FLIGHT STANDARDIZATION BOARD (FSB) REPORT

(Revision 4)

 

BOMBARDIER GLOBAL EXPRESS/GLOBAL 5000

BD-700-1A10

BD-700-1A11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                            APPROVED:    ________________________________   DATE:   

 

Gene Hartman

Chairman, Global Express/Global 5000 Flight Standardization Board

 

 

Federal Aviation Administration

Aircraft Evaluation Group (LGB AEG)

3960 Paramount Boulevard

Lakewood, CA 90712-4137

 

Telephone: (562) 627-5279

FAX (562) 627-5281

CONTENTS 

 

      REVISION RECORD.............................................................................................................3

1    PURPOSE...............................................................................................................................5

2    terminology...................................................................................................................6

3    BACKGROUND.....................................................................................................................6

4    APPLICATION OF FSB REPORT.......................................................................................7

5    PILOT "TYPE RATING" REQUIREMENTS......................................................................7

6    “MASTER COMMON REQUIREMENTS" (MCRs)......................................................... 8

7    “MASTER DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS" (MDRs)..................................................

8    ACCEPTABLE "OPERATOR DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS" (ODRs) TABLES..

9    FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRAINING.........................................................................10

10   FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CHECKING.......................................................................10

11   FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CURRENCY......................................................................11

12   AIRCRAFT REGULATORY COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST...........................................12

13   FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR DEVICES AND SIMULATORS.......................................13

14   ALTERNATE MEANS OF COMPLIANCE TO THIS REPORT....................................14

15   SUPPLEMENTAL BOARD REPORT - PART II.............................................................14

Appendix 1 - Operator Differences Requirements

            BD-7001A10 (global Express) to BD-7001A11 (global 5000) ……………..… 16

 

Appendix 2 - Operator Differences Requirements

            BD-7001A11 (global 5000) to BD-7001A10 (global Express) …………..….…19

 

APPENDIX 3 - tRAINING PROGRAM SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS …………………….….22

 

Appendix 4 - BD-7001A10 (global Express)

FAA Pilot Initial Training Course Outline ………………………….……..24

 

Appendix 5 - Aircraft Regulartory Compliance checklist ………………...25

Appendix 6 - THALES Head-up display (hud) systems………………………..….…..49

 

Appendix 7 - Bombardier Enhanced vision system (BEVS) ……………………...53

 

APPENDIX 8  - BOMBARDIER OPERATOR DIFFERENCES REQUIREMENTS

     BD-700-1A10 (Global ExPRESS XRS) TO BD-700-1A10 (GLOBAL 6000)

        BD-700-1A11 (GLOBAL 5000) TO BD-700-1A11 (GLOBAL 5000 GVFD)

          FAA PILOT INITIAL TYPE RATING BD-700-1A10 (GLOBAL 6000)/

                                 BD-700-1A11 (Global 5000 GVFD)

 

 

REVISION RECORD

 

Revision No.

Section(s)

Page #’s

Date

Original

All

All

7/14/99

1

All

All

1/14/2005

2

Contents

2

9/02/05

2

Highlights of Change

4

9/02/05

2

2.1

6

9/02/05

2

7.1

10

9/02/05

2

Section 9, 10, 11

11, 12, 13

9/02/05

2

Appendix 3

22, 23

9/02/05

2

Appendix 6

49, 50, 51, 52

9/02/05

2

Appendix 7

53, 54, 55, 56, 57

9/02/05

3

4

Appendix 6

APPENDIX 8

50

3

8/28/08
4/04/12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HIGHLIGHTS OF REVISIONS

 

 

Revision 2 adds Appendix 3, Appendix 6 [Head-Up Display system], and Appendix 7 [Bombardier Enhanced Vision System] to this report.

 

Revision 3 corrects a typographical error in Appendix 6 Thales Head-UP Display System (HUD)] paragraph 5.1 regarding the minimum requirement for ground school.  The change is from 4 hours to 2 hours as the minimum requirement.

 

Revision 4 adds Appendix 8

 

1 PURPOSE

 

1.1  The primary purpose of this report is to specify FAA master training, checking and currency requirements applicable to crews operating the Bombardier Global Express/Global 5000. This report can assist 14 CFR Part 135 or 125 Operators, FAA Principal Operations Inspectors (POI's), and 14 CFR Part 142 training centers and their FAA Training Center Program Managers (TCPMs) in the development and approval of 14 CFR Part 135 and 142 training programs. Provisions of this report are effective until amended, superseded, or withdrawn by subsequent FSB determinations.

 

1.2  Relevant acronyms are defined as follows:

 

AC                       Advisory Circular
ACO                    Aircraft Certification Office
AEG                     Aircraft Evaluation Group

AFCS                   Automatic Flight Control System

AFM                    Airplane Flight Manual
AP                        Autopilot
ATP                     Airline Transport Pilot

BA                       Bombardier Aerospace
CFR                     Code of Federal Regulations

EFIS                     Electronic Flight Instrument System
EGPWS               Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System
EICAS                 Engine Indication and Crew Alerting System

EMS                      Electrical Management System

FDA                     Flight Director Annunciator

FCOM                 Flight Crew Operating Manual

FGP                     Flight Guidance Panel
FMS                     Flight Management System
FSB                      Flight Standardization Board
FTD                     Flight Training Device
NSP                     National Simulator Program
PFD                     Primary Flight Display
POI                      Principal Operations Inspector
PTS                      Practical Test Standards

QRH                    Quick Reference Handbook
TCAS                   Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2  TERMINOLOGY

 

2.1   The term “must” is used in this report, even though it is recognized that this report, and the Advisory Circular AC 120-53 on which it is based, provides one acceptable means, but not necessarily the only means, of compliance with 14 CFR Part 61 or 14 CFR Part 135, Subpart H requirements.  The term “must” acknowledges the need for operators to fully comply with the FSB report provisions if AC 150-53 is to be used by the operator as its means of complying with 14 CFR Part 135, Subpart H.

3  BACKGROUND

 

3.1  The Global Express is a high altitude, ultra long-range business jet certified under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) Part 25. The Global Express is listed on FAA Type Certificate Data Sheet T00003NY as model BD-700-1A10. The FSB conducted a joint operational evaluation of the Global Express with three Civil Aviation Inspectors from Transport Canada resulting in the issuance of concurrent FSB and Transport Canada Operational Evaluation Reports. This was the first time that the FAA and Transport Canada have accomplished a joint operational evaluation.

 

3.2  From May 4 to May 26, 1999, the Global Express Flight Standardization Board (FSB) received the Global Express proposed initial pilot training course provided by Bombardier Aerospace (BA) at its Training Center located in Montreal, Canada. Training consisted of: classroom instruction, use of a level 7 Flight Training Device and an interim level C Flight Simulator, both of which were qualified by the FAA National Simulator Program (NSP). Bombardier proposed, and the FSB evaluated, an Advisory Circular (AC) 120-53 test T5, which is an evaluation of all the FAA Practical Test Standards (PTS) maneuvers required for an airman to receive a pilot type rating. This was accomplished in Global Express aircraft registration numbers C-FKGX (serial #9004) and C-FJGX (serial #9003), in Wichita, Kansas, from June 2-4, 1999. The FSB conducted seven flight legs, totaling approximately twenty flight hours to determine if the Global Express is suitable for operation in the U.S. under 14 CFR parts 91, 125 and 135.  In the time available on those flights, the FSB also evaluated a majority of the AFM normal, abnormal, and emergency procedures.

 

3.3  The Global 5000 is a high altitude, long- range business jet certified under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 25. The Global 5000 is listed on FAA Type Certificate Data Sheet T00003NY as model BD-700-1A11. The Global 5000 FSB conducted a joint operational evaluation with two Civil Aviation Inspectors from Transport Canada, resulting in the issuance of concurrent FSB and Transport Canada Operational Evaluation Reports. In addition, there were two representatives from Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA Europe). 

 

3.4 From August 16 to September 8, 2004, the FAA member of the Global 5000 Flight Standardization Board (FSB) evaluated the Global Express proposed initial pilot training course provided by Bombardier Aerospace (BA) at its training center located in Montreal, Canada. Training consisted of: classroom instruction, use of a level 5 Flight Training Device and a level D Flight Simulator, both of which were qualified by the FAA National Simulator Program (NSP).

 

3.5  Two Transport Canada members of their Operational Evaluation Board were qualified on the Global 5000, and they attended a recurrent class at the Bombardier Aerospace Training Center in Montreal, Canada.  The JAA representatives were current in the aircraft as they joined the process. Bombardier proposed, and the FSB evaluated, Advisory Circular (AC) 120-53 test T1, which is an evaluation of all the FAA Practical Test Standards (PTS) maneuvers required for an airman to receive a pilot type rating. This was accomplished in Global 5000 aircraft registration number C-GLRM (serial #9130), in Wichita, Kansas, from September 13-20, 2004. The FSB conducted 24 flight legs, totaling approximately 50 flight hours to determine if the Global 5000 is suitable for operation in the U.S. under 14 CFR Parts 91, 125 and 135.  In the time available on those flights, the FSB also evaluated a majority of the AFM normal, abnormal, and emergency procedures.

 

3.6 The FSB is responsible for conducting evaluations of future changes to the Global Express/Global 5000 (such as engine changes, systems and instrumentation changes, software changes or installation of new systems) and its derivatives. The FSB will determine the impact those change have on training, checking and currency, and will amend this report accordingly.

4  APPLICATION OF FSB REPORT

 

4.1 The guidelines in this report apply to: Operations Aviation Safety Inspectors, Principal Operations Inspectors (POI), Training Center Program Managers (TCPM), Aircrew Program Managers (APM), 14 CFR part 135 Air Carrier Check Airmen and Instructors, Airline Transport Pilots instructing in air transportation service, Certificated Flight Instructors, Certificated Ground Instructors, Designated Pilot Examiners, Pilot Proficiency Examiners, Aircrew Program Designees, and Training Center Evaluators.

5  PILOT "TYPE RATING" REQUIREMENTS

 

5.1  In accordance with 14 CFR Parts 1 and 61, and 135, the same type rating is assigned to the Global Express/Global 5000, and is designated “BBD-700”. The Global Express and Global 5000 have not been issued a new Type Certificate (TC) Data Sheet. The Global 5000 was added to the existing Global Express Data Sheet.  The FSB did not conduct a comparison between the Global Express/Global 5000 and any other aircraft models; therefore, no credit shall be given for training, checking, or currency between the Global Express/Global 5000 and any other aircraft.

 

 

6  “MASTER COMMON REQUIREMENTS" (MCRs)

 

6.1  The Master Common Requirements specify those items of crew qualification that apply to the BD-700-1A11 and BD-700-1A10 airplanes.

6.2   General Configuration

The BD-700-1A10 (Global Express) was the first in the series of aircraft to enter service. It was followed by the variant BD-700-1A11 (Global 5000), which is simply a shorter version.

 

6.3  Differences of the BD-700-1A11 include:

1.          Decrease max takeoff weight

2.          Shorter fuselage

3.          Less fuel capacity

 

The pilot/machine interface shares a high degree of commonality. Both aircraft have identical avionics systems.  With the exception of the fuel panel, the cockpits are identical.

 

6.4   V Speeds (V1, VR, V2, VFTO, VREF, VAC)

All maximum speeds for landing gear, slats and flaps are identical for both aircraft.
V Speeds for takeoffs and approaches are dependent upon aircraft weight and are identical at the same weight.

 

Critical speeds for both aircraft are presented to the pilot in the same standardized manner.

 

6.5   Normal ‘Final’ Landing Flap Setting

 

The normal ‘final’ landing flap is 30 degrees for both aircraft.


6.6  Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS)

 

The AFCS pilot/machine interface is the same for both aircraft.

 

6.7  Heads Up Display (HUD)

 

Both aircraft share the same Thales HUD equipment.  The HUD pilot/machine interface is the same for both aircraft.

 

6.8   Electronic Flight Instrument System (EFIS)

 

The EFIS pilot/machine interface is the same for both aircraft.

 

6.9   Navigation and Communication

 

Both aircraft share the same navigation and communication equipment. Pilot operation of the equipment is the same for both aircraft.

 

6.10   Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System (EICAS)

The EICAS philosophy is the same for both aircraft. Only minor changes to crew alerting messages and applicable synoptic page architecture have been made to support the changes in fuel system and the above cabin floor avionics rack.

 

6.11   Primary and Secondary Flight Controls

Pilot operation of the primary and secondary flight controls is the same for both aircraft.

 

6.12   Aircraft Systems

 

Except for the fuel system, all systems are the same for both aircraft.

 

6.13   Takeoff, Climb and Descent Profiles

 

The takeoff, climb and descent profiles are the same for both aircraft.

 

6.14   Approach Profiles

 

The approach profiles are the same for both aircraft

 

6.15   Abnormal & Emergency Procedures

 

Immediate Action items are identical for both aircraft.

 

Abnormal and emergency procedures are presented in Quick Reference Handbooks (QRH). The QRH’s for both aircraft share an identical presentation format and direct the pilots to carry out emergency or abnormal procedures in a methodical and structured manner.

 

6.16  Minimum Height for use of the Autopilot  (FAR 91/FAR 135.93):   

 

The minimum height for the use of the autopilot is 400 feet AGL (Part 135 - 500’) following takeoff in both airplanes.

 

6.17  Landing Minima Category

 

The following straight-in approach minima, based on Maximum Landing Weight (MLW), for both aircraft are as follows:

 

Aircraft

Landing Flap

Category

BD-700-1A10

30 degrees

C

BD-700-1A11

30 degrees

C

 

 

7 “MASTER DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS"

7.1   Master Differences Requirements (MDRs) for the Global Express and Global 5000 are shown in the following table. These provisions apply when differences between variants exist which affect crew knowledge, skills, or abilities related to flight safety (e.g. Level A or greater differences).

 

 

AIRPLANE TYPE RATING: BBD-700

 

 

FROM AIRPLANE

 

T

O

 

A

I

R

P

L

A

N

E

 

 

 

BD-700-1A10

 

 

BD-700-1A11

 

 

BD-700-1A10

 

---

 

A / A / A

 

BD-700-1A11

A / A / A

 

---

 

[ NOTE: For Global Express or Global 5000 aircraft equipped with the Thales Head-Up Display (HUD) system and/or the Bombardier Enhanced Vision System (BEVS), reference the additional training, testing, and checking requirements found in  Appendices 6 and 7 of this FSB report.]

8  ACCEPTABLE "OPERATOR DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS" (ODRs) TABLES

 

8.1  Operator Difference Requirement (ODR) tables are used to show an operator's compliance method. ODR tables for operators conducting mixed fleet operations, using the Global Express and Global 5000 are shown in Appendix 1 and Appendix 2. The ODR tables represent an acceptable means to comply with MDR provisions based on those differences and compliance methods shown. The tables do not necessarily represent the only acceptable means of compliance for operators with airplanes having other differences, where compliance methods (e.g., devices, simulators, etc.) are different. For operators flying the Global Express and Global 5000 the ODR tables in Appendices 1  and 2 have been found acceptable, and therefore, may be approved by a POI for a particular operator.

8.2  Operator Preparation of ODR Tables:


Operators seeking different means of compliance must prepare and seek FAA approval from their POI of specific ODR tables pertinent to their fleet. The POI should coordinate this with the FSB Chairman and AFS-200.

 

8.3  ODR Table Coordination:


New ODR tables proposed by operators should be coordinated with the FSB prior to FAA approval and implementation. Through this coordination, the FSB can ensure consistent treatment of variants between various operators’ ODR tables and compatibility of the MDR table with MDR provisions.

 

8.4  ODR Table Distribution:


Originally approved ODR tables are retained by the operator. Copies of approved Global Express and Global 5000 tables are retained by the Certificate Management Office (CMO). Copies of all approved ODR tables should be forwarded to the FSB Chairman, Long Beach Aircraft Evaluation Group (AEG).

 

 

FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRAINING

9.1        General:

9.1.1  The provisions of this training section apply to the Global Express and Global 5000, to programs for airmen having previous experience in 14 CFR Part 91 or 14 CFR Part 135 air carrier operations, and multi-engine turbojet or turboprop aircraft.   Additional requirements, as determined by the operator’s POI, the FSB, and AFS-200, may be necessary for airmen not having such experience.

 

9.2        Initial, Transition and Upgrade Training:

 

9.2.1        Pilot Initial, Transition, and Upgrade Ground Training is accomplished in  accord-ance with 14 CFR Part 135.343, 135.345, and SFAR 14 CFR SFAR 58, Advanced Qualification Program (AQP).

9.2.2        Pilot Initial, Transition, and Upgrade Flight Training are accomplished in  accord-ance with 14 CFR part 135.347. [Reference Appendix 4 for a typical initial ground and flight training course outline for the Global Express/5000.]

 

9.3     Recurrent Training:

9.3.1   Recurrent Ground Training is accomplished in accordance with 14 CFR part 135
           .351 and SFAR part 58 (AQP).

9.3.2    Recurrent Flight Training is accomplished in accordance with 14 CFR part 135.
           .351 and requires that the pilot be proficient in those maneuvers and procedures
           that are required for the original issuance of the pilot certificate.

9.4  Differences Training:

Differences training is accomplished in accordance with 14 CFR part 135.347.  If both the Global Express and Global 5000 are to be flown, appropriate instruction in design and systems differences will be required for both airplanes, consistent with MDR provisions listed in Section 7.

9.5   Other Training:

 

9.5.1              Flight Attendant Training is accomplished in accordance with 14 CFR part 135.341 if a flight attendant is utilized.  The Global Express and Global 5000  have a maximum seating capacity of 19 seats and therefore, do not require a  Flight Attendant.

 

9.5.2              Aircraft Dispatcher Training, Flight Engineer Training, and Flight Navigator Training are not applicable.

 

9.5.3              Special Emphasis Training is contained in Appendix 3 and lists special emphasis items that are to be included in an approved training program.

 

10 FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CHECKING

10.1      General

10.1.1  The provisions of this checking section apply to the Global Express and Global
            5000.  Testing, checking and evaluations specified by 14 CFR  Parts 61.57,
            61.58, 61.63, 61.67,  61.157,  61.159, 135.293, 135.297, SFAR 58, and FAA
           
Practical Test Standards (PTS) apply.

10.1.2    The following areas of emphasis must be demonstrated during checking:

(a)      Proficiency in manual and automatic (including FMS) flight in normal,          abnormal, and emergency situations must be demonstrated at each proficiency/competency check by all crewmembers.

 

(b)    The use of manual modes to operate systems such as electrical, hydraulic,  pressurization, environmental, etc. and emergency equipment must be demonstrated at each proficiency/competency check by all crewmembers.

 

(c)      Demonstration of a no flap approach and landing during a pilot type rating or 14 CFR part 135 check is required per the Airline Transport Pilot and/or Type
Rating Practical Test Standards - FAA-S-8081 Area of Operation VI, Task F. In accordance with Order 8400.10, when the flight demonstration is conducted in an airplane, verses a simulator, touchdown from a no flap approach is not
required and shall not be attempted.  However, the approach should be flown to the point where the inspector or examiner can determine whether a touchdown at an acceptable point on the runway and a safe landing to a full-stop could be made.

 

10.2  Type Ratings:

Type rating Practical Tests are administered in accordance with 14 CFR Parts  61.63, 61.157, 61.159, SFAR 58 and the
Practical Test Standards.

10.3  Competency/Proficiency Checks and Evaluations:

Competency/Proficiency checks and evaluations are administered in accordance with 14 CFR Parts 61.58, SFAR 58, 135.293, and 135.297.

 

11  FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CURRENCY

11.1      Currency  (Recency of Experience):

Currency is considered to be common for the Global Express and Global 5000.  Separate tracking of currency for the Global Express and Global 5000 is not necessary or applicable. Currency will be maintained, or re-established, in accordance with 14 CFR Parts 61.57, 61.58 135.247 and/or 135.351.

 

 

12  AIRCRAFT REGULATORY COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST

12.1  Aircraft serial number 9004, a Global Express, was utilized by the FSB to conduct its  evaluation on June 8, 1999. Aircraft serial number 9130, a Global 5000, was utilized by the FSB to conduct its evaluation from September 13-20, 2004.  These aircraft were representative of production versions. It enabled the FSB to determine compliance with the appropriate 14 CFR parts 91, 125 and 135 operating requirements.  The attached checklist, in Appendix 5, provides the FSB findings on those operating requirements. It may be used by Principal Inspectors to assist in determining operator compliance.

 

12.2 The aircraft are delivered without interior finishing or paint, in a “green” configuration, from the factory, therefore the completion center must determine final payload capacity of the airplane.

 

12.3 It is possible that individual aircraft could be outfitted to operate in excess of 6,000-pound payload. Such operators would have to show compliance with 14 CFR Part 125 requirements, or a letter of deviation authority would have to be obtained.

 

12.4 An operator of a Global Express/Global 5000 aircraft must demonstrate to the FAA that the aircraft fully complies with all applicable operating rules prior to that aircraft entering service.

13  FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR DEVICES AND SIMULATORS

Device and simulator characteristics are designated in AC 120-40 and 120-45 (as amended). The acceptability of differences between devices, simulators, and aircraft must be addressed by the NSP and the POI. Requests for device approval should be made to the POI.  The POI may approve those devices for operators if their characteristics clearly meet the established FAA criteria and have been qualified by the National Simulator Program (NSP).

14  APPLICATION OF FSB REPORT

All relevant parts of this report are applicable to operators on the effective date of this report.

15  ALTERNATE MEANS OF COMPLIANC E TO THIS REPORT

15.1      The FSB chairman should be consulted by the POI when alternate means of compliance, other than those specified in this report, are proposed. The FAA General Aviation and Commercial Division, AFS-800 or the FAA Air Transportation Division, AFS-200, must approve alternate means of compliance. If an alternate means of compliance is sought, operators will be required to submit a proposed alternate means for approval that provides an equivalent level of safety to the provisions of AC 120-53 and this FSB report.  Analysis, demonstrations, proof of concept testing, differences documentation, and/or other evidence may be required.

 

15.2      In the event that alternate compliance is sought, training program hour reductions, simulator approvals, and device approvals may be significantly limited and reporting requirements may be increased to ensure an equivalent level of training, checking, and currency.  FAA will generally not consider relief through alternate compliance means unless sufficient lead-time has been planned by an operator to allow for any necessary testing and evaluation.

 

 

16 SUPPLEMENTAL BOARD REPORT - PART II

 

16.1  Part II of the FSB report contains historical development information used to develop Part I. This information is kept on file at the Long Beach Aircraft Evaluation Group, (LGB AEG), 3960 Paramount Boulevard, Lakewood, CA 90712-4137.

 

16.2      Documents kept on file are as follows:

 

Global Express/Global 5000 FAA FSB Order (FSB member list)

Global Express/Global 5000 Training syllabus of FSB members

Global Express/Global 5000 Original Aircraft Flight Manual

Global Express/Global 5000 Operations Manuals

Global Express/Global 5000 Master Minimum Equipment List

Global Express/Global 5000 Operational Issue Papers

 

 

 20 Aircraft General

Performance

Max T.O. Weight:

87,700 lb. (39,780 kg)

Decrease of 8,300 lb.
(3,766 kg)

 

Max Landing Weight:

78,600 lb. (35,652 kg) APPENDIX 1  - Operator Differences Requirements – BD-700-1A10 (Global Express) to BD-700-1A11 (Global 5000)

 

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT BD-700-1A11 (Global 5000)

BASE AIRCRAFT: BD-700-1A10 (Global Express)

APPROVED BY

(POI)____________________________

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

 

 

 

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

DESIGN

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

20 Aircraft General

Fuselage

Length:

96 ft. 10 in.  (29.49 m)

Decrease of 32 inches (.81 m)

Removal of two side windows

 

Wingspan:

93 ft. 6 in. (28.65 m)

No change

 

Tailspan:

31ft. 9 in. (9.68 m)

No change

 

Height (SATCOM):

25 ft. 8 in. (7.83 m)

No change

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

 

No change

 

Fuel Capacity:

36,000 lb. (16,329 kg)

Decrease of 7,350 lb.
(3,421 kg)

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

20 Aircraft General

Wheel Base

Nose to Main Wheels:

40 ft, 2 in.  (12.25 m)

Decrease of 2 ft 8 in (.81 m)

 

 

No

 

  No

 

HO

 

 

 

A

A

28 Fuel

Removal of aft fuel tank

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

28 Fuel

Fuel recirculation is now an automatic system

 

No

See note

HO

 

 

 

A

A

31 Indicating / Recording Systems

New fuel synoptic page

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

 

 

 

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

Note:      The fuel recirculation, which is currently a manual system on the Global Express, becomes an automatic system on the 5000 and sequential Global Express.

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT BD-700-1A11 (Global 5000)

BASE AIRCRAFT: BD-700-1A10 (Global Express)

  APPROVED BY

  (POI)____________________________

 

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

SYSTEM

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

28 Fuel

Reduction in centre tank capacity

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

28 Fuel

Minor EICAS/Synoptic page changes

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

28 Fuel

Fuel control panel, deletion of switches and switch labels changed

 

No

See note

HO

 

 

 

A

A

28 Fuel

Refueling panel, deletion of switches and switch labels changed

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

 

Note:  The Fuel RECIRC switches become an inhibited function vice an ON/OFF one

 

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT BD-700-1A11 (Global 5000)

BASE AIRCRAFT: BD-700-1A10 (Global Express)

  APPROVED BY

  (POI)____________________________

 

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

MANEUVER

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

Taxi

Very slight decrease in taxi turning radius (TBA)

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

 

 

 

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

APPENDIX 2 - Operator Differences Requirements –BD-700-1A11 (Global 5000) to BD-700-1A10 (Global Express)

 

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT BD-700-1A10 (Global Express)

BASE AIRCRAFT: BD-700-1A11 (Global 5000)

APPROVED BY

(POI)____________________________

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

 

 

 

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

DESIGN

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

20 Aircraft General

Fuselage

Length:

99 ft. 5 in.  (30.30 m)

Increase of 32 inches (.81 m)

Addition of two side windows

 

Wingspan:

93 ft. 6 in. (28.65 m)

No change

 

Tailspan:

31ft. 9 in. (9.68 m)

No change

 

Height (SATCOM):

25 ft. 8 in. (7.83 m)

No change

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

20 Aircraft General

Performance

Max T.O. Weight:

96,000 lb. (43,546 kg)

Increase of 8,300 lb.
(3,766 kg)

 

Max Landing Weight:

78,600 lb. (35,652 kg)

No change

 

Fuel Capacity:

43,550 lb. (19,750 kg)

Increase of 7,350 lb.
(3,421 kg)

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

20 Aircraft General

Wheel Base

Nose to Main Wheels:

42 ft, 10 in. (12.25 m)

Increase of 2 ft 8 in (.81 m)

 

 

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

28 Fuel

Addition of aft fuel tank

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

28 Fuel

Fuel recirculation is now a manual system

No

See note

HO

 

 

 

A

A

31 Indicating / Recording Systems

New fuel synoptic page

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

 

 

 

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

Note:      The fuel recirculation, which is currently a manual system on the Global Express, becomes an automatic system on both the 5000 and for subsequent Global Express.

 

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT BD-700-1A11 (Global Express)

BASE AIRCRAFT: BD-700-1A10 (Global 5000)

  APPROVED BY

  (POI)____________________________

 

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

SYSTEM

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

28 Fuel

Increase in centre tank capacity

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

28 Fuel

Minor EICAS/Synoptic page changes

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

28 Fuel

Fuel control panel, addition of switches and switch labels changed

 

No

See note

HO

 

 

 

A

A

28 Fuel

Refueling panel, addition of switches and switch labels changed

 

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

 

 

 

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

21

 
Note:  The Fuel RECIRC switches become an ON/OFF function vice an inhibited one

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT BD-700-1A11 (Global Express)

BASE AIRCRAFT: BD-700-1A10 (Global 5000)

  APPROVED BY

  (POI)____________________________

 

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

MANEUVER

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

Taxi

Very slight increase in taxi turning radius. Radius is 68 feet. (20.9 m)

No

No

HO

 

 

 

A

A

 

 

 

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

 

APPENDIX 3 – GLOBAL EXPRESS/5000 TRAINING PROGRAM SPECIAL EMPHASIS ITEMS

 

The FSB has identified several aircraft systems and/or procedures that must receive special emphasis in a Global Express/Global 5000 Training Program:

 

Ground Training:

 

1)         High altitude physiology

2)         Fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption

3)                                  International operating procedures for special use airspace such as: MNPS, RVSM, RNP-10, and RNP-5 operations.

4)                                  Flight Management System (FMS)

5)                                  Fuel characteristics and fuel temperature management at high altitudes and cold temperatures.

6)                                  Wing leading edge contamination and its effect on clean (slats IN / flaps up) stall speed.

7)                                  DC Power system failure modes with emphasis on loss of all DC electrical power, including the relationship and significance of thermal circuit breakers in the Cockpit Circuit Breaker Panel.

8)                                  Thales Head-Up Display System (HUD) (See Appendix 6)

9)                                  Bombardier Enhanced Vision System (BEVS) (See Appendix 7)

10)                          Fuel recirculation inhibits.

11)                          FMS landing field length.

 

Systems Integration Training (Flight Training Device - Level 5):

            1)         Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS)

2)         Primary Flight Display (PFD) Flight Director Annunciations (FDA)

3)         Flight Management System (FMS)

4)                                  Electrical Management System (EMS)

5)                                  Thales Head-Up Display System (HUD) (See Appendix 6)

6)                                  Bombardier Enhanced Vision System (BEVS) (See Appendix 7)

7)         Guidance Panel Indications/Selections for autopilot, yaw damper, and coupling.

 

Flight Training (Full Flight Simulator - Level C or D and/or aircraft):

 

1)                                  Aileron/elevator disconnect (jammed controls in each axis).

2)                                  Primary Flight Display (PFD), Multifunction Display (MFD), and EICAS eversionary modes.

3)                                  Integrated use of EICAS messages, switch positions and synoptic pages to determine aircraft system status.

4)                                  Delayed engine response to full power applications at high altitudes (especially high altitude stalls).

5)                                  Low energy rejected landing from idle thrust.

6)                                  High altitude (above 45,000 ft.) handling characteristics with the autopilot and yaw damper inoperative.

7)                                  AFCS pitch (PIT) mode characteristics (flight path vs. pitch angle).

8)                                  Enhanced GPWS (including the loss of terrain mode when making MFD selections).

9)                                  Traffic Collision and Avoidance System (TCAS)

10)                          Thales Head-Up Display System (HUD) (See Appendix 6)

11)                          Bombardier Enhanced Vision System (BEVS) (See Appendix 7)

12)                          Loss of all DC Power

13)                          Stall warning advance.

14)                          Loss of Autothrottle during One Engine Inoperative Flight. 

 

The FSB also found that early exposure to the AFCS, autothrottles, and FMS is important, especially for pilots with no previous EFIS, autothrottle or FMS experience.  Establishing early confidence in manually flying the aircraft, converting from manual to automatic (FMS controlled) flight mode and back is equally important due to heavy reliance on the AFCS. In the event of a flight path deviation due to input error or system malfunction, the flight crew must be able to comfortably transition from automatic to manual operation and back in an orderly fashion consistent with Certificate holder’s automation philosophy.

 

 

APPENDIX 4 - BD-700-1A10 (GLOBAL EXPRESS/GLOBAL 5000) FAA PILOT INITIAL COURSE OUTLINE

 

 

 

Day

Ground Training

Ground Training System Integration

1

  • Intro,
  • Aircraft General,
  • EFIS,
  • Fuel

 

2

  • Power Plant,
  • Fire protection
  • CRM/SM
  • FMS

 

3

  • Nav./Comm.
  • AFCS

System Integration FTD 1

4

  • APU
  • Nav.
  • Emerg. Equip./LTS

System Integration FTD 2

5

  • Electrics

System Integration FTD 3

6

  • Hydraulics
  • Flight Control
  • Ldg Gear & Brakes
  • Performance

 

7

  • Performance
  • IAMS (Integrated Air Management Systems)
  • Ice/Rain protection

 

8

  • Performance

System Integration FTD 4

9

  • Weight & Balance
  • Review/Exam
  • High Altitude Indoc.

FLIGHT training

FTD - Simulator

Flight Training 1 FTD

10

  • Walk Around
  • Air Procedures (RVSM, RNP 5/10)

Flight Training 2 FTD

11

 

Flight Training 3 Simulator

12

 

Flight Training 4 Simulator

13

 

Flight Training 5 Simulator

14

 

Flight Training 6 Simulator

15

 

Flight Training 7 Simulator

16

 

Checkride

 

 

 

 

 


APPENDIX 5 AIRCRAFT REGULATORY COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST

 

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

 91. 9

(a)

Compliance with Flight Manual, Markings, and Placard Markings

The Internal / External Markings of the green aircraft configuration comply with FAR 25 requirements.

Operator's responsibility.

Drawings were not made available during FSB to determine compliance.

 91. 9

(b)(1)

Availability of Current Airplane Flight Manual in Aircraft

An FAA approved Airplane Flight Manual complying with FAR 25.1581 is provided with each aircraft. A current AFM and revision service is provided.

Operator's responsibility

AFM FAA approved on December 15, 1998 revision original, valid June, 1999. Operators are responsible for ensuring the AFM is current.

 91. 9

(c)

Identification of Aircraft in

 Accordance with FAR 45

A fireproof identification plate complying with FAR 45 is included in the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

   

 

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

 91.191

 

Category II  and Category III Manual

Certification for Cat II operations will be conducted after initial Type Certification.   An approved Airplane Flight Manual, including Category II procedures, instructions and limitations, will be provided with each aircraft.

An approved maintenance schedule as per the Maintenance Review Board (MRB) Report, derived from the MSG-3 process, and an Aircraft Maintenance Manual complying with FAR 25.1529 and Appendix H are provided to each operator.  These documents reflect the green aircraft as designed by Bombardier Aerospace and supplemented by Completion Center additions.

Operator's responsibility.

Compliance for CAT II approval will be sought at a later date. CAT III approval has not been requested at this time

 91.203

(a),(b)

Valid C of A, Flight Permit, Registration Certificate.

1. Valid C of A for green aircraft will be provided at aircraft delivery and will be supplemented by Completion Center for completed aircraft.  2. It is operator responsibility to keep the aircraft continuously airworthy.

Operator's responsibility

1.Complies

2. Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

 91.203

(c)

Fuel Tanks in the Passenger/Baggage Compartment

 

Not applicable.

Concur

 91.203

(d)

Fuel Venting and Exhaust Emissions Requirements

Compliance with FAR 34 requirements has been demonstrated during Type Certification.

 

Complies

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

 91.205

(a)

General

Compliance not shown

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

 91.205

(b)

Day VFR

All equipment specified for Day VFR, as applicable to a turbine engine aircraft is included in the baseline configuration except for Items:

(12) - pyrotechnic signal devices are not provided

(14) - not applicable

(15) - ELT provisions only

(17) - not applicable

 

Complies

 91.205

(c)

Night VFR

All equipment specified for Night VFR, Items (2)  thru (6) are included in the baseline configuration, except for:

Item (6) - Spare fuses are not provided since all re-settable circuits by the flight crew are protected by circuit breakers.

 

Complies

91.205

(d)

IFR

All equipment specified for IFR flight, Items (2)  thru (9) are included in the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

91.205

(e)

Flight at and Above FL240

Two DME systems are provided as part of the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

91.205

(f)

Category II Operations

Not applicable at this time.  Certification for Cat II operations will be conducted after initial Type Certification..

 

Aircraft not evaluated for compliance at this time.

91.205

(g)

Category III Operations

 

 

Not requested by Bombardier at this time


 

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

91.211

(a)

General

 

Operator's responsibility

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.Data will be provided by completion center.

 

(b)

Pressurized Cabin Aircraft

 

Operator's responsibility

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.Data will be provided by completion center.

 91.213

 

Inoperative Instruments and Equipment

 

Operator's responsibility.

MMEL has been developed for this aircraft.

91.215

(a)

Transponder Performance and Environmental Requirements

Two Mode S Transponders with ATC Modes A and C conforming to TSO-C112 is included in the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

91.215

(b),(c) (d)

Transponder Operation

 

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

91.217

(a)

ATC - Directed Deviation

 

Operator's responsibility

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

91.217

(b)

Encoded Altitude Accuracy

Mode C altitude - encoding equipment capable of transmitting altitude with at least 125-foot accuracy is provided in the baseline configuration.

Periodic testing and calibration is an operator responsibility.

Complies

91.217

(c)

Altimeter-Encoding Equipment Specifications

Altimeters conform to TSO C10b and C88 respectively.

 

Complies

 

91.219

(a)

Operational Requirement for System

 

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

91.219

(b)

Requirements and Operation

 

Operator's responsibility to maintain system in an operable condition.

Complies

91.219

(c),(d)

Operational Procedures

 

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

91.221

 

TCAS

 

 

Complies

91.409

 

Inspections

An approved maintenance schedule as per the Maintenance Review Board (MRB) Report, derived from the MSG-3 process, and an Aircraft Maintenance Manual complying with FAR 25.1529 and Appendix H are provided to each operator.  These documents reflect the green aircraft as designed by Bombardier Aerospace and supplemented by Completion Center additions.

Operator's responsibility.

Maintenance documents completed by Bombardier

91.411

 

Altimeter System and Altitude Reporting Equipment Tests and Inspections

The Maintenance Manual includes the tests and inspections required by Appendix E of FAR 43.  The FAR 43 tests and inspections are conducted as a part of the Canadair Functional Test Plan for each aircraft prior to delivery.

Operator responsible for conducting tests and inspections.

Complies

91.413

 

ATC Transponder Tests and Inspections

The Maintenance Manual includes the tests and inspections required by Appendix E of FAR 43.  The FAR 43 tests and inspections are conducted as a part of the Canadair Functional Test Plan for each aircraft prior to delivery.

Operator responsible for conducting tests and inspections.

Complies

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

 91.503

(a)(1)

Flashlights

Two flashlights are provided as basic aircraft equipment.

Working condition is responsibility of operator.

Complies

 91.503

(a)(2)

Cockpit Checklist

Checklists are provided in the Airplane Flight Manual / Flight Crew Operating Manual/Quick Reference Handbook (QRH).

Operator's responsibility.

Checklists in AFM are FAA approved. Checklists in FCOM and QRH are not FAA approved.

91.503

(a)(3) & (a)(4)

Aeronautical Charts

 

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

91.503

(a)(5)

One Engine Inoperative Climb Performance Data

The Airplane Flight Manual and Operating Manual contain the required data.

 

Complies

91.503

(b), (c)

Cockpit Checklist Contents

The Airplane Flight Manual contains all required checks.

Operator's responsibility to adhere to checklists and ensure that most current version is in use.

Checklists in AFM are FAA approved. Checklists in FCOM and QRH are not FAA approved.

91.503

(d)

Use of Data by Crew

 

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure most current  information is in use.

91.507

 

Equipment Requirement: Over the Top, or Night VFR Operations

Installed in baseline configuration

 

Complies

91.511

 

Radio Equipment for Overwater Operations

Installed in baseline configuration

 

Complies

91.513

 

Emergency Equipment

Installed in baseline configuration

 

Complies

91.517

 

Passenger information

 

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

91.519

 

Passenger Briefing

 

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

91.521

 

Shoulder Harness

Installed

 

Complies

91.525

 

 Carriage of Cargo

 

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

91.527

 

Operating in Icing Conditions

 

 

Flight into known icing conditions prohibited by AFM Limitation.

91.603

 

Aural Speed Warning Device

Speed warning devices which comply with FAR 25.1303(c)(1) are included in the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

91.605

 

Transport Category Civil Airplane Weight Limitations

Actual weight and balance manual provided with each delivered green aircraft.  Completion Center to update the manual to reflect their additions.

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

91.609

 

Flight Recorders and Cockpit Voice Recorders

A digital flight data recorder conforming to TSO C124 is included in the baseline configuration, in accordance with FAR 25.1459.  The FDR will be fully operational prior to aircraft entry into service.

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance.

91.609

(a)

Operation with Inactive Flight Data Recorder or Cockpit Voice Recorder

 

Operator's responsibility

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance

 91.609

(b)

Operation by Other than Holder of Air Carrier or Commercial Certificate

 

Operator's responsibility

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance

 91.609

(c)

Requirements for Flight Data Recorder - 10+ passengers

 

Operator's responsibility

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

 91.609

(d)

FDR Operations

The FDR operates from take-off roll to landing roll.

 

Complies

91.609

(e)(f)

Requirement for Cockpit Voice Recorder

A cockpit voice recorder conforming to TSO C123 is included in the baseline configuration in accordance with FAR 25.1457.

 

Complies

91.609

(g)

Accident Reporting

 

Operator's responsibility.

Operators responsibility to ensure compliance

91.613

 

Materials for Compartment Interiors

 

 

Complies

91.App A

 

Category II Operations

Certification for Category II operations will be conducted after initial Type certification.  An approved Airplane Flight Manual , including procedures, instructions and limitations will be provided with each aircraft.  A maintenance Document, derived from MSG-3 process, and an aircraft Maintenance Manual are provided with each aircraft.

 

CAT II certification not sought at this time.

91.App C

 

Operations in the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) Airspace

Aircraft navigation performance capability exceeds the minimum specifications.

 

Complies

 91 App G

 

Operations in Reduced Vertical Separation (RVSM) Airspace

 

 

Certification has not been requested by Bombardier at this time

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

125.1

(a)

Applicability

 

Aircraft with a maximum payload capacity of 6,000 pounds or more when common carriage is not involved.

Aircraft Serial #9006 has a maximum payload capacity of 5586 pounds. The operator of this aircraft is not required to comply with 14 CFR part 125.

125.75

(a)

Airplane Flight Manual

An approved AFM complying with 25.1581 is provided with each aircraft. Revision service will be provided with each AFM.

Operator's responsibility to maintain a current AFM.

AFM FAA approved on December 15, 1998 revision original, valid June, 1999. Principal Inspectors are responsible for ensuring the AFM is current.

125.75

(b)

Manual Required

An approved maintenance schedule as per the Maintenance Review Board (MRB) Report, derived from the MSG-3 process, and an Aircraft Maintenance Manual complying with FAR 25.1529 and Appendix H are provided to each operator.  These documents reflect the green aircraft as designed by Bombardier Aerospace and supplemented by Completion Center additions.

Operator's responsibility to either carry AFM or manual required by 125.71

Principal Inspectors are responsible for ensuring the AFM is current or manual is approved in accordance with current guidelines.

125.93

 

Airplane Limitations

The aircraft complies with the ditching requirements of 25.801 except that the equipment required by 25.1411 and 25.1415 are to be installed by the completion center.

 

Complies

125.183

 

Carriage of Cargo in Passenger Compartments

Not applicable to green aircraft configuration. There are no approved cargo bins located in the passenger compartment.

 

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

125.185

 

Carriage of Cargo in Cargo Compartments

Not applicable to green aircraft configuration. 

Operator's responsibility.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

125.187

 

Landing Gear: Aural Warning Device

The landing gear aural warning device is fully compliant with FAR 25.729.

 

Aircraft does not comply with 14 CFR part 125. 87(b) manual shutoff.

125.189

(a),(b)

Certificate Holder Demonstration - Land

 

 

Not applicable as maximum passenger seating capability is 19 passengers.

125.189

(c),(d)

Certificate Holder Demonstration - Ditching

Not applicable to green aircraft configuration.

Operator's responsibility.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

125.203

 

Radio and Navigational Equipment

All equipment prescribed in this paragraph are provided as part of the baseline configuration.

 

Complies except that compliance for SLRN to be determined by Principal Inspector.

125.205

 

Equipment Requirements: Airplanes under IFR

All equipment specified for IFR conditions are included in the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

125.206

(a)

Requirement & Operation

Pitot heat indication system complies with FAR 25.1326.

Operator's responsibility to maintain system in an operable condition.

Complies

125.209

 

Emergency Equipment: Extended Over water Operations

Not applicable to green aircraft configuration.

Operator's responsibility.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

125.211

 

Seats and Safety Belts

The aircraft is furnished with two approved crew seats fitted with approved safety belts/shoulder harnesses.  Completed aircraft to be outfitted with seats and safety belts as per FAR 25.785 as indicated in the Completion Center Handbook.

Operator's responsibility to ensure that approved seat/safety belt is provided for each passenger.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

125.213

 

Miscellaneous Equipment

 

 

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

125.213

(a)

Spare Fuses

 

 

Not applicable.  There is no requirement for spare fuses, since all circuit breakers that are required to be reset are accessible to the flight crew.

125.213

(b)

Windshield Wipers

The aircraft complies with FAR 25.773(b)(1)(i).

Aircraft windshields are coated with waterphopic material and no wipers are installed.

Complies

125.213

(c)

Electrical Power and Distribution

The power supply and distribution meet the requirements of FAR 25.

 

Complies

125.213

(d)

Means of Indicating Adequate Power

Indication of the adequacy of power supplies to required flight instruments complies with FAR 25.1331

 

Complies

125.213

(e)

Duplicated Static Pressure

Four independent static pressure systems are provided as part of the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

125.213

(f)

Placards

 

Operator's responsibility to ensure that no doors are installed which are required to be open during takeoff and landing to obtain access to an emergency exit

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

125.213

(g)

Means to Unlock Doors

Not applicable to green aircraft configuration.  Operator's responsibility to ensure that a mean are provided to unlock doors.

 

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

125.215

(a)

Requirement

Normal and emergency cockpit checklists and one engine inoperative climb performance data are included in AFM, Operating Manual and Quick Reference Handbooks provided with each aircraft.

Operator's responsibility to make checklists at pilot station and ensure most current information is available.

Checklists in AFM are FAA approved. Checklists in FCOM and QRH are not FAA approved. Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

125.215

(b),(c)

Content

Checklists contain the required procedures.

 

Checklists in AFM are FAA approved. Checklists in FCOM and QRH are not FAA approved. Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

125.217

 

Passenger Information

This requirement will be addressed by the completion centers/operators. Not applicable to green aircraft configuration.

Operator's responsibility.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

125.219

 

Oxygen for Medical Use by Passengers

This requirement will be addressed by the completion centers/operators. Not applicable to green aircraft configuration.

Operator's responsibility.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

125.221

 

Icing Conditions: Operating Limitations

 

 

AFM prohibits flight into known icing conditions

125.221

(a),(b)(e)

Icing Conditions: Flight

 

Operator's responsibility.

AFM prohibits flight into known icing conditions.

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

125.221

(c),(d)

Ice Protection Provisions

Certification for operations in icing conditions will be conducted after type certification.

Aircraft has ice protection provisions that will meet requirements of FAR 25 and Appendix C to FAR 25 and will be approved for operations in icing conditions prior to aircraft entry into service.  AFM and Flight Crew Operating Manual will contain the procedures for use of the anti-icing system.

Operator's responsibility.

AFM prohibits flight into known icing conditions.

125.223

(a)

Equipment Requirements

An airborne weather radar system conforming to TSO C63 is included in the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

125.223

(b)

Flight in Hazardous Weather Conditions

 

Operator's responsibility

 

125.223

(c)

Instructions and Procedures

Instructions and procedures are included in the aircraft AFM and Flight Crew Operating Manual provided with each aircraft.

 

Complies

125.223

(d),(e)

Alternate Electrical Power Supply

 

 

Compliance not determined

125.224

(a)

Requirement

 

An approved TCAS conforming to TSO C119 is provided in the baseline configuration.

Complies

125.224

( b)

Operating Information

 

Procedures and outline of all input sources are included in the Aircraft Flight Manual and Operating Manual.

Complies

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

125.225

 

Flight Recorders

A digital flight data recorder conforming to TSO C124 is included in the baseline configuration RAL-700-0001, in accordance with FAR 25.1459.  The FDR will be fully operational prior to aircraft entry into service.

 

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.       

125.225

(b)

Requirement for FDR

A digital FDR conforming to TSO C124 is included in the baseline configuration in accordance with FAR 25.1459.

 

Complies

125.225

(c)

Digital Flight Data Acquisition Unit

Aircraft parameters are transmitted to the FDR by a DAU in ARINC 717 digital format.

 

Complies

125.225

(d)

Aircraft Manufactured after 1991

Aircraft parameters are transmitted to the FDR by a DAU in ARINC 717 digital format.

 

Complies

125.225

(e)

Operations

The FDR operates continuously from take-off roll to landing roll.

 

Complies

125.225

(f)

Retention of Recorded Data

The FDR retains the most recent 25 hours of recorded information in non-volatile memory.

 

Complies

125.225

(h)

Installation Requirements

The FDR installation complies with FAR 25.1459.

 

Complies

125.225

(i)

Underwater Locator Device

An underwater locator device is part of the FDR as per FAR 25.1459.

 

Complies

125.227

(a)

Requirement

A CVR conforming to TSO C123 is included in the baseline configuration in accordance with FAR 25.1457.  Operation is continuous from power on to power off.

 

Complies

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

125.227

(c)(1)

Applicable Standards

The CVR complies with the requirements of FAR 25.

 

Complies

125.227

(c)(2)

Recorder Container - Color, Reflective Tape, underwater Locating

The recorder container is bright orange and reflective tapes and an approved underwater locating device are provided in accordance with FAR 25.1457.

 

Complies

125.227

(d)

Erasure Feature

The CVR retains the most recent 120 minutes of recorded information in non-volatile memory.

 

Complies

125.227

(e)

Boom or Mask Microphone

Uninterrupted signals received by the boom or mask microphones are recorded in accordance with FAR 25.1457(c)(5).

 

Complies

125.249

 

Maintenance Manual Requirements

 

 

 

125.249

(a)(1),(a)(2)

Organization Chart & Personnel

 

Operator's responsibility

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

125.249

(a)(3)

Inspection Programs

An approved maintenance schedule as per the Maintenance Review Board (MRB) Report, derived from the MSG-3 process, and an Aircraft Maintenance Manual complying with FAR 25.1529 and Appendix H are provided to each operator.  These documents reflect the green aircraft as designed by Bombardier Aerospace and supplemented by Completion Center additions.

Operator's responsibility.

Complies

125.249

(b)

Maintenance Tracking System

 

Operator's responsibility.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

125.269

 

Flight Attendants

No flight attendants are required as maximum passenger seating capacity is 19.

Should an operator desire flight attendant for its operations, the operator will be responsible to comply with this requirement.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

125.327

 

Briefing of Passengers Before Flight

Instructions on means of opening doors and emergency exits will be provided to completion centers.

Operator's responsibility.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

125.329

 

Minimum Altitudes for Use of Autopilot

The AFM and Flight Crew Operating Manual outline the required conditions for the use of the Autopilot system.

 

Complies

135. 21

 

Manual Requirements

An Airplane Flight Manual, Flight Crew Operating Manual and Maintenance Manuals are provided with each aircraft.

 

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

135.75

(b)

Inspector’s Credential: Admission to pilot’s compartment: Forward observer’s seat.

 

 

AEG has not evaluated forward observers seat for operational suitability.

135.93

 

Autopilot: Minimum Altitudes for Use

The AFM and Flight Crew Operating Manual outline the required conditions for the use of the Autopilot system.

 

Complies

135.127

 

Passenger Information

 

Operators Responsibility

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

135.143

(b)

Approved/Operable Instruments and Equipment

All equipment and instruments included in the green baseline configuration is approved and operable.

Operator's responsibility.

Complies

135.143

(c)

ATC Transponder

Two ATC transponders conforming to TSO-C112 (Mode S) is installed as the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

135.147

 

Dual Controls Required

Aircraft type certification operating limitations required two pilots and aircraft equipped with dual controls.

 

Complies

135.149

(a)

Altimeter Adjustable for Barometric Pressure

An altimeter adjustable for barometric pressure is installed as part of baseline configuration.

 

Complies

135.149

(b),(d),(e)

Additional Equipment

 

 

Compliance not determined.

135.149

(c)

Bank and Pitch Indicators

A third pitch and bank indicator complying with the requirement of 121.305(j) is installed as part of baseline configuration.

 

Complies

135.151

(a)

Requirement and Installation of CVR

A CVR conforming to TSO C123 is included in the baseline configuration. In accordance with FAR 25.1457.  Operation is continuous from power on to power off.

 

Complies

135.151

(d)

Boom and Microphone

Interrupted signals received by the boom or mask microphones are recorded IAW FAR 25.1457(c)(5).

 

Complies

135.151

(e)

CVR - Recorded Data

Installed CVR comply with this requirement.

 

Complies

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

135.152

 

Flight Recorders

A digital flight data recorder conforming to TSO C124 is included in the baseline configuration in accordance with FAR 25.1459.  The FDR will be fully operational prior to aircraft entry into service.

 

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

135.152

(a)

Requirement for FDR

A digital FDR conforming to TSO C124 is included in the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

135.152

(c)

Operations

FDR operates continuously from take-off roll to landing roll.

 

Complies

135.152

(f)

Installation Requirements

The FDR installation complies with FAR 25.1459.

 

Complies

135.152

(g)

Underwater Locator Device

An underwater locator device is part of the FDR as per FAR 25.1459.

 

Complies

135.153

(a)

Requirement for GPWS

A GPWS conforming to TSO C92 is included in the base line configuration.

 

Complies

135.153

(c)

Airplane Flight Manual

The Airplane Flight Manual and Operating Manual contains procedures for:

(i)  The use of the equipment;

(ii)  Flight crew action with respect to the equipment warnings and indications;

(iii)  Deactivation for planned abnormal and emergency  conditions;

(iv)  Inhibition of Mode 4 warnings based on flaps being in other than the approved landing configuration is appropriate;

(v) An outline of all input sources that must be operating

 

Complies

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

135.155

(a)

Type and Suitability of Agent

Extinguishing agent in flight deck extinguisher is suitable for use in compartments.

Operator's responsibility

Complies

135.155

(b)

Fire Extinguisher on Flight Deck

One flight deck fire extinguisher (halon) is included in baseline configuration.

Operator's responsibility

Complies

135.155

(c)

Fire Extinguisher in Passenger Compartment

Not applicable to green aircraft configuration.   Operator's responsibility to comply with this requirement

This requirement will be addressed by the completion centers/operators.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

135.157

(b)

Pressurized aircraft.

A flight crew oxygen system with sufficient quantity for operations up to 51,000 feet certified in accordance with applicable requirements of FAR 25.1439 through 25.1453 is provided. 

Operator is to establish mission profiles and demonstrate compliance against this requirement for the furnished aircraft.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

Charts are not available at this time

135.157

(c)

Equipment requirement

Indication of flight crew oxygen supply and pilots use of undiluted oxygen is provided as part of the green baseline configuration.

Operator's responsibility.

Complies

135.158

(a)

Requirement and Operation

Pitot heat indication system complies with FAR 25.1326.

 

Complies

135.159

(a)-(g)

Equipment Requirements

All equipment specified for night and over-the-top VFR conditions, Items (a) to (g) are included in baseline configuration .  Note: No gyroscopic rate-of-turn is installed, however a third attitude instrument system is included in the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

135.161

 

Radio and navigational: Aircraft Carrying Passenger Under IFR

All radio and navigation equipment specified for night and over-the-top VFR conditions are included in baseline configuration.

 

Complies

135.163

(a)-(e),(g)(h)

Equipment Requirements

All equipment specified for IFR conditions, Items (a)-(d), (g) and (h) are included in baseline configuration.

(e) - Aircraft is equipped with four pitot static systems to provide inputs for the air data system, stall protection system and standby altimeter/airspeed indicator.

 

Complies

135.165

 

Radio and Navigational Equipment: Extended Overwater or IFR Operations

All equipment specified for extended Overwater and IFR operations is included in baseline configuration.

 

Complies (a, b, c)

Compliance  for (d) to be determined by Principal Inspector

135.167

 

Emergency Equipment: Extended Overwater Operations

Not applicable to green aircraft configuration.

Operator's responsibility.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

135.169

(a)

 Additional Airworthiness Requirements: 121.213 through 121.283, 121.307 and 121.312

Aircraft is certified to FAR 25 requirements.  The compliance against FAR 135.169 requirements is limited to the green aircraft configuration.   Compliance for the furnished aircraft is the completion center / operator responsibility.

 

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

135.169

(d)

Cargo or Baggage Compartments

 

Operator's responsibility

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

135.170

 

Materials for Compartment Interiors

All materials used in the aircraft flight deck compartment comply with the standards of 25.853.

Materials for compartment interiors per an STC are completion center / operator responsibility.

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

135.171

(a)

Requirement

Crew shoulder harness are provided for each crew member as part of green aircraft baseline configuration.

 

Complies

135.173

(a)

Airborne Thunderstorm Detection Equipment

Approved lightning detection system conforming to TSO C110 is provided as part of green configuration.

 

Complies

135.173

(f)

Power Supply

 

 

Compliance not determined.

135.175

(a)

Airborne Weather Radar Equipment

Approved digital airborne weather radar equipment conforming to TSO C63 is provided as part of green configuration.

 

Complies

135.175

(e)

Power Supply

 

 

Compliance not determined.

135.180

(a)

Requirement for an Approved TCAS

A TCAS conforming to TSO C119 is installed as the baseline configuration.

 

Complies

135.180

(b)

Flight Manual Requirements

The Airplane Flight Manual and Flight Crew Operating Manual contain the appropriate procedures.

 

Complies

135.181

(a)

Climb Requirements

Aircraft climb performance data is provided in Aircraft Flight Manual

 

Complies

135.183

(a)

Engine Failure

 

Operator's responsibility

 

135.183

(b)

Take-Off or Landing

 

Operator's responsibility

 

135.183

(c)

Climb Performance - Critical Engine Inoperative

Aircraft performance data is provided in Aircraft Flight Manual.

 

Complies

135.185

(a)

Currency Requirement

Actual weight and balance manual provided with each delivered green aircraft.  Completion Center to update the manual to reflect their additions.

 

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

135.185

(b)

Aircraft Original Airworthiness Certificate

Actual weight and balance manual provided with each delivered green aircraft.  Completion Center to update the manual to reflect their additions.

 

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

135.227

(a)-(f)

Operations in Icing Conditions

 

 

AFM prohibits Flight into known icing conditions.

135.269

 

Flight Time Limitations and Rest Requirements: Unscheduled Three and Four Pilot Crews

 

Operator's responsibility

Flight Crew Sleeping Quarters have not been evaluated by the AEG for adequacy.

135.379

 

Large Transport Category Airplanes:

Turbine Engine Powered: Takeoff Limitations

Aircraft performance data is provided in Aircraft Flight Manual.

 

Published performance charts not available for evaluation. Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

135.381

 

Large Transport Category Airplanes:

Turbine Engine Powered: Enroute Limitations: Single Engine

 

 

Published performance charts not available for evaluation. Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

135.385

 

Large Transport Category Airplanes:

Turbine Engine Powered: Landing Limitations: Destination Airports

 

 

Published performance charts not available for evaluation. Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.

135.387

 

Large Transport Category Airplanes:

Turbine Engine Powered: Landing Limitations: Alternate Airports

 

 

Published performance charts not available for evaluation. Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector.


 

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

135.419

 

Approved Aircraft Inspection Program

An approved maintenance schedule as per the Maintenance Review Board (MRB) Report, derived from the MSG-3 process, and an Aircraft Maintenance Manual complying with FAR 25.1529 and Appendix H are provided to each operator. Manuals reflect green aircraft as designed by Bombardier Aerospace and supplemented by Completion Center additions.

Operator's responsibility

Complies

135.421

 

Additional Airworthiness Requirements

An approved maintenance schedule as per the Maintenance Review Board (MRB) Report, derived from the MSG-3 process, and an Aircraft Maintenance Manual complying with FAR 25.1529 and Appendix H are provided to each operator. Manuals reflect green aircraft as designed by Bombardier Aerospace and supplemented by Completion Center additions.. 

 

 

Operator's responsibility.

Complies

135.421

(a)

Nine Seat or Less

 

Operator's responsibility (dependent on interior seating capacity)

Compliance to be determined by Principal Inspector

FAR

Sub

Req.

Requirement

Compliance

Remark

FSB Finding

135.427

(b)

Manual for Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance and Alterations

An approved maintenance schedule as per the Maintenance Review Board (MRB) Report, derived from the MSG-3 process, and an Aircraft Maintenance Manual complying with FAR 25.1529 and Appendix H are provided to each operator. Manuals reflect green aircraft as designed by Bombardier Aerospace and supplemented by Completion Center additions. 

 

Operator is responsible to perform the required maintenance.

Operator's responsibility

Complies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

APPENDIX 6 – THALES HEAD-UP DISPLAY (HUD) SYSTEM

1  BACKGROUND

 

1.1 The Global Express/5000 Flight Standardization Board (FSB) participated in an evaluation of the Thales Head-up Display System (HUD) during its development in the fall of 2004 using a Global Express aircraft and simulator. The FSB conducted certification flight tests, along with the New York Aircraft Certification Office (NYACO), in a Global Express aircraft in Wichita, KS. Flight testing consisted of approximately 40 HUD approaches at several different airports, using CAT 1 procedures, during day, night, Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) and Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC).

 

1.2  The FSB also evaluated the Global Express/5000 proposed Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) Supplement for HUD Operations. The FSB found the HUD operationally acceptable for all phases of flight and for U.S. CAT I operations.   If the Global Express/5000 receives CAT II authorization in the future, the Thales HUD system has been found to be operationally acceptable for CAT II operations without further evaluation.

 

2    PREREQUISITES FOR HUD TRAINING

 

Unless the HUD training is integrated with, or occurs sequentially preceding an initial qualification pilot proficiency check, a prerequisite to HUD training in a Global airplane, is prior training, qualification and currency in the Global Express or Global 5000.

 

3    SIMILARITY OF INSTALLATION

 

The Thales HUD System installations on Global Express and Global 5000 airplanes have been found to be functionally equivalent.  If Thales HUD training and checking requirements are accomplished in one aircraft, training and checking need not be repeated in the other.

 

4     HUD TRAINING - GENERAL

 

4.1   The HUD pilot training requirements consist of those related to initial and recurrent ground and flight training.  It should be noted that the HUD training program focuses principally upon training events flown in the left seat by the Pilot-In-Command (PIC) as Pilot Flying (PF).  Nevertheless, HUD training of Pilot Not Flying (PNF) Second-In-Command (SIC) duties in the right seat is required, where there are procedural differences for the PNF, when the PF is heads up (compared to heads down). SIC HUD familiarization flown in the left seat is recommended.

 

         4.2   The FSB recommends special emphasis ground training in the following areas:

 

a.          Crew coordination;

b.        Crew briefings and callouts;

c.          Duties of flying and non-flying pilots; and

d.        EICAS messages and use of QRH and Checklists applicable to HUD.

 

5    HUD INITIAL GROUND TRAINING

 

5.1            The pilot-in-command of an aircraft equipped with a Thales HUD system should receive a minimum of 2 hours of ground school training in the operation and use of the HUD.

 

5.2   The initial ground training program should include the following elements:

 

a.     Classroom instruction covering HUD operational concepts, crew duties and responsibilities and operational procedures including preflight, normal and abnormal operations, EICAS messages, use of QRH and checklists, miscompare, and failure flags.

 

b.        Classroom instruction or Computer Based Training (CBT) on the HUD symbology set and its inter-relationship with airplane aerodynamics, inertial factors, environmental conditions and comparison to Primary Flight Display (PFD).

 

c.     A HUD pilot training manual or equivalent material in the Flight Crew Operations Manual (FCOM), which explains the limitations, all modes of operation, clear descriptions of HUD symbology, including limit conditions and failures, and incorporating a crew procedures guide clearly delineating PF and PNF duties, responsibilities and procedural call-outs and responses during all phases of flight during which HUD operations are anticipated.

 

6    HUD INITIAL FLIGHT/SIMULATOR TRAINING

 

6.1            The pilot-in-command of an aircraft equipped with a Thales HUD system should receive a minimum of 2 hours of flight training in the operation and use of the HUD.  A PIC who progresses through initial or transition flight training in a Global Express/5000 aircraft and satisfactory completes HUD system curriculum segments, is recommended by an instructor, and completes a HUD proficiency check by a person authorized by the Administrator, need not complete the recommended 2 hours of flight training.

 

6.2            Flight or simulator training shall be conducted from the left seat and may be conducted in a Thales HUD system equipped aircraft or a Thales HUD system equipped Level C simulator, with a daylight visual display, or a Level D simulator.  Simulator approaches, utilizing the HUD, should begin no closer than the final approach fix (FAF) for instrument approaches, and should begin no closer than approximately 1,000 feet AGL (3 - 4 NM) to the runway threshold for visual approaches. 

 

6.3   Unless integrated with initial type rating training, flight training dedicated to HUD familiarization and proficiency is in addition to other required training elements. 

 

6.4            The following HUD flight training program is generic in nature and should be considered as a guide only.

 

a.    Ground Operations:

 

 

 

(1)       Deployment of HUD and stowage, and

(2)      Taxi using HUD under various lighting and visibility conditions.

 

b.    Airwork:  

 

(1)  Straight and level flight, accelerations and decelerations,

(2)  Normal and steep turns, climbs and descents,

(3)  Wind Effects on HUD display,

(4)  Approach to stall recovery; and

(5)  Recovery from unusual attitudes.

 

c.    Visual Take-offs, Approaches and Landings

 

1)          Crosswind take-off and landing,

2)          Visual approaches to runways at night with minimal lighting (“black hole” approaches) and use of FPV to achieve desired descent angle,

3)          Engine failure on take-off,

4)          One Engine Inoperative (OEI) landing

5)          OEI go-around;

 

d.    Instrument Approaches:

                       

1)            Approaches to the lowest authorized minima including an approach and landing with OEI,

2)            Missed approach OEI

3)            Non-precision, and circling approaches (if applicable).

 

e.    Abnormal/Emergency Operations:  (as appropriate)

 

1)            Wind shear escape,

2)            EGPWS escape,

3)            TCAS Resolution Advisory

4)            HUD failure on approach

5)            Approaches with the aircraft in a non-normal slat/flap configuration.

 

6.5   The FSB recommends special emphasis flight training in the following areas:

 

a.    Approaches to ‘black hole’ airports.

b.    Use of the flare symbol as a cue (not as guidance)

c.    Recovery from unusual attitudes

d.    TCAS resolution advisory

e.    Crosschecking from HUD to cockpit displays, including EICAS and other   cockpit indications.

 

7    HUD INITIAL CHECKING REQUIREMENTS

 

7.1          Upon completion of training, a PIC must be administered a proficiency check conducted    in a level 'C’ simulator with a daylight visual display, or level 'D' simulator, or on a Thales

 

HUD System equipped aircraft. This proficiency check may be taken in conjunction with a pilot proficiency check conducted in accordance with FAR Parts 61 or 135 or may be administered as a separate test.

 

7.2            Maneuvers to be evaluated during the HUD proficiency check include as a minimum:

 

a.            One takeoff

b.          One departure procedures

c.            One instrument approach procedure

d.          One landing

 

7.3    SIC’s should be checked on PNF duties during HUD approaches and emergencies.

 

 

8    HUD RECURRENT TRAINING AND CHECKING REQUIREMENTS

 

8.1            Selected HUD related ground training subjects as outlined in Paragraph 5 above should be reviewed on a recurrent basis.

 

8.2            At least annually, in conjunction with a pilot-in command proficiency check required by FAR Part 61 or FAR Part 135, a PIC must demonstrate proficiency using the Thales HUD system by satisfactorily performing the maneuvers listed under paragraph 7.2.

 

8.3            At least annually, second-in-command pilots should be evaluated on crew resource management [CRM] responsibilities and procedures as the pilot-not-flying [PNF] when the pilot-flying [PF] is conducting HUD operations.

 

 

9    HUD CURRENCY REQUIREMENTS

 

PIC’s should have completed at least three takeoffs, approaches, and landings using the HUD in the Global Express/5000 or have completed three takeoffs, approaches, and landings as the pilot flying (PF) using the Thales HUD system in a Level C simulator with day and night visual displays, or Level D simulator, within the previous 90 days before acting as the PF using the HUD in revenue operations.

 

 

 

APPENDIX 7 – BOMBARDIER ENHANCED VISION SYSTEM (BEVS)

1  BACKGROUND

 

1.1    From December 2004 to May 2005 the GLOBAL EXPRESS/5000 (Global’s) Flight Standardization Board (FSB) Chairman participated with the New York Aircraft Certification Office in development, proof of concept, and certification flight tests for the Bombardier Enhanced Flight Vision System [BEVS]. Those flights included over 40 BEVS approaches conducted at several different airports during day, night, Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) and Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC).

 

1.2              Global Express/5000 BEVS Airplane Flight Manual Supplement was evaluated and found acceptable during the certification flight tests. In May 2005 two Global FSB members received BEVS ground school and simulator training from Bombardier Aerospace Training Center, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The FSB found the BEVS operationally acceptable.

 

1.3    The BEVS is certified for descent to 100 feet Height Above Touchdown (HAT) in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) when operated in accordance with the limitations contained in Global Aircraft AFM Supplement 22.  In general, descent below published Decision Height (DH) or Minimum Descent Altitude (MDA) to 100 feet HAT is authorized for straight-in instrument approach procedures other than Category II or Category III approaches.  Operators must conform to the requirements of  FAR 91.175 (l) and (m) to exercise this capability.  (See Note 1.)

 

2    PREREQUISITES FOR BEVS TRAINING

 

2.1   As a prerequisite for BEVS training, pilots should have successfully completed Thales HUD training in the Global Epress/5000 aircraft, however HUD and BEVS training can be conducted concurrently. (See Note 2.)

 

2.2   For operations conducted in accordance with FAR 91.175 (l) & (m), ground training on the Global Express/5000 aircraft for low visibility procedures, or CAT II training, is required if such training is not included in the BEVS training.

 

3    SIMILARITY OF INSTALLATION

 

The Bombardier Enhanced Vision System installations on the Global Express and the Global 5000 airplanes have been found to be functionally equivalent.  If BEVS training and checking requirements are accomplished in one aircraft, training and checking need not be repeated in the other.

 

4     BEVS TRAINING - GENERAL

 

4.1      The BEVS pilot training requirements consist of those related to initial and recurrent ground and flight training.  It should be noted that the HUD and BEVS training programs focus principally upon training events flown in the left seat by the Pilot-In-Command (PIC) as the Pilot Flying (PF).  Nevertheless, BEVS training in the duties of the Pilot Not Flying (PNF) in the right seat is required.  SIC BEVS familiarization flown in the left seat is recommended.

 

4.2   The FSB recommends special emphasis ground training in the following areas:

 

a.                  Crew briefings and callouts.

b.                Duties of pilot flying and pilot not flying.

c.                  Crew coordination and Crew Resource Management (CRM).

d.                Transition from BEVS imagery to non-BEVS visual conditions. Maximum use should be made of videotapes of actual EVS approaches.

e.                  Instruction on where on the BEVS to look for approach lights which, depending on the aircraft altitude, may be within or below the HUD display of HSI information during low weather approaches and, therefore, in a different location than during non-low weather approaches.

f.                    Importance of cross-checking the HUD instrumentation presentations against the BEVS visual scene presentation to enable the pilot to recognize malfunctions of the ground based navigational equipment and improper presentation of elements in the visual scene during the approach.

g.                  Instruction in the use the FMS Temperature Compensation feature, which is a limitation in the AFM supplement for LNAV/VNAV approaches per FAR 91.175 (l) & (m) at airfield temperatures below ISA.

h.                  Instruction in the use of the autopilot with auto-throttle coupled approaches allowing for better pilot monitoring of the BEVS image.

 

5    BEVS INITIAL GROUND TRAINING

 

         5.1      The pilot-in-command of an aircraft equipped with a Bombardier Enhanced Vision System should receive a minimum of 2 hours of ground school training in the operation and use of the BEVS.

 

5.2   The initial ground training program should include the following elements:

 

a.                  Classroom instruction covering BEVS operational concepts, crew duties and responsibilities and operational procedures including preflight, normal and abnormal operations, EICAS messages, use of QRH and checklists, miscompare, and failure flags.

 

b.                Classroom instruction or Computer Based Training (CBT) on the BEVS symbology set and its inter-relationship with airplane aerodynamics, inertial factors, environmental conditions and comparison to HUD symbology and the Primary Flight Display (PFD).

 

c.     A BEVS pilot training manual or equivalent material in the Flight Crew Operations Manual (FCOM), which explains the limitations, all modes of operation, clear descriptions of BEVS symbology, including limit conditions and failures, and incorporating a crew procedures guide clearly delineating PF and PNF duties, responsibilities and procedural call-outs and responses during all phases of flight during which BEVS operations are anticipated.

 

d.     Instruction in the effective and appropriate monitoring by the PNF on BEVS imagery presented on the FMS CDU.

 

 

6    BEVS INITIAL FLIGHT/SIMULATOR TRAINING

 

6.1            The pilot-in-command of an aircraft equipped with a Bombardier Enhanced Vision System should receive a minimum of 2 hours of flight or simulator training in the operation and use of the BEVS. 

 

6.2            Flight or simulator training shall be conducted from the left seat and may be conducted in a BEVS equipped aircraft or a BEVS equipped Level C simulator, with a daylight visual display, or a Level D simulator.  Simulator approaches, utilizing BEVS, should begin no closer than the final approach fix (FAF) for instrument approaches, and should begin no closer than approximately 1,000 feet AGL (3 - 4 NM) to the runway threshold for visual approaches. 

 

6.3   Unless integrated with initial type rating training, flight training dedicated to BEVS familiarization and proficiency is in addition to other required training elements. 

 

6.4            The following flight training program is generic in nature and should be considered as a guide only.

 

a.    Ground Operations:

 

(1)  Initialization of BEVS.

(2)  Taxi using BEVS under various lighting and visibility conditions.

 

b.    Airwork:  

 

There is no requirement for airwork training using BEVS.

 

c.    Visual Take-offs, Approaches and Landings

 

(1)      Normal takeoff and landing with crosswind.

(2)        Visual approaches at night with minimal lighting (“black hole” approaches) and use of FPV and Flight Path Reference Cue (FPRC) to achieve desired descent angle.

 

d.    Instrument Approaches:

                       

(1)   Precision and non-precision straight-in approaches to the lowest published minima with missed approaches or landings.

(2)   Precision and non-precision straight-in approaches to lowest published minima and acquisition of a sufficient BEVS image to continue to 100 feet HAT.  Acquisition of required visual references below 100 feet HAT without the aid of BEVS followed by a landing or a missed approach.

 

e.    Abnormal/Emergency Operations:  (as appropriate)

 

(1)   Failure of BEVS during approach.

(2)   Failure of BEVS below published minima but above 100 feet HAT.

 

6.5   The FSB recommends special flight training emphasis in the following areas:

 

a.    Transition from BEVS imagery to non-BEVS, visual conditions and acquisition.

b.    Crew briefings and callouts with emphasis on the duties of the PF and pilot monitoring.

c.    Importance of the “design eye position” in acquiring the proper BEVS image.

d.    Precision and non-precision instrument approaches in both day and night conditions.

e.    Use of the on/off switch “clear” mode.

f.     AFM performance and obstacle clearance on go-around from 100 feet HAT.

 

7    BEVS INITIAL CHECKING REQUIREMENTS

 

7.1   Checking requires a PIC proficiency check conducted in a level 'C’ simulator or level 'D' simulator, that has been qualified by the National Simulator Program for HUD and BEVS,

or on a HUD and BEVS equipped Global aircraft. This proficiency check may taken in conjunction with a pilot proficiency check conducted in accordance with FAR Parts 61 or 135 or may be administered as a separate test.

 

7.2    Maneuvers to be evaluated during the BEVS proficiency check include as a minimum:

 

a.  One instrument approach and landing with acquistion of the BEVS image before published minima and acquistion of required visual references without the aid of BEVS below 100 feet HAT.

b.  One instrument approach and acquisition of the BEVS image before published minima and failure of the BEVS below published minima requiring a missed approach above 100 feet HAT.

 

7.3    SIC’s should be checked on PNF duties during BEVS approaches and emergencies.

 

 

8    BEVS RECURRENT TRAINING AND CHECKING REQUIREMENTS

 

8.1            Selected BEVS related ground training subjects as outlined in Paragraph 5 above should be reviewed on a recurrent basis.

 

8.2            At least annually, in conjunction with a pilot-in command proficiency check required by FAR Part 61 or FAR Part 135, a PIC must demonstrate proficiency using the BEVS by satisfactorily performing the maneuvers listed under paragraph 7.2.

 

8.3            At least annually, second-in-command pilots should be evaluated on crew resource management [CRM] responsibilities and procedures as the pilot-not-flying [PNF] when the pilot-flying [PF] is conducting BEVS operations.

 

 

9    BEVS CURRENCY REQUIREMENTS

 

PIC’s should have completed at least one night takeoff, approach, and landing using the BEVS in the Global Express/5000 or have completed at least one takeoff, approach, and landing as the pilot flying (PF) using the BEVS in a Level C simulator with day and night visual displays, or Level D simulator, within the previous 90 days before acting as the PF using the BEVS in revenue operations.  The BEVS currency requirement may be credited toward the Thales HUD currency requirements (See Appendix 6).

 

 

NOTE 1 :  Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 14 Section 91.175 (c) states that a pilot may continue an approach below the authorized MDA or continue the approach below the authorized DH if subparagraphs (1), (2), and (3) are met. Subparagraph (1) states, in pertinent part, “The aircraft is continuously in a position from which a descent to a landing on the intended runway can be made….”. Subparagraph (2) states, in pertinent part, “The flight visibility is not less than the visibility prescribed in the standard instrument approach procedures being used”. Subparagraph (3) states, in pertinent part, “...at least one of the following visual references for the intended runway is distinctly visible and identifiable to the pilot...”. All three subparagraphs: (1), (2), and (3) must be met. BEVS is certified to allow the pilot to use BEVS imagery to see the visual references required by subparagraph (3). It is not certified or authorized and cannot be used to satisfy the flight visibility requirements of subparagraph (2). The pilot must determine flight visibility without the use of EVS imagery.

 

NOTE 2:    These EVS requirements assume that a pilot entering an BEVS training program is trained and proficient in the use of the Thales HUD. If a pilot is not trained and proficient in the use of the Thales HUD, the HUD training, identified in Appendix 6 of this report, may be accomplished concurrently with the provisions of these BEVS training requirements.

 

 

APPENDIX 8 - Operator Differences Requirements – BD-700-1A10 (GLOBAL EXPRESS XRS) TO BD-700-1A10 (GLOBAL 6000), BD-700-1A11 (GLOBAL 5000) TO BD-700-1A-11 (GLOBAL 5000) TO BD-700-1A11 (GLOBAL 5000 GVFD)

 

1. Background –

 

1.1 The Global Express Flight Standardization Board (FSB) participated in an evaluation of the training, checking, and currency differences that have occurred by the introduction of the Global Vision Flight Deck (GVFD).  Additionally, the FSB was tasked to determine the appropriate type rating for the BD-700-1A10 Global Vision Flight Deck known as the “Global 6000”.  

 

1.2 For clarification the FSB evaluation involved the following:

·              The differences between the BD-700-1A10 “Global Express XRS” aircraft and the BD-700-1A10 Global Vision Flight Deck known as the “Global 6000”.

·              The differences between the BD-700-1A11 “Global 5000” aircraft and the BD-700-1A11 Vision Flight Deck also known as the “Global 5000 GVFD”.

·              The initial Pilot Type Rating of the Global 6000/Global 5000 GVFD.

 

2.  Pilot Type Rating

The FSB determined that the same aircraft type rating designation “BBD-700” is appropriate between the existing Global Express XRS/5000 and the Global 6000/Global 5000 GVFD variants.  Differences training to be accomplished through ground school and the use of a Level 5 certified FTD. 

 

3.  Based on the existing Bombardier BD-700-1A10 & BD-700-1A11 and with respect to the evaluation described in paragraph 1.2 above, the FSB has determined the minimum training, checking, and currency acceptable to the FAA for pilot qualification regarding differences in the table below.

 

3.1 Master Differences Requirement (MDR) Table:

License

Endorsement

BD700

FROM AIRPLANE

1A101

(XRS)

1A111

(5000)

1A10

(6000GVFD)

1A11

(5000GVFD)

T

O

A

I

R

P

L

A

N

E

1A101

(XRS)

-----

A/A/A

C/C/C

C/C/C

1A111

(5000)

A/A/A

-----

C/C/C

C/C/C

1A10

(6000GVFD)

C/C/C

C/C/C

----

A/A/A

1A11

(5000GVFD)

C/C/C

C/C/C

A/A/A

-----

 

1 Up to batch 2+ aircraft only. Batch 3 will be included once an evaluation has been completed.

3.   Due to the flight crew differences the FSB recommends special emphasis ground training and checking in the following areas:    

·              Flight deck display layout (AFD/DU) and functionality.

·              Control panels – CTP, ACP, RTSA, CNS, MKP and CCP.

·              Emergency Descent Button (EDM) and functionality.

·              Under speed protection.

·              Nav to Nav transfer, GPS/WAAS/LPV/RNP/PBN, and instrument approach procedures.

·              DC power failure modes with emphasis on loss of all DC electrical power.

·              AFCS modes, A/P AEO in all phases of flight including OEI in all phases of flight including OEI go-around, PFD, FDA and FMA indications.

·              A/P response during windshear escape guidance.

·              TAWS and EGPWS.

·              Use of EVS & SVS for situational awareness only.

·              Caution and warning messages on the EICAS and HIS, and associated human factors issues.

·              Use of Flight Management System (FMS) including take-off preparation and Electrical Management System.

·              Crew Resource Management (CRM) with regards to the new functionalities.

 

4.  Line Operating Experience (LOE). 

After completion of the differences training referred to in paragraph 2, it is recommended that the LOE training be completed as soon as possible with a line check airman to consolidate training.  It is further recommended that a minimum of two flights be flown, 1 as the pilot flying and 1 as the pilot not flying.  Normal line indoctrination requirements apply following the initial pilot type rating course.

 

 5.  Flight Crew Currency.

           When operating both the Global Express XRS/Global 5000 and Global 6000/5000 GVFD,

the FSB recommends that flight crews:     

·              Comply with the currency requirements of  the FAR Subpart

·              Perform at least one flight as PF or PNF in the “Global Express XRS or Global 5000” variant and at least one flight in the” Global 6000 or Global 5000 GVFD” within the currency period (90 days).

 

            This currency requirement between variants should address the following differences:

·              Takeoff preparation and takeoff

·              Enroute use of the FMS

·              Instrument approach procedures

 

 

  6. Recurrent Training & Checking.

When operating more than one variant, recurrent training and proficiency checking should be alternated between the Global Express XRS/Global 5000 and Global 6000/Global 5000 GVFD, addressing the differences of all applicable variants on each occasion.