10/20/14

 

8900.1 CHG 12

Volume 6 Surveillance

CHAPTER 2 PART 121, 135, AND 91 SUBPART K INSPECTIONS

Section 41Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information. Safety Assurance System: Evaluate/Inspect Part 121, 129 (N-Registered only), 135 (10 or More), 91K, and 125 Operatorís Contract Maintenance Organization Facility

6-1121    REPORTING SYSTEM(S).

A.    Program Tracking and Reporting Subsystem (PTRS). For Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) parts 129, 91K, and 125, use PTRS activity codes 3338, 3640, 3624, 5338, 5640, and 5624.

B.    Safety Assurance System (SAS). For 14 CFR parts 121 and 135 (10 or more), use SAS automation. This section is related to SAS Element 4.5.2 (AW), Maintenance Providers.

6-1122    OBJECTIVE. This chapter provides guidance for evaluating and inspecting parts 91K, 121, 129 (N-registered only), and 135 air carriersí and part 125 operatorsí contract maintenance organization facility, and provides guidance for compliance with the air carrierís manual procedure system and with regulatory requirements of associated 14 CFR sections.

6-1123    GENERAL. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air carrier inspector will evaluate the contract maintenance providerís facility (certificated or noncertificated and other air carrier) to ensure that it has adequate housing, equipment, spare parts, technical data, and qualified personnel available to satisfactorily complete all contracted maintenance in accordance with parts 91K, 121, 125, 129 (N-registered only), and 135 (10 or more); and the air carrierís or the commercial operatorís program and applicable sections of its maintenance manual.

NOTE:  The purpose of this guidance is to evaluate and provide oversight of an air carrierís contract maintenance program. This guidance is not intended to evaluate a certificated repair station, noncertificated repair facility, or certificated air carrier.

A.    The term ďnoncertificated repair facilitiesĒ is not a regulatory term. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Inspector General used the term in a report (AV-2006-031) to describe a person, other than a repair station, that a certificate holder uses to perform maintenance under the authority of part 121, ß 121.379 and part 135, ß 135.437. These sections state in part that a certificate holder may arrange with another person to perform maintenance, preventive maintenance, or alterations. The term in the report described an air carrierís maintenance base. All of the employees were certificated mechanics with Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) ratings, and trained by the air carrier. However, all were contracted employees:

     Before certificating a new operator, and

     When an existing operator introduced a new make and model aircraft to an operation.

B.     Some contract maintenance organization/facility inspections are conducted outside the geographic boundaries of the certificate-holding district office (CHDO). In such cases, the aviation safety inspector (ASI) will coordinate with, and request assistance as necessary from, the Flight Standards (AFS) office responsible for the certificate management of a repair station or the management of the air carrier to be inspected.

6-1124    INITIATION AND PLANNING. Before inspecting a contract maintenance organization/facility, the inspecting ASI should:

A.Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information. Review the Safety Performance Analysis System (SPAS) Data Package. This data will provide the inspecting ASI with analysis and information that will be useful before and during the inspection (if data are available).

B.    Arranging a Visit. Schedule a meeting with the air carrierís management to discuss the arrangements made with this contract maintenance provider and the plans and provisions that will be in place during this visit/inspection.

C.    Check Agreements. Ensure the agreements stated in the contract are in accordance with the procedures in the air carrierís or operatorís manual. Contract agreements change routinely.

D.    Point of Contact. If an ASI is a geographical inspector conducting a facility inspection on behalf of the CHDO, the ASI will contact the air carrierís principal inspectors (PI) to discuss the scope of the inspection.

E.    Contract Review. If you are the air carrierís principal maintenance inspector (PMI) or principal avionics inspector (PAI), consider reviewing the contract between the air carrier and the contractor before the inspection.

F.    Obtain a List of Management Personnel. Before the inspection, the ASI should request a listing and telephone numbers of management personnel at the contract facility. If the facility is a certificated repair station, the ASI may obtain a listing of management personnel from SPAS (refer to profile).

G.    Inspections Outside the United States. During the early planning phase of the trip, the inspecting ASI should contact the U.S. Department of State (DOS). The ASI may view travel advisories for the country he or she plans to visit on the DOS Web site, http://www.travel.state.gov. A minimum of 30 days is recommended to obtain a visa and address any restrictions. ASIs should process their travel plans in accordance with their regionís policies. This is normally done through the Regional Operations Center (ROC).

NOTE:  Travel to any foreign country requires a security briefing in accordance with the current edition of FAA Order 1600.61, International Travel Security Briefing and Contact Reporting Requirements for FAA Employees and Contractors.

H.    Contract Maintenance Facility Outside the United States with a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA)-Maintenance Implementation Procedures (MIP) Approval. During the planning phase of a visit to a repair station/contract maintenance provider that is located in a country with a BASA and associated MIP with the United States, it is important that the ASI contact the International Field Office (IFO)/CHDO and the repair stationís PI. The inspecting ASI and the repair station PI should discuss the scope and intent of the inspection.

I.    Contract Maintenance Facility Outside the United States without a BASA-MIP Approval. Before the visit, contact the IFO/CHDO and the repair stationís PI, to discuss the scope and intent of the inspection.

J.    Canadian Approved Maintenance Organization (AMO) Visit. ASIs planning an inspection of maintenance on U.S. aeronautical products located in Canada must notify the cognizant regional specialist, who in turn will notify the Flight Standards Aircraft Maintenance Division (AFS-300). AFS-300 will notify Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA) of the impending inspection. ASIs will only inspect the regular maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations being performed on U.S. aeronautical products. Prior to the inspection, TCCA should be invited to participate.

6-1125    PERFORMING THE TASK.

A.    Inspecting ASI Responsibilities. The inspecting ASI must determine whether the contract maintenance provider has an adequate organization, equipment, and facilities. All maintenance personnel should be appropriately certificated (when necessary), trained by the air carrier or operator, and authorized to perform the work. The inspecting ASI must keep in mind that the contract providerís maintenance facility is an extension of the air carrierís overall maintenance organization; therefore, maintenance performed by the provider must be in accordance with the air carrierís approved maintenance program (refer to part 145, ß 145.205; ß 121.363; or ß 135.413).

B.    Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information. Before Visiting the Contract Facility. Before visiting the contract facility, the inspecting ASI should review SPAS data and any other information available. The SPAS program is an outstanding source for gathering supportive data.

C.    If the PTRS is Used to Document/Record the Inspection. The PTRS is used to document part 129, 91K, and 125 inspections. When the PTRS is used to document and record the inspection, ensure that the information supporting conclusion (positive or negative) is entered into the Comment block in Section IV of the PTRS record.

NOTE:  An alternate surveillance plan is included in this section. The inspection information contained in the Comment block is based on the information in this section. It is provided as a sample surveillance plan only. It should not be considered mandatory. (See Figure 6-41, Sample of a Basic Surveillance Plan.)

D.    If SAS is Used to Document/Record the Inspection. SAS will be used to document parts 121 and 135 (10 or more). When SAS is used to document and record the inspection, ensure that the information supporting the conclusion (positive or negative) is entered into the Comments block of the pertaining Data Collection Tool (DCT).

6-1126    COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS. If the contract maintenance provider holds a part 145 repair station certificate, air carrier certificate, or operating certificate, the ASI should make every effort to contact his or her PI and advise the PI of the planned inspection.

6-1127    REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References (current editions):

    Title 14 CFR Parts 43, 91, 119, 121, 125, 129, 135 (10 or more), and 145.

    Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR) Part 180.

    Advisory Circular (AC) 120-16, Air Carrier Maintenance Programs.

    Air carriersí or operatorsí maintenance manuals and manual systems.

     Air carriersí contract maintenance programs.

     Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information. SAS Element 4.5.2 (AW), Maintenance Providers.

B.    Forms. None.

C.    Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information. Job Aids. None.

6-1128    PROCEDURES. For part 125 or 129 (N-registered aircraft), if the contractor is a certificated repair station or Canadian AMO, the inspecting ASI should determine the maintenance providerís qualifications. Ensure that the contract maintenance facility is properly certificated and rated for the work being performed. If the repair station is authorized to work at a place other than the fixed location, the ASI should review the repair stationís operations specifications (OpSpecs). OpSpec D100, Work to be Performed at a Place Other than the Repair Stationís Fixed Location 14 CFR part (145, ß 145.203(b)), will list the authorized work able to be accomplished away from the fixed base and in the case of a repair station, the manual location in which the procedures are listed.

NOTE:  Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information. Subparagraphs A through R are appropriate to ASIs assigned operators who use the PTRS for documenting and recording inspections. Those who use SAS will use the appropriate DCT, but this information should be reviewed for informational purposes.

A.    Notify AFS-300. If the inspection is to be accomplished on U.S. aeronautical products located in Canada, notify AFS-300 of the intent to perform an inspection.

B.    Inspect the Contract Providerís Organization. Ensure that the contractorís organization is adequate to support the air carrierís maintenance program.

C.    Inspect the Technical Library. Ensure that the maintenance facilityís library is available for use by the facility personnel and includes the following:

1)    Repair Station Manual (RSM) (if applicable).
2)    Quality Control Manual (QCM) (if applicable).
3)    Transport Canada-approved supplement to the maintenance policy manual (MPM) for Canadian AMOs.
4)    If applicable, portions of the air carrierís or operatorís General Maintenance Manuals (GMM)/General Practices and Procedures (GPP).
5)    If required, applicable parts of the air carrierís or operatorís FAA-approved inspection program.
6)    If applicable, portions of pertinent maintenance instructions from the manual system.
7)    Applicable instructions for continued airworthiness (ICA).
8)    Applicable portions of the Continuous Airworthiness Maintenance Program (CAMP) necessary to properly maintain the aircraft.
9)    Manufacturersí aircraft, engine, propeller, appliance, and emergency equipment component repair manual(s) (CRM) or work scopes as required.
10)    If applicable, air-carrier-provided aircraft, engine, propeller, appliance, emergency equipment, CRMs, and work scopes.
11)    Airworthiness Directives (AD), Engineering Orders (EO), etc.

D.    Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information.Review the Work Process. If there is an aircraft, engine, or propeller in the facility undergoing maintenance, review the entire contracting process at work. The air carrierís work package usually comes to the planning department first. Review the inspection package provided by the air carrier. The first page is normally titled the work scope. It will list all of the ADs, nonroutine maintenance, and scheduled phase or check work cards, and list any components scheduled for removal and replacement during this heavy maintenance.

NOTE:  Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information. It is recommended that ASIs verify that the air carrierís or operatorís manual has procedures to cover the work processes.

1)    Be aware that every air carrierís or operatorís system is different. The information herein is provided as a tool, and is not to be used verbatim. The inspecting ASI must always use the air carrierís or operatorís manual procedure as a guide.
2)    By sampling the records, the inspecting ASI will ensure the work is accomplished and documented in accordance with the air carrierís or operatorís manual.
3)    Ensure that Required Inspection Items (RII) notations are accomplished in accordance with the air carrierís manuals.
4)    Ensure the airworthiness release is accomplished in accordance with ß 121.709; part 125, ß 125.411; and part 129; in accordance with the country of originís requirements; and in accordance with ß 135.443; and signed in accordance with the air carrierís or operatorís manual.

E.    Review Personnel Training Records. Review the maintenance providerís records to ensure that personnel are trained to perform the work for which they have been contracted. Inspect the quality control (QC)/quality assurance (QA) system. Ensure that the facility personnel have been trained to the air carrierís program and procedures. Verify the following:

NOTE:  Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information. The asterisk (*) items come under the responsibility of the part 145 repair station PI. It is most important that the inspecting ASI coordinate all findings with the repair station PI. For findings at a Canadian AMO, coordinate with AFS-300.

F.    Responsibility. Responsibilities for maintenance and inspection functions are separate.

G.    Personnel. Staffing reflects the complexity of the operation.

H.    Personnel Qualifications. Personnel are appropriately certificated (if required), qualified, and trained to perform inspections.

I.    RII Personnel. Personnel performing RII functions are properly trained and authorized by the air carrier.

J.    Authorized Personnel. Lists of authorized inspectors and RII personnel are maintained, including the type of equipment and limitations authorized.

K.    Records. All inspection personnel training records are maintained and kept current.

L.    Accountability. The air carrierís system for controlling accountability and documentation of all the work accomplished.

1)    The air carrier and the contract maintenance providers comply with the suspected unapproved parts (SUP) program.
2)    Incoming parts and supplies to the repair station are properly inspected, tagged, and distributed in accordance with the quality manual procedures.
3)    Verify the air carrier or operator has properly trained and authorized the contract maintenance providerís receiving and incoming parts and equipment personal.
4)    Contract maintenance provider receiving inspection personnel.
5)    Verify the air carrier or operator has properly trained the receiving inspection personnel (aircraft maintenance representatives) in accordance with the air carrierís or operatorís manual.

M.    Inspect the Contract Maintenance Providerís Maintenance Department. Ensure the following (this applies to all types of facilities):

1)    Verify that the contract maintenance providerís personnel are properly trained for the complexity of the work performed.
2)    The facilities are adequate for the type of work performed. Space, lighting, and ventilation reflect the requirements of the work being performed. (This does not apply to certificated repair station with line rating only.)
3)    Special tools and test equipment are available to support the work being performed.

NOTE:  ASIs inspecting the air carrierís or an operatorís calibrated tool program must concentrate on the air carrierís program, not the repair stationís calibration program, unless the air carrier or operator has adopted the repair stationís program. The ASI must ensure there is traceable documentation. In all cases all calibrations programs must be in accordance with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

a)    All work is to be accomplished in accordance with the pertinent parts of the air carrierís CAMP, ICA, and any other maintenance instructions.
b)    The shift turnover procedures must be in accordance with the air carrierís manual, not the repair stationís procedures. Refer to ß 121.369(b)(9) procedures to ensure that required inspections, other maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations that are not completed as a result of shift changes or similar work interruptions are properly completed before the aircraft is released to service.
4)    Flammable and hazardous materials are properly segregated and stored.
5)    Serviceable and unserviceable parts are identified and segregated.
6)    Shelf life limits are controlled.
7)    Review a copy of the audit form if the air carrier or operatorís internal audit system incorporates an ďin-process audit.Ē Ask the operator whether you can use the form to observe that it accomplishes its intended task.
8)    Maintenance personnel duty time limitations are in accordance with ßß 121.369(b)(9) and 121.377.
9)    The contract maintenance providerís parts-scrapping procedures must be in accordance with the air carrierís procedures.
10)    Discuss the Service Difficulty Report (SDR)/malfunction, or defects program requirement. Refer to ßß 121.703 and 135.415. Section 145.221 has changed the reporting requirements.
11)    Duty time limitations must be in accordance with the air carrierís manual procedures.

N.    Analyze Findings. Upon completion of the inspection, record all deficiencies and determine the appropriate corrective action(s).

O.    Debrief the Contractor Facilityís Management Team. Before leaving the facility, discuss the discrepancies and leave a courtesy copy of the inspection with the facilityís/contractorís management. Clarify that this is a preliminary listing.

P.    Determine Whether Any of the Findings Pertain to an Apparent Noncompliance Issue. Common courtesy dictates that the inspecting ASI contact the repair stationís CHDO and PI. The inspecting ASI and the maintenance providerís management should discuss the conditions and nature of the alleged discrepancy to ensure that all parties are aware of the condition.

Q.    Complete Appropriate Forms. When the inspecting ASI returns to his or her workplace, the inspector must complete the appropriate forms and enter the inspection into the appropriate database.

R.    Communicate Findings. If the inspection was performed by the Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) with geographic responsibility, that FSDO is responsible for coordinating all findings with the CHDO, the assigned PIs, and for Canadian AMOs the Aircraft Maintenance Engineers (AME).

6-1129    TASK OUTCOMES.

A.    Indicates new/changed information.Complete the PTRS Record. For parts 129, 91K, and 125, the surveillance is recorded under PTRS activity code 3338 or 5338.

B.    SAS. For parts 121 and 135 (10 or more), follow SAS guidance for Modules 4 and 5.

1)    Authorize OpSpec D091. SAS has Essential Maintenance Provider (EMP) DCTs in Module 4 for the inspector to collect and record data. If an EMP is being evaluated, see Volume 3, Chapter 42, Section 1 and SAS guidance for EMP DCT completion. After evaluation, OpSpec D091 would be authorized.
2)    Part 135 (10 or More) Does Not Have OpSpec D091 Authorization. The inspector documents in the DCT comment block the information listed in subparagraph 6-1129C.

C.    New PTRS Activity Codes.

1)    Indicates new/changed information. Figure 6-40, Description and Definitions for New PTRS Activity Codes, provides the description and definitions for the new PTRS activity codes, including those associated with the evaluation of the OpSpec D091 contractor maintenance facility inspection plan. The recording requirements for surveillance activities in the PTRS record for OpSpec D091 contract maintenance provider/facilities include activities to:

    Describe the initial evaluation of an OpSpec D091 contract maintenance facility,

    Describe an onsite inspection of that facility,

    Evaluate the contractual agreement between the air carrier and the maintenance facility, and

    Indicates new/changed information. Record a review of any revisions to that contractual agreement.

2)    Provide nonessential maintenance (other than part 121). Parts 125, 129 (N-registered only), and 135 (10 or more) operators do not have an OpSpec D091. PTRS activity codes 3624 (maintenance) and 5624 (avionics) were developed to track inspection observations at a contract maintenance provider/facility that does not perform essential maintenance for the operator.

NOTE:  Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information. For part 135 (10 or more), use the SAS DCT comment block to record inspection observations at a contract maintenance provider/facility that does not perform essential maintenance for the operator.

D.    A Canadian AMO does not Have PTRS Designators. When entering the results of this type of inspection in the PTRS, place the AMO name and operating number as it appears on the Transport Canada operating certificate in the Non-Cert Activity Name/Company block of Section I of the PTRS form.

E.    Section I of the PTRS Record. When completing Section I of the PTRS record for a Canadian AMO, ASIs will list the name of the maintenance provider in the Affiliated Designator block or Non-Cert Activity Name/Company block if a PTRS designator does not exist.

NOTE:  A Canadian AMO is not a part 145 certificated repair station.

NOTE:  All other information is the same.

6-1130    Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information.FUTURE ACTIVITIES. For parts 129 and 125, if deficiencies were noted during the surveillance, followup inspections are authorized. For parts 121 and 135 (10 or more), follow SAS guidance for Analysis, Assessment, and Action (AAA) in the SAS process.

Figure 6-40. Description and Definitions for New PTRS Activity Codes

APPLICABLE 14 CFRs

PTRS ACTIVITY CODE

SURVEILLANCE

AFFILIATED DESIGNATOR

Title: Change Bar - Description: Indicates new/changed information. 125, 129

3624/5624

New

Onsite inspection. Surveillance of any contract maintenance provider/facility not covered under the essential maintenance provider. PTRS description: SURVL/INSP NON-ESS/MX/PROVD

Required

Figure 6-41. Sample of a Basic Surveillance Plan

PROGRAM TRACKING AND REPORTING SUBSYSTEM DATA SHEET

SECTION I Ė Transmittal

Inspector Name Code:

Record ID:

Activity Number:

FAR:

Start Date:

Status:

Call-up Date:

Designator:

Results:

Closed Date:

Affiliated Designator:

Location:

****

SECTION IIóAS REQUIRED

SECTION IIIóAS REQUIRED

SECTION IVóCOMMENTS (UNLIMITED)

Primary Area

Key Word

Opinion Code

I, U, P

CONTRACT MAINTENANCE FACILITY

INSPECTION (3640/5640/3624/5624)

EVALUATION (3338/5378)

 

 

 

1.0 OPERATORíS CONTRACTOR

 

 

1.1

Review the contract maintenance providerís certificate and operations specifications (OpSpecs) (only required if it is a certificated repair station or air carrier).

 

 

1.2

Review the air carrierís or operatorís work scope and work instructions to the contract maintenance provider.

 

 

 

2.0 TECHNICAL LIBRARY

 

 

2.1

Inspect the library.

1) Ensure the contract maintenance facilities library is available for use by all facility personnel. Library contents should include but are not limited to:

a) The contract agencyís Repair Station Manual (RSM) and Quality Control Manual (QCM);

b) If applicable, the air carrierís or operatorís maintenance manual.

c) Current applicable advisory circulars (AC), Airworthiness Directives (AD), and Type Certificate Data Sheets (TCDS);

d) * Manufacturersí aircraft, engine, propeller, appliance, and emergency equipment maintenance and component repair manuals;

e) If applicable, the air carrierís or operatorís aircraft, engine, propeller, appliance, and emergency equipment maintenance and component repair manuals; and

f) If applicable, task cards (phase/calendar), Engineering Orders (EO), and pertinent instructions for continued airworthiness (ICA).

2) Does the contract maintenance provider have published procedures consistent throughout their manual system?

 

 

 

3.0 AIRCRAFT RECORDS

 

 

3.1

Inspect the records (maintenance records, aircraft, power plant, propeller, component, appliances, etc.). Sample the used records to ensure that the work is accomplished and documented in accordance with the air carrierís or operatorís manual.

 

 

 

4.0 TRAINING RECORDS

 

 

4.1

Personnel training records (if applicable)

1) Review the contract maintenance providerís personal training records.

2) Are the contract maintenance provider inspection personnel training records maintained and kept current in accordance with the repair stationís training program requirement?

3) Ensure their maintenance personnel have been trained in the in accordance with the air carrierís training requirements.

4) Ensure personal working on the air carrierís or operatorís aircraft are trained for the work contracted.

 

 

 

5.0 INSPECTION DEPARTMENT

 

 

5.1

*Inspect the quality control (QC) system.

1) Responsibilities for maintenance and inspection functions are separated.

2) Staffing reflects the complexity of the operation.

3) Personnel are appropriately certificated, qualified, and trained to perform inspections under the operatorís program.

 

 

5.2

Personnel performing Required Inspection Items (RII) (if applicable):

1) Is the list required by 14 CFR part 121, ß 121.371(d) ďauthorized inspection and required item personnel, maintained and up-to-date?Ē

Does the list include the type of equipment and limitations authorized?

2) Is the number of authorized RII inspectors at a level that would support the air carrierís or operatorís contract requirements?

 

 

 

6.0 CONTRACT MAINTENANCE FACILITIES SYSTEM

 

 

6.1

Procedures for controlling accountability and documentation:

1) Is the maintenance accomplished as specified in the air carrierís or operatorís contract, work instructions, and ICA?

2) Are procedures in place that direct the flow and control of all maintenance and inspection records?

 

 

6.2

* Are the contract maintenance providerís incoming parts and supplies inspected and tagged in accordance with the RSM?

 

 

6.3

Are the air carrierís incoming parts and supplies inspected and tagged in accordance with the air carrierís or operatorís maintenance manual?

 

 

 

7.0 HANGAR FACILITIES

 

 

7.1

Are the facilities adequate for the work performed?

1) Do space, lighting, and ventilation reflect the requirements of the work being performed?

2) Are safety procedures established and adhered to?

3) Procedures Ė Direct the flow and control of all maintenance and inspection records.

 

 

7.2

* Parts and storage areas:

1) Available for the air carrierís or operatorís equipment?

2) Has the air carrier or operator propositioned spare parts so that they are available to support the complexity of the maintenance requirement?

 

 

7.3

Are receiving inspections accomplished in accordance with the operatorís manuals/procedures?

 

 

7.4

Components and hardware: are they properly identified, protected, and classified as to serviceability?

 

 

7.5

Shift turnover procedures should be in accordance with the air carrierís manual. The procedures should be in place and utilized by the contract maintenance provider.

 

 

7.6

Special tools and test equipment:

NOTE: The repair stationís calibration program is not under inspection at this time. However, if the air carrier or operator has adopted the repair station program, ensure there is documentation to show the operator has inspected the contract maintenance providerís program before acceptance. In all cases, all calibrations programs must be in accordance with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

1) If foreign manufactured, are they to the standards of the country where they were manufactured?

2) Does the Administrator approve the standards?

3) Are there appropriate types and quantities available?

4) Is proper storage and protection utilized?

 

 

7.7

Flammable and hazardous materials are properly segregated and stored.

 

 

7.8

Are serviceable and unserviceable parts and hardware identified and segregated?

 

 

7.9

For local use.

 

 

 

8.0 SHELF LIFE

 

 

8.1

Shelf life limits: Are they controlled in accordance with the air carrierís or operatorís manual or manufacturerís recommendations.

 

 

 

9.0 ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

 

 

9.1

Inspect the engineering department (if applicable):

1) Is the staffing adequate for the complexity of assigned duties?

2) Are the personnel qualified?

 

 

9.2

Is all required technical data current and available? (Refer to the current edition of AC 120-77, Maintenance and Alteration Data).

 

 

9.3

If applicable, are air carrier or operator EOs accomplished and recorded in accordance with the air carrierís or operatorís manual procedures?

 

 

9.4

Major repairs and alterations:

1) Accomplished in accordance with FAA-approved data (refer to Order 8900.1)?

2) Are major repair reports retained and available?

3) Are major alterations reported per 14 CFR part 121, ß 121.707(b)?

 

 

 

10.0 MAINTENANCE PRODUCTION/PLANNING CONTROL INSPECTION

 

 

10.1

Is there evidence that the planning system is effective?

1) Review inspection/overhaul scheduling.

2) Facility scheduling.

3) Parts forecast.

4) Personnel requirements, and communication with other departments?

 

 

10.2

Service Difficulty Report (SDR) reporting requirements are in coordination with the air carrierís procedures, and the requirements of 14 CFR part 145, ß 145.221.

 

 

 

11.0 REPAIR STATION WITH LINE RATING (OPSPEC D107, LINE MAINTENANCE AUTHORIZATION)

 

 

 

NOTES:

Date:

Originator: (If Required)

Office:

Inspector Signature: (If Required)

Supervisor: (If Required)

Initials:

RESERVED. Paragraphs 6-1131 through 6-1145.