4/11/17

 

8900.1 CHG 525

VOLUME 6  SURVEILLANCE

CHAPTER 11  OTHER SURVEILLANCE

Section 26  Safety Assurance System: Evaluate/Inspect 14 CFR Parts 121, 125, or Part 129, § 129.14 Operators Fuel Tank System Fuel Tank Flammability Reduction Program

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6-2777    REPORTING SYSTEM(S).

A.    Program Tracking and Reporting Subsystem (PTRS) Activity Codes. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has developed the following PTRS activity codes for Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) parts 125 and 129, § 129.14 in order to track and document the initial incorporation of the operator’s Fuel Tank Flammability Reduction (FTFR) Program: 4308, 4309, 4635, and 6635.

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NOTE:  This guidance applies to operations specifications (OpSpecs), management specifications (MSpecs), and part 125 letters of authorization (LOA).

NOTE:  In this section, the terms “operator,” “it,” and “its” refer to any certificate holder, air carrier, or other entity operating under part 121, 125, or § 129.14.

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B.    Safety Assurance System (SAS) for Part 121 Operators. Aviation safety inspectors (ASI) must use Data Collection Tool (DCT) 4.2.2, (AW) Maintenance/Inspection Schedule, Element Design Assessment (EDA) or Element Performance Assessment (EPA) and 4.6.2, (AW) Airworthiness Special Emphasis Programs, EDA or EPA questions that pertain to the FTFR Program.

6-2778    OBJECTIVE. This section provides specific guidance for principal avionics inspectors (PAI) and principal maintenance inspectors (PMI) to determine if an operator is in compliance with the Reduction of Fuel Tank Flammability in Transport Category Airplanes final rule.

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6-2779    COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS. This task requires coordination between principal inspectors (PI) and ASIs.

6-2780    FTFR RULE. On July 21, 2008, the Reduction of Fuel Tank Flammability in Transport Category Airplanes final rule was published. It is referred to as the FTFR rule. The FTFR rule contains new requirements for design approval holders (DAH) and operators of certain transport airplanes. The FTFR rule was amended on July 2, 2009 to adjust the compliance dates resulting from an administrative error.

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NOTE:  Guidance for operator compliance with the FTFR rule is contained in Advisory Circular (AC) 120-98, Operator Information for Incorporating Fuel Tank Flammability Reduction Requirements into a Maintenance and/or Inspection Program.

NOTE:  As defined in 14 CFR part 26, § 26.3, the FAA Oversight Office is the Aircraft Certification Office (ACO) or the office of the Transport Airplane Directorate with oversight responsibility for the relevant type certificate (TC), Supplemental Type Certificate (STC), or manufacturer as determined by the Administrator. A list of FAA Oversight Offices is identified in appendix 3 of AC 120-98.

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6-2781    DEFINITIONS.

A.    Auxiliary Fuel Tank. An auxiliary fuel tank is a tank installed to make additional fuel available for increasing the flight range of the airplane. It is secondary to the airplane’s main fuel tanks.

B.    Center Wing Fuel Tank (CWT). CWT is an auxiliary fuel tank located partially or entirely in the center of an airplane’s wing box.

C.    Flammability Reduction Means (FRM). FRM is any system or feature designed to reduce the flammability exposure of a fuel tank either by affecting oxygen levels or by affecting fuel vapor concentration levels.

D.    Ignition Mitigation Means (IMM). IMM is a system or feature designed to prevent overpressure of a fuel tank following ignition of fuel or vapor in the tank.

E.    Inerting. Inerting is a process where a noncombustible gas is introduced into the ullage of a fuel tank so that the ullage becomes non-flammable.

F.    Main Fuel Tanks. Main fuel tanks are fuel tanks that feed fuel directly into one or more engines and holds required fuel for reserves continually throughout each flight.

G.    Ullage. Ullage is the volume within the fuel tank not occupied by liquid fuel.

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6-2782    FTFR RULE REQUIREMENTS.

A.    DAH Requirements. The FTFR rule requires DAHs and operators increase the level of safety of certain fuel tanks. It accomplishes this by requiring incorporation of either FRM such as nitrogen inerting or IMM such as polyurethane foam to reduce the fuel tank explosion risk to an acceptable level. The fuel tank flammability safety standards in part 26 subpart D require DAHs to conduct flammability impact assessments, incorporate FRM or IMM designs in new production airplanes, and develop service instructions for retrofit installation of FRM or IMM for those affected airplane models with high flammability exposure time fuel tanks.

B.    Possible Adverse Effects on the Design Approval. The DAH for auxiliary fuel tanks in the airplanes where FRM or IMM are required must assess any possible adverse effects of their design approval on the effectiveness of the fuel tank safety (FTS) improvements. If an operator installed an auxiliary fuel tank pursuant to a field approval in an airplane affected by § 26.33, the operator is the auxiliary fuel tank DAH. Any adverse effects on the DAH’s approved design must be mitigated by design changes and service instructions (refer to § 26.35(d)) identified as Flammability Impact Mitigation Means (FIMM). FIMM are modifications developed by DAH for auxiliary fuel tanks when a flammability exposure analysis per § 26.35 determines that an auxiliary fuel tank installed by STC or field approval could have an adverse impact on the performance of existing fuel system FRM or IMM of other tanks.

C.    Example of FIMM. The CWT vent system is part of the type design of the airplane. The installation of an auxiliary fuel tank such as in the forward cargo compartment may reduce the effectiveness of the Nitrogen Gas System (NGS) resulting in an increase in flammability exposure of the CWT. The NGS installation is designed to provide the proper level of nitrogen to the CWT in order to reduce the flammability exposure time to levels required by the certification regulations. Auxiliary fuel tank installations typically transfer fuel and ullage gases to and from the CWT. The concern here is that the auxiliary fuel tank that allows transfer of ullage directly to or from the CWT might increase the flammability exposure time of the CWT above the certification limits. Therefore, the DAH for the auxiliary fuel tank system must comply with § 26.35 and determine if the auxiliary fuel tank system reduces the effectiveness of the NGS resulting in an increase in flammability exposure of the CWT and therefore FIMM is necessary.

D.    Field Approval Auxiliary Fuel Tanks. Section 121.1117(c) and the similar provisions in parts 125 and 129 require that, after the applicable date stated in § 121.1117(e), no operator may operate any airplane subject to § 26.33 that has an auxiliary fuel tank installed by a field approval unless that operator complies with § 26.35 by the applicable dates specified in that section and, if required, installs a FIMM approved by the FAA Oversight Office. The operator may also choose to deactivate or remove the auxiliary fuel tank, but must use FAA Oversight Office-approved data to accomplish that.

NOTE:  Based on our oversight, Flight Standards does not believe there are any field-approved auxiliary fuel tank installations on airplanes identified in Table 2 of § 121.1117.

E.    Excluded Models. The airplane models listed under “Exclusions” in part 121, § 121.1117(o), part 125, § 125.509(m), and part 129, § 129.117(o) of the FTFR rules are excluded from the retrofit requirements. All the airplanes produced of these models were issued an original Certificate of Airworthiness before January 1, 1992. These also are airplane models that, because of their advanced age and small numbers, would likely make compliance economically impractical even if used in passenger service beyond the 100 percent retrofit compliance dates.

F.    Operator Requirements—New Production. For §§ 121.1117, 125.509, and 129.117, no operator may operate a new production airplane identified in Table 1 below (including all-cargo airplanes) for which the State of Manufacture issued the original Certificate of Airworthiness or export airworthiness approval after December 27, 2010, unless a FRM or IMM meeting the requirements of § 26.33 is operational. Table 1 below contains current production airplanes at the time the FTFR rule was issued.

Table 1 of Section 121.1117, 125.509, or 129.117

Model—Boeing

Model—Airbus

747 Series

A318, A319, A320, A321 Series

737 Series

A330, A340 Series

777 Series

 

767 Series

 

NOTE:  Section 26.37 requires affected pending new transport airplane TC projects comply with the 14 CFR part 25, § 25.981 fuel tank flammability TC requirements adopted by the FTFR rule.

NOTE:  Table 1 does not include the Boeing 757 or Airbus A300 or A310 because they were out of production when the FTFR rule was adopted.

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NOTE:  The FTFR rule does not apply to any airplane for which the State of Manufacture issued the original Certificate of Airworthiness or export airworthiness approval before January 1, 1992, unless they are operated in passenger service beyond the date by which the operator is required to modify 100 percent of its affected fleet. After that date, all pre-January 1, 1992 airplanes listed in Table 2 of § 121.1117, § 125.509, or § 129.117 that will still carry passengers will have to be § 26.33(c) compliant. The 100 percent retrofit date is contingent on whether the operator is using “Ground Conditioned Air” identified in subparagraph 6-2783C.

NOTE:  The retrofit requirements of the FTFR rule do not apply to airplanes designed solely for all-cargo operations. Refer to § 26.33(a).

Table 2 of Section 121.1117, 125.509, or 129.117

Model—Boeing

Model—Airbus

747 Series

A318, A319, A320, A321 Series

737 Series

A300, A310 Series

777 Series

A330, A340 Series

767 Series

 

757 Series

 

G.    Operator Requirements—Retrofit.

1)    Compliance Dates.
a)    Section 121.1117, paragraphs (d), (e), and (m), and similar provisions in parts 125 and 129 require that, if FRM, IMM, or FIMM is required by § 26.33 or § 26.35, each operator must complete the installation of FRM, IMM, or FIMM that are approved by the FAA Oversight Office. The retrofit compliance dates require each operator complete retrofit on a percentage of its fleet by specific dates. The DAH is required by § 26.33 or § 26.35 to develop design changes and service instructions for the airplane models manufactured on or after January 1, 1992, if FRM, IMM, or FIMM is required by those part 26 regulations.
b)    The two following notes are considered “must reads” for PIs:
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NOTE:  If an operator wishes to carry passengers in a pre-1992 airplane(s) listed in Table 2 of § 121.1117, § 125.509, or § 129.117 past their 100 percent fleet retrofit compliance date, § 121.1117(m) and similar requirements in §§ 125.509 and 129.117 require the operator modify the airplane(s) to comply with § 26.33(c) before that date. As there is no requirement in § 26.33 or § 26.35 for DAHs to develop design changes and service instructions for pre-1992 airplane(s) any operator of pre-1992 airplane(s) wanting to continue to operate their airplane(s) past the 100 percent retrofit compliance date must comply with the part 26 requirements.

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NOTE:  Table 2 of § 121.1117, § 125.509, or § 129.117 does not include the airplane models listed in the following Table 6-12, Airplane Models Excepted From the Fuel Tank Flammability Reduction Rule, which is not included in the FTFR operating rules. These models are not listed under Exclusions in §§ 121.1117(o), 125.509(m), and 129.117(o) of the FTFR operating rules either. However, they were issued the original Certificate of Airworthiness or export airworthiness approval before January 1, 1992. They also do not include high flammability exposure fuel tanks that would require FRM or IMM in order to comply with § 26.33(c). Therefore, they are not required to comply with § 26.33(c) or the retrofit requirements in the FTFR rule even if an airplane listed in Table 6-12 below were to carry passengers past the 100 percent retrofit compliance date.

2)    Retrofit Compliance Times. Section 121.1117(e) and (m), and similar provisions in parts 125 and 129, require the retrofit installations be phased in over the period specified in the rules. Below is a summary of the retrofit compliance date requirements.
a)    Fifty percent of each operator’s fleet must be modified no later than December 26, 2014. A 1-year extension may have been granted by using the “Ground Conditioned Air” provision in § 121.1117(k) or § 129.117(k). There is no similar provision in § 125.509.
b)    One hundred percent of each operator’s fleet must be modified no later than December 26, 2017, unless a 1-year extension has been granted by using the “Ground Conditioned Air” provision in the FTFR rule.
c)    For those operators that have only one airplane of a model identified in Table 1 in § 121.1117(b), (“New Production Airplanes”) in their affected fleet, the airplane must be modified no later than December 26, 2017.
3)    Compliance Plan (PI Action). The PI should encourage and work with the operator to develop a compliance plan for the 50 percent and 100 percent retrofit requirements in § 121.1117(e) and the similar provisions in parts 125 and 129. The compliance plan should contain a complete list/schedule of airplanes that require retrofit. The list/schedule should be updated as airplanes are added or retrofitted. The PI should be apprised of any delays, addition, or deletion of airplanes from the list/schedule.
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Table 6-12.  Airplane Models Excepted From the Fuel Tank Flammability Reduction Rule

Model

Year of Last Delivery

L-1011

1984

DC-10

1990

B-727

1984

DC-9

1982

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6-2783    AN OPERATOR’S AIRPLANE RETROFIT FLEET DEFINED. For the purposes of the FTFR rule an operator’s airplane fleet is defined as the total number of affected airplanes of all affected model types listed on OpSpec/LOA D085, Aircraft Listing.

NOTE:  “New Production Airplanes” that are FRM compliant (refer to § 121.1117(b)) either manufactured on or prior to December 27, 2010, or those manufactured after December 27, 2010 cannot be counted as part of the 50 percent or 100 percent retrofit mix.

A.    Retrofit Mix Example. For example, an operator has a fleet comprised of Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 airplanes. The “affected fleet” is the total number of the affected 737 airplanes plus the total number of affected A320 airplanes. The operating rules require the operator retrofit 50 percent of its affected fleet of airplanes by the 50 percent retrofit compliance date of December 26, 2014. Airplanes in long term storage and listed on OpSpec D106, Aircraft in Long Term Maintenance or Storage, cannot not be counted in the 50 percent or 100 percent retrofit mix for the purposes of the FTFR rule. However, any airplane(s) brought back into service from storage and added to OpSpec/LOA D085 become part of the operator’s 50 percent or 100 percent retrofit mix. The operator must recalculate the retrofit mix based on the number of airplanes added to OpSpec/LOA D085. In addition, any newly acquired airplanes added to the operator’s fleet that are not FTFR retrofit compliant and added to OpSpec/LOA D085 become part of the operator’s 50 percent or 100 percent retrofit mix. If an operator has more than one affected airplane listed on its OpSpec/LOA D085 on the 50 percent retrofit compliance date, they are required to have retrofitted 50 percent of those airplanes by that date.

B.    Retrofit Mix Adjustment. The 50 percent or 100 percent retrofit mix can be adjusted by the operator to suit its operational needs. The operator can change the retrofit mix of airplanes at will and at any time as long as the retrofit percentages and dates are complied with. For instance, an operator has 50 airplanes that need to be FTFR retrofit compliant by December 26, 2014. The operator sells, or puts in storage 25 of those airplanes and purchases 25 that are FTFR retrofit compliant (not new production airplanes). The operator’s 50 percent retrofit requirement remains the same, but now 25 are retrofit compliant and only 25 of the original 50 percent fleet need to be retrofitted to meets its 50 percent requirement by December 26, 2014. The fact that the operator purchased 25 FTFR retrofit compliant airplanes rather than retrofitting them itself has no bearing on its original 50 percent retrofit requirement. For the purposes of the FTFR, the operator would meet the 50 percent requirement. This also applies to the operator’s 100 percent mix.

C.    Use of Ground Conditioned Air.

1)    One Year Extension. In order to give the operators additional time to incorporate FRM at a time other than during a heavy check, the FTFR rule has a provision in § 121.1117(k), and § 129.117(k) to allow a one year extension to the retrofit requirements in § 121.1117(e), and § 129.117 (e) if the operator uses ground conditioned air for all airplanes with high flammability tanks for “actual gate times” exceeding 30 minutes when ground air is available at the gate and operational and the ambient temperature exceeds 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Operators were required to apply for amendment to their OpSpec no later than March 26, 2009 in order to obtain this one year extension. This provision does not apply to § 125.507 because these airplanes are not typically parked at gates where ground conditioned air is available. In addition, these operators have few airplanes subject to this rule.

NOTE:  This “Ground Conditioned Air” provision is controlled on OpSpec A570, One Year Extension of Compliance Times in Section 121.1117(e) and 129.117.

2)    OpSpec A570 Authorized Airplanes (PI Action). The PI must ensure that the operator’s manual contains any applicable airplanes in Table 6-13 below that are authorized in OpSpec A570 to use Ground Conditioned Air. This must include a listing by N registration number and fleet type of airplanes that require retrofit with FRM or IMM. As airplanes are retrofitted they should be removed from the list. The OpSpec A570 authorization terminates on December 26, 2018 or when all of the operator’s airplanes listed in its manual are retrofitted, whichever occurs first.
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Table 6-13.  Airplanes Authorized by OpSpec A570 to Use Ground Conditioned Air

Boeing

Airbus

747 Series

A300, A310

737 Series

A318, A319, A320, A321 Series

777 Series

A330, A340 Series

767 Series

 

757 Series

 

D.    Service Instructions.

1)    Installing FRM or IMM. In order for the operators to install FRM or IMM the DAHs are required to develop airplane model specific design change service instructions (Service Bulletins (SB)) that are FAA Oversight Office-approved. Operators will use these service instructions along with installation kits to install FRM or IMM. The FAA Oversight Office-approved FRM/IMM SBs are part of the airplane type design. Therefore, certain changes must be FAA Oversight Office-approved in accordance with the procedures in the subparagraph 6-2783E.

E.    Deviation/Changes to FAA Oversight Office-Approved FRM SBs. The retrofit requirements contained in § 121.1117 require installation of an FRM, if required by § 26.33, § 26.35, or § 26.37, that is “approved by the FAA Oversight Office”. Unlike an Airworthiness Directive (AD) that typically requires accomplishment of corrective actions “in accordance with” a manufacturer’s SB, § 121.1117 does not require strict adherence (“in accordance with”) to the manufacturers SB. As with any SB that implements a change to type design, the manufacturers SBs for NGS have been FAA approved. Although the entire SB is identified as approved, only the technical data (type design) associated with the SB is FAA approved. Therefore, deviations to the SBs that revise the technical data contained within the SB would have to be approved. Major changes to the technical data include, but are not limited to, any deviation to the service bulletin that could affect the performance/reliability/operation of the NGS. Minor deviations to non-AD FAA-approved SBs should be handled in accordance with the procedures in the operator’s manual acceptable to the PI.

1)    Proposed Deviations. PIs should advise operators to discuss deviation/change(s) to instructions in the manufacturers FRM SB with the cognizant FAA Oversight Office before making the deviation/change(s).
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2)    Procedures to Address Changes (PI Action). The PI must ensure that the operator has procedures in its maintenance/inspection program/manual that address both major and minor changes to FAA Oversight Office-approved FRM/IMM service instructions/bulletins. The PI must not approve operator deviations/changes to the FAA Oversight Office-approved FRM SBs without approval from the cognizant FAA Oversight Office and the Aircraft Evaluation Group (AEG) responsible for the type design.
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6-2784    AIRWORTHINESS LIMITATIONS.

A.    DAH-Developed Airworthiness Limitations. The DAH is required to develop FAA Oversight Office-approved airworthiness limitations which include critical design configuration control limitations (CDCCL), inspections, or other procedures to prevent increasing the flammability exposure of any tanks equipped with FRM or FIMM above the certification limits or to prevent degradation of the performance of any IMM installed throughout the operational life of the airplane. The DAH is required to include these airworthiness limitations in the Airworthiness Limitation Section (ALS) of the instructions for continued airworthiness (ICA). These airworthiness limitations are part of the type design of the modified airplane. This requirement is similar to that contained in § 25.571. Airplane fuel tank system airworthiness limitations are intended to be treated the same as airplane structure airworthiness limitations. Part 25 appendix H requires including fuel tank system airworthiness limitations in the ALS of the ICA.

1)    Sections 26.33 and 26.35, if required, require the DAH to develop airworthiness limitations to prevent increasing the flammability exposure of any tanks equipped with FRM and to prevent degradation of the performance of any IMM.
2)    Section 121.1117 and similar provisions in parts 125 and 129 require the operator to incorporate the airworthiness limitations required by §§ 26.33 and 26.35, if required into their maintenance or inspection program.

B.    Types of FRM/IMM Airworthiness Limitations. There are three types of fuel system airworthiness limitations.

1)    An airworthiness limitation item (ALI) inspection which has a specific task and interval, such as 10 years.
2)    ALI procedures that could have specific task intervals.
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3)    A CDCCL which has no interval but establishes configuration limitations to maintain and to protect the “critical design feature” identified in the CDCCL. CDCCLs can also include requirements to have placards on the airplane with information about critical features. (Refer to AC 25.981-1, Fuel Tank Ignition Source Prevention Guidelines, and AC 25.981-2, Fuel Tank Flammability Reduction Means, for additional information on CDCCLs.)

NOTE:  Section 121.1117 and similar provisions in parts 125 and 129 require the operator to incorporate the airworthiness limitations required by §§ 26.33 and 26.35, if required, into their maintenance or inspection program. The FAA Oversight Office-approved FTFR airworthiness limitations make the CDCCL the primary source for the critical design feature information. While the critical design feature may also be in the Airplane Maintenance Manual (AMM) reference, it is not to be used as the primary source of information for the CDCCL critical design feature. The primary source is the CDCCL.

C.    Maintenance/Inspection Program/Manual (PI Action).

1)    The PI must ensure that the operator has procedures in its maintenance/inspection program/manual that instruct its maintenance program development personnel who write/revise manuals and job/task cards, and engineering personnel who develop/revise Engineering Orders (EO), that all information identified in the fuel system airworthiness limitations, including AMM/standard wiring practice manual (SWPM) required to be followed (and not just referenced) by the airworthiness limitations, are included. The job/work cards and EOs should be identified as a fuel system airworthiness limitation and whether it is an ALI or CDCCL.
2)    The PI must ensure that the CDCCL critical design features are incorporated into the maintenance/inspection program/manual and are adhered to as written. Any proposed operator changes must be approved by the FAA Oversight Office. The CDCCL critical design feature identified above is just one of many that are included in the airworthiness limitations for the airplane. The CDCCL’s critical design features must be included on the operator’s EOs and job/task cards.
3)    The PI must ensure that the operator who takes delivery of “New Production Airplanes” (§ 121.1117(b)) either manufactured on or prior to December 27, 2010, or manufactured after December 27, 2010 that have either FRM or IMM installed must have FAA Oversight Office-approved airworthiness limitations (CDCCLs, inspections, or other procedures) from the ICA incorporated into their maintenance/inspection program/manual prior to putting the airplane into service.
4)    The PI must ensure that operators who retrofit their fleet incorporate the FAA Oversight Office‑approved airworthiness limitations (CDCCLs, inspections, or other procedures) from the ICA into their maintenance/inspection program/manual prior to putting the airplane back into service.
5)    The PI must ensure that the operator has procedures in its maintenance/inspection program/manual to maintain placards that have information about critical design features on the airplane as required by the airworthiness limitations.

NOTE:  Airworthiness limitations that include FAA Oversight Office-approved CDCCLs, inspections, and other procedures are part of the airplane type design and therefore any changes must be approved by the FAA Oversight Office.

NOTE:  PIs must ensure that the operator has procedures in its maintenance/inspection program/manual that address any changes to airworthiness limitations. This includes notifying the PI of any changes.

Figure 6-111.  Example of a Flammability Reduction Means/Ignition Mitigation Means Critical Design Configuration Control Limitation

TITLE: Center Fuel Tank Vent System – Auxiliary Tanks

The Concern: The addition of an auxiliary fuel tank system via a Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) may reduce the effectiveness of the Nitrogen Gas System (NGS) resulting in an increase in flammability exposure of the center tank.

Reason for Concern: The NGS installation is designed to provide the proper level of nitrogen to the center wing tank in order to reduce the fleet wide average flammability exposure to levels equal to that of wing fuel tanks. Auxiliary fuel tank installations typically transfer fuel and ullage gases to and from the center wing fuel tank (CWT).

The Critical Design Feature: Any auxiliary fuel tank system that allows transfer of ullage directly to or from the CWT must not significantly affect the performance of the NGS.

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6-2785    MAINTENANCE PROGRAM REVISIONS AFTER ALTERATIONS.

A.    Including Airworthiness Limitations. Section 121.1117(h), and similar provisions in parts 125 and 129 state, in part, after the maintenance/inspection program is revised, before returning an airplane to service after any alteration for which airworthiness limitations are required, the certificate holder/operator must revise the maintenance/inspection program for the airplane to include those airworthiness limitations.

B.    Maintenance Review Board Report (MRBR) or Maintenance Implementation Document (MID) (PI Action). The PI must ensure that the operator has incorporated the TC-holder-developed MRBR or MID revisions and FAA Oversight Office-approved fuel tank system airworthiness limitations (CDCCLs, inspections, and other procedures) into its maintenance or inspection program.

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1)    The PI review ensures that the operator’s maintenance and/or inspection programs are in compliance with the fuel tank system and Aging Aircraft Program rules. When the review is complete, the PI will issue or amend OpSpec/MSpec/LOA D097, Aging Aircraft Programs.
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2)    When the operator’s first FTFR-compliant “New Production Airplane” is complete (ICA incorporated) or the first “Retrofit Airplane” is complete, whichever occurs first, this would provide the PI the best opportunity to validate the operator’s maintenance and inspection program for incorporation and completeness with the FTFR rules.

C.    Operators that are Authorized OpSpec/MSpec/LOA D097. The issuance of this OpSpec signifies the FAA has reviewed the operator/certificate holder/program manager’s policy and procedures incorporated into their maintenance and/or inspection programs for compliance with the Aging Aircraft Program rules. Table 1 of D097 will consist of three columns that list:

    The Aging Aircraft Program rules;

    The manual and section where the policy and procedures are located for the applicable Aging Aircraft Program; and

    The date of the manual and section where the current policy and procedures are located for the applicable Aging Aircraft Program.

NOTE:  Figure 6-112 below illustrates a sample D097 Table 1 that lists the various 14 CFR part rules. The certificate holder/program manager will have a specific OpSpec D097 template for their operation.

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Figure 6-112.  Sample D097 Table 1 – Aging Aircraft Maintenance Programs

Aging Aircraft Program Rules

Certificate Holder/Program Manager’s Maintenance and/or Inspection Program Policy and Procedures (Manual and Section)

Date

Repairs Assessment for Pressurized Fuselages — § 121.1107, § 125.505, § 129.107

 

 

Supplemental Inspections — § 121.1109, § 129.109

 

 

Electrical Wiring Interconnection Systems (EWIS) Maintenance Program — § 121.1111, § 129.111

 

 

Fuel Tank System Maintenance Program — § 121.1113, § 129.113

 

 

Flammability Reduction Means — § 121.1117, § 125.509, § 129.117

 

 

Fuel Tank System Inspection Program — § 125.507

 

 

1)    Initial submission and any later revisions to the operator/certificate holder/program manager’s maintenance and/or inspection program policy and procedures must be submitted to the PI for review for compliance with the Aging Aircraft Program rules.
2)    An operator/certificate holder/program manager must have procedures to ensure that ICAs are incorporated into their maintenance and/or inspection program.
3)    The PI must ensure that the operator/certificate holder/program manager has procedures in its manual that track any changes and approvals made to the FAA Oversight Office-approved FTS ICAs.

6-2786    TASK OUTCOMES. If not already accomplished, document that the air carrier or operator has successfully incorporated the DAH FTFR ICA and airworthiness limitations into its maintenance or inspection program and has completed the OpSpec/LOA D097.

A.    Complete the SAS DCT or PTRS Record.

1)    For part 121 use the EDA and EPA questions related to the FTFR to document the initial incorporation. See subparagraph 6-2777B.
2)    For part 125 and § 129.14 open a new PTRS record using the codes listed in subparagraph 6-2777A. Enter FTFR in the “National Use” block of section I. In section IV, the “Comment” block, annotate the following:
a)    Document that the air carrier or operator has incorporated the applicable FTFR airworthiness limitations for each fleet type (make, model, and series (M/M/S) into its maintenance or inspection program.
b)    Record the OpSpec/LOA D097 signature date.

B.    Ongoing Surveillance of Part 125 and § 129.14 Operators. To ensure the operator continues to comply with its FTFR program requirements, accomplish surveillance activities and record them using the PTRS codes listed in subparagraph 6-2777A. Use FTFR in the “National Use” block. Enter the findings in the PTRS database in accordance with existing procedures.

C.    Ongoing Surveillance of Part 121 Air Carriers. To ensure the air carriers continue to comply with their FTFR program requirements, accomplish surveillance activities by using DCT 4.2.2 (AW) EDA or EPA questions that pertain to the FTFR Program. This will enable certificate management offices (CMO) to evaluate FTFR during normal risk-based evaluations of the air carrier’s maintenance program in accordance with SAS policy and guidance.

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6-2787    FUTURE ACTIVITIES. For part 121 follow SAS guidance.

RESERVED. Paragraphs 6-2788 through 6-2803.