substances?” The applicant must check “Yes” or “No,” as appropriate (refer to § 61.15). Do not include alcohol offenses involving motor vehicle mode of transportation, as those are covered on FAA Form 8500-8, Application for Airman Medical Certificate or Airman Medical and Student Pilot Certificate.

A.    “No” Marked. If the “No” box is marked, the inspector conducts the practical test and, if appropriate, issues the airman certificate as usual. If it is determined later that the applicant should have marked “Yes,” the inspector should follow established procedures in Volume 7, Chapter 6, Section 1, Conduct an Investigation of FAA Flight Operations to Determine Compliance, and the current edition of FAA Order 2150.3, FAA Compliance and Enforcement Program, regarding falsification of application.

B.    “Yes” Marked. If the applicant indicates “Yes,” the applicant must indicate the date of conviction.

1)    If the date of final conviction is more than 1 year before the date of application, the inspector should conduct the practical test and, if appropriate, issue the airman certificate.
2)    An examiner must contact an operations inspector in the nearest district office, and advise the inspector that the file indicates a narcotics conviction more than 1 year before the date of application. The operations inspector receiving this notification should advise the appropriate Regional Flight Surgeon (RFS) for any action deemed appropriate.
3)    If the date of final conviction is less than 1 year before the date of application, the inspector or examiner may not continue with the examination. The examiner should notify the appropriate FSDO of the decision to terminate the examination and forward the application to the FSDO. The FSDO should contact Regional Counsel to determine the appropriate action.

NOTE:  If the applicant marks “Yes,” and the date of final conviction is more than 1 year before the date of the application, the inspector or examiner should conduct the practical test and, if appropriate, issue the airman certificate as usual.

5-56    INSPECTOR REVIEW OF APPLICATION FORMS. Applicants should follow the instructions for completing FAA application forms carefully to preclude an excessive number of airman certification paperwork files from being returned by AFS-760 for correction. Application forms are designed for computer processing of information. Applicants should be aware that character limitations are imposed in some areas. Inspectors should ensure that applicants use FAA Form 8710-1 for the ATP Certificate (see Figure 5-1) and FAA Form 8400-3, Application for an Airman Certificate and/or Rating, for the Flight Engineer (FE), flight navigator, and Aircraft Dispatcher Certificates (see Figure 5-3, FAA Form 8400-3, Application for Airman Certificate and/or Rating). Inspectors should use the procedures and guidance that follow when reviewing an application form.

A.    Application for an Airman Certificate and/or Rating—FAA Form 8400-3. Inspectors should review the front side of the application form as follows:

1)    Type of Certificate Designation. Ensure that the block designating the type of certificate for which the application is being made is checked.
2)    Applying for an Additional Rating. When an applicant already holds the basic certificate and is applying for a rating to be added to the basic certificate, ensure that the “Additional Rating” block is checked. This block should only be checked when a rating is being added to an existing certificate.
3)    Reissuance of Certificate. When the applicant already holds the certificate and is applying for the certificate to be reissued, ensure that the “Reissuance of Certificate” block is checked.
4)    Section 1, Type of Aircraft to be Used. Ensure that both the make and model of the aircraft to be used are entered. This entry should be identical to the current designation. Since aircraft type designations are frequently changed, a current listing of the designations may be obtained at http://registry.faa.gov/TypeRatings/Type_Rating_Table.pdf.
5)    Section 2, Time in This Aircraft. Ensure that the time accrued in the make and model of aircraft to be used in the flight test is entered in this block. Simulator time must not be entered. If the flight test will be conducted in two segments (full flight simulator (FFS) and aircraft), the block should be left blank until the applicant takes the aircraft portion of the test.
6)    Section 3, Name of Employer. Ensure that the employer’s name is entered in this block. (e.g., American Airlines).
7)    Section 4, Applicant Identification. Ensure that the applicant has completed this section in its entirety.
8)    Section 5, Certificates Held by Applicant. Ensure that all applicable boxes are checked.
9)    Section 6, Applicant’s Certification. Ensure that the applicant has signed and dated the application with a date that is on or before the date reflected in Section 8, “Evaluation Record.”
10)    Section 7, Instructor’s Recommendation. Ensure that this section is completed if the applicant fails a test and retests in less than 30 days.
11)    Section 8, Evaluation Record. Ensure that this section is completed with the “Oral” and “Simulator Check” and/or “Oral” and “Aircraft Flight Check” signature of the inspector or examiner, and the date of the testing. Ensure that the date of the practical test is the same date that is reflected on the Temporary Airman Certificate (FAA Form 8060-4). Section 8 will not be completed if the applicant completed an Advanced Qualification Program (AQP). A statement in Section 10, “Remarks,” will indicate that an AQP was completed.
12)    Section 9, Inspector’s Record. Ensure that the “Temporary Airman Certificate Issued” box has been checked if a temporary was issued. If a Notice of Disapproval of Application was issued, then this box will need to be checked. The “Examiner’s Action Accepted” box will be checked by the inspector if the examiner’s action has been accepted and approved. The last line will also be completed and will include the date, inspector’s signature, and FSDO office.

B.    Reverse Side of FAA Form 8400-3. Inspectors should review the back side of the application form as follows:

1)    Section A, Flight Engineer. Items 1–11 must be graded satisfactory or unsatisfactory by the examiner or inspector, or the practical test must indicate “Job Aid Used.” If the applicant completed an AQP, the practical test report will not be completed. This will be annotated in the “Remarks” section.
2)    The Airman’s Identification Section. This section will be completed to show the form of identification used, the number, and expiration date (e.g., Maryland driver’s license, 123456789, expires December 31, 2020).
3)    Section 10, Remarks. This section will be completed with any information that will help make the application more clear.

C.    FAA Form 8710-1. Inspectors should ensure that applicants complete the appropriate blocks in accordance with the instructions provided with the guidance material listed in paragraph 5-53 and with the form instructions listed below.

NOTE:  In subparagraphs 1) through 19) below, “you” is referring to the applicant.

1)    Block A, Name. Enter full legal name (Last, First, Middle). Only allow up to 47 characters including suffix and spaces. Do not change the name on subsequent applications unless it is done in accordance with § 61.25. If you do not have a middle name, enter “NMN.” If you have a middle initial only, indicate “Initial only.” If you are a Jr., II, or III, so indicate. If you have an FAA certificate, the name on the application should be the same as the name on the certificate, unless you have had it changed in accordance with § 61.25.
2)    Block B, SSN. The SSN is optional; however, this block should not be left blank. If the SSN is not available for FAA use, enter “Do Not Use.” If the applicant does not have an SSN, enter “None.” In either case, AFS-760 will issue a 9-digit pseudo-number.
3)    Block C, Date of Birth. Check for accuracy. Enter 8 digits. Use numeric characters (e.g., 07/09/1925 instead of July 9, 1925). Check to see that the DOB is the same as it is on the medical certificate.
4)    Block D, Place of Birth. If you were born in the United States, enter the city and state where you were born. If the city is unknown, enter the county and state. If you were born outside the United States, enter the name of the city and country where you were born.
Indicates new/changed information.
5)    Block E1, Residential Address. Enter residence number and street, city, state, and ZIP code. If a foreign address, country must also be included. Check for accuracy. Make sure the numbers are not transposed.
Indicates new/changed information.
6)    Block E2, Mailing Address. If a Post Office Box, rural route, flight school address, PMB, commercial address, or other mail drop is furnished as the preferred mailing address, the physical residential address must also be furnished. If a physical residential address does not exist, a map or written directions to the applicant’s physical residence must be attached to the application. FAA policy requires that you provide proof of your permanent residential address on every FAA application form.
7)    Block F, Citizenship/Nationality. Mark “USA” if you are a U.S. citizen or legally naturalized citizen. If you are not a U.S. citizen, enter the country where you are a legal citizen. If the applicant claims dual citizenship, the information should be articulated within this box and appropriate documentation presented.
8)    Block G, Do You Read, Speak, Write, and Understand the English Language? Mark “Yes” or “No.” If you answered “No” and it is due to medical reasons, an operating limitation will be placed on the certificate in accordance with Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 5.
9)    Block H, Height. Enter height in inches. For example, 5’9” should be entered as 69 inches. Enter whole inches only. Do not enter fractions. Foreign applicants must convert to U.S. measurements (for height, 1 in = 2.54 cm; 1 cm = 0.3937 in).
10)    Block I, Weight. Enter weight in pounds. Enter whole pounds only. Do not enter fractions. Foreign applicants must convert to U.S. measurements (for weight, 1 lb = 0.4536 kg; 1 kg = 2.20 lbs).
Indicates new/changed information.
11)    Block J, Hair Color. Spell out the color of hair. Choose from the following: bald, black, red, brown, blond, gray, or white. If you wear a wig or toupee, enter the color of your hair under the wig or toupee.
Indicates new/changed information.
12)    Block K, Eye Color. Spell out the color of eyes. Choose from the following: blue, brown, black, hazel, green, or gray.
13)    Block L, Sex. Mark “Male” or “Female.”
Indicates new/changed information.
14)    Block M, Do You Hold, or Have You Ever Held, an FAA Certificate? Mark “Yes” or “No.” A student pilot certificate is a pilot certificate.
a)    Block M1, Grade of Certificate. Enter the grade of pilot certificate (such as student, recreational, private, commercial, or ATP) currently or previously held, not the grade for which the application is being made. Flight instructor certificate information should not be entered into this block.
b)    Block M2, Certificate Number. If the applicant already holds, or has previously held, an FAA pilot certificate, enter that certificate number.
c)    Block M3, Date Issued. Enter the date the FAA pilot certificate was issued.
15)    Block N, Do You Hold a Medical Certificate? Ensure that the applicant marks either “Yes” or “No.”
a)    Block N1, Class of Medical Certificate. Enter the class of medical certificate.
Indicates new/changed information.
b)    Block N2, Name of Medical Examiner. Enter the name of the Medical Examiner.
c)    Block N3, Date Issued. Enter the date the medical certificate was issued.
16)    Block O. This block asks the question, “Have you ever been convicted for violation of any Federal or state statutes relating to narcotic drugs, marijuana, or depressant or stimulant drugs or substances?” The applicant must mark either “Yes” or “No.” Do not include alcohol offenses involving motor vehicle mode of transportation, as those are covered on FAA Form 8500-8 or FAA Form 8500-9, Medical Certificate _____ Class.
a)    If the applicant marked “No,” the inspector or examiner should conduct the practical test and, if appropriate, issue the airman certificate. If it is determined later that the applicant should have marked “Yes,” the inspector should conduct an investigation to determine compliance (refer to FAA Order 2150.3 regarding falsification of application).
b)    If the applicant marked “Yes,” the applicant must indicate the date of final conviction. If the date of final conviction is less than 1 year before the date of application, the inspector or examiner may not continue with the examination. The examiner should notify the appropriate FSDO of the decision to terminate the examination and forward the application to the FSDO. The FSDO should contact Regional Counsel to determine what action to take.

NOTE:  If the applicant marks “Yes,” and the date of final conviction is more than 1 year before the date of the application, the inspector or examiner should conduct the practical test and, if appropriate, issue the airman certificate as usual.

c)    On November 29, 1990, a final rule affecting pilots convicted of alcohol- or drug-related motor vehicle offenses became effective. An airman’s conviction of a motor vehicle offense involving either alcohol or drugs is to be evaluated by the Aerospace Medical Certification Division (AAM-300). An alcohol- or drug-related conviction is not necessarily grounds for disqualification. A medical judgment relative to the condition involved must be made by the Federal Air Surgeon, the Manager of AAM-300, or an RFS. Under this new rule, an airman certificate or rating may be denied to an individual who has had two or more alcohol- or drug-related motor vehicle convictions or state motor vehicle actions within a 3-year period. The information requested on the old FAA Form 8710-1 exceeded the requirements currently outlined in 14 CFR. As a result of this problem, the language on the form was revised to comply with the new rule. When the Federal Air Surgeon reissues a medical certificate to a drug- or alcohol-convicted airman, the airman may then exercise the privileges of the new airman certificate. The inspector or examiner should inspect the applicant’s current medical certificate to ensure that it is valid.

D.    Section II, Certificate or Rating Applied For on Basis Of. Mark the appropriate block: A, B, C, D, or E.

1)    Block A1, Aircraft to be Used. Enter the make and model of the aircraft to be used. This should be identical to the current designation. Since aircraft type designations are frequently changed, a current listing of the designations may be obtained at http://registry.faa.gov/TypeRatings/Type_Rating_Table.pdf. If the entire test was in a flight simulation training device (FSTD), the block can be left blank. AFS-760 double-checks this with the attached Temporary Airman Certificate (FAA Form 8060-4) (see Figure 5-4, FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate) to ensure that the proper aircraft type rating is issued.

NOTE:  The aircraft listed in Section II, block A1 must match the aircraft listed in the “Aviation Safety Inspector or Technician Report” section. If two aircraft are used for the practical test, both aircraft must also be shown in the “Aviation Safety Inspector or Technician Report” section.

Indicates new/changed information.
2)    Block A2, Total Time in This Aircraft and/or Any Approved FFS or FTD.
a)    Block 2a, Flight Time. Enter the time accrued in the aircraft or FSTD to be used in the flight test, including flight training time. If the flight test will be conducted in two segments (FSTD and aircraft), leave the space blank until the applicant takes the aircraft portion of the test.
Indicates new/changed information.
b)    Block 2b, As Pilot in Command. Enter total PIC time in the aircraft and/or FSTD to be used. For a type rating, this block may be zero.
3)    Block B, U.S. Military Competence or Experience. Enter the applicant’s branch of service, date rated as a U.S. military pilot, and rank or grade. In block 4a and/or 4b, enter the make and model of each military aircraft used to qualify (as appropriate).
4)    Block C, Graduate of an Approved Course. Complete as follows:
Indicates new/changed information.
a)    Block 1, Training Agency or Training Center.

1.    Block 1a, Name. Enter the name as shown on the graduation certificate.

2.    Block 1b, Location. Enter the location (city and state).

3.    Block 1c, Certification Number. Enter as shown on the graduation certificate.

b)    Block 2, Curriculum From Which Graduated. Enter name of curriculum, level, category, and/or type rating, as applicable.
Indicates new/changed information.
c)    Block 3, Date. Enter the date of graduation from the indicated course. An approved course graduate must also complete section II, “Certificate or Rating Applied For on Basis Of,” unless the applicant graduated from a part 141 school with examining authority, in which case this application process is only administrative.
Indicates new/changed information.
5)    Block D, Holder of Foreign License. Verify that the entry accurately reflects the information on the foreign pilot license. See Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 14, Issue a Title 14 CFR Part 61 U.S. Pilot Certificate on the Basis of a Foreign Pilot License, for guidance on issuing a certificate based on a foreign license.
Indicates new/changed information.
6)    Block E, Air Carrier’s Training Program. Enter the name of the air carrier and the date that the operator’s training program required for certification was started. Then, enter the appropriate category of training (such as initial, upgrade, transition, or recurrent).

NOTE:  The intermediate stages of the training will be reflected in the applicant’s training record.

E.    Section III, Record of Pilot Time. The applicant must list at least the aeronautical experience required for the airman certificate and rating sought. Graduates of part 141 pilot schools or part 142 training centers must provide their aeronautical experience, even though the graduation certificate is evidence of having completed the course of training. If aeronautical experience has no bearing on the airman certification action sought, it is not necessary for an applicant to complete section III. The “Instruction Received” blocks of the “Airplanes,” “Rotorcraft,” “Gliders,” and “Lighter-than-Air” lines refer to instruction in an aircraft in flight. The time entered in the “FFS,” “FTD,” and “ATD” rows may be used for credit towards the total time in the category, class, and instrument time as permitted by the regulations.

F.    Section IV, Have You Previously Failed the Practical Test for the Certificate or Rating That You are Applying? Check the appropriate box. Inspectors and examiners must ensure that applicants who check “Yes” meet the requirements of § 61.49 (pilots), 14 CFR part 63, §§ 63.41 FEs and 63.59 (flight navigators), or 14 CFR part 65, § 65.19 (aircraft dispatchers). If the applicant checks “Yes,” ensure that the date of last disapproval is entered.

G.    Section V, Applicant’s Certification. Enter the date that the application was signed. The applicant must certify to the accuracy and truth of the information on the application by signing in this space. The applicant’s date must be on or before any testing, oral or practical. Due to the drug statement, this date must be within 2 calendar-months of the inspector or examiner approval date.

H.    Reverse Side of FAA Form 8710-1. The reverse side of this form is used for recommendations, reports, records, and attachment notes, when required.

1)    Instructor Action. This section does not need to be signed for an ATP Certificate or for a type rating (see § 61.39(a)(6)(iii)); however, when an applicant has received instruction in an approved 14 CFR part 121 or 135 training program, an instructor, supervisor, or check pilot must certify (in the applicant’s training record) that the applicant’s knowledge and proficiency is satisfactory in accordance with part 121, § 121.401(c) and part 135, § 135.323(c) before the applicant may take the test. Also, if the ATP or type rating test was previously disapproved, then the “Instructor’s Recommendation” section must be completed for the retest in accordance with § 61.49.
2)    Air Agency’s Recommendation. This section is only used by part 141 pilot schools and their examining authority.
3)    Designated Examiner or Airman Certification Representative Report. This section is used by APDs, air carrier airman examiners, TCEs, Airman Certification Representatives (ACR), and General Aviation Pilot Examiners.
a)    The examiner who issues FAA Form 8060-5 is required to complete and sign this section, and must check the “I have personally reviewed this applicant’s pilot logbook and/or training record...” box, the “I have personally tested and/or verified this applicant...” box, the “I have personally delivered the Written Notification under the Pilot’s Bill of Rights to the applicant...” box, and the “Approved” or “Disapproved” box.
b)    In the case of an approved school that has a graduation certificate, the third box must also be checked, “I have personally reviewed this applicant’s graduation certificate...”
c)    The examiner must then complete the information requested in the boxes titled, “Location of Test,” “Certificate or Rating Being Applied For,” “Type(s) of Aircraft Used” (with level of FSTD used), and “Registration Number(s)” of aircraft, if used. The examiner must indicate the level, category, class, and type rating, whichever is applicable.
d)    If the class rating is being added at the same time as the type rating, it must be indicated (e.g., ATP, AMEL, CE-500.).
e)    The remaining blocks need to be completed with the date, examiner’s signature, certificate number, designation number, and expiration date.
f)    The “Duration of Test” block should contain an indication of the approximate duration of the oral, simulator, and flight check, as applicable.
g)    The level of FSTD used must be noted in the “Type(s) of Aircraft Used” block of the examiner’s report.

NOTE:  If this section is completed by an ACR, the following boxes will be marked: “I have personally reviewed this applicant’s pilot logbook and/or training record...” box, “I have personally tested and/or verified this applicant...” box, “I have personally delivered the Written Notification under the Pilot’s Bill of Rights to the applicant...” box, and the “Approved” or “Disapproved” box. In the case of an approved school that has a graduation certificate, the third box, “I have personally reviewed this applicant’s graduation certificate...” must also be checked. The “Certificate or Rating Being Applied for” block will also be completed by the ACR. The remaining blocks need to be completed with the date, ACR’s signature, certificate number if one exists (if no certificate number exists, enter the letters “ACR”), designation number, and expiration date. This date must match the date reflected on the Temporary Airman Certificate (FAA Form-8060-4).

4)    Evaluator’s Record (Use for All ATP Certificate(s) and/or Type Rating(s)). This section must be used by inspectors, DEs, TCEs, and APDs who administer multiple-phase testing for an ATP Certificate or a type rating added to an ATP Certificate. The inspector, DE, TCE, or APD who administers each phase of the test must sign on the appropriate line and enter the date. Inspectors, DEs, TCEs, and APDs should enter their certificate number. The oral testing must be done prior to the simulator or flight testing. The last date of multiple‑phase testing will be the date reflected on the Temporary Airman Certificate (FAA Form 8060-4).

NOTE:  On disapproval applications, the “Evaluator’s Record” is still required even when the oral and/or practical test has been failed. These signatures certify that the testing was performed.

I.    Aviation Safety Inspector or Technician Report.

1)    If the inspector has personally tested the applicant, or is the approving official for approving or denying any certificate action (e.g., removing a limitation) and is issuing or denying a certificate, the inspector should check the appropriate box: “Approved-Temporary Certificate Issued” or “Disapproved-Disapproval Notice Issued.” Inspectors should complete the information requested in the boxes titled, “Location of Test,” “Certificate or Rating Being Applied For,” “Type(s) of Aircraft Used” (with level of FSTD used), and “Registration No.(s)” of aircraft, if used. The inspector must indicate the level, category, class, and type rating, whichever is applicable. If the class rating is being added at the same time as the type rating, it must be indicated (e.g., ATP, AMEL, CE-500). The inspector completes this section by dating, signing, entering their certificate number, and identifying the inspector’s permanently assigned FSDO.
2)    Inspectors reviewing applications completed by examiners should check the block titled, “Examiner’s Recommendation,” and either “Accepted” or “Rejected.” If the inspector rejects the examiner’s recommendation, the inspector must attach a brief statement containing both an explanation and any intended further actions (such as a reexamination). The inspector should then date, sign, and enter the FSDO designation.
3)    Inspectors renewing a flight instructor rating must check the “Approved-Temporary Certificate Issued (Original Attached)” box, “Certificate or Rating Based on” box, “Flight Instructor” box, “Renewal” box, and the “Instructor Renewal Based on” “Activity” or “Duties and Responsibilities” box. The inspector should complete this section of the form by dating, signing, entering their certificate number, and identifying the inspector’s permanently assigned FSDO (such as ASO-FSDO-19), Regional Office (RO) (such as ASO-260), or HQ office (such as AFS-250) into the “FAA District Office” box.

J.    Attachments. This section of the form is used for recording the method of documenting the applicant’s identity and the documents attached to the application. See subparagraph 5-54C for identity instructions.

1)    If the knowledge test was passed after July 31, 2014, the applicant for an ATP Certificate in the airplane category with a multiengine class rating must also submit a copy of the ATP CTP graduation certificate. The graduation certificate must contain the following:
a)    The full name, address, and FAA certificate number of the training provider authorized to conduct the course.
b)    The full name, certificate number, and address of the graduate.
c)    The statement: “The applicant named above has successfully completed the Airline Transport Pilot Certification Training Program as required by § 61.156, and therefore has met the prerequisite required by § 61.35(a)(2) for the Airline Transport Pilot Airplane Knowledge Test.” If the statement is unclear on the graduation certificate, the POI of the endorsing entity should be contacted to validate that the applicant has produced a valid graduation certificate.
d)    The date of issuance.
e)    The signature of the authorized instructor who completed the academic portion of the course.
f)    A sequential number on the certificate starting with the first four identifiers of the training provider’s certificate number.
2)    An applicant applying for an ATP Certificate with restricted privileges in accordance with § 61.160(b), (c), or (d) should present their official college transcript and the following certifying statement: “The [insert institution’s name] certifies that the recipient of this degree has successfully completed all of the aviation coursework requirements of § 61.160[(b), (c), or (d)] and therefore meets the academic eligibility requirements of § 61.160[(b), (c), or (d)].” The certifying statement can be on the official transcript or other FAA-accepted document.

5-57    ORAL TEST PHASE FOR PARTS 121 AND 135. Oral testing is conducted to determine whether the applicant has acquired adequate practical knowledge to safely and competently exercise the privileges of the certificate.

A.    Location. The preferred locations for conducting oral tests for airman certificates are in ground training devices (GTD) or FSTDs. The interactive logic available in these devices provides an effective method of testing the applicant’s knowledge of normal, abnormal, and emergency procedures.

B.    Question Phrasing. Questions should be phrased in simple, focused, and specific terms. Applicants should be encouraged to answer in the same manner. An example of a simple, focused, and specific question is, “What is the maximum allowable exhaust gas temperature (EGT) limit during a normal engine start?” An example of an abstract, ambiguous, and confusing question is, “Tell me everything you know about starting an engine.” Inspectors and examiners should encourage applicants to ask for clarification before answering when they are unsure of the meaning of a question.

C.    Length and Scope. The scope of oral tests is defined by regulation. The items that should be evaluated on each type of oral test are specified in the applicable regulations, practical test standards (PTS), and job aids. Inspectors and examiners should choose their questions from the entire range of appropriate topics rather than concentrate on only a few topics. Questions should be related to the specific characteristics of the aircraft involved. The length of the oral test depends on the complexity of the aircraft involved, the applicant’s responses, and the evaluator’s proficiency. Therefore, a specific duration for an oral exam is not appropriate and should not be used as a standard. The duration must be of sufficient time to thoroughly cover all of the required knowledge items.

D.    Standards of Performance. Sections 121.403(b)(3) and 135.327(b)(3) require that operators publish “detailed descriptions or pictorial displays of the approved normal, abnormal, and emergency maneuvers, procedures and functions that will be performed during each flight training phase or flight check, indicating those maneuvers, procedures and functions that are to be performed during the inflight portions of flight training and flight checks.” Operators should use the current edition of FAA-S-8081-5, Airline Transport Pilot and Type Rating Practical Test Standard, any applicable Flight Standardization Board (FSB) reports, and the manufacturer’s recommendations. Inspectors and examiners should use the standards approved by the POI for the operator when conducting oral tests.

1)    Applicants are expected to possess a broad understanding of the aircraft and its systems rather than a highly detailed knowledge of component design and construction. They should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the essential features of system design and how various systems interrelate. Applicants must be able to demonstrate such knowledge by interpreting cockpit indications and describing the condition of aircraft systems from these indications. Applicants are not expected to have memorized specific facts that are immediately available in reference manuals and checklists that are required to be in the cockpit. Applicants must, however, be able to state items on emergency checklists (in the correct sequence) and flight manual limitations from memory.
a)    When a limitation is presented in terms of a gauge marking, the applicant should be able to state the operational significance of the marking, but does not need to have memorized the appropriate value the marking represents. When a limitation is not clearly presented by such a marking, the applicant must be able to state the appropriate value from memory.
b)    To illustrate the standards described, the following example is provided. Assume the aircraft involved requires a specific fuel burn sequence. The applicant should be able to describe in general terms the fuel burn sequence and to detect correct and incorrect conditions from gauge indications. The applicant should be aware of any checklist or procedure that corrects an improper condition and where that checklist or procedure is located. The applicant is not expected to memorize the sequence of steps necessary to correct the condition. On the other hand, the applicant should be able to state from memory the flight manual limitation concerning allowable fuel imbalance between pairs of tanks.
2)    An applicant may not be able to give entirely correct answers to some of the questions in an oral test; however, that applicant may still meet an acceptable standard. Inspectors and examiners must base their decisions on whether applicants pass or fail on the soundness of the applicant’s overall command of basic principles. Inspectors and examiners should avoid commenting on an applicant’s performance until after the oral test is complete.

E.    Debriefing. Immediately after the oral test, the applicant will be debriefed on performance and informed of the results of the test.

5-58    FLIGHT TEST PHASE FOR PARTS 121 AND 135. Sections 121.403(b)(3) and 135.327(b)(3) require that operators publish “detailed descriptions or pictorial displays of the approved normal, abnormal, and emergency maneuvers, procedures and functions that will be performed during each flight training phase or flight check, indicating those maneuvers, procedures and functions that are to be performed during the inflight portions of flight training and flight checks.” Operators should use the Air Transport Pilot and Type Rating Practical Test Standard (FAA-S-8081-5), any applicable FSB reports, and the manufacturer’s recommendations. Inspectors and examiners should use the standards approved by the POI for the operator when conducting flight tests.

A.    Purpose. The purpose of the flight test is to evaluate the applicant’s ability to operate safely and effectively in a real-time environment. Inspectors and examiners should determine whether applicants have achieved an acceptable level of physical manipulation skills, positional orientation abilities, flight management skills, and crew coordination skills. Flight test duration will depend upon the complexity of the aircraft involved, the speed of the applicant, and the evaluator’s efficiency during the test. No set duration for the test is appropriate. The duration must be of sufficient time to complete all of the required events.

B.    Separation of Oral Phase from Flight Test Phase. For all flightcrew airman certificates, the oral and flight test phases should not be conducted simultaneously. The purpose of the oral test phase is to examine an applicant’s depth of knowledge, while the purpose of the flight test phase is to observe and evaluate an applicant’s skills. An inspector’s or examiner’s presence in the cockpit can affect the normal interaction of the flightcrew. Inspectors and examiners should endeavor to minimize this effect by maintaining a passive role and by not becoming involved in normal crew operation. Questions that require explanations and probe the applicant’s depth of knowledge are appropriate during the oral test phase, but not during the flight test phase.

NOTE:  The oral testing must be done before the flight testing.

C.    Normal, Abnormal, and Emergency Procedure Test Events. The events that must be evaluated on each flight test are specified by regulation or determined by the Administrator. The events have been listed on appropriate job aids for the convenience of inspectors and examiners. The regulations require inspectors to evaluate normal, abnormal, and emergency procedures that appear in the operator’s manual but are not specifically identified by regulation. Inspectors and examiners should evaluate on each flight test as many of these events that the inspector or examiner “finds are necessary to determine that the person being checked has an adequate knowledge of, and ability to perform, such procedures...” Examples of these events include flight instrument and display failures, operations in ice and rain, emergency descent, and emergency ground evacuation. Inspectors should vary these events on subsequent flight tests so that the effectiveness of the operator’s manual and training program can be evaluated.

D.    Flight Management and Crew Coordination Skills. Inspectors and examiners should observe and evaluate crew coordination and flight management skills. The applicant must demonstrate good judgment, continual spatial and situational awareness, and cockpit management throughout the flight test.

E.    Briefings. Before the FSTD segment and aircraft segment of a flight test, inspectors and examiners should brief applicants on what will be expected of them during the flight test. Before the flight test, inspectors and examiners should determine by agreement with the applicant whether or not to continue the flight test after a failed event. When other crewmembers are involved, they should be briefed on their roles. Suggested briefing outlines are included on the job aids. Inspectors and examiners should avoid commenting on the applicant’s performance during the flight test.

Indicates new/changed information.

F.    Debriefings. After the test, the applicant should be informed of the results and debriefed. If the applicant is unsuccessful, the inspector or examiner should ensure that the applicant clearly understands specifically what was unsatisfactory about each event that was failed. Inspectors and examiners should use judgment and discretion when inviting other crewmembers to attend these debriefings. It is important that company instructors or check pilots receive direct feedback on their students’ performances. Instructors or check pilots who participate in flight tests (as co-pilots or safety pilots) should usually be invited to attend these debriefings. An inspector or examiner may choose to limit attendance at the debriefing to only the applicant. If an instructor or check pilot who participated in the flight test is not at the debriefing, the inspector or examiner should debrief that person at a later time.

G.    Termination of Flight Tests Before Completion. When the inspector or examiner determines that an applicant’s performance is unsatisfactory, the inspector or examiner may then either terminate the flight test immediately or, with the consent of the applicant, continue with the flight test until the remaining events are completed. Usually, graduates of approved training programs are well-prepared. Although a single event is failed, retraining and retesting in all events of the flight test is normally unnecessary. In such cases, it is usually better for the inspector or examiner to continue with the flight test to complete the other events. When the inspector or examiner determines that the entire flight test must be repeated, the flight test should not be continued, but should be immediately terminated. Whether the flight test is continued or not after a failure, the inspector or examiner must issue the applicant FAA Form 8060-5. Safety pilots should immediately terminate any maneuver or an entire flight test whenever flight safety is in question.

H.    Inconclusive Events. When the inspector or examiner is unable to determine whether the objectives of an event have been met, the inspector or examiner may require the applicant to repeat the event or a portion of the event. This provision has been made in the interest of fairness and does not mean that instruction or practice is permitted during the certification process. Inspectors and examiners should not repeat completed, failed maneuvers.

NOTE:  If the check must be terminated (for mechanical or other reasons) and there are events which still need to be repeated, a Letter of Discontinuance, valid for 60 days, should be issued listing the specific areas of operation that have been successfully completed (see Figure 5-5, Sample Letter of Discontinuance).

Indicates new/changed information. Indicates new/changed information. Indicates new/changed information.

Figure 5-1.  FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

Figure 5-1. FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

Indicates new/changed information. Indicates new/changed information. Indicates new/changed information.

Figure 5-1.  FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Continued)

Figure 5-1. FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Continued)

Figure 5-2.  Reserved

Figure 5-3.   FAA Form 8400-3, Application for Airman Certificate and/or Rating

Figure 5-3. FAA Form 8400-3, Application for Airman Certificate and/or Rating

Figure 5-3.  FAA Form 8400-3, Application for Airman Certificate and/or Rating (Continued)

Figure 5-3. FAA Form 8400-3, Application for Airman Certificate and/or Rating (Continued)

Figure 5-4.  FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate

Figure 5-4. FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate

Figure 5-5.  Sample Letter of Discontinuance

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Applicant’s name and address]

Dear [applicant’s name]:

On this date, you successfully completed the oral portion of the practical test for a [indicate grade] certificate with an [indicate category] and [indicate class] class rating. The practical test was discontinued because of [indicate reason].

If application is made by [indicate date 60 days from date of letter], this letter may be used to show the following portions of the practical test which have been completed satisfactorily:

[Indicate areas of operation completed on the test.]

After [indicate expiration date], you must repeat the entire practical test.

Note: This letter does not extend the expiration date(s) for your knowledge test results, your graduation certificate, airman medical certificate, or the required instructor endorsements.

Sincerely,

[Signature of inspector conducting practical test of examiner candidate]

RESERVED. Paragraphs 5-59 through 5-75.