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Volume 9  AIRCRAFT, AIRPORT, AND OPERATIONAL SECURITY ISSUES

CHAPTER 1  ISSUANCE AND CONTROL OF SENSITIVE SECURity INFORMATION ISSUED BY THE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION AND OTHER FEDERAL AGENCIES

Section 1  General

9-1    BACKGROUND. Immediately following the 9/11 attacks, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) security, and subsequently the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), markedly increased the number and scope of Sensitive Security Information (SSI) documents issued as a means of notifying specific segments of the air carrier industry, airports, and air operators of the current threat to U.S. civil aviation. Often, SSI documents have required implementation of specific measures by any aircraft operator covered by Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR) part 1544, § 1544.101(a) conducting scheduled and/or public charter flight operations from or within the United States or its territories.

9-2    SSI ACCESS. Aviation safety inspectors (ASI) of each specialty are often required to review and approve procedures proposed by air carriers in response to SSI documents delivered by the TSA or other Federal agencies. This action is accomplished to ensure that those procedures have no undesirable consequences in operational safety, the FAA’s traditional area of responsibility. To perform a competent review, access to current and past SSI documents is often helpful. This section describes the developed process to ensure that access to SSI material is done securely.

9-3    COORDINATION. As is necessary, the Aviation Special Operations and Security Staff (AFS-7) will coordinate with TSA and other Federal Agencies in identifying specific SSI documents that ASIs should access, and will convey SSI documents to appropriate offices as follows:

A.    Relevance of SSI. SSI documents that are pertinent and in the scope of FAA responsibilities will be conveyed to Flight Standards District Office (FSDO)/certificate management office (CMO)/International Field Office (IFO) managers who have a need for the SSI documents. The typical transmission of documents is through a password-protected e-mail. However, at times, it may be necessary to either mail or hand-deliver SSI documents.

B.    Securing SSI. The FSDO/CMO/IFO manager is responsible for the security of the SSI information in accordance with the Interim SSI Policies and Procedures for Safeguarding and Control, posted at the following Web site: http://www.fas.org/sgp/othergov/ssi-safeguard.pdf. It is not a requirement for offices to retain the SSI information. An office can electronically delete or physically destroy it when it is of no value to that office.

C.    Printing SSI. FSDOs/CMOs/IFOs can print SSI documents as long as the offices physically secure them.

D.    Access to SSI. The FSDO/CMO/IFO manager/supervisor will determine access to the document by inspectors on a need-to-know basis.

E.    Electronic SSI. Unless otherwise directed by AFS-7, do not forward electronic copies of SSI and the subsequent password. Use the SSI as reference material only.

F.    SSI from Other Agencies. Flight Standards Service (AFS) does not have authority or responsibility to enforce the requirements set forth in SSI issued by other Federal agencies.

RESERVED. Paragraphs 9-4 through 9-19.