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8900.1 CHG 95

Volume 13 FLIGHT STANDARDS DESIGNEES

CHAPTER 5   GENERAL AVIATION DESIGNEE MANAGEMENT

Section 1 Appoint/Renew a General Aviation Designee

13-401       PROGRAM TRACKING AND REPORTING SUBSYSTEM (PTRS) ACTIVITY CODES.

A.       Operations: 1550, 1551, 1552.

B.       Maintenance: 3516, 3518, 3522, 3524.

C.       Avionics: 5516, 5518, 5522, 5524.

13-402       OBJECTIVE. This section provides specific inspector guidance on the designation and renewal of Flight Standards Service (AFS) General Aviation (GA) airman designees and Designated Airworthiness Representatives-Maintenance (DAR-T), referred to collectively in this section as designees.

A.       GA Airman Designee Guidance. The current edition of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Order 8900.2, General Aviation Airman Designee Handbook, in conjunction with Volume 13, Chapters 5 through 8, provides general inspector guidance for AFS GA airman designees.

B.       DAR-T Guidance. The current edition of FAA Order 8100.8 , Designee Management Handbook, in conjunction with Volume 13, Chapters 5 and 9, provides general inspector guidance for DAR-Ts.

13-403       GENERAL.

A.       Purpose. This section provides procedures for the designation and renewal of AFS GA designees. Designees leverage the FAA’s workforce and provide certification services to the public. Designation is a privilege, not a right, and designees are appointed by the Administrator to meet FAA needs.

B.       Types of Airman Designees.

1)       Technical Personnel Examiners (TPE). For the purposes of this chapter, TPE refers only to Designated Mechanic Examiners (DME) and Designated Parachute Rigger Examiners (DPRE).
2)       Designated Pilot Examiners (DPE).
a)       For the purposes of this chapter, DPE refers only to:

·         Private Pilot Examiners (PE),

·         Commercial and Instrument Rating Examiners (CIRE),

·         Commercial Pilot Examiners (CE),

·         Airline Transport Pilot Examiners (ATPE),

·         Flight Instructor Examiners (FIE),

·         National Designated Pilot Examiner/Flight Engineer Examiners (NDPE/FEE),

·         Sport Pilot Examiners (SPE),

·         Sport Pilot Flight Instructor Examiners (SFIE), and

·         Pilot Proficiency Examiners (PPE).

b)       DPE also includes pilot examiners with administrative privileges only, including:

·         Flight Instructor Renewal Examiners (FIRE),

·         Airman Certification Representatives (ACR),

·         Military Competency Examiners (MCE),

·         Foreign Pilot Examiners (FPE),

·         Military Competency (MC)/FPE, and

·         Ground Instructor Examiners (GIE).

3)       DAR-T. DAR-Ts are individuals.

NOTE:   All ODAR-T designations terminated on or before November 14, 2009.

C.       Eligibility Requirements. FAA Order 8100.8 sets forth DAR-T eligibility requirements. Order 8900.2 sets forth AFS GA airman designee eligibility requirements generally in Chapter 2, and specifically by designee type in its respective component program chapter:

·         TPE: Chapter 6.

·         DPE: Chapter 7.

D.       Pilot Examiner Exceptions. If a pilot examiner candidate does not meet all of the appropriate eligibility requirements, according to Order 8900.2, the following procedures must apply:

1)       A pilot examiner candidate must obtain a written recommendation from the managers of the managing FAA office and regional Flight Standards division (RFSD).
2)       The managers from the managing FAA office and RFSD must send a written recommendation to the National Examiner Board (NEB) for a waiver from the specified eligibility requirements. The recommendation must include a statement of all special circumstances affecting the designation and the reasons why the managers have determined that these eligibility requirements should be waived for this pilot examiner candidate. The NEB must receive the written recommendation before it will evaluate and rank the pilot examiner candidate’s application for appointment to the NEB’s registry. The NEB must receive the written recommendation directly from the managing FAA office and RFSD—not from the pilot examiner candidate.
3)       Before the managing FAA office makes any commitment or issues an authorization to the pilot examiner candidate, the managing FAA office and RFSD must complete the written recommendation and the NEB must evaluate and approve the pilot examiner candidate’s application and rank that pilot examiner candidate on the NEB registry. In addition, the managing FAA office must receive the pilot examiner candidate’s application file from the NEB before it can make a commitment to issue an authorization to the pilot examiner candidate.

E.       Designee Standards.

1)       An AFS GA airman designee must conduct all tests according to the applicable guidance in the respective Order 8900.2 component program chapter:

·         TPE: Chapter 6.

·         DPE: Chapter 7.

2)       A DAR-T must conduct all certification activities according to the applicable FAA orders.

F.       Privileges and Limitations. Order 8100.8 sets forth DAR-T privileges and limitations. Order 8900.2 sets forth AFS GA airman designee privileges and limitations generally in chapter 5 and specifically by designee type in its respective component program chapter:

·         TPE: Chapter 6.

·         DPE: Chapter 7.

G.       Designee Surveillance. Volume 13, Chapter 5, Section 2, and the chapters specific to each designee type address AFS GA designee surveillance and oversight.

H.       Termination and Appeal. Volume 13, Chapter 5, Section 3 addresses termination and appeal procedures for all GA designee types.

13-404       PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES. The National Program Office (NPO) for each designee type is responsible for the development of national policy regarding the particular designee type. The current version of FAA Order FS 1100.1 contains the NPO for each designee type.

A.       Region. The regional AFS division manager is responsible for the designee program within that region. The region ensures that field offices conform to national policy with respect to designee appointment, geographic coverage, and other matters. The region reviews field office surveillance policies and activities and evaluates field office administration of the designee program. Regional focal points are available to assist field offices with designee oversight and surveillance questions. (See Volume 13, Chapter 5, Section 4.)

B.       Field Office. The field office level handles the designee’s oversight and surveillance. Field office focal points are available to assist inspectors with designee oversight and surveillance. (See Volume 13, Chapter 5, Section 4.)

C.       Program Management. Regional offices should establish procedures to ensure that field offices conform to national policy with respect to designation, geographic coverage, and other matters. Regional offices also review field office surveillance policies and activities and evaluate field office administration of the designee program.

D.       Program Evaluation. During scheduled office evaluations, regional office personnel must review field office administration of the designee program, and perform special reviews as the need arises. Program evaluation is especially valuable in improving field office standardization and in maintaining effective oversight of the designee program. Designee programs are also evaluated nationally through the Quality Management System (QMS).

13-405       SELECTION AND APPOINTMENT. Candidates for designation must be highly experienced, appropriately qualified and must meet all applicable eligibility requirements.

A.       NEB. We created the NEB to improve designee selection and standardization, develop initiatives for the designee program, and represent AFS on designee issues. The NEB is a permanent board composed of representatives from AFS divisions having designee oversight responsibility. The NEB meets quarterly and schedules additional meetings as required. The NEB oversees and administers the following functions:

1)       The National Designee Candidate Pool. The NEB is responsible for maintaining a national designee candidate pool which contains the application files of all designee applicants who meet applicable requirements for the designation sought. The NEB categorizes applicants who are approved for assignment to the national designee candidate pool according to the geographical area(s) which the applicant can serve and by the type(s) of designation sought.
2)       Designee Applications. The NEB accepts and evaluates applications from designee applicants whose designations are governed by the guidance in FAA Order 8900.2 and Order 8100.8. The NEB will use the general qualification requirements, technical requirements, and experience criteria detailed in FAA Order 8900.2 or Order 8100.8 for each type of designation, as applicable, to determine whether applicants meet general FAA requirements for the initial designation sought.

B.       Designee Applications. Except as indicated in subparagraphs 1), 2) and 3) below, candidates for initial designation should send a completed application form to the NEB. (See Order 8900.2, chapter 2, paragraph 1 for AFS GA airman designees and Order 8100.8 for DAR-Ts.)

1)       Candidates for designation as a ACR FIRE, FPE, GIE, MCE, MC/FPE or PPE send their completed application forms directly to the designating field office for processing. (Candidates holding ACR FIRE, FPE, GIE, MCE, MC/FPE or PPE designations and applying for designation as a DPE must submit applications for DPE authorization to the NEB.)
2)       Candidates for designation as an NDPE/ Flight Engineer Examiners Registry (FEER) examiner should submit applications directly to the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) for consideration. The EAA will recommend successful candidates to the NPO for selection and appointment.
3)       Candidates for renewal, or reinstatement at the same field office where they were previously assigned should send applications directly to that field office;
4)       The NEB treats former designees who relocate to another field office and request reinstatement as initial applicants who must apply for initial evaluation and recommendation.

C.       Initial Screening. The NEB will notify the applicant of the results of the initial screening in writing.

D.       Practical Test. Each DPE candidate, other than those pilot examiner candidates with administrative privileges only, selected for designation by a field office must pass a practical test by an FAA inspector before the FAA issues an initial designation. The practical test assists the FAA in determining if the candidate is competent to apply current practical test requirements, procedures, and performance standards in the aircraft for which authorization is sought. The field office schedules the practical test upon selecting a candidate for DPE designation. Record the results of the practical test on FAA Form 8710-1 , Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, or FAA Form 8710-11, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application–Sport Pilot, as applicable.

E.       Selection. Selection is the process of determining eligibility. This involves the evaluation of an applicant’s technical skills and competence in applying those skills in their area of expertise as well as their understanding of FAA policy and guidance.

F.       Appointment. Each designee appointment must follow the specific procedures in FAA Orders 8900.1, 8100.8, or 8900.2, as applicable.

13-406       RENEWAL CRITERIA. The designee must satisfy the requirements and follow the procedures set forth in Order 8900.2, chapter 3, for renewal or, in the case of DAR-Ts, Order 8100.8.

A.       Certification Activity. During the renewal process, the managing FAA office reviews the amount of certification activity to determine the continuing need for that designation. In the case of a pilot examiner applying for renewal, any one of the following levels of activity is acceptable:

1)       General. The examiner has conducted during the previous 12 calendar-months:

·         Ten certification or aircraft rating tests in airplanes;

·         Five certification or rating tests in helicopters, powered-lifts, gyroplanes, gliders, balloons, airships, powered parachute, and weight shift control;

·         Five instrument rating practical tests; or

·         Five airline transport pilot (ATP) practical tests.

2)       Multiengine Airplane. For renewal of multiengine airplane authorizations, as shown on the examiner’s certificate of authority (COA) letter, the examiner should have conducted at least five multiengine rating tests in each make and model of airplane authorized during the previous year. In extenuating circumstances, an FAA office manager may authorize an exception to this requirement, by including a written memorandum in the examiner's file to substantiate the circumstances.

B.       Reissuance of COA Letter. The COA letter is valid until the expiration date shown on the letter. The FAA reissues the COA letter with each designation renewal.

NOTE:   We no longer issue the FAA Form 8430-9 and LOA for GA designees, but they may remain in effect for active designees until expiration, unless sooner surrendered or terminated.

C.       Renewal Test. DPEs with flight privileges must demonstrate knowledge and skill by the satisfactory completion of an annual renewal test (i.e., via one of the testing methods as described in paragraph 13-415D) appropriate to the designation and authorizations up for renewal or reinstatement, if a renewal test is required. Record the results of the renewal test on FAA Form 8710-1 or FAA Form 8710-11, as applicable. The renewal test does not have to be performed in the renewal expiration month. This means the renewal test may occur at a different time during the year, provided a PTRS record properly documented the renewal test.

D.       DAR-T. The appointing FAA office may issue DAR-T appointments for one to three years at its discretion. However, the FAA office should use a risk-based analysis in issuing any certificates of designation with an appointment or renewal period of more than one year.

1)       The FAA may renew a DAR-T appointment based solely on a projected or anticipated need. However, failure to attend or successfully complete the required standardization seminar, including passing the post-course written examination, will result in suspension or termination based on non-attendance of a seminar.
2)       When determining whether to renew or not to renew a DAR certificate, the aviation safety inspector (ASI) must verify and review Designee Information Network (DIN) records for the DAR-T to ensure he or she attended a recurrent standardization seminar within the last three years and/or has a copy of the recurrent seminar certificate of attendance on file. The ASI also must review the DAR’s summary activity reports, if applicable, to verify that the DAR-T has performed at least one or more per year of the following activities consistent with authorized functions:
a)       Issuance of recurrent Standard Airworthiness Certificate.
b)       Issuance of recurrent/original special airworthiness certificate.
c)       Issuance of special flight permits.
d)       Issuance of export airworthiness approvals
e)       Issuance of domestic airworthiness approval for engines.
f)       Issuance of domestic airworthiness approval for propellers.
g)       Issuance of domestic airworthiness approval for parts or appliances.
h)       Issuance of notification of completion after conducting records reviews and aircraft inspections required by the Aging Aircraft Safety Act of 1991.
i)       Issuance of completeness for alterations that use Designated Engineering Representative (DER)-approved data.

NOTE:   DARs do not need to have performed at least one of every function authorized as long as the managing office can establish the DAR continues to meet the requirements to hold that authorized function, and the office establishes a need for the DAR to continue to be available to perform that function.

j)       Renewal concurrence will be obtained from the appointing/managing office manager indicating the need for an appointment still exists. Update the DAR status in the DIN to indicate renewal or termination. When a designation is not renewed, but must be terminated, the managing office will provide written notification to the designee of the reasons for termination in accordance with Volume 13, Chapter 5, Section 3.

13-407       REINSTATEMENT. A former designee whose privileges were terminated may apply for reinstatement only at the field office where that designee was last assigned, provided poor performance, judgment, or integrity were not the basis for the termination. The FAA office where the former designee was last assigned may reinstate the designation only if that designee meets the requirements and procedures for an original issuance of the designation. (See paragraph 13-415 for initial designation procedures.)

A.       Standardization Training. If the designation has been terminated for more than 36 calendar-months, the designee must satisfactorily complete an initial standardization training seminar before reinstatement. If the designation has been terminated for less than 36 calendar-months, the applicant may be appointed if he or she meets that recurrent training requirement for the designee type.

B.       Demonstration of Competency. If the designation has been expired for less than 12 calendar-months, the field office may require a demonstration of competency for reinstatement.

C.       Reissuance of a COA Letter. To qualify for the reissuance of a COA letter, a reinstated designee must demonstrate competency appropriate to the authorization sought.

D.       Designation Number. Use the original designation number for reinstatement, unless a change in the managing FAA office is involved or the region directs a general renumbering. If a change in number occurs, update this information in the Vital Information Subsystem (VIS).

13-408       RELOCATION. Designees may relocate to a different geographical area, if the receiving FAA office agrees to the transfer, without applying to the NEB. The designee must submit a new application to the receiving FAA office.

13-409       GEOGRAPHIC LIMITS OF AUTHORITY. Field offices should ensure that adequate FAA personnel and/or designees are available to address the certification activity within their geographic area. However, unanticipated or rarely occurring certification activity may necessitate that the field office use designees from other geographic areas to perform this work.

A.       Geographic Restrictions. The FAA intends that General Aviation designees (DPE, DME, DPRE and DART-T) perform their authorized function(s) within the geographic boundaries of their managing FAA office. However, a managing office may authorize a designee to perform authorized function(s) outside the geographic boundaries (including other countries) on a case-by-case basis, in consultation with the receiving office, when the FAA can maintain the ability to adequately monitor and supervise the designee. Designees will obtain written authorization from their managing office before performing any authorized function(s) outside their geographic boundaries. In these cases, the FAA office with geographic responsibility for the location where the designee will accomplish the work must delegate the work. Specific procedures for DAR-T and DME authorization are in the following paragraphs.

NOTE:   The designee’s managing office and the geographically responsible office should coordinate any needed FAA involvement of oversight of the activity. In all cases, the authorization should not exceed 30 calendar-days unless both offices provide and agree to additional written justification.

B.       DAR-T Geographic Expansion Authorization. A DAR-T requesting authority to perform work outside of the geographic boundaries of his or her managing office, must submit a written request to the principal inspector at least 7 days before the scheduled activity. The FAA Form 8130-13, Designee Geographic Expansion Authority may be used for this purpose; however, other methods may be used if agreed to by the DAR-T’s managing office and contains the same basic information allowing the FAA to properly evaluate the request.

1)       DAR-T Authorization Issuance. Within 3 working days of receipt of the request for geographic expansion authority the managing office should approve or deny the designee’s request. Before approving the request, the managing office must obtain written authorization from the FAA office having geographic responsibility over the activity location. The geographically responsible office may deny the request when a local Inspector or designee can accomplish the work. If the geographically responsible office approves the request, the designee’s managing office will provide written authorization to the DAR-T to conduct the expanded geographic activity and to the geographically responsible FSDO/IFO. The authorization will contain the specific location, functions authorized, and duration (not to exceed 30 days) of the geographic expansion. The designee’s managing office must provide authorization before the designee performs any function(s) The DAR-T must be instructed to maintain a copy of authorization onsite while performing the authorized function(s) Document (written or electronic) permission from the FAA office with geographic responsibility must be placed in the designee’s file with the completed authorization.

NOTE:   Completed certification files and other documentation required for certification activity will be submitted to the DAR-T’s managing office. The geographically responsible office may however, request to review any certification work performed by a designee in their district by contacting the managing office.

2)       CAA Notification. When authorizing a DAR-T to perform any function outside the United States, the managing office must determine if the foreign Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) requires notification. The managing office must provide the responsible CAA written notification before the designee’s arrival only if the Implementation Procedures Agreement (IPA) of a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) with that country requires it. Refer to the listing of current bilateral agreements at www.faa.gov. The Aircraft Certification Service, International Policy office (AIR-40), maintains a bilateral partners contact list on the AIR-40 page of the MyFAA Employee Intranet Web site. The notification, if required, will outline the proposed visit (for example, anticipated activities and length of stay) and request the CAA’s concurrence.

13-410       EXPANDED AUTHORITY (DAR). For DAR-Ts, the definition of expanded authority is adding authorized function(s)—not making changes to limitations to authorized functions.

A.       Application. DAR-Ts requesting expanded authority, and who have previously gone through the NEB process, need only to submit the technical portion of the application package (Form 8110-28 with relevant experience for the added function(s) requested, along with a recommendation letter from their managing FAA office). DAR-Ts who have never been through the NEB process must submit a complete application package, as required in Order 8100.8 (current edition). The managing FAA office may require additional portions in the application package.

B.       Authorization. The managing FAA office and the NEB will review these applications. Document the results in the DAR-T’s COA letter, update the DIN, and accomplish the administrative requirements in accordance with this section and Order 8100.8. Only the NEB may authorize added functions, and only the managing FAA office may specify any limitations(s) on the authorized functions.

13-411       EXPANDED AUTHORITY (DME) For DME, the definition of expanded authority is conducting applicant testing away from their principal location or for testing two applicants at one time.

A.       Temporary Test Locations. A DME must not conduct a test at locations not listed as a base of operation on the current COA letter (which replaces Form 8430-9) held by the designee, unless authorized by the managing FAA office. The authorization will be in writing, placed in the DME’s office file and will list the temporary location along with the timeframe for conducting the test at the additional location. (Reference Order 8900.2 chapter 5.) The managing and the geographically responsible office must find testing locations acceptable.

NOTE:   Temporary should be considered as a maximum of 30 calendar-days for any DME extension of authorization approvals.

B.       Testing Multiple Applicants. DMEs wishing to test more than one applicant at a time will submit their request to the managing FAA office for consideration. The managing FAA office will limit approvals to no more than two applicants at a time for the practical portion of the test only, and only after a thorough review of the DME’s testing environment and experience.

1)       Authorization. Add the authorization to the “Authorized Functions” on the COA letter and keep a copy in the DME’s office file. Make an entry in the VIS comments section for the DME that describes the authorization.

NOTE:   Temporary authorization to conduct testing away from a DME’s principal location can include testing two applicants simultaneously; however, the authorization must be clearly state this. In this case, we do not require an entry in VIS.

2)       DME Requirements to Test Multiple Applicants. The DME must have a minimum of 2 years of recent experience conducting tests and a minimum level of activity of 12 tests in the prior 12-month period before the managing office gives consideration for approval. Subsequently, any approval issued by the managing office will require followup surveillance by the ASI assigned to the DME while conducting a simultaneous test of two applicants. Any unsatisfactory finding will result in removal of the expanded authority.

NOTE:   The FAA field office , at its discretion, gives authorization to test multiple applicants to support testing needs in the district. The FAA field office is not required to grant authorization but may choose to grant authorization if there is a valid sustained need. The field office may designate additional DMEs rather than grant authorization to test multiple applicants.

13-412       DESIGNATION NUMBERING.

A.       Numbering System. For designees managed by a field office, the system of designation numbers assigned by the VIS or DIN, as applicable, should be used to identify the region and field office where the designee was designated.

B.       DAR-T Certificate Number. For DAR-T, the designee’s certificate number will be composed of the following:

1)       The type of designation (DAR).
2)       A suffix of “T” added after the designation type to identify the designee as a maintenance (airworthiness or avionics) designee.
3)       The DIN-generated ID number (six digits).
4)       The geographical region code (i.e., AL–Alaska, CE–Central, EA–Eastern, GL–Great Lakes, NM–Northwest Mountain, SO–Southern, SW–Southwest, WP–Western Pacific).

NOTE:   For example, the number for a maintenance DAR appointed in the Northwest Mountain Region would be DART-123456-NM. Only Aircraft Evaluation Group (AEG) Offices appoint DAR-Ts with function code 51and use the office code instead of the Regional identifier as follows: MKC-Kansas City AEG, BOS-Boston AEG, LGB-Long Beach AEG, SEA-Seattle AEG, and FTW-Fort Worth AEG.

C.       DME/DPRE Certificate Number. For DME and DPRE, use the airman’s core certificate number as the designation number.

D.       DPE Certificate Number. Issue designation numbers in the proper order and ensure that they clearly differ from those numbers issued by other regions or other previous numbering systems. Do not assign the number assigned to a terminated designee to a different designee, as a computer check of designee records would call up records of more than one designee.

13-413       PREREQUISITES AND COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS.

A.       Prerequisites. This task requires knowledge of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 61, 63, or 65, and part 183 regulations and FAA policies, and qualification as an ASI (Operations or Airworthiness), as applicable.

B.       Coordination. This task may require coordination between the managing FAA office, the regional office, and/or the applicable NPO.

13-414       REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.       References (current editions):

·         Title 14 CFR parts 1, 21, 39, 43, 61, 63, 65, 91, and 183.

·         FAA Order 8900.2, General Aviation Airman Designee Handbook.

·         FAA Order 8100.8, Designee Management Handbook.

·         Title 49 of the United States Code (49 U.S.C.).

·         PTRS/VIS Procedures Manuals.

·         FS 1100.1, Flight Standards Service Organizational Handbook

B.       Forms:

·         FAA Form 8000-5, Certificate of Designation.

·         FAA Form 8110-14, Application and Statement of Qualifications (DAR-ODAR-DMIR-DER) [for Amateur-Built and Light Sport DAR-T].

·         FAA Form 8110-28, Application and Statement of Qualification (DME/DPRE/DAR-T/ODAR-T).

·         FAA Form 8130-13, Designee Geographic Expansion Authorization.

·         FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application.

·         FAA Form 8710-10, National Examiner Board Designated Pilot Examiner Candidate Application.

·         FAA Form 8710-11, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application–Sport Pilot.

·         FAA Form 8710-12, Light-Sport Standardization Board – Designated Pilot Examiner Candidate Application.

13-415       PROCEDURES FOR INITIAL DESIGNATION.

A.       Need for and Ability to Manage a Designee. Successfully meeting the eligibility requirements does not guarantee appointment as a designee. The managing FAA office, within its sole discretion, determines the need for and ability to manage a designee.

1)       Determining the Need. The FAA office considers several factors in determining the need for a designee including, but not limited to:
a)       Activity level of designees performing similar work in your area.
b)       Demand/convenience to the public as determined by:

·         Ability to provide examinations within a reasonable period of time, and

·         Number of complaints from the public about the lack of availability of certification.

c)       Geographic dispersion as determined by the distance the applicant must travel to the designee.

NOTE:   The need for a new designee is driven by the needs of the public and not by the impact on other existing designees or the desires of air operator/agencies.

2)       Determining the Ability to Manage. The managing FAA office reviews several criteria including, but not limited to, to determine the ability to manage a designee:
a)       Effect of workload on inspectors,
b)       Funding (e.g., travel allocation) needed to oversee the designee workforce, and
c)       Availability of trained inspectors (specialists) and/or managers.

NOTE:   The term specialist is defined in Order VS 1100.2 (current edition).

B.       Request for Designee Evaluated by the NEB. The field office which has determined the need for a designee will submit a request including designee type and relevant details (e.g., specific ratings, function codes, or other capabilities needed) via e-mail to the NEB at 9-AMC-AFS650-NEB@faa.gov. The NEB will send the field office copies of applicant files for the three most qualified candidates appropriate to the designation needed and the geographic area to be served. If fewer than three appropriate candidates are on file in the national pool, the NEB will send the field office files for all of the available candidates appropriate to the designation needed and geographic area to be served.

1)       The field office may accept or decline any candidate referred by the NEB. A field office that declines all of the candidates referred by the NEB may not request further referrals for a period of 6 months.
2)       If fewer than three appropriate candidates are available, the field office may maintain an open request for the files of all additional candidates that become available through the national designee candidate pool, until the NEB is able to refer three candidates.
3)       If a field office requests designee candidates and there are no candidates in the national pool available to provide service in that field office’s geographical area, the NEB will immediately advise the field office that no candidates are available. If the field office deems the need for a designee to be time-critical and finds that geographical resolution is not appropriate or available, the following process applies:
a)       The field office may encourage a suitable applicant to apply.
b)       The field office manager will forward that person’s application to the NEB with a request for priority processing.
c)       Upon receipt of a designee application with a field office’s request for priority processing, the NEB will convene within 10 days and approve or disapprove the application.
d)       The NEB will advise the field office and the applicant by the most expeditious means of the approval/disapproval of the application and continue to give priority handling to the field office’s request until the critical shortage is filled.
4)       If a field office that has declined all candidates referred by the NEB requests new referrals after a lapse of 6 months, the NEB will again refer the three most highly qualified candidates currently in the national pool, appropriate to the designation needed and the geographic area to be served. Whether the candidates are the same or different from those previously referred will have no bearing on current or subsequent referrals.
5)       The field office will notify the NEB of the selection or non-selection of all candidates.

C.       Selection. The field office reviews the application package.

1)       For each prospective DPE, TPE, or DAR-T candidate, the ASI queries the Enforcement Information Subsystem (EIS), Accident/Incident Data System (AIDS) or Safety Performance Analysis System (SPAS).
a)       Prior to designation and/or renewal of a designee, the field office must conduct a review of the designee’s EIS history (including all airman certificates held by the individual) to determine if there is a regulatory violation history. Applicants for designation and/or renewal must have no more than two separate incidents involving 14 CFR violations in the last 5 years. An applicant with more than two separate incidents involving 14 CFR violations in the last 5 years is not eligible for designation and/or renewal as a designee. A candidate with a revoked airman certificate is ineligible for appointment, regardless of the number of violations.
b)       In the case of a violation history that is not disqualifying (two or fewer incidents in the last 5 years), an inspector must conduct an evaluation to ascertain the type of violation(s) and any special or mitigating circumstances, and the applicant’s attitude toward compliance with 14 CFR. Inspectors should consider whether:

1.       The nature of the violation allows the designee to continue holding any required certificate.

2.       The violation was inadvertent and was not the result of purposeful conduct.

3.       The violation did not involve a substantial disregard for safety or security, and the circumstances of the violation are not aggravated. “Substantial disregard” means, in the case of a designee, that the act or failure to act was a substantial deviation from the degree of care, judgment, and responsibility normally expected of a person holding an airman certificate with that type, quality, and level of experience, knowledge, and proficiency.

4.       The designee has a constructive attitude toward 14 CFR compliance.

c)       If the field office selects an applicant for initial designation that has a violation history, but does not have more than two violations in the last five years, then the field office must include a copy of the EIS history in the designee’s file, along with a statement that the field office completed the violation history review in accordance with the guidance in subparagraph 1 above.
2)       The ASI assesses each designee candidate’s knowledge and experience through review of the application and consultation with others who are familiar with the designee program and/or candidates. The inspector should issue DARs appropriate limitations based on the applicant’s background experience, other qualifications, and the needs of the appointing office.
3)       The ASI submits the findings and recommendations in accordance with that office’s policies and procedures. The inspector provides the following information to the office manager on each prospective designee candidate:

·         EIS/AIDS report;

·         The designee candidate’s application form; and

·         Any other pertinent information, references, or recommendations.

D.       Pilot Examiner Practical Test. The practical test for initial pilot examiner designations, issuance of additional pilot examiner designations, and renewal of pilot examiner designations must contain both the appropriate oral questioning and aircraft/flight simulator performance in accordance with the practical test standards (PTS). A complete pretest, preflight, and postflight briefing must be completed for any practical test.

1)       Methods of Testing. In order of preference, an ASI will choose one of the following methods to test a pilot examiner applicant:
a)       The ASI will observe the pilot examiner applicant testing an actual pilot applicant for a rating or certificate. The ASI will evaluate the pilot examiner applicant’s performance while the pilot examiner applicant evaluates the pilot applicant. Hold in private any discussion between the pilot examiner applicant and the ASI concerning the pilot examiner applicant’s performance with the pilot applicant.
b)       The ASI will play the role of a pilot applicant for a certification practical test appropriate to the type of designation the pilot examiner applicant is seeking. If the ASI answers a question incorrectly to test whether the pilot examiner applicant recognizes an incorrect answer, the incorrect response must be obviously wrong.
c)       The ASI will test the pilot examiner applicant on selected maneuvers to assess the pilot examiner applicant’s flight proficiency and ability to evaluate a pilot applicant in accordance with the appropriate PTS.
2)       Practical Test Roles. Where the ASI plays the role of a pilot applicant during a simulated practical test, the simulated practical test will be appropriate to the type of designation that the pilot examiner is seeking.
a)       The ASI will evaluate the pilot examiner applicant’s plan of action for completeness and efficiency.
b)       During the oral portion of the simulated practical test, the ASI will not use “trick” replies. If the ASI answers questions incorrectly to test whether the pilot examiner applicant recognizes an incorrect answer, the incorrect response must be obviously wrong.
c)       The ASI will test the pilot examiner applicant on selected maneuvers to assess the pilot examiner applicant’s flight proficiency and ability to evaluate a pilot applicant in accordance with the standards and objectives in the appropriate PTS.
3)       Scheduling. Since a pilot examiner applicant’s hours may be incompatible with the FAA’s normal duty hours, the ASI will make every effort to be flexible when scheduling tests with pilot examiner applicants.
4)       Authority to Issue Documentation After the Practical Test.
a)       In the case of a practical test with an actual pilot applicant and a successful pilot examiner applicant, the pilot examiner applicant does not yet have the authority to issue a certificate to the pilot applicant. However, the ASI may allow the pilot examiner applicant to fill out the appropriate documentation for the pilot applicant while the ASI observes. The ASI will then sign any certificate issued.
b)       In the case of a practical test with an actual pilot applicant and an unsuccessful pilot examiner applicant, the ASI will complete and sign the appropriate documentation.

E.       Appointment.

1)       Schedule Appointment with Applicant. After the office manager decides upon a qualified designee candidate, the ASI schedules an appointment for the designee candidate to meet with the ASI and/or take a practical test, if applicable.
2)       Designee Candidate Appointment with ASI. When the designee candidate arrives for the scheduled appointment, the ASI:
a)       Inspects acceptable forms of identification to establish the designee candidate’s identity.
b)       Reviews applicable records including the designee candidate’s certificates and logbooks (if applicable) to ensure the airman is appropriately certificated and verify the aeronautical experience indicated.
c)       Proceeds with the practical test, if applicable.
3)       Training. Each designee must successfully complete the initial standardization training seminar requirement within 1 year before initial designation.
a)       In addition to general certification procedures and information pertinent to all designations, designees may receive instruction in procedures specific to the type of designation sought. Following this training, the candidate/designee will take a comprehensive knowledge examination that may test the candidate/designee on any or all subjects in which the class received instruction. Some of the test questions may require knowledge beyond that encompassed by the authorizations indicated on an individual candidate/designee’s current or proposed COA letter.

NOTE:   We no longer issue the FAA Form 8430-9 and LOA for GA designees, but they may remain in effect for active designees until expiration, unless sooner surrendered or terminated.

b)       Successful completion of the standardization course is a prerequisite for designation. Under most circumstances, if a designee candidate arrives after a course has started, the course manager will not permit that person to attend the remainder of the course. If he/she is more than one hour late, the course manager will not permit that designee candidate to complete the training. After accepting a late arrival, the course manager will require the candidate to make up the missed instruction with instructor personnel outside of normal class hours. Once the designee candidate has accomplished this, he/she will take the final examination with the class.
c)       Should a designee applicant fail to pass the post-test examination after completing the training curriculum, the Designee Standardization Branch, AFS-640 will notify the Manager of the designee’s assigned FAA Office. After a review of the circumstances related to the failure, the FAA Office may elect to not appoint the applicant, or to allow the applicant to retake the training course. If appropriate, the FAA Office will allow the applicant only one additional attempt at successfully completing the training with a passing grade.

NOTE:   A designee may receive authorization to serve outside the United States as set forth in Order 8900.2 or Order 8100.8, as applicable.

F.       DAR Orientation. The managing office should review the following additional items with each DAR:

1)       Product Certification. Caution the DAR that any irregularities or deficiencies related to the product certificated may result in the termination of the designation under the provisions of § 183.15(b)(4).
2)       Authorized Functions. Remind the DAR to perform only authorized functions within the limits of his/her authority.
3)       Communication. Remind the DAR to contact the managing office for authorization before accepting any applicant requests for certification or inspection activity and obtaining any special directions or instructions deemed necessary.
4)       Activity Reports. Remind the DAR to provide a summary report of information relating to the accomplishment of delegated functions at least annually. The managing office could require a more frequent schedule of summary reporting based on DAR activity, complexity of projects, or level of geographic expansion activity. The reports should include enough detail to allow the managing office to determine the designee is conducting activity in accordance with the authorized function codes and limitations, including geographic restrictions if applicable.
5)       Safeguarding of Forms. Emphasize that the DAR must properly safeguard all FAA forms, certificates, and other official documents. Under no circumstance will any certificate be in the possession of an applicant until the DAR has completed and signed the certificate. All airworthiness certificates or approvals and related documents will include the DAR’s printed or typed name, signature, and designation number.
6)       Conflicts of Interest. Remind the DAR that he/she is not allowed to perform any mechanical, maintenance, or inspection function, or act as an agent on behalf of an applicant (for example, owner, agent, repair station, or PAH) on products for which the applicant seeks an airworthiness certificate or approval. This would not preclude the DAR from performing maintenance, mechanical functions, or inspections, or act as an agent in a non-DAR capacity when not involved in the airworthiness certification/approval actions under the DAR’s authority.
7)       Use of Authority. Remind the DAR to ensure that products meet the FAA-approved type design data, are in a condition for safe operation, and comply with any other applicable regulations (for example, ADs, marking requirements, registration, and special importing requirements) before issuing airworthiness or export certificates. The DAR will seek guidance from their managing office when problems arise that he or she cannot resolve.
8)       Document Submittal. Remind the DAR to submit applicable original or duplicate documents within 7 days of completion to the managing office for review. DAR-Ts must not submit aircraft certification document or files directly to Aircraft Registry (AFS-750). They must submit aircraft certification files to the geographically cognizant FAA office for review before forwarding to AFS-750.
9)       Airworthiness Applications. Emphasize that the DAR is to review applications for completeness and ensure the various airworthiness certificates or approvals have certification statements signed by an applicant or authorized agent. When appropriate, the DAR must also obtain a completed Form 8130-9, Statement of Conformity, from an applicant before performing any inspections in accordance with Order 8130.2.

G.       Inspector’s Actions. When issuing an initial designation:

1)       The ASI prepares the designee file (See Volume 13, Chapter 5, Section 2).
2)       The ASI enters the designee’s information into the VIS and/or DIN, as applicable, and assigns a control number.
3)       The ASI prepares the FAA Form 8000-5 (see Figure 13-23) and the appropriate COA letter (see Figures 13-24 through 13-26) for the office manager’s signature with Regional Manager’s concurrence.
4)       The ASI forwards the authorization documentation to the designee.
5)       Complete orientation for AFS GA airman designees in accordance with Order 8900.2 or Order 8100.8, as applicable.

Figure 13-23, FAA Form 8000-5, Certificate of Designation

13-416       COA LETTERS. The FAA will issue a COA letter to each Flight Standards GA designee which specifies the authority and appropriate limitations for that appointment period. The COA letter will be consistent with both the needs of the appointing office and the designee’s qualifications. See Figure 13-24 through 13-26 for examples of COA letters.

Figure 13-24, Sample COA Letter for TPE

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Applicant]

[Applicant’s Address]

Dear [Applicant]:

We are pleased to inform you that your [appointment/renewal] as a Technical Personnel Examiner: [Designated Mechanic Examiner/Designated Parachute Rigger Examiner] per § 183.25 of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) has been approved. This letter serves as your Certificate of Authority. This Certificate of Authority should be retained for your use and should be safely filed where it is available to you and the FAA.

DESIGNATION CERTIFICATE NUMBER: [core cert #]

FIXED BASE OF OPERATION: [appropriate designee or company address]

DATE OF DESIGNATION: [date of initial appointment]

DESIGNATION EXPIRATION: [date]

This authorization is subject to certain functions and limitations as described below:

AUTHORIZED FUNCTIONS:

AIRFRAME, POWERPLANT [DME: can be one or both rating]

BACK, CHEST, SEAT, LAP [DPRE: must be two or more ratings]

LIMITATIONS: (The following is the only limitation that should be listed – otherwise use “NONE.”)

May not issue Temporary Airman Certificates

Sincerely,

[Field Office manager’s signature]

******************************NOTHING FOLLOWS*********************

Figure 13-25, Sample COA Letter for DAR-T

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Applicant]

[Applicant’s Address]

Dear [Applicant]:

We are pleased to inform you that your [appointment/renewal] as a [type of designee] per § [appropriate section of the CFR, for example, 183.31] of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) has been approved. This letter serves as your Certificate of Authority. This Certificate of Authority should be retained for your use and should be safely filed where it is available to you and the FAA.

DESIGNATION CERTIFICATE NUMBER: [number, e.g., DART-123456-NM]

FIXED BASE OF OPERATION: [appropriate designee or company address]

DATE OF DESIGNATION: [date of initial appointment]

DESIGNATION EXPIRATION: [date]

This authorization is subject to certain functions and limitations as described below:

AUTHORIZED FUNCTIONS AND LIMITATIONS: (The following are examples of functions and limitations delegated to a DAR.)

1.          Function Code 23—Issue recurrent standard airworthiness certificates for U.S.-registered aircraft.

LIMITATIONS: Limited to part 25 airplanes including legacy transport category certification rules

2.          Function Code 26—Issue recurrent/original special airworthiness certificates, in the experimental category, for the purposes of exhibition or air racing on U.S.-registered aircraft located in the United States.

LIMITATIONS: Limited to Group I and III Aircraft.

Sincerely,

[Field Office manager’s signature]

************************NOTHING FOLLOWS****************************

Figure 13-26, Sample COA Letter for DPE

FAA Letterhead

[Date]

[Examiner’s Name and Address]

Dear [Candidate’s Name]:

This letter authorizes [name of examiner], Examiner Designation Number [region, offices, core cert #, G signifies designee; e.g., EA03006793452-G], to perform the duties as a [PPE, CIRE, SPE, etc.] for the following aircraft: [e.g., CE-500, BE-2000, powered parachute, etc.].

Enclosed is your FAA Form 8000-5, Certificate of Designation, to include:

DESIGNATION CERTIFICATE NUMBER:

DATE OF DESIGNATION: [date of initial appointment]

DESIGNATION EXPIRATION: [date]

This letter expires on [applicable date].

Sincerely,

[Field Office manager’s signature]

13-417       Special Authorization. Designated Pilot Examiners who are authorized to conduct practical tests in helicopters, multiengine airplanes, vintage airplanes, turbine-powered aircraft, and aircraft requiring a type rating will receive a special authorization on their COA letter. The COA letter is valid until the expiration date shown on the letter.

A.       Multiengine Airplanes and Turbine-Powered or Large Aircraft. For DPEs who are authorized to administer practical tests in a piston-powered multiengine airplanes or turbo-propeller multiengine airplanes that do not require the PIC to hold a pilot type rating, the phrase “Small Multiengine Airplanes” must be listed on the DPE’s COA letter. Prior to being designated to administer a practical test in a small multiengine airplane, the DPE must have logged at least 5 hours of PIC flight time in that multiengine airplane make and model.

B.       Aircraft That Require the PIC to Hold a Pilot Type Rating. For pilot examiners who are authorized to administer practical tests in aircraft that require the PIC to hold a pilot type rating, the COA letter must list that type of aircraft. Before receiving designation to administer a practical test in an aircraft that requires the PIC to hold the appropriate pilot type rating, the examiner must have logged at least 5 hours of PIC flight time in that aircraft type. However, in the case of an examiner on the National Designated Pilot Examiner Registry (NDPER), that examiner when performing NDPER privileges need only hold authorization in the group of aircraft shown on his or her NDPER COA letter.

C.       Helicopters. For pilot examiners who are authorized to administer practical tests in helicopters that do not require the PIC to hold a type rating, the COA letter must list each make and model of helicopter. Before receiving designation to administer a practical test in a specific make and model of helicopter, an examiner must have logged at least 5 hours as PIC flight time in that helicopter make and model. Initial authorization for large helicopters requires examiners to have successfully demonstrated competency in the specific helicopter type.

D.       Flight Simulator. For pilot examiners who are authorized to administer practical tests in a flight simulator that is representative of an aircraft that requires the PIC to hold a pilot type rating, the examiner’s COA letter should list the phrase “Flight Simulator-[Aircraft type].”

E.       Infrequently Requested Aircraft (Turbine-Powered). The supervising FSDO may elect not to issue a COA letter to a pilot examiner for a turbine-powered aircraft that requires a pilot type rating if the FSDO receives infrequent requests for certification practical tests in that specific aircraft. The supervising FSDO may assign an ASI to conduct practical tests in that type of turbine-powered aircraft.

13-418       ADDITIONAL DESIGNATIONS. A pilot examiner may receive an additional designation by completing the same procedures used for original designation. The DPE candidate must hold the certificate and rating(s), without limitation, appropriate to the designation sought. (See FAA Order 8900.2 for procedures.)

A.       Requirements. Except for placing additional vintage airplanes on an existing NDPE authorization, each additional designation requires a demonstration of competency as a pilot examiner appropriate to the aircraft or simulator and the designation sought. The ASI uses the current designation number to issue a new COA letter showing all designations. When a designation is added, the existing designation(s) may be renewed.

B.       Qualifying for Additional Designations. Although an initial designation requires testing for all maneuvers and procedures from the PTS, the candidate does not need to repeat the same maneuvers and procedures for an additional designation. For example, a DPE candidate simultaneously tests for both PE and CIRE airplane designations. If the DPE candidate satisfactorily completes all of the maneuvers and procedures for the PE designation, then only those maneuvers that differ for the CIRE designation need testing. However, if 12 months or more have elapsed since a DPE candidate has qualified for the PE designation, the DPE candidate must retest on all maneuvers and procedures for the CIRE designation.

13-419       RENEWAL—INSPECTOR TECHNICAL ADMINISTRATION.

A.       Application for Renewal. Designees should apply for renewal at least 45 calendar-days before their certificate expires. The designee must submit a completed renewal package to the managing field office or NPO in accordance with FAA Order 8900.2, Chapter 3, or this chapter, as applicable.

B.       Recurrent Training Requirements. The designee’s renewal application package should include a copy of a training certificate issued by the Designee Standardization Branch, AFS-640, indicating the designee has successfully completed the appropriate recurrent training course. While training is a prerequisite of renewal, designees must maintain recurrent training currency at all times in order for the designation to be effective. Refer to Chapter 5, Section 2 for more information on recurrent training requirements.

C.       Renewal for DPE Authorization. An ASI may administer a renewal test for renewing a DPE’s authorization by one of the testing methods stated in paragraph 13-415D above. It should be noted that we have deleted use of the term “pilot-in-command (PIC) competency renewal check” and our current guidance just uses the term “renewal test.” We deleted the term “pilot-in-command (PIC) competency renewal check” because it was causing confusion with the guidance with the renewal testing methods stated in paragraph 13-415D above. Furthermore, we have replaced the 24-calendar-month renewal testing duration with the 12-calendar-month renewal testing duration. We deleted the 24-calendar-month renewal testing duration for DPEs to eliminate confusion. Furthermore, the FSDOs should consider the follow-on procedural guidance in this paragraph as guidelines when conducting renewal tests of DPEs. However, we recognize and respect that the FSDOs have the most “first-hand” knowledge of their DPEs’ activity levels, and so the supervising ASI, in consultation with FSDO management, should determine the frequency, monitoring, and renewal tests of DPEs.

1)       The preferred method of renewing a DPE’s authorization is for the supervising FSDO to observe the DPE conduct an actual practical test of an applicant. Another renewal test method may be for the supervising ASI to play the role of an applicant. However, the supervising FSDO, at its discretion may require a DPE to submit to a PIC proficiency/competency check. If the supervising FSDO has reason to believe the DPE’s piloting skills are not proficient or the DPE has demonstrated a lack of aeronautical knowledge, it may require the DPE to submit to a PIC proficiency/competency check.
2)       A DPE who holds designations in the kinds of aircraft listed below may not conduct a practical test in that designation of aircraft unless that DPE has passed a renewal test in the category of aircraft within the preceding 12 calendar-months. The jurisdictional FSDO requires a DPE to pass, within the preceding 12 calendar-months, a renewal test in each aircraft category listed on that DPE’s COA letter.

·         Designation in the Airplane category.

·         Designation in the Rotorcraft category.

·         Designation in the Powered lift category.

·         Designation in the Lighter-than-air category.

·         Designation in the Glider category.

·         Designation in the Powered parachute category.

·         Designation in the Weight shift control category.

·         Designation in vintage airplanes in one of the groups of vintage airplanes for which the DPE holds authorization.

·         Designation in the experimental aircraft category by make and model.

3)       If a DPE holds designations in multiple classes within an aircraft category (e.g., ASEL, ASES, AMEL, and AMES classes), the supervising FSDO should alternate between the aircraft classes every 12-calendar-month cycle. In addition, if the DPE’s authorization has specific airplane types, the supervising FSDO should alternate the specific airplane types in the 12-calendar-month renewal test cycles. However, the DPE only has to take one renewal test every 12-calendar-month cycle within that airplane category.
4)       If a DPE holds designations in multiple classes within an aircraft category (e.g., Balloon and Airship classes), the supervising FSDO should alternate between the aircraft classes every 12-calendar month cycle. However, the DPE only has to take one renewal test every 12-calendar month cycle within that Lighter than Air category on the DPE’s COA letter.
5)       If a DPE holds multiple aircraft category designations, then the supervising FSDO should administer a renewal test in each aircraft category every 12-calendar-month cycle. For example, if a DPE holds designations in the Airplane and Rotorcraft categories, then the supervising FSDO should administer a renewal test in the Airplane and Rotorcraft category every 12-calendar-month cycle.
6)       If a DPE holds multiple makes and models of helicopters on his or her COA letter, the supervising FSDO should alternate the DPE’s renewal tests between those different helicopter makes and models. In addition, if the DPE’s authorization has a specific helicopter type (e.g., SK-92, SK-61, A-139, etc.), the supervising FSDO should alternate the specific helicopter type in the 12 calendar-month renewal test cycles. However, the DPE only has to take one renewal test every 12-calendar-month cycle within that Rotorcraft category.
7)       If a DPE holds a designation for the glider category, the supervising FSDO should administer a renewal test every 12-calendar-month cycle in a glider and alternate the methods of launch that the DPE is authorized to conduct practical tests on.
8)       If a DPE holds a designation for vintage airplanes, the General Aviation and Commercial Division, AFS-800, is the supervising office. AFS-800, or its designated representative, should administer a renewal test every 12-calendar-month cycle in one of the groups of vintage airplanes for which the DPE holds authorization. If a DPE holds multiple designations of vintage airplanes on the COA letter, AFS-800 may alternate renewal tests between the groups of vintage airplanes. However, the DPE only has to perform one renewal test every 12-calendar-month cycle within the vintage airplane designation on the DPE’s COA letter.
9)       If a DPE holds a designation for experimental aircraft, the General Aviation and Commercial Division, AFS-800, is the supervising office. AFS-800, or its designated representative, should administer a renewal test every 12-calendar-month cycle in one of the makes and models of experimental aircraft, or representative aircraft, for which the DPE holds authorization. If a DPE holds multiple designations of experimental aircraft on the COA letter, AFS-800 may alternate renewal tests between the experimental aircraft or representative aircraft. However, the DPE only has to perform one renewal test every 12-calendar-month cycle in the experimental aircraft designation on the DPE’s COA letter.
10)     If a DPE holds authorization to conduct practical tests at the various pilot certification levels (e.g., sport pilot, recreational pilot, private pilot, commercial pilot), the supervising FSDO may elect to schedule additional spot checks of that DPE administering practical tests at the various pilot certification levels throughout year.

D.       Inspector’s Action. When reviewing the designee’s renewal application package:

1)       The ASI should review the renewal criteria set forth in paragraph 13-406 and determine whether the designee should be renewed or terminated.
2)       If the ASI renews the designee, the ASI should prepare and issue a new COA letter listing the designations and authorizations renewed. The ASI does not need to reissue a new FAA Form 8000-5.
3)       When renewing a designee with a violation history (see paragraph 13-415C1), the field office must include a statement in the designee’s office file acknowledging acceptance of the enforcement history or, in the case of termination, the reason for denial of the designee’s renewal application based on the EIS history.
4)       If the ASI decides to terminate the designee, the ASI must follow the termination procedures in Volume 13, Chapter 5, Section 3.

13-420       TASK OUTCOMES.

A.       Results. Completion of this task may result in issuance of one or more of the following:

·         FAA Form 8000-5, Certificate of Designation;

·         COA letter; and/or

·         Designee supplies.

B.       VIS/DIN. Enter information in the VIS and/or DIN, as applicable.

C.       Close the PTRS Record. Complete a PTRS entry for the designation or renewal.

13-421       FUTURE ACTIVITIES.

A.       Recordkeeping. The field office is responsible for the recordkeeping associated with the completed certifications submitted by the designee. Maintain these records in accordance with the current edition of FAA Order 1350.15, Records Organization, Transfer, and Destruction Standards.

B.       Designee Oversight. Conduct designee oversight and surveillance in accordance with the applicable guidance for the specific designee type contained in Volume 13.

RESERVED. Paragraphs 13-422 through 13-430.