U.S. Department of Transportation

Federal Aviation Administration

Washington, D.C.

 

Flight Standardization Board (FSB) Report

 

 

Revision: 1

 

Date: 06/12/2013

 

 

 

Hawker Beechcraft Corporation BE-200

 

 

Restricted Category Models:

(200T, 200CT, A200CT, B200T, B200CT, B200C, B200)

 

Commuter Category STC Models:

(200, 200C, 200T, 200CT, A200, A200C, A200CT, B200, B200C, B200T, B200CT, B200GT, B200CGT)

 

 

 

Johnathon Vetter, Chairman

Flight Standardization Board

 

 

Federal Aviation Administration

Kansas City Aircraft Evaluation Group

MKC-AEG, ACE-211

901 Locust Street #332

Kansas City, MO 64104

 

 

 

 

Telephone:

(816) 329-3233

FAX:

(816) 329-3241

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECORD OF REVISIONS

 

 

Revision

Sections

Pages

Date

Chairman

(0) Original

All

All

01/10/1986

Argil L. Axford

Revision 1

All

All

06/12/2013

Johnathon Vetter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Highlights of Changes:

 

Revision Original

Restricted Category airplanes over 12,500 pounds established as separate BE-200 pilot type rating.

 

Revision 1 Changes

Report Format Change, original issuance of composite report.

Commuter Category Model 200 airplanes by HALO 250 STC established as same pilot type rating “BE-200”

Publish Appendix 1, MDR Table

Publish Appendix 2, Acceptable ODR Table for Commuter Category STC Model 200s

Publish Appendix 5 to list Military Model Designations applicable for BE-200 Type Rating.

Publish Appendix 6 to list Restricted Category Model 200s applicable for BE-200 Type Rating.

 

CONTENTS

 

 

SECTION                                                                                                                           PAGE

 

        RECORD OF REVISIONS................................................................................................ 2

 

        CONTENTS ...................................................................................................................... 3

 

1.         PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY................................................................................... 4

       

2.         PILOT TYPE RATING DETERMINATION...................................................................... 5

       

3.         MASTER REQUIREMENTS............................................................................................. 7

       

4.         OPERATOR DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS TABLES................................................. 9

       

5.         FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRAINING...................................................................... 10

       

6.         FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CHECKING.................................................................... 14

       

7.         FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CURRENCY................................................................... 16

       

8.         AIRCRAFT REGULATORY COMPLIANCE................................................................. 18

       

9.         FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRAINING DEVICES AND SIMULATORS................. 19

       

10.     APPLICATION OF FSB REPORT.................................................................................. 20

       

11.     ALTERNATE MEANS OF COMPLIANCE.................................................................... 20

       

 

 

APPENDIX 1.    MASTER DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS (MDR) TABLE

 

APPENDIX 2.    OPERATOR DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS (ODR) TABLES

 

APPENDIX 3.    SAMPLE TRAINING PROGRAM FOOTPRINT (NVG Training)

 

APPENDIX 4.    AIRCRAFT COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST (RESERVED)

 

APPENDIX 5.    MILITARY EQUIVALENT MODEL DESIGNATIONS

 

APPENDIX 6.    RESTRICTED CATEGORY TYPE RATED MODELS

 

1.  PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY

 

1.1  Purpose

 

This FSB report specifies master training, checking, and currency requirements applicable to flight crewmembers operating Hawker Beechcraft Corporation (HBC) BE-200 type rated airplanes.  This report provides guidance to operators under 14 CFR Part 91 & 135, FAA Principal Inspectors, Part 142 Training Centers, Part 141 Approved Schools and other training providers.

 

The BE-200 Flight Standardization Board (FSB) Report addresses training, checking, and currency requirements for pilots operating the BE-200 type rated aircraft.  The FSB evaluates operating characteristics and techniques to propose training, checking and currency requirements applicable to the BE-200 type rated aircraft.  The objectives of this FSB are:

·        Determination of Pilot Type Rating.

·        Identify training, checking and currency requirements.

·        Establish Master Common Requirements.

·        Establish Master Difference Requirements.

·        Provide sample Differences Tables.

·        Review AFM and Checklist procedures for operational suitability.

·        Describe acceptable training program and training device characteristics.

·        Provide determination of regulatory compliance status

 

1.2 Applicability

 

In accordance with existing 14 CFRs, the provisions of this report apply to all operations of a BE-200 type rated airplanes identified as applicable models on the cover of this report and listed on TCDS A24CE.  This report is also applicable to all training and checking conducted in the aircraft, as well as the currency and experience provisions.

 

The guidelines in this report determine minimum requirements for approval by FAA applicable to: Operations Aviation Safety Inspectors, Principal Operations Inspectors (POIs), Training Center Program Managers (TCPMs), Aircrew Program Managers (APMs), 14 CFR Part 135 Air Carrier Check Airmen and Instructors, Airline Transport Pilots instructing in air transportation service, Certificated Flight Instructors, Aircrew Program Designees, and Training Center Evaluators.

 

Determinations made in this report are based on the evaluations of specific BE-200 type rated aircraft equipped in a given configuration and in accordance with regulations and guidance current at that time.  Modifications and upgrades made to the models described herein, or introduction of new related aircraft, may require amendment of the findings in this report. The FSB reserves responsibility/authority to re-evaluate and modify sections of this report based on new or revised Advisory Circular material or CFR, aircraft operating experience, or the testing of new or modified aircraft under the provisions of AC 120-53A and/or the Common Procedures Document for conducting Operational Evaluation Boards, 10 June, 2004.

 

The provisions of this Flight Standardization Board (FSB) report are effective until amended, superseded, or withdrawn by subsequent revisions to this report

 

2.  PILOT "TYPE RATING" REQUIREMENTS

 

2.1 Pilot Type Rating Background

 

This report assigns the “BE-200” pilot type rating to the Hawker Beechcraft Corporation Model 200 series from TCDS A24CE for those airplanes certified to operate greater than 12,500 pounds MGTW.  The Board utilized pertinent CFRs and the evaluation process outlined in Advisory Circular AC 120-53 and the Common Procedures Document for Conducting Operational Evaluation Boards (JAA, TCCA, FAA) dated 10 June 2004.  For the purpose of design and operating characteristics the BE-200 type rating designation is a Restricted Category above 12,500 pounds or Commuter Category, Multiengine, Turbo-Propeller, Land aircraft certificated for One Pilot Flight Crewmember.

 

2.1.1 Model 200 Restricted Category

 

The BE-200 Flight Standardization Board convened to evaluate the Beechcraft Model 200 Restricted Category airplane, December 11 & 12, 1985 in Wichita, KS.  The Model 200 Restricted Category airplanes over 12,500 pounds were evaluated to determine if they could be included as a Common Pilot Type Rating with the Beechcraft Model 300 pilot type rating or if a new separate pilot type rating would be required.  Training and operation objectives for these two model airplanes were considered.

 

The Model 200T, S/N BB1223, was evaluated against Model 300, S/N FA54.  Both airplanes were loaded with ballast to gross takeoff weight of 14,000 lbs.  14 CFR 61, Appendix A maneuvers were performed.  AFM Supplement Limitations vary for each Restricted Category airplane due to the special purpose for which it is certificated as well as varying weights.  Restricted Category weights vary from 14,000 pounds up to 16,000 pounds.  Special purpose attachments placed on the fuselage can affect flight controls and flight characteristics.

 

Each Restricted Category airplane has different performance capabilities and limitations.  These different configurations can have significant effect on performance.  Model 200T and 200CT represents an example of significant performance detriment in Restricted Category Model 200s.  Restricted Category Model 200 configurations can be very sluggish and sensitive to airspeed deterioration when flaps and gear are down with substantial power application necessary to maintain or correct airspeed.  Restricted Category airplanes have significantly reduced performance on takeoff with an engine failure at increased gross weights.  Some Restricted Category AFM Limitations restrict sink rate for landing touchdown because of increased gross weight.  Restricted Category Model 200 limitation and performance characteristics are significantly different for some configurations when compared to the Model 300.  Designation as a common pilot type rating with the BE-1900/BE-300 is not recommended.

 

The BE-200 Flight Standardization Board recommends a separate Pilot Type Rating Designation for the Restricted Category Model 200s designated as the “BE-200”.  The “BE-200” pilot type rating designation is established for all Restricted Category Model 200s certificated with a maximum takeoff weight greater than 12,500 pounds.

 

No specific general training or differences are recommended for Restricted Category Model 200s.  Training must encompass the specific special purpose configurations designated by the applicable AFM Supplement with no defined credit between Restricted Category Model 200s.

 

2.1.2 Model 200 Commuter Category STC

 

The Commuter Category STC Model 200 is based on Hawker Beechcraft Model 200 airplanes designated as any Model 200 on the A24CE Type Certificate Data Sheet.  The Commuter Category STC Model 200 aircraft is a complex, high performance, turboprop aircraft powered by 2 P&W PT6A-41, -42, -52, -61 engines with 850 shp.

 

The BE-200 Flight Standardization Board convened in Waco, TX. The aircraft used for FSB evaluation was a Model B200, s/n BB-1278.  Airline Transport Pilot and Aircraft Type Rating Practical Test Standards for Airplane were utilized for evaluation.  Commuter Category STC Model 200s differ from Normal Category Model 200s by maximum takeoff weight of 13,420 lbs but limited to 9 or less passengers, commuter category performance and requisite design changes to meet commuter category certification standards.  Maximum landing weight is unchanged at 12,500 lbs. which establishes the maximum takeoff weight due to 25% of total fuel capacity for certification purposes.  System changes include Takeoff Trim Warning, Over-Speed Warning, Engine Fire Extinguisher, Stall Warning Ice Mode, Emergency Cabin Lighting and Escape Path Markings to meet commuter category requirements.  Various Flight Instrument Systems remain the same as certificated in the Normal Category Model 200s but with Flight Hazard Assessment (FHA) to a more stringent design assurance level for Commuter Category.  Majority of the Certification Basis for the Commuter Category STC Model 200 is Amendment 23-57 with a few determinations to original certification basis where approved.  The primary differences for the Commuter Category STC Model 200 from the Normal Category Model 200 are dictated by handling procedure changes resulting from commuter category performance requirements.  This new commuter category performance and procedures along with additional safety related equipment substantially improve the operating safety margins for the Commuter Category STC Model 200 airplanes.

 

The BE-200 Flight Standardization Board recommends the Commuter Category STC Model 200s be designated the same “BE-200” pilot type rating as the Restricted Category Model 200s.  No differences credit for training, checking and currency is recommended between the Restricted Category Model 200s and the Commuter Category STC Model 200s.  Training, checking and currency for Restricted Category airplanes must encompass the specific special purpose configurations designated by the applicable AFM Supplement therefore no credit is available for Commuter Category intended mission profile.  The Model 200 FSB maintains the recommendation for the same pilot type rating between Restricted Category and Commuter Category because although Restricted Category airplanes vary widely in performance capabilities and limitations, in cases where Restricted Category airplanes are certified to ICAO Annex 8 the performance and handling will be nearly identical.  The Commuter Category STC Model 200s were not evaluated in comparison to the Model 300 Series airplanes.  No training, checking or currency credit for Model 300 Series is recommended for Restricted Category Model 200s or Commuter Category STC Model 200s training credit.

 

2.2 Pilot Type Rating Determination

 

In accordance with 14 CFR Parts 1 and 61, the pilot type rating for Restricted Category Model 200s is designated as “BE-200”.  The “BE-200” pilot type rating is applicable only to Restricted Category airplanes certified above 12,500 lbs. per TCDS NOTE 10.  Eligible models are limited to 200T, B200T, 200CT, A200CT, B200CT, B200C, B200 with Restricted Category certification and documentation of certified MGTOW greater than 12,500 lbs because not all Restricted Category Mode 200s are certified greater than 12,500 lbs requiring this Pilot Type Rating.

 

The pilot type rating for Commuter Category STC Model 200s is designated as “BE-200” on October 15, 2012.  All maneuvers required by the Airline Transport Pilot and Aircraft Type Rating Practical Test Standards are applicable.  Airmen who successfully complete a practical test in a Restricted Category Model 200 or a Commuter Category Model 200 receive a “BE-200” pilot type rating on their pilot certificate.  The BE-200 type rated aircraft have minimum crew determinations for 1 pilot operation. 

 

2.3 “Second-In Command Required” Limitation Pilot Type Rating

 

In accordance with the provisions of 14 CFR 61.43(b)(3), FAA Order 8900.1 and AC 120-53A, a pilot type rating with a “Second-in-Command Required” Limitation is assigned to the BE-200 pilot type rating whenever a pilot practical test is completed utilizing a 2 pilot flight crew.  This assignment of limitation is based on practical test demonstrated ability for the flight crew utilized regardless of whether the airplane’s minimum required certificated flight crew is 1 pilot or 2 pilots.

 

2.3.1 Removing SIC Limitation

 

Removing a “Second-in-Command Required” limitation issued in accordance with provisions of 14 CFR 61.43(b)(3), FAA Order 8900.1 and AC 120-53A may be accomplished with a partial practical test in accordance with FAA Order 8900.1, Vol.5, Chp.2, Sec.19 or the Designated Pilot Examiners Handbook.

 

2.4 Second-In-Command Pilot Type Rating

 

The Second-In-Command Pilot Type Rating (BE-200 SIC PRIVILEGES ONLY) may be issued in accordance with 14 CFR Part 61.55.  In addition to training in accordance with 61.55, the items identified in paragraph 5.2.5 Seat Dependant Task Training must be performed and 5.2.3 Flight Crew Emergency Training must be accomplished for all SIC qualifications in the BE-200.

 

3.  MASTER REQUIREMENTS

 

3.1      Common Requirements

 

3.1.1.   Autopilot Engage Altitudes.  The BE-200 has been evaluated for autopilot suitability for engagement at or above the altitude specified in respective AFMs during takeoff.  There are various autopilots approved for the BE-200 and all do not have the same autopilot engagement altitudes.  For the 14 CFR 135.93 operators, authorization for autopilot engagement during takeoff is as designated in accordance with the AFM limitations or 14 CFR 135.93, whichever is higher.

 

3.1.2.   Minimum Altitude for Autopilot Use/Non-Precision Approaches.  The BE-200 has been evaluated for autopilot suitability for continued use during non-precision approaches to an altitude of not less than 50 ft. below the applicable DA(H)/MDA(H) unless it is coupled to an ILS glideslope and localizer.  For ILS approaches the minimum altitude for autopilot use is designated in accordance with the AFM limitations or 14 CFR 135.93, whichever is higher.

 

3.1.3    Landing Minima Categories (97.3).  The BE-200 is considered Category B aircraft for the purposes of determining straight-in landing weather minima (Flaps Landing) and Category C (Flaps Approach until landing assured) for normal circling minima unless otherwise required by 14 CFR or Operations Specifications for actual approach speeds used.

 

3.1.4  Normal "Final Landing Flap Setting".  The normal "final landing flap setting" per 14 CFR 91.126(c) is “Flaps Landing” for all BE-200s. 

 

3.1.4.1  Straight-in-Instrument Approach Flap Settings.  For ICAO Annex 8 compliant Restricted Category 200s and Commuter Category 200s normal straight-in-instrument approaches are flown with landing configuration selected at the final approach fix.  "Flaps Approach" is used only for One Engine Inoperative Approach and Landing until landing assured.  For Restricted Category airplanes that are not ICAO Annex 8 compliant and Normal Category airplanes, normal straight-in-instrument approaches are flown with Flaps Approach until landing is assured due to lack of Approach Climb Gradient data.  Use of constant angle decent non-precision approaches is recommended.

 

3.1.4.2  Circling Approach Flap Settings.  Normal circling approaches are flown “Flaps Approach” from the FAF until landing assured.

 

3.1.5  Normal “Takeoff Flap Setting” is either “Flaps Up” or “Flaps Approach” with respective performance data.

 

3.1.6  “No Flap” Approach & Landing is not waived.  Training and Checking is required.

 

3.1.7  Special/Unique Requirements.  No aircraft “Specific Flight Characteristics” are specified for the Model 200 but Restricted Category Model 200s require specific training for special purpose configurations.  Flight Characteristics may vary between Categories for various power to weight ratios and specific performance requirements. For Takeoff and Engine Failure Tasks should be evaluated respective various category flight characteristics.

 

3.1.7.1  Required Special Emphasis.  Special emphasis for training, checking and currency is common to all Model 200s for the following areas:

·        Training in High Altitude Operation is required per 14 CFR 61.31.

·        Knowledge of specific aircraft performance is essential to safe operation due to various performance capabilities for Model 200 airplanes with the BE-200 pilot type rating designation.

·        Knowledge of specific aircraft avionics is essential to safe operation due to the variety of avionics suites available in the Model 200s.

 

3.2      Master Difference Requirements (MDR)

Master Difference Requirements (MDRs) for related aircraft of the BE-200 are shown in Appendix 1.  These provisions apply when differences between related aircraft exist which affect crew knowledge, skills, or abilities related to flight safety (e.g., Level A or greater differences).

 

Footnotes to MDR requirements may define additional optional differences within a specific model designation or define acceptable "required means" or "alternate means" of compliance.  A footnote can indicate requirements that are less restrictive than the basic designation, or more restrictive than the basic designation, depending on the significance of the differences between related aircraft.

 

4.  ACCEPTABLE "OPERATOR DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS" (ODR) TABLES

 

4.1  ODR Tables

ODR tables are used to show an operator's compliance method. ODR tables for operators conducting mixed fleet operations, using the BE-200 are shown in Appendix 2.  The ODR tables represent an acceptable means to comply with MDR provisions based on those differences and compliance methods shown.  The tables do not necessarily represent the only acceptable means of compliance for operators with airplanes having other differences, where compliance methods (e.g., devices, simulators, etc.) are different. For operators flying the BE-200 the ODR tables in Appendix 2 have been found acceptable, and therefore, may be approved by a POI for a particular operator.  The three types of ODR Tables are Design, System and Maneuver Differences Tables.  Design differences account for equipment model changes.  System differences account for specific system level changes.  Maneuver differences account for changes in operating procedures of changed equipment.

 

4.2  Operator Preparation of ODR Tables

Operators flying a “mixed fleet” of BE-200 aircraft must have approved ODR tables pertinent to their fleet or complete Initial Training, Checking and Currency in each separate Model 200 in their fleet.

 

4.3  ODR Table Coordination

Unless identical or equivalent ODR tables have been previously approved by the FAA, new ODR tables proposed by operators should be coordinated with the FSB prior to FAA approval and implementation. FSB coordination ensures consistent treatment of related BE-300 aircraft between various operators, and compatibility of each ODR table with MDR provisions

 

4.4  ODR Table Distribution

Original FAA approved ODR tables are to be retained by the operator.  Copies of FAA approved ODR tables are to be retained by the Certificate Holding District Office (CHDO) and should be provided to the BE-200 FSB Chairman at the applicable AEG

 

5.  FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRAINING

 

5.1 General

 

5.1.1  Assumptions Regarding Airmen’s Previous Experience.  The provisions of this Section apply to programs for airmen who have experience in multi-engine turboprop aircraft including various avionics suites and navigation experience. For airmen not having this experience, additional requirements may be appropriate as determined by the POI, FSB, and/or AFS-200.

 

5.1.2  Training for Seat Dependent Tasks.  Accomplishment of certain tasks, procedures, or maneuvers requires training of a crewmember for a particular crew position when other than single pilot operation(e.g. captain, first officer, check airman, etc.). Training programs should recognize and address the necessary seat/position related tasks for the applicable crewmember. Accordingly, training programs should address seat dependent tasks or maneuvers to the extent necessary to satisfy crew qualification objectives and should be in accordance with ODR tables when applicable.

 

5.1.3  Second-In-Command Training Tasks.  Flight Crews qualify to serve as SIC must accomplish certain tasks, procedures or maneuvers for the SIC crew position.  Training programs should address all training elements of the 14 CFR 61.55 and/or 14 CFR 135.345 in accordance with FAA Order 8900.1.  SIC Pilot Type Rating may be issued in accordance with the 14 CFR 61.55(d) or (e) provided training required by the 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1, including tasks stipulated by this report, are completed.

 

5.1.4  Future Air Navigation Systems (FANS)/RNP/ANP/CNS/CPDLC/ADS.  Flight Crews operating aircraft equipped with FANS software should receive appropriate instruction in its general operational functions, appropriate uses for areas of operation, routes, or procedures to be flown. General training should address communications, navigation, and surveillance (CNS) functions covered by FANS, RNP, and ANP. In addition, sufficient training in use of data link communication and Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) to ensure adequate knowledge, skill, and proficiency for flight crews to operate the above system(s) in typical daily operations (requiring their use) should be provided.

 

5.2  Pilots Initial, Transition and Upgrade Training

 

5.2.1  Pilots Initial, Transition and Upgrade Ground Training,  Initial, Transition, or Upgrade ground training for the BE-200 is accomplished as specified by 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1.  Initial, Transition or Upgrade program hour allowance is available between Normal and Commuter Category airplanes for reduced hours based on current crew qualification in the same model aircraft of a different category.  Initial, Transition or Upgrade Training program hours is not addressed for Restricted Category airplanes due to special purpose operation and procedures.  Training program hours may be reduced as specified in 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1.  Reduced Initial Ground Training program hours may be applicable for pilots qualified and current in a Model 200 airplane of another Category where Differences are not available.

 

5.2.2  Pilots Initial, Transition and Upgrade Flight Training.  Initial, transition, or upgrade flight training for the BE-200 is accomplished as specified by 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1.  Initial, Transition or Upgrade Flight Training must be completed in Model 200 of the Category for which qualification is being sought.  Initial, Transition or Upgrade program hour allowance is available between Normal and Commuter Category airplanes for reduced hours based on current crew qualification in the same model aircraft of a different category.  Initial, Transition or Upgrade Training program hours is not addressed for Restricted Category airplanes due to special purpose operation and procedures.  Training program hours may be reduced as specified in 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1.  Reduced Initial Flight Training program hours may be applicable for pilots qualified and current in a Model 200 airplane of another Category where Differences are not available.

 

5.2.3  Crewmember Emergency Training.  Crewmember emergency training should be conducted for the BE-200 in accordance with 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1 The objective of emergency training for the BE-200 aircraft is to provide crewmembers with the necessary knowledge concerning emergency equipment, situations, and procedures, to ensure implementation of the correct actions in the event of an emergency.

 

Emergency training consists of instruction on the location, function, and operation of emergency equipment in each related aircraft of the BE-200.  Where emergency equipment is common, instruction may be adjusted for crewmembers qualified and current on this equipment, provided records are available which demonstrate that crewmembers meet 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1 requirements.  For example, if the fire extinguishers are common to fire extinguishers on other aircraft in the operator's fleet, training may credited for all applicable aircraft.  Conversely, for equipment that is unique to the BE-200, training on the emergency equipment for each related aircraft is required.

 

Emergency training also consists of instruction in crewmember emergency assignments and procedures including crew coordination and communication, the handling of emergency or other unusual situations, and emergency performance and observation drills specific to BE-200 aircraft.  Commuter Category airplanes complied with Evacuation Demonstration requirements at the time of certification.  Crewmembers must be trained in procedures similar to those used for certification compliance for Commuter Category.

 

In accordance with the 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1, emergency training requirements refer to two types of training: "general" emergency training and "aircraft-specific" emergency training.  General emergency training is instruction on those emergency items that are common to the BE-200 and all aircraft in the operator's fleet, e.g., instruction on fire extinguishers and firefighting procedures, if common to all aircraft.  Aircraft-specific emergency training is training on those items that are specific to the BE-200 aircraft.  An example of aircraft-specific emergency training is instruction on the location of emergency equipment.

 

As part of an approved training program, an operator may use many methods when conducting aircraft-specific emergency training, including classroom instruction, pictures, videotape, ground training devices, computer-based instruction, and static aircraft training.

 

There are no specified training program hours for Crewmember Emergency Training.  A chart addressed in 8900.1 provides "national norms" for the approval of the general emergency training program hours.  The complexity of the different related aircraft of the BE-200 and the complexity of the type of operation to be conducted should be considered when approving the BE-200 aircraft-specific emergency training.

 

5.2.4  Areas of Special Emphasis.  The following areas of emphasis should be addressed during ground and flight training:

a)     Aircraft performance calculations and the differences in certification rules for Normal, Restricted and Commuter Category performance.  Actual versus Net climb gradients for TERPS and obstacles.

 

b)    Primary Flight Instrument format and function for mechanical, electronic and PFD displays.

 

d)    EFIS function and procedures should be emphasized throughout training.  Special significance should be placed on Display Processor Unit (DPU) failures and EFIS Reversionary Switching.  Use of Composite Mode should be trained to conduct Precision and Non-Precision Approaches, with and without the Flight Director.

 

5.2.5  Training for Seat Dependent Tasks.  Seat-dependent-task training is common for all Model 200s.  Accomplishment of certain tasks, procedures, or maneuvers require training of a crewmember for a particular crew position (i.e. captain, first officer, check airman, etc.).  Training programs should recognize and address the necessary seat/position related tasks for the applicable crewmember.  Seat Dependent Task training requirements are common between Normal and Commuter Category airplanes.  Restricted Category Seat Dependent Task Training is determined by special purpose operating requirements.  Accordingly, training programs should address seat dependent tasks to the extent necessary to satisfy crew qualification objectives, and per ODR tables when applicable.

 

Procedures which could have Seat Dependent Elements when operating with 2 pilot crew (as determined by each operator and/or POI).  These may include the following:

a)   Cockpit Preflight

b)   Rejected Takeoff

c)   Engine Fire and Failure During Takeoff after V1

d)   Abnormal Procedures for One-Engine-Inoperative and Landing

e)   Manual Gear Extension

 

5.2.6  Second-In-Command Crew Training.  Second-in-command training qualification is common between Normal and Commuter Category airplanes.  Restricted Category SIC Training is determined by special purpose operating requirements.  SIC Pilot Type Rating may only be issued for SIC familiarization training given in a Restricted or Commuter Category Model 200.  SIC crew training is accomplished as specified in 14 CFR 61.55 and/or 14 CFR 135.345.  Training programs should address tasks stipulated in FSB Specifications for Training; Areas of Emphasis, Training for Seat Dependent Tasks and SIC Crew Training are accomplished.

 

5.3  Differences Training

 

5.3.1  General.  Unless Initial or Transition Training is completed for each related aircraft, Differences Training is necessary for each related aircraft or type, as provided in MDR and ODR tables (14 CFR 135.347).  Differences Training Credit is not available for any training resulting in the issuance of a BE-200 Type Rating by 14 CFR 61.157.  Differences Training is not applicable to 14 CFR Part 61 or Part 142 FAA Approved Training.  Differences Training is available between Normal, Commuter  and Restricted Category airplanes as specified in the MDR and ODR tables.  Some allowance for Differences Training still required separate checking to account for different Flight Characteristics of the various Category Model 200s.  Differences affecting Restricted Category Model 200s is more restrictive due to special purpose configurations, intended mission profile and varied specific flight characteristics related to performance.  These ODR tables may not include all items applicable to particular aircraft operators.

a)   A Differences Training Program prerequisite is that a trainee has completed initial, upgrade, or transition training in one related aircraft and will receive differences training for the other related aircraft.

b)   When a Differences Training Program involves related aircraft having the same Pilot Type Rating, coverage of differences may be completed either coincident with each phase of an initial, upgrade, or transition training course, or following completion of that training course. The differences training must be consistent with the provisions of the approved applicable MDR/ODR Tables.

 

5.3.2  Differences Ground Training.  Differences Ground Training is available only with FAA approved training programs to maintain integrity of required training topics due to Model 200 Categories that do not require approved training.  Differences Ground Training is required on the topics applicable to the pertinent related aircraft and is shown by applicable ODR tables  Reduced Initial Ground Training program hours may be applicable for pilots qualified and current in a Model 200 airplane of another Category where Differences are not available.

 

5.3.3  Differences Flight Training.  Differences Flight Training is available only with FAA Approved Training programs to maintain integrity of required training due to Model 200 Categories that do not require approved training.  Difference Flight Training is required in the topics and maneuvers applicable to the pertinent related aircraft that is shown by applicable ODR tables.  Reduced Initial Flight Training program hours may be applicable for pilots qualified and current un a Model 200 airplane of another Category where Differences are not available.

 

5.4  Recurrent Training:

 

5.4.1  Recurrent Ground Training. Courses must include appropriate training in accordance with 14 CFR 135.351 for each related BE-200 aircraft as specified by MDR and ODR tables for differences training.  Recurrent Ground Training is creditable between Normal and Commuter Category airplanes provided Differences Currency Items are trained in addition to Base Airplane Recurrent.

 

5.4.2  Recurrent Flight Training. Courses require appropriate maneuvers and procedures in accordance with 14 CFR 135.351, FAA Order 8900.1 or as otherwise described in this report.  Maneuvers and procedures must account for differences between each related BE-200 aircraft operated.  Recurrent Flight Training is creditable between Normal and Commuter Category airplanes provided Differences Currency Items are trained in addition to Base Airplane Recurrent.  The ODR table(s) must identify the differences.

 

5.4.3  Recurrent training consideration for Mixed Fleet Flying Operations.  Recurrent Training and/or Checking requirements to comply with 14 CFR 135.351 & 293 12 month currency may be alternated between Normal Category and Commuter Category at 24 months currency cycle for Mixed Fleet Operation.  This common currency is granted based on same model designation and similarity for Normal and Commuter Category.

 

5.4.4  Recurrent Training Program Hours may be reduced as specified in 14 CFR 135.325 or FAA Order 8900.1.

 

5.5  Operating Experience:

 

5.5.1  Initial Operating Experience and Supervised Line Flying are in accordance with existing 14 CFRs for assigned flight crew position in the BE-200.  Operating Experience may be credited between Normal and Commuter Category aircraft.  Operating Experience for Restricted Category airplanes is Category specific due to special purpose operation.

 

For the purpose of obtaining operating experience or receiving a line check, the Pilot-in-Command of the BE-200 aircraft must occupy the left pilot seat due to orientation of equipment controls.

 

5.5.2  Supervised Operating Experience(SOE).  SOE required for a PIC Type Rating in accordance with the 14 CFR pilot certification must be accomplished from the left pilot seat.  SOE required by pilot certification should include one complete operating cycle for each 2 hours of SOE.  One complete operating cycle includes Start, Taxi, Takeoff, Approach, Landing, Shutdown procedures.

 

5.6  Other Training:

 

5.6.1  LOFT Programs.  When operators have LOFT programs and related BE-200 aircraft, POIs should review LOFT credits to assure suitability for each BE-200 aircraft.

 

5.6.2  Instrument Approaches. Only CAT I approaches are permitted by certification.

 

Note: Operators should assure that flight crews are familiar with appropriate use of the FCU and FMS, including mode selection, for the types of instrument approaches to be flown.  Use of RNAV/GPS FCU navigation modes in lieu of or in conjunction with NDB, VOR, localizer, or back course localizer procedures must be trained as appropriate. This training is also appropriate for aircraft that do not have certain navigation system sensors, such as ADF, installed.

 

5.6.3  Aircraft Dispatchers. Initial and transition training should be conducted in accordance with 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1.

 

 

6.  FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CHECKING

 

6.1  Checking  (14 CFR 135.293)

The Commuter and Restricted Category Model 200s are a separate “type of aircraft” from the Normal Category BE-200s as described in 14 CFR 135.293(b) however alternating Recurrent Pilot Checking with Normal Category Model 200s is authorized.  Completion of 135.293 12 month checking is credited to both Normal Category Model 200s and Commuter or Restricted Category Model 200s when Normal Category Model 200 from the applicable Commuter or Restricted Category Model 200 are Level B or less provided they are alternated so the pilot maintains a check in each “type of aircraft” within the previous 24 months.  Commuter and Restricted Category Model 200s are not part of the Beechcraft Turbopropeller Airplane Family specified in FAA Order 8900.1, Vol 3, Chp.19, Sec.1 because the pilot type rating separates them from the “group of airplanes determined by the Administrator”.  Currency applies to the BE-200 Pilot Type Rating for compliance with 14 CFR 135.293 as authorized by this report for Mixed Fleet Operation.  Satisfactory completion of a proficiency check may be substituted for recurrent flight training as permitted in 14 CFR 135.351.

 

All checking must include evaluation of the subjects and maneuvers listed in the Master Requirements, Areas of Special Emphasis, of this report and the following subject areas, if equipped:

 

A pilot being checked for the addition of a type rating or PIC proficiency check must occupy the left pilot seat due to an inability to access all equipment controls from the right seat.

 

6.1.1  Checking Items.  Pertinent knowledge, procedures, and maneuvers specified by 14 CFR 61, FAA Practical Test Standards (PTS), 14 CFR 61.157; 135.293, 297, & 299, and 14 CFR 121, Appendix F, pertinent to multi-engine turboprop aircraft apply.

 

6.1.2  Specific Flight Characteristics.  No Specific Flight Characteristics maneuvers are applicable to the Normal or Commuter Category Model 200.   Restricted Category airplanes may have Specific Flight Characteristics applicable based on special purpose operation, procedures and performance characteristics.  An applicant for the BE-200 Pilot Type Rating must demonstrate knowledge of the various performance characteristics and handling applicable to Normal, Commuter and Restricted Category airplanes of the Model 200.

 

6.1.3  Areas of Special Emphasis Checking.  The following areas should be addressed during checks:

a)   Aircraft Performance calculation and aircraft handling to achieve performance.

b)   Demonstration of FMS navigation (departures, arrivals, approaches) proficiency.

c)   Selection and use of EFIS displays, raw data, flight director, and Reversion/Composite modes, including DPU failure when applicable.

d)   Proficient use of Autopilot and flight automation to support single pilot operation.

e)   Knowledge of Normal, Commuter and Restricted Categories of airplanes related to the BE-200 Pilot Type Rating applicability and requirements.

 

6.1.4   No Flap  Landings. Demonstration of a  No Flap  approach and landing during a check is appropriate.  In accordance with Order 8900.1, when the flight test is conducted in the airplane in actual flight, a touchdown from a no flap is not required.  However, the performance and handling of the Model 200 is such that it is acceptable to conduct No Flap Landings to a full stop.

 

6.1.5  Checking Engine Failure on TakeoffFAA Order 8900.1 (Vol 5, Ch 3, Sec 2) paragraph 5-830(C) for Flight Test Events identifies how to conduct an Engine Failure on Takeoff for a multiengine type rating flight test.  For airplanes with a published V1, Vr, V2 the engine failure shall be introduced at a speed after takeoff decision speed (V1) and before takeoff safety speed (V2), and appropriate to the airplane and prevailing conditions.  For airplanes that have no V1, Vr, V2 published the Engine Failure on Takeoff is introduced at a speed and altitude that is appropriate for the airplane.  This means the Engine Failure on Takeoff checking event is different for Normal Category or Restricted Category Model 200s without V1, Vr, V2 published versus Commuter Category or Restricted Category (ICAO Annex 8) Model 200s with V1, Vr, V2 published.

 

6.2  Type Ratings

 

6.2.1  Oral Examinations.  Oral examinations for the BE-200 may be completed at the end of the academic phase of training.  Oral test items need only address the model for which the test is being conducted when qualification is sought on only the one variant being tested.  Oral examination must include evaluation of applicant to ensure correct understanding of the various models and categories of airplanes applicable to the BE-200 pilot type rating.

 

6.2.2  Practical Tests.  Practical tests may follow standard provisions of 14 CFR 61. The satisfactory completion of a practical type rating evaluation in a Commuter Category or Restricted Category above 12,500 lbs Model 200 will meet the requirement for the BE-200 type rating.  In order to operate a another category or related aircraft, crewmembers operating under 14 CFR Part 135 are required to satisfactorily comply with the requirements of the MDR and ODR tables in Appendices 1 and 2. The same requirement should be followed by flight crewmembers operating under 14 CFR Parts 91.

 

6.2.3  Application For and Issuance Of Type Ratings.  .  Airmen completing pertinent 14 CFR 61 requirements in either a Commuter Category or Restricted Category BE-200 in accordance with FSB requirements described in this report, may apply to the FAA for the BE-200 type rating endorsement. Upon completion of required tests, and submission of an application (FAA Form 8710-1), authorized FAA inspectors or designees may issue the necessary pilot certificate with type rating.

 

6.3  Proficiency Checks  (14 CFR 135.297 & 61.58)

 

6.3.1  General.  Proficiency Checks are administered as designated in 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1.  These checks must be administered by an authorized check airman, Designated Examiner or FAA Aviation Safety Inspector.  A proficiency check for type rated Commuter or Restricted Category Model 200 is specific for the BE-200 Pilot Type Rated airplanes unless otherwise specified in this report for Mixed Fleet Flying.  14 CFR 61.58 is not applicable for type rated single pilot turbo-propeller airplanes and therefore a BE-200 Proficiency Check may not be used to alternate 24 month checking as PIC per 14 CFR 61.58(a)(2).

 

6.3.2  Instrument Proficiency Checks for Mixed Fleet Flying.  Instrument Proficiency Checks (IPC) for Mixed Fleet Flying of Commuter or Restricted Category Model 200s to comply with 14 CFR 135.297 is in accordance with 135.297 IPC rotation requirements.  A Normal Category Model 200 IPC may be credited toward Commuter or Restricted Category Model 200 IPC requirements or visa versa provided the MDR Differences for training, checking and currency of the Normal Category Model 200 from the applicable Commuter or Restricted Category Model 200 are Level B or less.  When MDR Differences of the Normal Category Model 200 from the applicable Commuter or Restricted Category Model 200 are greater than Level B, the type rated Commuter or Restricted Category Model 200 must be considered a separate type of aircraft for the purpose of IPC rotation requirements.

 

6.4  Instructors, Check Airman and Examiners

For the purpose of checking, FAA Aviation Safety Inspectors, Designated Pilot Examiners, Training Center Evaluators and Check Airmen must be PIC qualified in the BE-200 Type Rated airplanes.  Examiners and Check Airmen should have 100 hours PIC in the BE-200 and maintain currency in accordance with this report to provide checking in the aircraft.

 

7.  FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CURRENCY

 

Currency requirements (14 CFR 61.55, 61.56, 61.57, and 135.247) for the BE-200 require Model 200 experience in accordance with applicable 14 CFRs.  Normal, Commuter and Restricted Category Model 200 aircraft are the same category, class and considered the same type for the purpose of currency even though the Normal Category Model 200 is not Pilot Type Rated based on same model designation and similarity for Normal and Commuter Category.  Commuter and Restricted Category Model 200s are not part of the Beechcraft Turbopropeller Airplane Family specified in FAA Order 8900.1, Vol 3, Chp.19, Sec.1.

 

7.1  Recent Flight Experience (14 CFR 61.57).  All Model 200 experience is considered common experience for 14 CFR 61.57 compliance based on category, class and as specified in this report.  Recency of experience should include operation/programming of the Navigation and Flight Guidance System for departure and arrival.

 

7.1.1  Take Off and Landing Common Credit.  All Model 200 landing currency is common between the Normal, Commuter and Restricted Category airplanes.  Model 200s have the same Maximum Landing Weight with various Takeoff Weights and performance characteristics between categories.  Takeoffs and landings performed in one Model 200 airplane may be granted equivalent credit to those performed in the other Model 200 airplanes.  Takeoff and Landing currency obtained in the a Commuter or Restricted Category Model 200 may be credited toward “Beechcraft Turbopropeller Airplane Family” currency for Normal Category Model 200s.  “Beechcraft Turbopropeller Airplane Family” Takeoff and Landing currency does not count for the BE-200 type rated airplanes.  Only those Takeoffs and Landings specific to Normal Category Model 200 may be counted for common currency with Commuter or Restricted Category 200s.

 

7.1.2  Instrument Currency:  Instrument experience to satisfy 14 CFR 61.57(c) or (d) is not BE-200 exclusive provided BE-200 Recent Flight Experience requirements are maintained.

 

7.2  Flight Review (14 CFR 61.56)  A Flight Review completed in any Model 200 demonstrates privileges of a pilot certificate for Airplane Multi-Engine Land.

 

7.3  Currency for Mixed Fleet Flying Operations.  Mixed Fleet Flying of Normal, Commuter and Restricted Category Model 200s is common currency or differences as specified MDR/ODR tables or other sections of this report.

 

7.4  Methods to Reestablish Currency.

Re-establishing currency for the BE-200 is in accordance with existing 14 CFRs and FAA guidance for Recent Flight Experience and/or Requalification.

 

7.4.1  When MDR/ODR specifies Level B Currency, currency is maintained by operating the variant aircraft within the previous 180 days.  Currency may be reestablished by a review of Placards, Limitations and Operating Procedures prior to operating the variant airplane.

 

7.4.2  When MDR/ODR specifies Level C Currency, currency is maintained by operating the variant aircraft through a complete flight cycle including an instrument approach procedure within the previous 90 days.  Currency may be reestablished by operating the variant with a qualified PIC for at least one flight segment, completing a Line Check with a Line Check Airman, completing a Proficiency Check in the variant aircraft or compliance with 14 CFR 61.57(c) or (d) recent flight experience requirements in the variant airplane.

 

7.4.3  When MDR/ODR specifies Level D Currency, currency is maintained by operating the variant aircraft through 3 complete flight cycles (takeoff, departure, arrival, approach and landing) within the previous 90 days.  Currency may be reestablished by completing a Line Check with a Line Check Airman, completion on a Proficiency Check in the variant aircraft or compliance with 14 CFR 61.57(c) or (d) recent flight experience requirements in the variant airplane.

 

8.  AIRCRAFT REGULATORY COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST

 

8.1  Compliance Checklist (Appendix 4, Reserved).

 

Compliance checklists are provided as an aid to FAA Certificate Holding District Offices (CHDO) in identifying those specific rules or policies for which compliance has already been demonstrated to the FAA for aircraft having a particular aircraft type certificate. The checklist also notes rules or policies not demonstrated to the FSB, which must be demonstrated to CHDOs by operators.

 

8.2  Discussion of Specific Compliance Checklist Items

 

8.2.1  Emergency Evacuation Demonstration.  (14 CFR 135.331(3)(iii)).  The Commuter Category STC BE-200 has successfully been demonstrated under 14 CFR 23.803 for passenger seating configuration capacity up to 9 passengers.  The Commuter Category STC BE-200 is limited to 9 or less passengers by type design approval.  Accordingly, an additional full scale evacuation is not necessary for aircraft configurations consistent with previously approved tests.  Passenger capacity less than or equal to the demonstrated capacity may be authorized.  Evacuation Demonstration procedures and passenger information used for the test should be used by operators unless another full scale evacuation is conducted to validate alternative procedures. Centex Document PBC 006-0000 is the acceptable Passenger Safety Information and Briefing Card used for Evacuation Demonstration.

 

8.2.2  Ditching Demonstration and compliance with 25.801 has not been demonstrated.  Operators must comply with 135.331(3)(iii).

 

8.2.3  Forward Observer Seat  Available forward passenger seats were evaluated and found suitable for conducting enroute inspections per 135.75(b).  The right front passenger seat has been demonstrated suitable with the standard passenger seat / seatbelt, passenger oxygen and a splitter cord for audio.  Audio jacks may be installed at the forward seat to provide for enroute inspection.

 

8.2.4  Proving Tests to satisfy 14 CFR 135.145 have not been conducted and should be conducted in accordance with FAA Order 8900.1.

 

8.2.5  Validation Tests to satisfy 14 CFR 135.145(d) may be given common credit for operation of Normal Category or Commuter Category BE-200 airplanes.  Similarity of airplane equipage must be considered for crew qualification.

 

8.2.6  Cockpit Checklist: Centex Pilot Checklist # 006-2-(NP, EP & AP) respectively are acceptable for compliance with 14 CFR 91.503(a)(2) for cockpit checklist procedures for Commuter Category airplanes with STC # SA11103SC.  If a Commuter Category STC airplane has other specific procedures applicable not covered in the Centex Pilot Checklist the operator must make those cockpit checklist procedures available in checklist form.  Restricted Category airplanes require their own specific cockpit checklist to comply with 14 CFR 91.503(a)(2).

 

8.2.7  Electronic Flight Bag

            Electronic Checklists (Proline 21 Only)

Printed Pilot Checklist remains required for compliance with 14 CFR 91.503, 135.83.  The Electronic Pilot Checklist does not contain all required procedures due to inability to function in all non-normal flight operation situations.  The Electronic Pilot Checklist is acceptable for use for those Normal Procedures it contains provided the aircraft operator ensures the Electronic Pilot Checklist procedures remain current for the aircraft.

 

            Electronic Charts

(Proline 21 Only)

Electronic Approach Charts (SIDS, STARS, Approach Charts & Airport Diagrams) are available through the IFIS-5000 File Server Unit.  Dual redundancy is not met due to single MFD Display, File Server Unit, and Cursor Control Panel.  Memory button selection on the Cursor Control Panel is required to allow single pilot action to change between Navigation Display, Electronic Checklist Display and Electronic Charts Display to mitigate single pilot workload using these functions.  The enhanced map overlays do not meet requirements for Enroute charts therefore another suitable source of Enroute Chart information must be available at the pilot station.

 

            (G1000 Only)

Electronic Approach Charts (SIDS, STARS, Approach Charts & Airport Diagrams) are available through the GDU-1500 MFD SD Card.  Dual redundancy is not met due to single MFD Display and SD Card.  Display does not meet criteria for full chart displayed equally viewable to paper being replaced however the zoom and pan feature allows a single pilot action to view the remainder of a chart when set to a readable size.  In addition, the chart display function has softkeys for Briefing, Plan, Profile & Minimums chart sections to be selected with single pilot action.

 

 

9.  FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR DEVICES AND SIMULATORS

 

9.1  Device and Simulator Characteristics.  Requests for device qualification for training should be made in accordance with FAA procedures.  Flight Training Device and Flight Simulator characteristics must comply with applicable 14 CFR Part 60.  Credit for training, checking and currency in an approved Flight Training Device (FTD) or Simulator is allowed in accordance with the Simulator Task Credit given in accordance with Airline Transport Pilot and Aircraft Type Rating Practical Test Standards or current guidance in FAA Order 8900.1, as applicable, except where this report is more restrictive.  The acceptability of differences between devices, simulators, and aircraft must be addressed by the POI.  Requests for device approval to be used for approved training should be made to the POI/TCPM.  The POI/TCPM may approve these devices for that operator if their characteristics clearly meet the established FAA criteria and have been qualified by the National Simulator Program (NSP).

 

FSTDs qualified for Training, Checking or Currency credit for BE-200 type rated airplane specific requirements must be appropriately evaluated and qualified to a Model 200 that represents a Commuter or ICAO Annex 8 compliant Restricted Category airplane.  Model 200 Commuter or ICAO Annex 8 compliant Restricted Category FSTD qualification for BE-200 type rated airplane specific requirements is necessary in order to maintain similarity of flight characteristics and operating procedures to the majority of BE-200 type rated airplane handling characteristics.  FAA Order 8900.1 (Vol 5, Ch 3, Sec 2) paragraph 5-830(C) for Flight Test Events identifies difference in conduct of an Engine Failure on Takeoff for a multiengine type rating flight test when V1, Vr, V2 are published therefore FSTDs should be modeled for these procedures and flight characteristics.  It is not acceptable to use a Normal Category Model 200 qualified FSTD and simply operate at a heavier weight to provide training, checking or currency for BE-200 type rated airplane specific requirements.

 

10.  APPLICATION OF FSB REPORT

 

All Commuter or Restricted Category BE-200 operations are subject to the provisions of this report.  This report becomes effective when given final approval by the FAA.  Training, checking and currency for the Type Rated BE-200 aircraft must be conducted in accordance with all provisions of this report.  All FAA Approved Training Programs must incorporate the latest FAA Approved AFM Procedures, AFM compliant checklist, manufacturer’s recommendations for training maneuvers and all provisions of this report.

 

11.  ALTERNATE MEANS OF COMPLIANCE

 

11.1  Approval Level and Approval Criteria.  Alternate means of compliance to the requirements of this report must be approved by the FSB. If alternate compliance is sought, operators must show that the proposed alternate means provides an equivalent level of safety to the provisions of AC 120-53 and this FSB report.  Analysis, demonstrations, proof of concept testing, differences documentation or other evidence may be required.

 

11.2  Equivalent Safety.  Significant restrictions may apply in the event alternate compliance is sought, and the reporting requirements may be increased to ensure equivalent safety.  FAA will generally not consider relief through alternate compliance unless sufficient lead-time has been planned by an operator to allow for any necessary testing and evaluation.

 

11.3  Interim Programs.  In the event of clearly unforeseen circumstances in which it is not possible for an operator to comply with provisions of this report, the operator may seek an interim program approval rather than a permanent alternate compliance method.  Financial arrangements, scheduling adjustments and other such reasons are not considered “unforeseen circumstances” for the purposes of this provision. Interim program approvals must be approved by the FSB Chairman.

 

 

APPENDIX 1 - AIRCRAFT MDR TABLES

MASTER DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS TABLE

 

 

FROM Aircraft (Base Aircraft)

 

 

 

 

200

Series

(Normal)

*

200

Series

(Commuter)

**

200

Series

(Restricted)

 

 

 

 

T

O

 

A

i

r

c

r

a

f

t

 

 

200

Series

(Normal)

B/A/B (1)(2)(3) (4)(5)

B/A/B (1)(2) (3)(4)(5)

B/C/B (1)(2) (3)(4)(5)

 

 

 

*

200

Series

(Commuter)

D/D/D (1)(2) (3)(4)(5)

B/A/B (1)(2)(3) (4)(5)

D/D/D (1)(2)(3) (4)(5)(6)

 

 

 

**

200

Series

(Restricted)

D/D/D (1)(2) (3)(4)(5)

D/D/D (1)(2)(3) (4)(5)(6)

Not Determined (1)(2)(3) (4)(5)(6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTES

* Pilot Type Rating BE-200

** Pilot Type Rating BE-200 for only those Restricted Category airplanes certified above 12,500 lbs. per TCDS NOTE 10.  Eligible models are limited to 200T, B200T, 200CT, A200CT, B200CT, B200C, B200 with Restricted Category certification and documentation of MGTOW greater than 12,500 lbs because not all Restricted Category airplanes are certified above 12,500 lbs requiring this Pilot Type Rating.

 

(1) Primary Flight Instruments may include mechanical, electro-mechanical, Collins EFIS-74A & EFIS 85 (3, 4 or 5 tube), Sperry EDZ 600/800 (3 or 5 tube), Bendix EFS-10 (3 or 4 tube). Differences in primary flight instruments from mechanical and electro-mechanical (servo) to EFIS or between EFIS systems installations is C/B/C.  Differences in primary flight instruments from EFIS to mechanical and electro-mechanical (servo) or between mechanical and electro-mechanical (servo) is B/B/B.

 

(2) Installation of Proline 21 on aircraft equipment listed in NOTE (1) is D/C/C.

 

(3) For Collins Proline 21 equipped aircraft, the installation of IFIS-5000 FSU is C/B/C.

 

(4) Installation of Collins IDS-3000 ON EFIS 85 aircraft is D/C/C.

 

(5) Installation of GARMIN G1000 is D/C/D.

 

(6) Restricted Category differences may be less than designated based on similarity of special purpose equipage.  ICAO Annex 8 compliant Restricted Category differences may be less than designated for Normal Category based on similarity of special purpose equipage.

 

 

APPENDIX 2 - ACCEPTABLE ODR TABLES

 

Operator Differences Requirements

 

Definitions used in the ODR Tables:

X             = Flight Manual/Pilot’s Operating Handbook and/or FM Supplement

AI           = Aided Instruction

CBT        = Computer Based Training

ICBT       = Interactive Computer Based Training

FTD        = Flight Training Device (Level 1 to 7)

FBS         = Fixed Base Simulator (Level 5 to 7)

FFS         = Full Flight Simulator (Level A, B, C, D)

 

 

 

ACCEPTABLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

  DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: HBC Model 200 Commuter Category

 

  BASE AIRCRAFT: HBC Model 200 Normal Category

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

DESIGN

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

General Airplane Configuration

Change from Normal to Commuter Category

Remain Single Pilot operation

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

 

Weights

MGTOW 13,420 lbs

Ramp Weight 13,510lbs.

Landing Weight 12,500 lbs, no change

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

 

Limitations

See AFM Supplement

Limit 9 or less Pax

NO

YES

X

 

 

 

A

B

Placards and Markings

New illuminated exit signs

New Escape Path Lighting

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

 

Servicing

Some Inspection Interval Changes

No other changes

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

B

 

Engines

Limited to PT6A-41, 42, 52, 61 Engines only

NO

NO

 

AI

 

 

A

B

 

Flight Deck

Takeoff Trim Warning System

Overspeed Warning System

Stall Warning Ice Mode

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

B

C

Instrument Panel Layout

New Stall Speed Ice Mode schedule

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

B

C

 

Cabin

Emergency Lighting System installed with own battery system

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

A

B

Flight Controls

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aerodynamic Controls

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACCEPTABLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

  DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: HBC Model 200 Commuter Category

 

  BASE AIRCRAFT: HBC Model 200 Normal Category

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

MANEUVER

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

Preflight

First Flight Check – Emergency Lighting System

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

Engine Start

Each Flight Check – Takeoff Trim Warning

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

B

C

Taxi

Before TO

Stall Warning Ice Mode annunciator check

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

B

C

Takeoff

Add V1, Vr Procedure, Rotate 6-7 degrees pitch initially

YES

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

C

RTO

Or

V1 Fail

V1, Vr, V2 speeds for WAT Limit

Accel/Stop – Accel/Go required

Approach Climb Gradient for Landing required for Takeoff

NO

YES

 

 

 

FFS

D

D

Climb

Cruise

Decent

DeIce Boot activation at first indication

Stall Warning Ice Mode speed procedures

Minimum speed in Icing not 145 kts

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

C

Instrument Approaches

Approach Climb Gradient for landing

Balked Climb Gradient for landing

YES

YES

 

 

 

FFS

D

D

Landing

Vref speed used for landing

Approach configuration for landing

NO

YES

 

 

 

FFS

D

D

Shutdown

Emergency Cabin Lighting System switch

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

Normal Procedures

Changes in AFMS

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

C

Abnormal Procedures

Changes in AFMS

NO

YES

 

 

 

FFS

D

D

Emergency Procedures

Emergency Speeds change

Engine Failure Procedures

Evacuation Procedures and Lighting

Engine Fire Extinguisher Procedure

Changes in AFMS

NO

YES

 

 

 

FFS

D

D

In-Flight Maneuvers

Flight in Icing Procedures

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACCEPTABLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

  DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: HBC Model 200 Commuter Category

 

  BASE AIRCRAFT: HBC Model 200 Normal Category

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

SYSTEM

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

21

Air Conditioning

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22

Auto-Flight

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23

Communications

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24

Electrical Power

Battery for Emergency Lighting System

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

25

Equipment / Furn.

Escape Path Lighting – electroluminescent

Emergency Exit Lighting – electroluminescent

 

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

26

Fire Protection

Engine Fire Extinguisher System required

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

27

Flight Controls

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

28

Fuel

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

29

Hydraulic

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30

Ice / Rain

Stall Warning Ice Mode speed schedule system

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

31

Indicating/Record

Takeoff Warning Trim system added

Stall Warning system new Ice mode

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

32

Landing Gear

Approved for Standard and High Flotation landing gear

All options for Brakes approved at new weight

NO

NO

 

AI

 

 

A

B

33

Lights

Emergency Lighting system added

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

34

Navigation

Overspeed Warning system added

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

35

Oxygen

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

36

Pneumatics

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

37

Vacuum

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

38

Waste / Water

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45

Maintenance Computer

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

46

Information Systems

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

52

Doors

9 or less Pax for only one Emergency Exit

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

B

53

Fuselage

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

54

Nacelles/Pylons

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

55

Horizontal & Vertical Stab.

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

56

Windows

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

57

Wings

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

61

Propellers

Both 3 & 4 Blade Propellers approved

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

B

72

Engine (turbine)

Limited to 850 shp engines only

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

B

73

Fuel Controls

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

74

Engine Ignitions

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

75

Engine Bleed Air

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

76

Engine Controls

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

77

Engine Indicating

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

78

Exhaust

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

79

Engine Oil

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

80

Engine Starting

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX 3 - AIRCRAFT SAMPLE TRAINING PROGRAM

 

AIRPLANE NVG TRAINING PROGRAM

 

Applicability:  STC # SA02264SE, BE-200, Kind of operation, Night VFR and/or IFR,

 

Intended function: Normal Operation; Takeoff & Landing, Flight Below 1000 per 91.119, and Below 500 per 91.119

 

Pilot qualification: The operational suitability of this training is applicable to add NVG qualification to already current and qualified BE-200 pilot.

 

Program Hours: 8900.1, Vol.4, Chp.7, Sec.4, paragraph 4-1128, B. addressed minimum program hours and content for FAA Approved Training Programs

 

NVG Operations: STC is for Single Pilot operation with Helmet mounted NVG,  For 2 pilot operations both pilots must utilize NVGs for NVG operations.

 

References: 14 CFR, FAA Order 8900.1, RTCA DO-268,  Concepts of Operation, NVIS for Civil Operators, RTCA DO-295,  Civil Operators’ Training Guidelines for Integrated NVIS Equipment, RTCA DO-275,  Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Integrated Night Vision Imaging System Equipment.

 

NVG Ground Training 61.31(k)(1) Endorsement from Authorized Instructor

 

1)                  NVG Flight Operation Requirements

a)      14 CFR 61.1(b)(13)  Night Vision Goggles (appliance)

b)      14 CFR 61.1(b)(14)  Night Vision Goggle Operation

i)                    1 hour after sunset to 1 hour before sunrise

ii)                   Visual surface reference using NVGs

iii)                 Aircraft approved for such an operation

c)      14 CFR 61.31(k) Training Required

d)      14 CFR 61.57 PIC Recent Flight Experience for NVG operation

i)                    Paragraph (f) NVG Recent Operating Experience.

(1)   Required experience varies by NVG intended function

(2)   Takeoff & Landing needs to be Category specific to be consistent with rest of 61.57 currency requirements

ii)                   Paragraph (g) NVG Proficiency Check

(1)   All task subjects and intended functions per 61.31(k)

(2)   By a qualified pilot per 61.57 or Part 135 (where applicable)

e)      61.195(k) NVG Authorized Flight Instructor

f)        91.119 minimum altitudes

g)      91.205(h) NVG Operation required equipment (7 items)

h)      FAA Order 8900.1, Vol.4, Chp.7, Sec.4, NVIS

i)                    Equipment

ii)                   procedures & training

iii)                 limitations

iv)                 operational authorization

i)                    Applicable STC, AFMS and approved intended functions

 

2)                  Aeromedical Subjects   (ref. DO-295, 4.1.1.4 & other applicable reference)

a)      Eye Physiology

b)      Types of Vision

c)      Common visual deficiencies, peripheral and blind spots

d)      Limitations of unaided night vision

e)      Factors and lighting affecting dark adaptation

f)        Adaptation and proper night vision viewing techniques

g)      Methods used to protect night vision

h)      Self-imposed stresses that affect night vision

i)        Distance estimation and depth perception cues

j)        Visual illusions

k)      Physiological effects of night vision devices

 

3)                  Operating Procedures

a)      PIC NVG Qualification (training, checking, currency)

b)      PIC Logging of NVG Flight Experience (time vs. operations)

c)      PIC Duty & Responsibility

d)      Recording NVIS discrepancies (aircraft & NVGs)

e)      Normal Operating Procedures (ref. DO-268, 4.5.1 & other applicable reference)

f)        Preflight (aircraft & NVGs)

g)      Maintaining VMC operation

h)      Emergency Procedures (inadvertent IMC)

 

4)                  NVGs (ref. DO-295, 4.1.1.2 & other applicable reference)

a)      Performance

i)                    NVG Classifications and TSO

ii)                   Characteristics & Capabilities

iii)                 Functional limitations

iv)                 NVG assembly (appliance)

v)                  NVG Components & Operating sequence

vi)                 Operational checks

vii)               NVG mount (helmet mount)

viii)              NVG Power

ix)                 NVG failure modes

x)                  General care and cleaning

 

b)      Interpretation of NVG display scene (ref. DO-268, 3.3 & other applicable ref.)

i)                    Visual Deficiencies

ii)                   NVG adjustments (optimum function)

iii)                 Actual Visual Surface Reference VS light source reference

 

5)                  NVG interpretation of terrain (visual surface reference) (ref DO-295, 4.1.1.3)

a)      Light sources

b)      Restrictions to visibility

c)      Visual recognition cues

d)      Terrain features

 

6)                  NVG Flight Planning

(ref. DO-295, 4.1.1.5 as applicable & DO-268, 4.5 as applicable & other applicable ref.)

a)      Authorized NVG Operations

b)      Weather

c)      Area of Operation

d)      Operating Environment & Conditions (ref. DO-268, 4.2 as applicable)

e)      Intended operational function (minimum altitude)

f)        Risk Management  (8083-21, Rotorcraft Flying Handbook, Chp.14)

i)                    Airport Ground Operation

ii)                   Takeoff

iii)                 Enroute

iv)                 Approach & Landing

v)                  Contingencies, Emergency & Abnormal

 

 

NVG Flight Training 61.31(k)(2) Endorsed from Authorized Flight Instructor

 

1)                  Flight Module 1 (NVG Technique & Maneuvering)

a)      Preflight Planning

b)      NVG Preflight

i)                    NVG Inspection

ii)                   NVG Adjustment & Focus

iii)                 NVG Operational Checks

iv)                 Aircraft NVG Preflight Inspection

v)                  Aircraft NVG Lighting & Filtration Check

c)      Preflight Procedures

i)                    Cockpit Familiarization (NVG mounted, stowed up & positioned for use)

ii)                   Normal Preflight, Before Start, Engine Start

iii)                 Use of aircraft lighting

iv)                 Taxi

v)                  Pre-Takeoff Checks (run-up)

d)      Takeoff & Departure

i)                    Rejected Takeoff

ii)                   Normal Takeoff

iii)                 Crosswind Takeoff

iv)                 Unlit Runway Takeoff

v)                  Area Departure

e)      Inflight Maneuvers

i)                    Light use (Interior & Exterior)

ii)                   Steep Turns

iii)                 Unusual Attitude Recovery

iv)                 Effects of ambient light

v)                  Altitude management & use of radar altimeter

vi)                 Multiple Transitions aided to unaided to aided

f)        Visual Ground Reference (1000 ft AGL and below)

i)                    Terrain & obstruction visual surface reference

ii)                   Distinguish obstructions & congested areas

iii)                 Altitude management (radar altimeter & visual reference)

iv)                 Estimating horizontal distances

v)                  Distinguish open water & sparse settled areas

vi)                 Distinguish person, vessel, vehicle, structure for below 500 ft AGL

vii)               Area arrival

g)      Emergency Procedures (NVG Failure Procedures)

i)                    Aircraft Emergencies  (Simulated Dual Engine Failure & Forced Lndg)

ii)                   Dual Tube NVG Failure

h)      Approach & Landing

i)                    Traffic Pattern & Visual approach

ii)                   Normal Landing

iii)                 Crosswind Landing

iv)                 Unlit Runway Landing

i)        Post Flight

i)                    Taxi

ii)                   Shutdown

2)                  Flight Module 2  (NVG Takeoff & Landing)

a)      Preflight Planning

b)      NVG Preflight

i)                    NVG Inspection

ii)                   NVG Adjustment & Focus

iii)                 NVG Operational Checks

iv)                 Aircraft NVG Preflight Inspection

v)                  Aircraft NVG Lighting & Filtration Check

c)      Preflight Procedures

i)                    Normal Preflight, Before Start, Engine Start (NVG mounted)

ii)                   Use of aircraft lighting

iii)                 Taxi

iv)                 Pre-Takeoff Checks (run-up)

d)      Takeoff & Departure

i)                    Use of aircraft lighting

ii)                   Rejected Takeoff

iii)                 Normal Takeoff

iv)                 Powerplant Failure on Takeoff

v)                  Crosswind Takeoff

vi)                 Short Field Takeoff

vii)               Soft Field Takeoff (if applicable to intended NVG operation)

viii)              Lit Runway Takeoff (minimal & maximum runway lighting)

ix)                 Unlit Runway Takeoff

e)      Navigation

i)                    NVG Techniques

ii)                   Terrain & obstruction visual surface reference

iii)                 Effects of Ambient Light

iv)                 Departure & Arrival

v)                  Traffic Pattern

f)        Approach & Landing

i)                    Use of aircraft lighting

ii)                   Visual Approach References (geometric perspective cues)

iii)                 Landing with Powerplant Failure

iv)                 Balked Landing

v)                  Crosswind Landing

vi)                 Short Field Landing

vii)               Soft Field Landing (if applicable to intended NVG operation)

viii)              Lit Runway Landing (minimal & maximum runway lighting)

ix)                 Unlit Runway Landing

g)      Emergency Procedures

i)                    Single & Dual tube NVG failure (various modes of flight)

ii)                   Inadvertent IMC recovery

h)      Post Flight

i)                    Taxi

ii)                   Shutdown

 

 

3)                  Flight Module 3  (Inadvertent IMC,  IFR transition, remaining items & Proficiency)

a)      Preflight Planning

b)      NVG Preflight

i)                    NVG Inspection

ii)                   NVG Adjustment & Focus

iii)                 NVG Operational Checks

iv)                 Aircraft NVG Preflight Inspection

v)                  Aircraft NVG Lighting & Filtration Check

c)      Preflight Procedures

i)                    Normal Preflight, Before Start, Engine Start (NVG mounted)

ii)                   Taxi

iii)                 Pre-Takeoff Checks (run-up)

d)      Takeoff & Departure

i)                    VMC Takeoff (NVG surface reference transitioning to instrument flight)

ii)                   Normal or Crosswind Takeoff

iii)                 Various available runway lighting conditions

e)      Instrument Procedures

i)                    Circling Approach (visual maneuvering to landing)

ii)                   IAP to Breakout to visual navigation

iii)                 Determine & maintain IAP visibility minimums

iv)                 Cruise Clearance to VFR (transition from instrument flight to aided flight)

f)        Landing

i)                    Runway Approach Lighting systems use

ii)                   Landing from Circling Approach

iii)                 Use of aircraft lighting

iv)                 Normal or Crosswind Landing

g)      Emergency Procedures

i)                    Inadvertent IMC recovery

ii)                   Maintaining VMC minimums

h)      Post Flight

i)                    Taxi

ii)                   Shutdown

 

NVG Proficiency Check 61.57(g) (ref.: 8900.1, Vol.3, Chp.19, Sec.7, Para. 3-1279, Table 3-71)

Entire Proficiency Check is completed using Normal NVG Procedures.

1)                  Preflight Planning

2)                  NVG Preflight

a)      NVG Inspection

b)      NVG Adjustment & Focus

c)      NVG Operational Checks

d)      Aircraft NVG Preflight Inspection

e)      Aircraft NVG Lighting & Filtration Check

3)                  Preflight Procedures

a)      Normal Preflight, Before Start, Engine Start (NVG mounted)

b)      Use of aircraft lighting

c)      Taxi

d)      Pre-Takeoff Checks (run-up)

4)                  Takeoff & Departure

a)      Lit Runway Takeoff

b)      Unlit Runway Takeoff

c)      VMC Takeoff (NVG surface reference transitioning to instrument flight)

d)      Short or Soft Field Takeoff

e)      Powerplant Failure on Takeoff

5)                  Inflight Maneuvers

a)      Steep Turns

b)      Unusual Attitude Recovery

c)      Terrain & obstruction visual surface reference

d)      Effects of Ambient Light

e)      Altitude management (radar altimeter use & visual reference)

f)        Transition aided to unaided

6)                  Instrument Procedures (if NVG operation includes IFR)

a)      Circling Approach (visual maneuvering to landing)

b)      IAP or Cruise Clearance to VFR operation (instrument flight to aided flight)

7)                  Landings

a)      Landing from Circling Approach (visual maneuvering to landing)

b)      Use of aircraft lighting

c)      Landing with Powerplant Failure

d)      Lit Runway Landing

e)      Unlit Runway Landing

f)        Short or Soft Field Landing

8)                  Emergency Procedures

a)      Aircraft System Malfunction

b)      NVG Failure

c)      Maintaining VMC visibility

d)      Inadvertent IMC recovery

9)                  Post Flight

a)      Taxi

b)      Shutdown

 

APPENDIX 4 - AIRCRAFT REGULATORY COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST

 

RESERVED

 

 

APPENDIX 5 – MILITARY EQUIVALENT MODEL DESIGNATIONS

 

The following Military Model Designations have Restricted Category certification over 12,500 lbs. by original type design and are therefore eligible for the BE-200 pilot type rating by qualified military crewmembers.

 

NOTE: Any Factory Model not identified as Restricted must be verified for eligibility by AFM Approved Maximum Takeoff Weight of greater than 12,500 lbs.(ref. FAA Order 8900.1, Figure 5-92)

 

Military Model Designation                   Factory Model & Serial Numbers

 

C-12D                                                 A200CT (Army & USAF)

                                                            BP-1, BP-19, BP-22, BP-24 thru BP-51

 

RC-12D                                               A200CT Restricted (Army)

                                                            GR-1 thru GR-13

                                                            (Army Tail #’s; 78-23141 thru 78-23145,

                                                            80-23371, 80-23373 thru 80-23378, 80-23542)

 

FWC-12D                                           A200CT Restricted

                                                            BP-7 thru BP-11

 

C-12F                                                  A200CT (Army)

                                                            BP-52 thru BP-63

 

C-12F                                                  B200C (USAF)

                                                            Approximately 40 BL-sn’s (BL-99 thru BL-104 are Restricted)

 

UC-12F                                               B200C (Navy)

                                                            BU-1 thru BU-10

 

RC-12F                                               B200C(T) Restricted, (Navy)

                                                            BU-11 & BU-12 with Supplement NAVAIR-RC12FFF-1

 

RC-12G                                               A200CT Restricted (Army)

                                                            FC-1, FC-2, FC-3, BP-21

                                                            (Army Tail #’s:

                                                            80-23372, 80-23379, 80-23380)

 

RC-12H                                               A200CT Restricted (Army)

                                                            GR-14 thru GR-19

                                                            (Army Tail 3’s: 83-24313 thru 83-24318)

 

UC-12M                                              B200C (Navy)

                                                            BV-1 thru BV-10

 

RC-12M                                              B200C(T) Restricted (Navy)

                                                            BV-11 & BV-12

C-12R                                                 B200C (Army) BW-1 & Up

(ARMSS)                                            (BW-1, BW-4, BW-5, BW-7, BW-8, BW-17, BW-18, BW-27, BW-28)

                                                            (some BW’s subsequently upgraded to C-12V)

 

C-12T                                                  A200CT (Army)(upgrade C-12F)

                                                            (subsequently converted to C-12U)

 

C-12U                                                 A200CT (Army)(upgrade C-12T) BP-46 thru BP-51,

                                                            BP-53 thru BP-59, BP-61, BP-71

                                                            B200C (Army)  BL-73 thru BL-76, BL-79 thru BL-98, BL-101, BL-102,

                                                            BL-104 thru BL-106, BL-108 thru BL-110, BL-112, BL-118 thru BL-123

 

C-12V                                                 B200C (Army)

                                                            BL-159, BL-160, BL-163 thru BL-165, BL-169

                                                            BW-2, BW-6, BW-9, BW-10 thru BW-16, BW-19,

                                                            BW-21 thru BW-24, BW-26, BW-29

 

Highlighter                                            A200CT (Army) GR-10 only

                                                            (need AFM proof of Tip Tanks or document Registration #N321P)

                                                            One Highlighter is A200 BC-28(N42S)and not eligible for BE-200 type rating

 

CEASAR                                             A200CT (Army) BP-30, (N40Y)

                                                            B200C, (Army) BL-67

 

FWC-II                                               B200CT

                                                            FG-1 & FG-2

 

RC-12K                                              A200CT Restricted (Army)

                                                            FE-1 thru FE-9

                                                            (Army Tail #’s: 85-0147 thru 85-0155)

                                                            Subsequently converted to C-12Ns

 

RC-12N                                              A200CT Restricted (Army)

                                                            FE-10 thru FE-24

                                                            (Army Tail #’s: 88-0325 thru 88-0327,

                                                            89-0267 thru 89-0276, 91-0516, 91-0517)

 

RC-12P                                               A200CT Restricted (Army)

                                                            FE-25 thru FE-31, FE-33, FE-35

                                                            (Army Tail #’s: 91-0518, 92-13120 thru 92-13125,

                                                            93-0698, 93-0700)

 

RC-12Q                                              A200CT Restricted (Army)

                                                            FE-32, FE-34, FE-36

                                                            (Army Tail #’s: 93-0697, 93-0699, 93-0701)

 

RC-12X                                               A200CT Restricted (Army)

                                                            (RC-12K, RC-12N, RC-12P, RC-12Q (FE s/n) upgraded to 890R EFIS)

 

The following Military Model Designations do not have a Restricted Category certification over 12,500 lbs. by original type design and are therefore ineligible for the BE-200 pilot type rating.

 

Military Model Designation                   Factory Model & Serial Numbers

 

C-12A                                                 A200, BC-1 thru BC-61 (Army)

                                                            A200, BD-1 thru BD-30 (USAF)

 

C-12C                                                 A200, BC-62 thru BC-75 (Army)

                                                            A200, BC-1 thru BC-61 (Army with Mod C-12-0076)

                                                            A200, BD-1 thru BD-30 (USAF with Mod C-12-0076)

 

C-12E                                                  A200, BD sn’s (USAF with PT6A-42 engines)

 

UC-12B, TC-12B, NC-12B                A200C, BJ-1 & Up

 

U-21J                                                  A100-1, (Army)

                                                            BB-3, BB-4 & BB-5

C-12L                                                  A200, (Army)(Former RU-21J, 3 Only)

 

YOGI A200                                         A200, (Army)

                                                            BC-7, BC-56

 

APPENDIX 6 – RESTRICTED CATEGORY TYPE RATED MODELS

 

The following Restricted Category Model Designations have certification over 12,500 lbs. by original type design and are therefore require the BE-200 pilot type rating by qualified crewmembers. (TCDS NOTE: 10)

 

Restricted Category Model Designation                        Factory Serial Numbers

 

200T                            Patrol                                       BT-1 thru BT-22 & BT-28

                                    Photo

                                    Flight Inspection

 

B200T                         Patrol                                       BB-1314, BT-23 thru BT-27, BT-29 thru BT-38

                                    Survey

                                    Flight Inspection

 

200CT                         Flight Inspection                       BN-1

 

B200CT                       Patrol                                       BN-2, BN-3, BN-4

                                    Survey

 

A200CT                      Survey                                      BP-?

 

B200                            Flight Inspection                       BB-1114, BB-1204, BB-1205, BB-1206, BB-1315

                                    Survey                                      BB-1434, BB-1436, BB-1441, BB-1443, BB-1733, BB-1744

 

B200C                         Survey                                      BL-65, BL-128, BL-130