4/11/17

 

8900.1 CHG 525

VOLUME 6  SURVEILLANCE

CHAPTER 11  OTHER SURVEILLANCE

Section 23  Safety Assurance System: Evaluate/Inspect 14 CFR Part 91K/121/125 and § 129.14 Operators’ Fuel Tank System Instructions for Continued Airworthiness/Revisions

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6-2691    REPORTING SYSTEM(S).

A.    Program Tracking and Reporting Subsystem (PTRS) Activity Codes. Use the PTRS activity codes for Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) parts 91 subpart K (part 91K), 125, and 129 in order to track and document the initial incorporation of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Oversight Office-approved fuel tank system instructions for continued airworthiness (ICA) into an operator’s program.

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1)    Maintenance: 3314, 3315, 3316, 3317, 3363, 3364, 4632.
2)    Avionics: 5314, 5315, 5316, 5317, 5363, 5364, 6632.
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NOTE:  In this section, the terms “operator,” “it,” and “its” refer to any certificate holder, program manager, operator, or foreign air carrier operating under part 91K, 121, 125, or part 129, § 129.14.

NOTE:  The following notes in this section are directed to principal inspectors (PI) and aviation safety inspectors (ASI). PIs and ASIs should use the information in these notes when performing their fuel tank safety (FTS) oversight.

NOTE:  As defined in 14 CFR part 26, § 26.3, the FAA Oversight Office is the Aircraft Certification Office (ACO) or the office of the Transport Airplane Directorate with oversight responsibility for the relevant type certificate (TC), Supplemental Type Certificate (STC), or manufacturer as determined by the Administrator.

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B.    Safety Assurance System (SAS) for Part 121 Operators. Use SAS automation and the associated Data Collection Tools (DCT). This section is related to SAS Element 4.6.2, (AW) Maintenance Special Emphasis Programs.

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6-2692    OBJECTIVE. This section provides specific guidance for PIs and ASIs to determine if an operator is in compliance with the Enhanced Airworthiness Program for Airplane Systems (EAPAS)/FTS operating rule and the specific fuel tank system Airworthiness Directives (AD).

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6-2693    COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS. This task to determine operator compliance with the FTS rule requires coordination between PIs and ASIs. It may also include coordination with the ACO for initial/revision approval of electrical wiring interconnection system (EWIS) ICAs.

6-2694    FUEL TANK SYSTEMS RULE. On May 7, 2001, the Transport Airplane Fuel Tank System Design Review, Flammability Reduction and Maintenance and Inspection Requirements final rule was published. It has since been referred to as the 2001 FTS rule. It adopted amendments to 14 CFR part 25, Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 88, and operating requirements related to SFAR 88. The operating requirements included requirements to implement ICAs that design approval holders (DAH) developed in compliance with SFAR 88.

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6-2695    SFAR 88 REQUIREMENTS. SFAR 88 requires DAHs to conduct a safety review of the applicable airplanes identified in the rule to determine that their design meets the FTS ignition requirements described in part 25, §§ 25.901 and 25.981(a) and (b). If their design was determined not to meet those requirements, they were required to develop design changes for those noncompliant designs. The FAA is issuing ADs mandating those design changes. Though it is likely that operators will use the DAH’s ICAs, the FAA acknowledges that they are able to develop their own or contract third parties to develop alternative but acceptable ICAs.

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NOTE:  Guidance for operator compliance with the FTS requirements in the EAPAS/FTS rule is contained in Advisory Circular (AC) 120-97, Incorporation of Fuel Tank System Instructions for Continued Airworthiness into Operator Maintenance and/or Inspection Programs.

NOTE:  Operators are not required to use the DAH’s fuel tank ICAs. They are only required to incorporate ICAs approved by the FAA Oversight Office and required by SFAR 88 or § 25.1529 and part 25 appendix H into their maintenance or inspection program.

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6-2696    GENERAL. On November 8, 2007, the FAA published the EAPAS/FTS rule. The purpose of the rule is to help ensure the continued safety of transport category airplanes by improving the design, installation, and maintenance of electrical wiring systems. The EAPAS/FTS rule amended the operating requirements to implement FTS actions developed in accordance with SFAR 88. It also established new part 26 to support the continued airworthiness of and safety improvements for transport category airplanes. Section 26.11(b) requires integrating the incorporation of the fuel tank system and EWIS § 25.1701 requirements to ensure compatibility and eliminate duplication.

NOTE:  The EAPAS/FTS rule contains SFAR 88 maintenance and inspection instructions to assure the safety of the fuel tank system. The DAH were required by the EAPAS/FTS rule § 26.11(b) to align the fuel tank system instructions developed during the SFAR 88 design review with the EWIS ICA to ensure compatibility and minimize redundancies. Some EWISs are also part of the fuel tank system. The requirements for their maintenance and inspection might be more specific than those for wiring in general, and might contain additional requirements.

NOTE:  AC 120-102, Incorporation of Electrical Wiring Interconnection Systems Instructions for Continued Airworthiness into an Operator’s Maintenance Program, addresses the EWIS portion of the EAPAS/FTS rule. ACs are available on the FAA website at: http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/advisory_circulars.

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6-2697    ICA DEVELOPMENT. FAA policy memorandum ANM112-05-001, Policy Statement on Process for Developing SFAR 88-related Instructions for Maintenance and Inspection of Fuel Tank Systems, dated October 6, 2004 provides standardized guidance to the DAH for developing maintenance instructions as a method of compliance with SFAR 88. The policy identified two categories of potential ignition source‑related ICAs. These two categories of SFAR 88 ICAs have been referred to as “Unsafe Condition” and “No Unsafe Condition”-related ICAs.

A.    Unsafe Condition Category ICAs.

1)    Unsafe Condition Category Criteria. The DAHs are required to develop design changes and ICA to address features of the fuel tank system design that are determined to meet the SFAR 88 unsafe condition criteria, and mandated by ADs. These AD-mandated actions could include design changes, operational procedures, or airworthiness limitation items (ALI) containing repetitive maintenance and inspection instructions, or all three. FTS airworthiness limitations (AL) include critical design configuration control limitations (CDCCL), inspections, or other procedures that are necessary to prevent the development of ignition sources within the fuel tank system. CDCCLs are a type of fuel tank system AL introduced by § 25.981(b).
2)    Including AD-Mandated Actions (PI Action). The PI must ensure that the operator’s maintenance/inspection program/manual includes all AD-mandated actions, such as design changes, operational procedures, or ALs containing repetitive maintenance and inspection instructions. These repetitive maintenance and inspection instructions allow the operator additional time to accomplish the design change. Operators should be tracking these interim repetitive maintenance or inspection tasks on the specific airplanes during the accomplishment of the design change.

NOTE:  Any operator-proposed changes to AD-mandated ALs must be handled by the AD alternative method of compliance (AMOC) process through the FAA Oversight Office.

B.    No Unsafe Condition Category FTS ICAs.

1)    Safety Failure Effects Category (FEC). The DAHs were also required to develop ICAs for all FEC 5 and 8 tasks developed from analysis Maintenance Significant Items (MSI). They were developed and based on anticipated consequences of failure logic in Maintenance Steering Group – 3rd Task Force (MSG-3); therefore changes to these categories may have an effect on safety. FEC 5 and 8 tasks address those features of the fuel tank system design that are determined to be a “No Unsafe Condition” but are necessary to maintain the continued airworthiness of the ignition source prevention features of the fuel tank system. The DAH, through the Maintenance Review Board (MRB) process, subjects these MSIs to maintenance program development logic using the latest version of MSG-3. They are FAA Oversight Office-approved. They will normally be found in the DAH’s Maintenance Review Board Report (MRBR) or a source document required by part 25 appendix H, § H25.5(b). Inspection tasks, intervals, and task instructions/procedures are developed as a result of this process. AC 120-102 provides information on the source document. The STC ICA will be contained in the FAA-approved STC document.

NOTE:  The “No Unsafe Condition” ICAs discussed in subparagraph 6-2698B are the ICAs that the operator must incorporate into their maintenance or inspection program to comply with the fuel tank system operational requirements. (Refer to part 91, § 91.1507; part 121, § 121.1113; part 125, § 125.507; and § 129.113.)

NOTE:  For administrative purposes some DAHs have put both the “No Unsafe Condition” and the “Unsafe Condition” category ICAs in their Airworthiness Limitation Section (ALS) mandated by ADs. Therefore they both require the same level of visibility and attention by the operator. Changes to either category must be approved by the FAA Oversight Office as an AMOC to the AD.

2)    Operator’s AD Tracking System (PI Action). PIs must ensure that the operator’s AD tracking system does not draw a distinction between the “No Unsafe Condition” and “Unsafe Condition” category ICAs. Both are mandated by ADs, and require the same level of attention by the operator. The two categories should be clearly identified in the operator’s manual/AD tracking system.
a)    The first category is the maintenance or inspection program actions to ensure the continued airworthiness of the fuel tank system throughout the operational life of the airplane (see subparagraph 6-2697B).
b)    The second category is the unsafe condition and actions required by the AD to prevent development of ignition sources within the fuel tank system (see subparagraph 6-2697A).
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6-2698    FUEL TANK SYSTEM AIRWORTHINESS LIMITATIONS. Fuel tank system ALs are FAA Oversight Office-approved mandatory CDCCLs, inspections, or other procedures determined necessary to ensure that fuel tank ignition sources do not occur and are not introduced into the fuel system as a result of maintenance actions, repairs, or alterations throughout the operational life of the airplane. This requirement is similar to that contained in § 25.571 for airplane structure and fuel tank system ALs are intended to be treated the same as airplane structure ALs. Therefore, § 25.981 added a new requirement to part 25 appendix H to require fuel tank system ALs in the ALS of the ICAs.

A.    AD-Mandated ALs. While fuel system ALs are developed as part of the type certification process (new designs) in compliance with § 25.981, in-service airplanes did not have this requirement for fuel system ALs in their certification basis. Therefore, the SFAR 88 required DAHs to develop fuel system ALs that the FAA then mandated by ADs. These fuel system ADs require the operator to incorporate the fuel system ALs into their maintenance or inspection program. A fuel tank system AL may be a mandatory replacement time, related inspection or procedures, ALI, or a CDCCL.

1)    Mixed Airplane Fleets (PI Action). Operators with mixed airplane fleets include:

    Those that have fuel system ALs in their certification basis (e.g., B747-800, B787, etc.).

    Those with fuel system ALs mandated by ADs (e.g., 2008-10-11, B757, etc.).

2)    Ensuring Proper Approval Process (PI Action). The PI must ensure that the operator has procedures that track the above-listed models’ specific ALs separately. This is to ensure that the proper approval process for changes and recordkeeping is used.

NOTE:  Operator-proposed changes to AD-mandated ALs must be handled by the AD AMOC process through the FAA Oversight Office. Changes to fuel system ALs that are part of the airplanes certification basis is a change to the type design of the airplane.

B.    Types of Fuel System ALs. There are three types of fuel system ALs. One is an ALI inspection that has a specific task and interval, such as 10 years. A second type is ALI procedures that could have specific task intervals. The third type is a CDCCL that has no interval but establishes configuration limitations to maintain and to protect the “critical design feature” identified in the CDCCL. CDCCLs can also include requirements to have placards on the airplane with information about critical features. (Refer to AC 25.981-1, Fuel Tank Ignition Source Prevention Guidelines, for additional information on CDCCLs.)

1)    Critical Design Feature Example. The following is an example of a CDCCL critical design feature for a “Legacy Airplane.”
a)    For an alternating current fuel pump fault current bonding strap installation, the concern is the potential for fault current path through the pump motor housing to structure inside the tank. Electrical faults internal to the fuel pump motor impeller are by design routed through the motor impeller assembly to the bonding straps on the front face of the motor impeller assembly to structure outside the tank. The bonding straps ensure that fault currents are conducted to structure outside the tank until the circuit breaker and/or Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI) has had time to remove power from the pump.
b)    The following features must be maintained during pump replacement per the manufacturer’s Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM):

    Install two bonding straps between the pump motor impeller end cap and structure; and

    Verify motor impeller bonding resistance to structure is 0.0004 ohms (0.4 milliohms) or less.

2)    Ensuring Critical Design Feature Incorporation (PI Action). PIs must ensure that the critical design features are incorporated into the maintenance or inspection program/manual and adhered to as written. Any proposed operator changes must be approved through an AMOC to the AD. The CDCCL critical design feature identified above is just one of many that are included in the ALs for the airplane. The CDCCL’s critical design features must be included on the operator’s Engineering Orders (EO) and job/task cards.

C.    Traditionally Structural ALs. Traditionally structural ALs have a specific task and interval, and are performed as part of a scheduled inspection in a hangar environment. Most fuel system ALs will also involve a scheduled inspection in a hangar environment.

D.    Unscheduled Maintenance. There will also be times when a fuel system AL that includes a CDCCL will involve unscheduled maintenance such as a fuel pump change at a line station overnight. The fuel pump change requires that the critical design feature identified in subparagraph 6-2698B1) must be accomplished.

E.    Safety of Flight. Accomplishment of fuel system ALs that include CDCCLs relate directly to safety of flight similar to the Required Inspection Item (RII) requirement in part 121. Operators must consider all ALs that include CDCCLs with the same safety consideration and emphasis whether the work occurs during scheduled or unscheduled maintenance or it arises at an inconvenient time or location.

1)    Fuel System AL CDCCLS (PI Action). PIs must ensure that operators consider all fuel system AL CDCCLs with the same safety consideration and emphasis whether it occurs during scheduled or unscheduled maintenance or it arises at an inconvenient time or location. A means of accomplishing this is to have the operator include subparagraph 6-2698E or a similarly worded paragraph in specific sections of their manual, especially those sections that deal with the accomplishment of both scheduled and unscheduled maintenance.
2)    CDCCL Procedures (PI Action). PIs must ensure that operators have procedures in their maintenance/inspection program/manual that ensure that the CDCCL is performed whether it’s during scheduled or unscheduled maintenance.

F.    Identifying Critical Design Features. CDCCLs are intended to identify only critical design features of a design that must be maintained. For example, certain components of a fuel pump, or all components of the fuel pump, may include critical design features that are identified as CDCCLs. These critical design features would be identified in the ALS of the ICA as in CDCCLs.

G.    Component Maintenance Manual (CMM). Although not intended by the introduction of CDCCLs and other fuel system ALs, there are also DAHs that have created certain ALs CDCCLs that include both the critical design feature as well as the tasks associated with maintaining the CDCCL. Typically these ALs require adhering to a specific CMM at a specific revision level to be used when repairing or overhauling fuel system components. In this case, operators are required to adhere to all elements of the CMM specified in the CDCCL. Any deviations from the CMM specified in the CDCCL, including using later revisions to those CMMs, must be approved by the FAA Oversight Office. Deviations from CMMs specified in the CDCCL may also involve an AMOC to an AD.

H.    Primary Source of Information. The ADs require that the fuel system ALs be incorporated in the operator’s maintenance or inspection program/manual; therefore, this makes the CDCCL the primary source for the critical design feature information. While the critical design feature may also be in the AMM reference, it is not to be used as the primary source of information for the CDCCL critical design feature.

1)    Ensuring the Inclusion of Fuel System AL Information and References (PI Action). PIs must ensure that the operator has procedures in its maintenance/inspection program/manual that instruct its maintenance program development personnel, who write/revise manuals and job/task cards, and engineering personnel who develop/revise EOs, that all information identified in the fuel system ALs and any FAA Oversight Office-approved AMM/standard wiring practice manual (SWPM) references are included. The job/task cards and EOs should be identified as a fuel system AL.
2)    Policy Statement (PI Action). The operator should have a policy statement in its manual that cites the following or similarly worded statement: “While the critical design feature may also be in the AMM reference, it is not to be used as the primary source of information for the CDCCL critical design feature.” The primary source is the CDCCL.
3)    Third-Party AL (PI Action). PIs must ensure that the operator has procedures in its maintenance/inspection program/manual that address the performance of, and procedures to follow, when a fuel system AL is performed by a third-party contract maintenance/repair station.

I.    CMM Specified in the CDCCL.

1)    Specific Revision Level. There are also CDCCLs that require a specific CMM at a specific revision level be used when repairing or overhauling fuel system components. Operators are required to use the CMM specified in the CDCCL. Any changes to the AD must be approved by an AMOC.
2)    CMM Revision Control Procedures (PI Action). PIs must ensure the operator has fuel tank system CMM revision control procedures that ensure the latest CMM revision level identified in the CDCCL is being complied with. In addition, the operator must convey this information to any third-party contractor/repair station performing fuel tank system component maintenance or overhaul work for it.
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6-2699    AD REQUIREMENTS. The AD requires revising the ALS of the ICA to incorporate new limitations for fuel tank systems.

NOTE:  PIs must ensure that the operator incorporates these fuel tank systems limitations into their maintenance or inspection program in accordance with subparagraphs 6-2699A through D.

A.    Fuel Systems ALs.

1)    Maintenance Planning Data (MPD). The information in this subparagraph and subparagraphs 6-2699B and C is based on a transport airplane MPD ALS. It includes explanatory language, which is also referred to as the program rules/front matter, what the fuel system ALs are, their regulatory basis, and what they contain. It explains the difference between an ALI and CDCCL. Operators are required by the AD to include this explanatory language into their maintenance or inspection program. This includes appropriate manuals used in the administration of the operator’s maintenance or inspection program. Any changes to these program rules must be approved by the FAA Oversight Office.
2)    Including Explanatory Language (PI Action). PIs must ensure that the operator’s maintenance/inspection program/manual includes explanatory language. This language is “incorporated by reference” in the AD; therefore, it is FAA-approved. Any changes by the operator must be FAA Oversight Office-approved.

B.    Format—Fuel System ALs. This paragraph includes a format in terms of AL number, task, interval, airplane applicability, and description. This is the format used by the DAH and included in the ALS. The operator can use its own format, however as a best practice, it is recommended that the operator include the AL number, task, interval, airplane applicability, and description in its manual or document used in the administration of the maintenance or inspection program. It is especially important that the operator’s documents, such as EOs and job/task cards, contain the appropriate format information for the document so that the person performing the task knows the safety significance of the task.

C.    ALs—Fuel System ALs.

1)    ALIs and CDCCLs. This paragraph includes the ALs. Some DAHs have separated fuel system ALs into two subcategories: ALIs and CDCCLs. In this case, ALIs include only fuel tank AL inspections and procedures. The CDCCLs, in some cases, reference FAA Oversight Office-approved data contained in the DAH AMM and the SWPM. Any changes to the approved data in the AMM or the SWPM must be FAA Oversight Office-approved before being utilized. Only the specific data referenced in the DAH, AMM, and SWPM is FAA Oversight Office-approved, not the entire manual.
2)    FAA Oversight Office-Approved Changes (PI Action). The PI must ensure that the operator’s maintenance program/manual contains instructions for maintenance program development personnel (who write/revise job/task cards), and engineering personnel (who develop/revise EOs, explaining that these references are FAA-approved and any changes must be approved by the FAA Oversight Office).

D.    Work Instructions/Procedures. As stated in subparagraph 6-2699C1), AMM and SWPM references in the ALs are approved by the FAA Oversight Office. The following subparagraphs should be used as guidance when complying with ALs that contain references to AMMs or SWPMs.

1)    When the language “in accordance with” or “per” is cited in the CDCCLs, the procedures in the AMM or SWPM must be followed to ensure that the critical design feature is maintained. Any changes to these procedures require FAA Oversight Office approval.
2)    When the language “refer to” is cited in the CDCCL, the procedures in the AMM or SWPM represent one method of complying with the AL. An accepted alternative procedure may be developed by the operator in accordance with its procedures in its maintenance program/manual. Prior FAA Oversight Office approval is not required for this action. This does not preclude the PI from coordinating with the FAA Oversight Office before accepting the revision.
3)    While all DAHs may not specifically use “in accordance with,” “per,” or “refer to” when referencing their AMM or SWPM in the CDCCL, the regulatory effect is the same. The fuel system ALs are required by ADs and therefore those references are FAA-approved.
a)    CDCCLs that use “in accordance with” or “per” to refer to work instructions/procedures can only be changed through an AMOC to the AD.
b)    CDCCLs that use “refer to” work instructions/procedures are also FAA-approved, but changes can be made by the operator without further FAA approval (i.e., AMOC).

E.    Maintenance/Inspection Program/Manual (PI Action). PIs must ensure that operators have incorporated in their maintenance/inspection program/manual the following:

1)    Specific Fuel System ALs (PI Action). All airplane-model-specific fuel system ALs.
2)    Specific References (PI Action). All specific references to FAA Oversight Office-approved fuel system AMM/SWPM work instructions/procedures. (See subparagraph 6-2699D.)
3)    FAA Oversight Office Approval (PI Action). Procedures that clearly delineate between AMM/SWPM work instructions/procedures that must be approved by the FAA Oversight Office and those that can be changed by the operator without FAA Oversight Office approval. (See subparagraph 6-2699D.)
4)    Instructions to Personnel (PI Action). The PI must ensure that the operator’s maintenance program/manual contains instructions for maintenance program development personnel (who write/revise manuals and job/task cards), and engineering personnel (who develop/revise EOs, explaining that these AMM/SWPM references are FAA Oversight Office-approved. (See subparagraph 6-2699D.)
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6-2700    APPLICABLE STCs. The FAA has identified a list of applicable STCs, and the associated amendment dates containing the fuel tank system ICAs. (See Table 6-10, List of Applicable Supplemental Type Certificates.)

NOTE:  PIs must ensure that the operator has incorporated the ICA into its maintenance or inspection program. Refer to AC 120-97 for further information on applicable STCs.

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6-2701    FIELD-APPROVED AUXILIARY FUEL TANKS.

A.    Auxiliary Fuel Tank Installations. In order for an operator to use field-approved auxiliary fuel tank installations after December 16, 2008, the operator must:

1)    Perform a design review and develop ICAs that include maintenance, inspections, procedures, and limitations in accordance with SFAR 88 requirements.
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NOTE:  When an operator develops or requests a change to the ICAs, the PI will inform the operator to work closely with the FAA Oversight Office to complete a design review.

2)    Submit the ICAs through the PI, who may add comments and forward them to the FAA Oversight Office for approval.
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3)    The operator will submit to the PI for review the revisions to their maintenance and inspection program incorporating the FAA Oversight Office-approved ICA changes.

NOTE:  When an operator requests a change to the auxiliary fuel tank installation ICA, inform the operator to follow this process. If the operator decides to deactivate or remove the auxiliary fuel system, it will require FAA-approved data.

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B.    Operations Specification (OpSpec)/Management Specification (MSpec) D097, Aging Aircraft Programs (PI Action). The PI will ensure the operator has incorporated the auxiliary fuel tank ICA and any subsequent revisions into their maintenance and/or inspection programs. When the review is complete, the PI will issue or amend OpSpec/MSpec D097.

6-2702    OPERATOR-DEVELOPED SHOP INSTRUCTIONS. In the past, CMMs were accepted by the FAA, not approved. The FAA Oversight Office will approve certain CMMs and certain parts of the CMM in accordance with the requirement in § 25.981(b) to establish CDCCLs.

A.    Operator Changes. In certain CDCCLs the entire manual is FAA Oversight Office-approved and a statement is contained in the manual to that effect. The FAA Oversight Office must approve any operator changes to the CMM.

B.    Approved FAA Oversight Office Data.

1)    Requiring Specific FAA-Approved Data. Another example is a CDCCL where the entire CMM is not FAA Oversight Office-approved, but the CDCCL requires following specific FAA-approved data such as maintenance instructions, inspections, and procedures in the CDCCL and CMM.
2)    Shop Manuals and Instructions (PI Action). The PI must ensure that operator-developed shop manuals and instructions that include FAA Oversight Office-approved data are identified as such. Any changes to FAA-approved data in the operators shop manuals must be FAA Oversight Office-approved.
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6-2703    EXCEPTIONAL SHORT-TERM EXTENSION OF FUEL TANK SYSTEM ALs.

A.    Oversight Office-Approved ALS. An operator may extend certain fuel system ALs up to the maximum number of days specified in the applicable ALS for a specific airplane without FAA Oversight Office approval. The FAA Oversight Office-approved ALS includes a statement that explains that the exceptional short term extensions of fuel tank system ALs, subject to the procedures in the document, are FAA Oversight Office‑approved. The FAA defines an exceptional short-term extension as an increase in a fuel system ALI interval that may be used by the operator to cover an uncontrollable or unexpected situation in which the AL cannot be performed within the ALI timeframe (e.g., an operator’s airplane is scheduled for an AL inspection but cannot enter the hangar bay because it is still occupied by another airplane). In this case, the operator, in accordance with the procedures in the ALS, must request an exceptional short-term extension through the PI, who must approve in advance any operator exceptional short-term extension.

B.    Exceptional Short-Term Extension.

1)    Original Interval. After an operator uses an exceptional short-term extension of a fuel tank system AL, that AL interval must revert back to the original interval in the maintenance program. Extensions are only allowed on an individual airplane. Under the procedures in the ALS, repeated use on the same airplane (or similar airplanes) in the operator’s fleet is not allowed.
2)    Procedures for Short-Term Extensions (PI Action). The PI must ensure that the operator’s maintenance/inspection program/manual has procedures that address short-term extension of ALs.
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6-2704    OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS TO INCORPORATE FTS ICAs.

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A.    Maintenance or Inspection Program Revision. Section 121.1113 (and similar provisions of §§ 91.1507, 125.507, and 129.113) states that after December 16, 2008, no certificate holder, air carrier, or operator may operate an airplane unless it has revised the maintenance and/or inspection program for that airplane to include FAA Oversight Office-approved ICAs for the fuel tank system.

Indicates new/changed information.

B.    MRBR or Maintenance Implementation Document (MID) Revisions (PI Action). The PI must ensure that the operator has incorporated the DAH-developed MRBR or MID revisions or other FAA Oversight Office-approved fuel tank system ICAs into its maintenance and/or inspection program. The PI review ensures that the operator’s maintenance and/or inspection programs are in compliance with the fuel tank system and Aging Aircraft Program rules. When the review is complete, the PI will issue or amend OpSpec/MSpec D097.

C.    Operators/Certificate Holders/Program Managers that are Authorized OpSpec/MSpec/Letter of Authorization (LOA) D097. The issuance of OpSpec D097 signifies the FAA has reviewed the operator/certificate holder/program manager’s policy and procedures incorporated into their maintenance and/or inspection programs are in compliance with the Aging Aircraft Program rules. Table 1 of D097 will consist of three columns that list:

    The Aging Aircraft Program rules;

    The manual and section where the policy and procedures are located for the applicable Aging Aircraft Program; and

    The date of the manual and section where the current policy and procedures are located for the applicable Aging Aircraft Program.

Indicates new/changed information.

NOTE:  Figure 6-113 below illustrates a D097 Table 1 that lists the various 14 CFR part rules. The operator/certificate holder/program manager will have a specific OpSpec D097 template for their operation.

Figure 6-113.  Sample D097 Table 1 – Aging Aircraft Maintenance Programs

Aging Aircraft Program Rules

Operator/Certificate Holder/Program Manager’s Maintenance and/or Inspection Program Policy and Procedures (Manual and Section)

Date

Repairs Assessment for Pressurized Fuselages — § 91.1505, § 121.1107, § 125.505, § 129.107

 

 

Supplemental Inspections — § 121.1109, 129.109

 

 

Electrical Wiring Interconnection Systems (EWIS) Maintenance Program — § 121.1111, § 129.111

 

 

Fuel Tank System Maintenance Program — § 121.1113, § 129.113

 

 

Flammability Reduction Means — § 121.1117, § 125.509, § 129.117

 

 

Fuel Tank System Inspection Program — § 91.1507, § 125.507

 

 

1)    Initial submission and any later revisions to the operator/certificate holder/program manager’s maintenance and/or inspection program policy and procedures must be submitted to the PI for review for compliance with the Aging Aircraft Program rules.
2)    An operator/certificate holder/program manager must have procedures to ensure that ICAs are incorporated into their maintenance and/or inspection program.
3)    The PI must ensure that the operator/certificate holder/program manager has procedures in its manual that track any changes and approvals made to the FAA Oversight Office-approved FTS ICAs.

6-2705    CHANGES TO OPERATORS’ FUEL TANK SYSTEM TASKS, INTERVALS, AND INSTRUCTIONS/PROCEDURES. Fuel tank system tasks resulting from SFAR 88 safety reviews are unique to SFAR 88 since the FTS rule (May 7, 2001) requires FAA approval of any changes. These intervals allow flexibility for operators to perform these maintenance tasks within their normal scheduled maintenance checks.

A.    DAH Changes. Normally, throughout the course of an airplane’s life cycle, the DAH will make changes to the maintenance program, which will include revising the FAA-approved “source document.” Revisions to the source document must be FAA Oversight Office-approved. The operator may also propose changes to its fuel tank system maintenance or inspection program. The operator must submit fuel tank system changes to the PI for review and approval. AD-mandated fuel tank system ALs are not required to be approved for OpSpec/MSpec D097.

Indicates new/changed information.

B.    Operator Changes. The operator must have procedures in its maintenance/inspection program/manual that ensure that any changes to fuel tank system tasks are routed through the PI. The PI may add comments and then must formally coordinate the changes for approval with the relevant FAA Oversight Office, through the appropriate Aircraft Evaluation Group (AEG).

6-2706    THE EAPAS FUEL TANK SYSTEM IGNITION PREVENTION TRAINING.

A.    Section 121.375. The EAPAS/FTS rule does not have a specific requirement for operator fuel tank ignition prevention training. Section 121.375 sets the standard for a training program to ensure that each person (including inspection personnel) who determines the adequacy of work done is fully informed about procedures and techniques and new equipment in use and is competent to perform their duties.

B.    Part 91K. Part 91K also has maintenance personnel training requirements similar to part 121.

C.    Section 125.507(a)(1) and (2). Part 125 does not have a maintenance personnel training requirement similar to parts 91K and 121. With an airplane applicability established in the EAPAS/FTS rule (refer to § 125.507(a)(1) and (2)), more large, complex transport category airplanes are operating under part 125.

D.    Section 121.375 Standards (PI Action). PIs must ensure that the operator has a fuel tank system ignition prevention training program that is consistent with the standard set in § 121.375 and information in AC 120-97.

E.    Section 91.1111 or § 91.1433 Standards (PI Action). PIs assigned to a part 91K fractional ownership operator to which § 91.1507 applies must ensure that the operator has a fuel tank system ignition prevention training program consistent with the standard set in § 91.1111 or § 91.1433 and information in AC 120-97.

F.    Section 125.507 Applicable Operators (PI Action). PIs assigned to part 125 operators to which § 125.507 applies should encourage their operator to develop a fuel tank system ignition prevention training program consistent with the information in AC 120-97.

G.    Sections 129.14 and 129.113 Assigned PIs (PI Action). PIs assigned to § 129.14 operators to which § 129.113 applies should encourage their operator to develop a fuel tank system ignition prevention training program consistent with the information in AC 120-97.

Table 6-10.  List of Applicable Supplemental Type Certificates

STC Number

STC Holder

Airplane Models

Description

Operator Actions

ST00069BO

Goodrich Corporation

DC8-62, -62F, -63F, -72, -72F, -73F

Fuel Quantity Indicating System (External to Tank)

STC Amended 1/5/04, Operators must incorporate ICA T3068‑0005‑01, Initial issue, dated Oct 23, 2003 (or later version). (At D check interval, inspections of flight deck wiring and connectors.)

ST00020BO

Goodrich Corporation

B747-100, -100B, -100B SUD, -200B, -200C, -200F, -300, B747SP & B747SR

Retrofit of Entire Fuel Quantity Gauging System

STC Amended 10/19/04, Operators must incorporate ICA T3070‑0005‑0101, Initial issue, dated July 2, 2004 (or later version). (At D check interval, inspections of wiring separation, shielding, bonding.)

ST00142BO

Goodrich Corporation

B737-300

Isolation Fuel Quantity Transmitter System

STC Amended 2/10/04, Operators must incorporate ICA T3072‑0005‑0101, Revision A, dated Jan 22, 2004 (or later version). (Periodic inspections of wiring and bonding.)

SA298NE

Goodrich Corporation

B727-100, -200

Computerized Fuel Quantity Indicator System

STC Amended 4/19/04, Operators must incorporate ICA T3066‑0005‑0101, Revision D, dated March 10, 2004 (or later version). (Inspections to determine the condition of the wiring and connector interfaces, every 16,000 flight hours.)

ST00053BO

Goodrich Corporation

B727, -100, -100C, -200, -200F, 727C

FQIS Indicators w/VTO & Optional FSU, In-tank Harnesses

STC Amended 4/19/04, Operators must incorporate ICA T3065‑0005‑0101, Revision D, dated March 10, 2004 (or later version). (Inspections to determine the condition of the wiring and connector interfaces, every 16,000 flight hours.)

Indicates new/changed information. Indicates new/changed information.

6-2707    TASK OUTCOMES. If not already accomplished, document that the operator has successfully incorporated the FAA Oversight Office-approved FTS ICAs into its maintenance program by issuing or amending OpSpec D097.

A.    Complete the PTRS Record. For part 91K, part 125, and part 129 operators, open a new PTRS record using the PTRS codes in this section. Enter “FTS” in the “National Use” block of section I. In section IV, the “Comment” block, annotate the following:

1)    Document that the operator has incorporated the applicable FTS ICAs into its maintenance program.
2)    Record the signature date of the FTS OpSpec.

B.    Ongoing Surveillance of Part 121 Air Carriers. Follow SAS guidance.

C.    Ongoing Surveillance of Part 91K, Part 125 and Part 129 Operators. To ensure the operator continues to comply with its FTS requirements, accomplish and record surveillance activities using the PTRS codes listed in this section using “FTS” in the “National Use” block. Enter the findings in the PTRS database in accordance with existing procedures.

Indicates new/changed information.

RESERVED. Paragraphs 6-2708 through 6-2722.