U.S. Department of Transportation

Federal Aviation Administration

Washington, D.C.

 

Flight Standardization Board (FSB) Report

 

 

Revision: 4

Date: 06/24/2015

 

 

 

 

Beechcraft Corporation BE‑300

Models 300, 300LW, B300, B300C

 

Johnathon A Vetter

Chair, Flight Standardization Board

 

 

Federal Aviation Administration

Kansas City Aircraft Evaluation Group

DOT Building, Room 332

901 Locust Street

Kansas City, MO 64106-2641

 

 

 

Telephone:

(816) 329-3233

FAX:

(816) 329-3241

 

 

 

 

 


 

RECORD OF REVISIONS

 

Revision

Sections

Date

Chairman

300/1900

Original

01/25/1984

Argil L. Axford

300LW

Original

06/17/1988

Troy D. Sims

B300

Original

02/09/1990

Kenneth W. Davis

BE‑300, BE‑1900 Original

(1900, 300, 300LW, B300, 300FF)

Original Composite Report

11/21/1990

Kenneth W. Davis

BE‑300

Rev.1 (300,300LW,B300, B300C)

1 & 3

Separate 1900 from 300 type rating

03-23-1993

Douglas Edwards

B300 R1

1 & 4

03-23-1993

Douglas Edwards

300FF

Rev.1

Cancel separate

type rating

05-17-2002

Fred Beeman

BE‑300

Rev. 2 (300,300LW,B300, B300C,300FF)

ALL

08/02/2012

Johnathon Vetter

Rev.3

5, 6, App.3&5

12/17/2014

Johnathon Vetter

Rev.4

8.1.3, App.1 & 2

06/24/2015

Johnathon Vetter

 


 

HIGHLIGHTS OF CHANGE

 

Revision Original Changes

Model 300 added as BE‑300, BE‑1900 Pilot Type Rating January 25, 1984 with AFS Memo dated December 6, 1984.

Model 300LW independent report determines 300LW requires same training and type rating as Model 300.

Model B300 independent report determines B300 is same pilot type rating as 300 with B/B/B differences per AFS Memo dated February 15, 1990. Model 300 (FF serials) independent report determines 300(FF serials) are Separate Pilot Type Rating BE‑300F per AFS Memo dated May 24, 1990.

 

Revision 1 Changes (2 separate Revision 1 reports issued)

Separates BE‑300 Pilot Type Rating from BE‑1900 Type Rating reference AFS Memo dated November 6, 1991.

BE‑300 Report did not include 300(FF serials) because they were separate pilot type rating at the time.

Separate 300(FF serials) report revision 1 issued deleting BE‑300F pilot type rating as separate and make 300(FF serials) part of the Same Pilot Type Rating BE‑300 with C/D/D differences per AEG Memo dated May 21, 2002.

 

Revision 2 Changes

Consolidate all previous FSB Reports for Model 300 Type Rating airplanes into single report.

Add G1000 differences

Address Specific Compliance Items for section 8.0, Aircraft Regulatory Compliance Checklist.

 

Revision 3 Changes

Retitle report to Beechcraft Corporation

Add 5.2.4.1 special emphasis training for Night Vision Goggle Operation (NVGO)

Add 6.1.2 Specific Flight Characteristic for G1000 with GFC-700 Autopilot Electronic Stability & Protection.

Add Appendix 3, Suitable NVG Operation Training

Add Appendix 5, Military Equivalent Model Designations

 

Revision 4 Changes

Revise report to add Proline FUSION from Proline 21 Differences.

Update 8.1.3 to include Proline FUSION EFB functions.

Appendix 1 updated with NOTE for Proline FUSION EDS is C/C/C

Appendix 2 updated with ODR Table for Differences from Proline 21 to Proline FUSION EDS.

 

 

 

 


 

CONTENTS

 

 

SECTION                                                                                                                                                     PAGE

 

       RECORD OF REVISIONS ..........................................................................................................................2

 

       HIGHLIGHTS OF CHANGE ......................................................................................................................3

 

       CONTENTS .................................................................................................................................................4

 

1.       PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY ............................................................................................................5

 

2.       PILOT TYPE RATING DETERMNATION ...............................................................................................6

 

3.       MASTER REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................................................11

 

4.       DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS TABLES ............................................................................................12

 

5.       FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRAINING ...............................................................................................13

 

6.       FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CHECKING .............................................................................................17

 

7.       FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CURRENCY ............................................................................................19

 

8.       AIRCRAFT REGULATORY COMPLIANCE .........................................................................................20

 

9.       FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRAINING DEVICES AND SIMULATORS .........................................21

 

10.    APPLICATION OF FSB REPORT ...........................................................................................................21

 

11.    ALTERNATE MEANS OF COMPLIANCE ............................................................................................21

 

APPENDIX 1.   MASTER DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS (MDR) TABLE

 

APPENDIX 2.   SAMPLE DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS TABLES

 

APPENDIX 3.   SAMPLE ACCEPTABLE TRAINING PROGRAM (Reserved)

 

APPENDIX 4.   AIRCRAFT COMPLIANCE CHECKLISTS

 

APPENDIX 5    MILITARY EQUIVALENT MODEL DESIGNATIONS

 
 

 
1. PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY

 

1.1 Purpose

 

This FSB report specifies master training, checking, and currency requirements applicable to flight crewmembers operating Beechcraft Corporation BE‑300 type rated airplanes. This report provides guidance to operators under 14 CFR Parts 91 & 135, FAA Principal Inspectors, Part 142 Training Centers, Part 141 Approved Schools and other training providers.

 

The Model 300, 300LW, B300 & B300C Flight Standardization Board (FSB) Report addresses training, checking, and currency requirements for pilots operating the BE‑300 type rated aircraft. The FSB evaluates operating characteristics and techniques to propose training, checking and currency requirements applicable to the BE‑300 aircraft. The objectives of this FSB were to:

·       Determination of Pilot Type Rating.

·       Identify training, checking and currency requirements.

·       Establish Master Common Requirements.

·       Establish Master Difference Requirements.

·       Provide sample Differences Tables.

·       Review AFM and Checklist procedures for operational suitability.

·       Describe acceptable training program and training device characteristics.

·       Provide determination of regulatory compliance status.

 

1.2 Applicability

 

The provisions of this report apply to all operations of a BE‑300 airplane identified as Model 300, 300LW, B300 and B300C on TCDS A24CE. This report is also applicable to all training and checking conducted in the aircraft, as well as the currency and experience provisions.

 

The guidelines in this report determine minimum requirements for approval by FAA applicable to: Operations Aviation Safety Inspectors, Principal Operations Inspectors (POIs), Training Center Program Managers (TCPMs), Aircrew Program Managers (APMs), 14 CFR Part 135 Air Carrier Check Airmen and Instructors, Airline Transport Pilots instructing in air transportation service, Certificated Flight Instructors, Aircrew Program Designees, and Training Center Evaluators.

 

Determinations made in this report are based on the evaluations of specific BE‑300 type rated aircraft equipped in a given configuration and in accordance with current regulations and guidance. Modifications and upgrades made to the models described herein, or introduction of new related aircraft, may require amendment of the findings in this report. The FSB reserves responsibility/authority to re-evaluate and modify sections of this report based on new or revised regulations, Advisory Circular material, aircraft operating experience, or the testing of new or modified aircraft under the provisions of AC 120-53(x), Guidance for Conducting and use of Flight Standardization Board Evaluations and/or the Common Procedures Document for conduction Operational Evaluation Boards, 10 June, 2004.

 

The provisions of this Flight Standardization Board (FSB) report are effective until amended, superseded, or withdrawn by subsequent revisions to this report

 

2. PILOT TYPE RATING DETERMINATION

 

2.1 Pilot Type Rating Background Summary

 

This report assigns the “BE‑300” pilot type rating to the Hawker Beechcraft Corporation Model 300, 300LW, B300 and B300C from TCDS A24CE. The Board utilized pertinent regulations and the evaluation process outlined in Advisory Circular AC 120-53 and the Common Procedures Document for Conducting Operational Evaluation Boards (JAA, TCCA, FAA) dated 10 June 2004. For the purpose of design and operating characteristics the BE‑300 type rating designation is a SFAR 41(300 & 300LW) and Commuter Category (B300 & B300C), Multiengine, Turbo-Propeller, Land aircraft certificated for both One and/or Two Pilot Flight Crewmembers. (See Appendix 5 for Military Equivalent Model Designation)

 

2.1.1 Model 300

 

The Beechcraft Model 300 aircraft is a complex, high performance, turboprop aircraft powered by 2 P&W PT6A‑60, 1050 shp engines. Rudder Boost is required to be installed and operative; if inoperative, 180lb. pressure may be required for single engine operation. Autofeather is required to be armed and operative for takeoff, climb, approach and landing. The aircraft is certified for operations up to 35,000 feet but flight above 11,000 feet is prohibited without Yaw Damper operating. Maximum takeoff / landing weight is 14,000 pounds and maximum seating is 15, including crew.

 

The Model 300 was type certified under 14 CFR Part 23 and Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 41C.

 

The FSB convened January 10-13, 1984 in Wichita, KS to consider pilot training, checking, currency and pilot type rating requirements for the Model 300. The FSB evaluated the Model 300 in all maneuvers required by 14 CFR Part 61, Appendix A using aircraft serial number FA-1. The Model 300 was evaluated as a proposed Common Pilot Type Rating with the BE‑1900. The FSB evaluated the systems of the Model 300 and compared them with the Model 1900 systems. The Board concluded the systems on the two aircraft were basically the same regarding pilot actions. The exceptions were the power steering on the Model 1900 and the propeller pitch lights and rudder boost on the Model 300. Training was used to resolve these areas of difference. Some flight characteristics of the Model 300 associated with the shorter fuselage are not apparent in the Model 1900. However, most control and basic flight characteristics of the two airplanes are similar.

 

One area of concern identified by the board was Avionics/EFIS. Beech intended to use EFIS in the Model 300 airplane but changed certification to conventional instruments during the certification program. The evaluation airplane, FA-1, had conventional mechanical instruments but Beech intends production airplanes to have EFIS. The Board concluded a different pilot type rating would not be required based solely on Avionics/EFIS differences but that effective training was needed on the operation of Avionics/EFIS equipment.

 

The FSB concluded a pilot type rating was required by regulation for the Model 300. The FSB recommended the Model 300 be included with the Model 1900 pilot type rating. The FAA established a Pilot Type Rating BE‑300, BE‑1900 for the Model 300 and 1900 on the Pilot Certificate Aircraft Type Rating List December 6, 1984.

 

2.1.2 Model 300LW

 

The Model 300LW FSB was convened May 3, 1988 in Wichita, KS. The FSB was to evaluate the Model 300LW to determine if a pilot type rating specified by 14 CFR § 61.31(a)(4) would be required. The difference in the Model 300LW from the Model 300 described in section 2.1.1 of this report is the Model 300LW has a maximum takeoff / landing weight of 12,500 pounds, the airspeed limitations and indicator markings are changed reference the new weight and the LW designation is added to the Data Plate.

 

A Model 300 was used for the FSB evaluation because no Model 300LW had been completed or in production at the time. The manufacturer stated the Model 300 and Model 300LW were identical airplanes with the Model 300LW operating at a reduced weight. The Aircraft Type Rating Evaluation Matrix was used to evaluate differences. All systems, procedures and limitations remain the same between the two models.

 

The FSB concluded that a pilot type rating is required under the provisions of 14 CFR § 61.31(a)(4) for the Model 300LW. The Model 300LW requires the same proficiency and competency for safe operation as the existing Model 300. The existing Model 300 has a pilot type rating requirement and training/service history that indicates the level of proficiency required by the pilot type rating is essential for safe operation of both the Model 300 and Model 300LW. The Model 300LW FSB concluded the Model 300LW is the same pilot type rating as the Model 300 because the airplanes are identical in design and operation. The Model 300 has a same pilot type rating designation with the Model 1900, therefore the Model 300LW pilot type rating is designated as BE‑300, BE‑1900.

 

2.1.3 Model B300 / B300C

 

The Model B300 FSB convened on February 5, 1990 in Wichita, KS to evaluate the Model B300 to determine the Pilot Type Rating. The requesting proposal was to determine if the Model B300 should be part of the Same Pilot Type Rating for the Model 300 and 1900.

 

The Model B300 is a follow-on version to the Model 300 with increased gross weight and performance changes. The B300 has a 34 inch increase in cabin length, 14 inches ahead of the wing and 20 inches aft of the wing. Wingspan is increased by approximately 3 feet plus winglets adding 7 square feet of wing area. The B300 gross weight is increase to 15,000 pounds with 17 maximum occupants. The B300 is equipped with EFIS on the left side with optional EFIS for the right side. The Model B300C is identical to the B300 except the addition of a large top hinged Cargo Door in place of the bottom hinged passenger airstair door.

 

The B300 is certificated in the Commuter Category of Part 23 through amendment 34, 14 CFR Part 36-1, and SFAR 27 through amendment 27-4. Commuter Category certification affects minimum crew requirements for the B300 reference 91.531 (formerly 91.213). 2 pilots are required with passenger seating configurations of 10 or more.

 

The FSB concluded the differences between the Model 300 and B300 where not significant enough to warrant as separate type rating. The FSB recommended the Model B300 be given the same type rating as the Model 300 which at the time was the same pilot type rating as the Model 1900. Therefore the pilot type rating for the Model B300 is designated as BE‑300, BE‑1900.

 

2.1.4 Model 300 (FF serials) (BE‑300F)

 

The Model 300 (FF serials) is a Model 300 modified for use as a flight inspection aircraft and issued FF series serial numbers. The modification consists primarily of an electronic testing equipment installation. The major difference in type design is a large center console, installed in the 300 (FF serials) variant that houses some of this flight inspection equipment. The center console restricts either pilot from reaching required items on the opposite side of the cockpit. Because of this condition, the “Pedestal Equipment Location” was cited as the reason for the minimum crew determination of two pilots for all operations. A total of nineteen Model 300’s were built with FF series serial numbers. Eighteen of them remain in service.

 

Modifications to the Model 300 specific to the 300 (FF serials) include:

 

a)   Dual EFIS and dual autopilots.

b)   The pressurization controller has been moved to the rear of the center console.

c)   The FD and AP controls have been relocated to the glareshield.

d)   An auxiliary air conditioner to cool the flight test equipment. See supplement 13.

e)   Several switches have been relocated and additional mission buses have been installed.

f)    An APU that was originally installed in every 300 (FF serial), has been subsequently removed from all.

g)   Because of the extra flight test equipment, load shedding is different. For example, if a generator fails, the A/C will automatically shed, provided the gear is in the up position.

h)   Performance figures are more conservative than those of the Model 300. (to meet ICAO requirements)

i)    A battery temperature monitor, which is a requirement for the Nicad batteries, and a battery warning & caution lights.

j)    Center pedestal location resulting in minimum crew determination of 2 pilots. AFM Limitation, two pilots are required.

k)   Certified for CAT II operations with 2 pilot crew.

 

NOTE       The BE‑300 and the BE‑300F have identical flight characteristics. An evaluation conducted during engine cuts and single engine operations determined that although the rudder boosts are manufactured by King Avionics on the BE‑300F and Collins Avionics on the BE‑300, they operate the same. Documentation of this effort was recorded on March 11, 1987.

 

2.1.4.1 300FF Separate Type Rating (2 pilot airplane)

 

On April 25, 1990, the FSB recommended that the BE‑300 (FF serials) have a separate Type Rating to accommodate the 2 pilot minimum crew requirement different from existing BE‑300, BE‑1900 minimum crew of 1 pilot. AFS-800 issued a Memo dated May 24, 1990 that designated the BE‑300FF as a separate Type Rating rescinding the AFS-800 Memo issued April 4, 1990 that authorized operation of 300 (FF serials) with the same BE‑300, BE‑1900 pilot type rating without supporting FSB justification to do so. On June 12, 1990, the designation was changed to BE‑300F to accommodate 7 digit limit for pilot type rating designation.

 

2.1.4.2 300FF Same Type Rating Determination (2 pilot airplane)

 

Aviation System Standards (AVN), the sole operator of the BE‑300F, requested by letter dated December 9, 1999, that the FSB be reconvened to consider eliminating the BE‑300F as a separate Type Rating. This would allow AVN pilots to receive all of their aircraft training at Flight Safety International (FSI), including the Type Rating flight tests. Currently, FSI administers 85% of the aircraft training and testing in flight simulators. AVN then completes the remaining 15% in the BE‑300F aircraft. This action would streamline the training program by affording AVN the opportunity to concentrate primarily on variant, differences, and on the job training. On August 21, 2001, the FSB convened in Wichita, Kansas to consider making the BE‑300 and BE‑300F the same pilot type rating. Aircraft systems were among several items discussed to determine the level of differences between the BE‑300 and the BE‑300F.

 

FSB recommended as of May 21, 2002 the BE‑300F no longer be a separate Pilot Type Rating. It will share a same type rating with the BE‑300, and become a variant of the BE‑300. Upon satisfactory demonstration of his/her ability to pilot a BE‑300, in accordance with the Practical Test Standards, a pilot will be qualified to pilot the BE‑300F, without further testing. Differences and currency training is required as outlined in this report. Minimum crew determination for 2 pilots is unchanged by this same type rating determination.

 

The current holder of a BE‑300F type rating would be authorized to have the BE‑300 type rating added to his/her pilot certificate, without further testing. BE‑300 type ratings obtained by this method, would carry the limitation “second in command required,” until the pilot demonstrated single pilot competency, in accordance with the Practical Test Standards. The BE‑300F type rating designation should remain on the pilot certificate.

 

2.1.4.3 300FF Same Type Rating (1 pilot airplane) (STC # SA01267WI‑D)

 

Model 300 (FF serials) modified by installation of Rockwell Collins Proline 21 EFIS per STC # SA01267WI‑D, approved July 27, 2007, have a minimum crew determination of 1 pilot for STC type design. The FSB convened in Cedar Rapids, IA on July 25, 2007 to evaluate the differences for installation of Proline 21 EFIS in Model 300 (FF serials) previously equipped with Bendix King EFS-10. Model 300 (FF serials) modified by STC # SA01267WI‑D require 1 pilot with the “BE‑300” pilot type rating. Model 300 (FF serials) not modified by STC # SA01267WI‑D continue to require a minimum crew of 2 pilots.

 

2.2 Pilot Type Rating Determination

 

In accordance with 14 CFR Parts 1 and 61, the pilot type rating for the Model 300 (including FF serials), 300LW, B300, B300C is designated as “BE‑300”. All maneuvers required by the Airline Transport Pilot and Aircraft Type Rating Practical Test Standards are applicable. Airmen who successfully complete a practical examination in the Model 300, 300LW, B300, B300C receive a “BE‑300” pilot type rating on their pilot certificate. The BE‑300 type rated aircraft have minimum crew determinations for 1 pilot operations except for Model 300 (FF serials) unmodified by STC # SA01267WI‑D which have minimum crew determination for 2 pilots in all operations.

 

SUMMARY NOTE: The Model 300 pilot type rating was added as the same “BE‑1900” pilot type rating February 7, 1984. The pilot type rating was subsequently revised December 6, 1984 to a common pilot type rating “BE‑300, BE‑1900” for Models 300, 1900 & 1900C. The Model 300LW was included to the common pilot type rating “BE‑300, BE‑1900” on June 17, 1988. The Model B300 was added to the common pilot type rating “BE‑300, BE‑1900” on February 15, 1990. The Model B300C was included in the common pilot type rating “BE‑300, BE‑1900” as identical to the Model B300 except for the cargo door. The Model 300 (FF serials) is determined a separate pilot type rating May 24, 1990 because the minimum crew determination is 2 pilots. The “BE‑300, BE‑1900” pilot type rating was issue to pilots for a Practical Test completed in any Model 300 series until November 6, 1991. After November 6, 1991 the BE‑300 and BE‑1900 are issued as separate pilot type ratings with pilots completing a Practical Test in any Model 300 series receiving the “BE‑300” pilot type rating. The Model 300 (FF serials) were deleted as a separate pilot type rating and included in the “BE‑300” pilot type rating as of May 21, 2002.

 

2.2.1 Inactive Pilot Type Rating (BE‑300F)

 

When the Model 300 (FF serials) entered service they were designated a separate BE‑300F pilot type rating May 24, 1990 to accommodate the 2 pilot minimum crew and other differences. Model 300 (FF serials) continue as a separate BE‑300F pilot type rating until May 21, 2002 when the separate pilot type rating was deleted to allow the Model 300 (FF serials) to be the same BE‑300 pilot type rating as the rest of the Model 300 series. At the time this occurred the Model 300 series had been separated from the Model 1900 series pilot type rating and the use of a “Second-in-Command Required” type rating limitation is used to accommodate the 2 pilot minimum crew requirement for the Model 300 (FF serials).

 

After May 21, 2002 any pilot completing Practical Test in a Model 300(FF serial) airplane received a BE‑300 pilot type rating with a “Second-in-Command Required” Limitation. The holder of a BE‑300F pilot type rating on their pilot certificate is authorized to have the BE‑300 pilot type rating added to their pilot certificate without any further testing. BE‑300 pilot type rating obtained by this method would carry the limitation “Second‑in‑Command Required”. The BE‑300F pilot type rating should remain on the pilot certificate. The BE‑300F pilot type rating remains valid to operate the Model 300 (FF serials) airplane only. The BE‑300 pilot type rating is required to operate any other Model 300 series airplane except Model 300 (FF serials). The holder of a BE‑300 pilot type rating is authorized to operate a Model 300 (FF serial) airplane after May 21, 2002 provided pilot certificate limitations and airplane minimum crew requirements are met.

 

Model 300 (FF serials) modified by installation of Rockwell Collins Proline 21 EFIS per STC # SA01267WI‑D, approved July 27, 2007 changed minimum crew requirement to 1 pilot. Any pilot completing a practical test in a Model 300(FF serial) modified per STC # SA01267WI-A and operated with 1 pilot for the practical test may receive a BE‑300 pilot type rating without a “Second-in-Command Required” limitation.

 

2.3 “Second-In Command Required” Limitation Pilot Type Rating

 

In accordance with the provisions of 14 CFR § 61.43(b)(3), FAA Order 8900.1 and AC 120-53(x), a pilot type rating with a “Second-in-Command Required” Limitation is assigned to the BE‑300 pilot type rating whenever a pilot practical test is completed utilizing a 2 pilot flight crew. This assignment of limitation is based on practical test demonstrated ability for the flight crew utilized regardless of whether the airplane’s minimum required certificated flight crew is 1 pilot or 2 pilots.

 

A “Second-in-Command Required” Limitation is always applicable for pilot practical test given in Model 300 (FF serials) unmodified by STC # SA01267WI‑D or if the holder of a BE‑300F pilot type rating is issue a BE‑300 pilot type rating without any further testing.

 

2.3.1 Removing SIC Limitation

 

Removing a “Second-in-Command Required” limitation issued in accordance with provisions of 14 CFR
§ 61.43(b)(3), FAA Order 8900.1 and AC 120-53(x) may be accomplished with a partial practical test in accordance with FAA Order 8900.1,Vol.5,Chp.2,Sec.19 or General Aviation Airman Designee Handbook

 

2.4 Determination of Second-In-Command Pilot Type Rating

 

The Second-In-Command Pilot Type Rating (BE‑300 SIC PRIVILEGES ONLY) may be issued in accordance with 14 CFR Part 61.55. In addition to training in accordance with 61.55, the items identified in paragraph 5.2.5 Seat Dependant Task Training must be performed and 5.2.3 Flight Crew Emergency Training must be accomplished for all SIC qualifications in the BE‑300.

 

3. MASTER REQUIREMENTS

 

3.1 Master Common Requirements

a)   No “Specific Flight Characteristics” are designated for Basic BE‑300 models. (See Section 6.1.2.)

b)   Landing Minima Category for the BE‑300 is generally Category “B” for normal straight in approaches (Flaps Down) and Category “C” for normal circling approaches (Flaps Approach) unless otherwise required by 14 CFR or Operations Specifications. (14 CFR § 97.3)

c)   Normal “Landing Flap Setting” is Flap Down.(14 CFR § 91.126(c))

d)   Normal “Takeoff Flap Setting” is Flap Up or Flap Takeoff.

e)   “No Flap” Approach & Landing is not waived. Training and checking is required.

f)   For Model 300 (SFAR 41) normal straight-instrument approaches are flown with Flaps Approach until landing is assured due to lack of Approach Climb Gradient data. For Model B300 (Commuter Category) or 300 (SFAR 41) with ICAO Annex 8 Performance, landing configuration may be selected at the final approach fix. Use of Continuous Descent Final Approach is recommended.

g)   Normal Circling approaches are flown Flaps Approach from the FAF until landing is assured.

h)   Minimum Altitude for Autopilot use is determined by specific autopilot options. Evaluated procedures were with Autopilot engagement for Departure/Cruise at 1000 ft AGL and 200 ft AGL on Approach with Collins FCS-65 Autopilot. Bendix/King KFC-400 Autopilot is 500 ft AGL for Climb, 1000 ft AGL for Cruise and 200 ft AGL for Approach. Collins Proline 21 Integrated Autopilot is 400 ft AGL for Takeoff, 1000 ft AGL for Cruise, 79 ft AGL on coupled Approach, and 160 ft AGL for Steep Approach. Proline 21 Integrated APS-300 Autopilot per STC # SA01267WI‑D is 300 ft AGL for Takeoff, 1000 ft AGL for Cruise, and 100 ft AGL for Approach. Garmin GFC-700 Autopilot is 400 ft AGL for Takeoff, 1000 ft AGL for Cruise, 200 ft AGL for coupled Approach with vertical guidance, and 400 ft AGL or MDA for Approach without vertical guidance.

 

3.1.1 Areas of Special Emphasis

The FSB has determined that certain aspects of pilot knowledge, skills and abilities are especially critical to safe operation of the BE‑300 and must be emphasized during training and evaluated during checking for the BE‑300.

a)   Training for High Altitude Operation is required 14 CFR § 61.31 for all Model 300 airplanes

b)   Knowledge of aircraft performance determination should be emphasized. Specific performance factors vary with different certification categories for SFAR 41 and Commuter Category.

 

3.2 Master Difference Requirements (MDR)

The Master Difference Requirements for related aircraft of the BE‑300 are shown in Appendix 1. These provisions apply when differences between related BE‑300 aircraft exist which affect crew knowledge, skills, or abilities related to flight safety. (e.g. Level A or greater differences)

 

Footnotes to MDR requirements define acceptable "required means" or "alternate means" of compliance. A footnote can indicate requirements that are less restrictive than the basic designation, or more restrictive than the basic designation, depending on the significance of the differences between related aircraft.

 

4. OPERATOR DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS TABLES (ODR)

 

4.1 ODR Tables

ODR tables are used to show an operator's compliance method. ODR tables for operators conducting mixed fleet operations, using the BE‑300 are shown in Appendix 2. The ODR tables represent an acceptable means to comply with MDR provisions based on those differences and compliance methods shown. The tables do not necessarily represent the only acceptable means of compliance for operators with airplanes having other differences, where compliance methods (e.g., devices, simulators, etc.) are different. For operators flying the BE‑300 the ODR tables in Appendix 2 have been found acceptable, and therefore, may be approved by a POI for a particular operator. The three types of ODR Tables are Design, System and Maneuver Differences Tables. Design differences account for equipment model changes. System differences account for specific system level changes. Maneuver differences account for changes in operating procedures of changed equipment.

 

4.2 Operator Preparation of ODR Tables

Operators flying a “mixed fleet” of BE‑300 aircraft must have approved ODR tables pertinent to their fleet

 

4.3 ODR Table Coordination

Unless identical or equivalent ODR tables have been previously approved by the FAA, new ODR tables proposed by operators should be coordinated with the FSB prior to FAA approval and implementation. FSB coordination ensures consistent treatment of related BE‑300 aircraft between various operators, and compatibility of each ODR table with MDR provisions

 

4.4 ODR Table Distribution

Original FAA approved ODR tables are to be retained by the operator. Copies of FAA approved ODR tables are to be retained by the Certificate Holding District Office (CHDO) and should be provided to the BE‑300 FSB Chairman at the applicable AEG

 

5. FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRAINING

 

5.1 General

5.1.1 Assumptions Regarding Airmen’s Previous Experience. The provisions of this Section apply to programs for airmen who have experience in multi-engine turboprop aircraft including various avionics suites and navigation experience. For airmen not having this experience, additional requirements may be appropriate as determined by the POI, FSB, and/or AFS-200.

 

5.1.2 Training for Seat Dependent Tasks. Accomplishment of certain tasks, procedures, or maneuvers requires training of a crewmember for a particular crew position when other than single pilot operation (e.g. captain, first officer, check pilot, etc.). Training programs should recognize and address the necessary seat/position related tasks for the applicable crewmember. Accordingly, training programs should address seat dependent tasks or maneuvers to the extent necessary to satisfy crew qualification objectives and should be in accordance with ODR tables when applicable.

 

5.1.3 Second-In-Command Training Tasks. Flight Crews qualify to serve as SIC must accomplish certain tasks, procedures or maneuvers for the SIC crew position. Training programs should address all training elements of the 14 CFR § 61.55 and/or 14 CFR part 135 in accordance with FAA Order 8900.1. SIC Pilot Type Rating may be issued in accordance with the 14 CFR § 61.55(d) or (e) provided training required by the 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1, including tasks stipulated by this report, are completed.

 

5.2 Initial / Transition / Upgrade Training:  

5.2.1 Pilots Initial, Transition and Upgrade Ground Training, Initial, transition, or upgrade ground training for the BE‑300 is accomplished as specified by 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1. No unique provisions or requirements are specified. Training program hours may be reduced as specified in 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1.

 

5.2.2 Pilots Initial, Transition and Upgrade Flight Training. Initial, transition, or upgrade flight training for the BE‑300 is accomplished as specified by 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1. No unique provisions or requirements are specified. Training program hours may be reduced as specified in 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1.

 

5.2.3 Crewmember Emergency Training. Crewmember emergency training should be conducted for the BE‑300 in accordance with 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1 The objective of emergency training for the BE‑300 aircraft is to provide crewmembers with the necessary knowledge concerning emergency equipment, situations, and procedures, to ensure implementation of the correct actions in the event of an emergency.

 

Emergency training consists of instruction on the location, function, and operation of emergency equipment in each related aircraft of the BE‑300. Where emergency equipment is common, instruction may be adjusted for crewmembers qualified and current on this equipment, provided records are available which demonstrate that crewmembers meet 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1 requirements. For example, if the fire extinguishers are common to fire extinguishers on other aircraft in the operator's fleet, training may credited for all applicable aircraft. Conversely, for equipment that is unique to the BE‑300, training on the emergency equipment for each related aircraft is required.

 

Emergency training also consists of instruction in crewmember emergency assignments and procedures including crew coordination and communication, the handling of emergency or other unusual situations, and emergency performance and observation drills specific to BE‑300 aircraft.

 

In accordance with the 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1, emergency training requirements refer to two types of training: "general" emergency training and "aircraft-specific" emergency training. General emergency training is instruction on those emergency items that are common to the BE‑300 and all aircraft in the operator's fleet, e.g., instruction on fire extinguishers and firefighting procedures, if common to all aircraft. Aircraft-specific emergency training is training on those items that are specific to the BE‑300 aircraft. An example of aircraft‑specific emergency training is instruction on the location of emergency equipment.

 

As part of an approved training program, an operator may use many methods when conducting aircraft-specific emergency training, including classroom instruction, pictures, videotape, ground training devices, computer‑based instruction, and static aircraft training.

 

There are no specified training program hours for Crewmember Emergency Training. A chart addressed in 8900.1 provides "national norms" for the approval of the general emergency training program hours. The complexity of the different related aircraft of the BE‑300 and the complexity of the type of operation to be conducted should be considered when approving the BE‑300 aircraft-specific emergency training.

 

5.2.4 Areas of Special Emphasis Training –All 300s. The following areas of emphasis should be addressed during ground and flight training:

a)    Aircraft performance calculations and the differences in certification rules between SFAR 41 and Commuter Category performance. Gross versus Net climb gradients for TERPS and obstacles.

 

b)    Navigation means with various installed equipment and area navigation systems.

 

c)    Primary Flight Display format and function for mechanical, electronic and PFD displays.

 

d)    EFIS function and procedures should be emphasized throughout training. Special significance should be placed on Display Processor Unit (DPU) failures and EFIS Reversionary Switching. Use of Composite Mode should be trained to conduct Precision and Non-Precision Approaches, with and without the Flight Director.

 

5.2.4.1 Areas of Special Emphasis Training – Night Vision Goggle Operation (NVGO)

The following areas of emphasis should be addressed during Airplane NVG ground and flight training:

 

a)    Recovery from Inadvertent IMC.

b)    2 pilot operating procedures if needed for type of NVG operation to mitigate workload or NVG Failures transitioning to Un-Aided operation.

c)    Landing illusions using NVGs

d)    Operating airplanes around Airports and/or Obstructions with LED lighting not visible with authorized NVGs

 

5.2.5 Training for Seat Dependent Tasks. Accomplishment of certain tasks, procedures, or maneuvers require training of a crewmember for a particular crew position (i.e. captain, first officer, check pilot, etc.). Training programs should recognize and address the necessary seat/position related tasks for the applicable crewmember. Accordingly, training programs should address seat dependent tasks or maneuvers to the extent necessary to satisfy crew qualification objectives, and per ODR tables.

 

Procedures which could have Seat Dependent Elements when operating with 2 pilot crew (as determined by each operator and/or POI). These may include the following:

a)   Cockpit Preflight

b)   Rejected Takeoff

c)   Engine Fire and Failure During Takeoff after V1

d)   Abnormal Procedures for One-Engine-Inoperative and Landing

e)   Manual Gear Extension

 

5.2.6 Second-In-Command Crew Training. SIC crew training is accomplished as specified in 14 CFR § 61.55 and/or 14 CFR part 135. Training programs should address tasks stipulated in FSB Specifications for Training; Areas of Emphasis, Training for Seat Dependent Tasks and SIC Crew Training are accomplished.

 

5.3 Differences Training:

5.3.1 General. Unless an initial or transition program is completed for each related aircraft, differences training is necessary for each related aircraft or type, as provided in MDR and ODR tables. Detailed sample ODR tables are available in Appendix 2. These ODR tables may not include items that are applicable to particular operators.

 

a)   A Differences Training Program prerequisite is that a trainee has completed initial, upgrade, or transition training in one related aircraft and will receive differences training for the other related aircraft.

b)   When a Differences Training Program involves related aircraft having the same Pilot Type Rating, coverage of differences may be completed either coincident with each phase of an initial, upgrade, or transition training course, or following completion of that training course. The differences training must be consistent with the provisions of the approved applicable MDR/ODR Tables.

c)   When a Differences Training Program involves related aircraft having different Pilot Type Ratings, coverage of a differences course must be completed in accordance with the prerequisites defined in 5.1.1, and applicable MDR/ODR provisions.

 

5.3.2 Differences Ground Training. Differences ground training is required on the topics applicable to the pertinent related aircraft and is shown by applicable ODR tables.

 

5.3.3 Differences Flight Training. Difference flight training is required in the topics and maneuvers applicable to the pertinent related aircraft that is shown by applicable ODR tables.

 

5.4 Recurrent Training

5.4.1 Recurrent Ground Training. Courses must include appropriate training in accordance with 14 CFR § 135.351 for each related BE‑300 aircraft as specified by MDR and ODR tables for differences training.

 

5.4.2 Recurrent Flight Training. Courses require appropriate maneuvers and procedures identified in the 14 CFR, FAA Order 8900.1 or as otherwise described in this report. Maneuvers and procedures must account for differences between each related BE‑300 aircraft operated. The ODR table(s) must identify the differences.

 

5.4.3 Recurrent training consideration for Mixed Fleet Flying Operations. When different pilot type ratings are assigned between the related aircraft, an alternate plan for recurrent training and checking is acceptable.

 

5.4.4 Training program hours for Recurrent Training may be reduced as specified in 14 CFR and/or FAA Order 8900.1.

 

5.5 Operating Experience

Initial Operating Experience, Supervised Operating Experience, and Supervised Line Flying are in accordance with existing 14 CFRs for assigned flight crew position in the BE‑300.

 

For the purpose of obtaining operating experience or receiving a line check, the Pilot-in-Command of the BE‑300 aircraft must occupy the left pilot seat due to orientation of equipment controls.

 

5.5.1 Supervised Operating Experience(SOE). SOE required for a PIC Type Rating in accordance with 14 CFR Part 61 must be accomplished from the left pilot seat. SOE required by pilot certification should include one complete operating cycle for each 2 hours of SOE. One complete operating cycle includes Start, Taxi, Takeoff, Approach, Landing, Shutdown procedures.

 

5.6 Other Training

5.6.1 LOFT Programs 14 CFR § 121.409(b)(2)(ii). When operators have LOFT programs and related BE‑300 aircraft, POIs should review LOFT credits to assure suitability for each BE‑300 aircraft.

 

5.6.2 Instrument Approaches. Only Model 300 (FF serials) are certified for CAT II operations.

 

Note: Operators should assure that flight crews are familiar with appropriate use of the Flight Guidance System and FMS or navigation radios, including modes to be used, for the types of instrument approaches to be flown, when using Area Navigation methods in lieu of or in conjunction with NDB, VOR, localizer, or back course localizer procedures. This emphasis is also appropriate for aircraft that do not have certain navigation system sensors, such as ADF, installed.

 

6. FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CHECKING

 

6.1 Checking Requirements

The BE‑300 is considered a separate type of aircraft as described in 14 CFR § 135.293(b) for the purpose of recurrent checking. Twelve month testing currency applies to the BE‑300 exclusively for compliance with 14 CFR § 135.293.

 

All checking must include evaluation of the subjects and maneuvers listed in the Master Requirements, Areas of Special Emphasis, of this report and the following subject areas, if equipped:

 

A pilot being checked for the addition of a type rating or PIC proficiency check must occupy the left pilot seat due to an inability to access all equipment controls from the right seat.

 

6.1.1 Checking Items. Pertinent knowledge, procedures, and maneuvers specified by 14 CFR 61, FAA Practical Test Standards (PTS), 14 CFR §§ 135.293, 297, & 299, and 14 CFR Part 121, Appendix F, pertinent to multi‑engine turboprop aircraft apply.

 

6.1.2 Specific Flight Characteristics. No Specific Flight Characteristics are applicable to the Basic BE‑300 models. Airplanes modified to Garmin G1000 with a GFC-700 Autopilot have a Specific Flight Characteristic for Electronic Stability & Protection system including Under Speed Protection and Over Speed Protection, if installed.

 

6.1.3 Areas of Checking Emphasis. The following areas of emphasis should be addressed during checks:

 

a)   Aircraft Performance calculation and aircraft handling to achieve performance.

b)   Demonstration of FMS navigation (departures, arrivals, approaches) proficiency.

c)   Selection and use of EFIS displays, raw data, flight director, and Reversion/Composite modes, including DPU failure when applicable.

 

6.1.4 No Flap Landings. Demonstration of a No Flap approach and landing during an 14 CFR Parts 61, 14 CFR Part 135 or 14 CFR Part 121 Appendix F check is appropriate. In accordance with Order 8900.1, when the flight test is conducted in the airplane in actual flight, a touchdown from a no flap is not required. However, the performance and handling of the Model 300 is such that it is acceptable to conduct No Flap Landings to a full stop.

 

6.2 Type Ratings

6.2.1 Oral Examinations. Oral test items need only address the model for which the test is being conducted when qualification is sought on only the one 300 variant being tested.

 

6.2.2 Practical Tests. Practical tests may follow standard provisions of 14 CFR Part 61. The satisfactory completion of a practical type rating evaluation in any BE‑300 will meet the requirement for the BE‑300 type rating. In order to operate another related aircraft, crewmembers operating under 14 CFR Part 135 are required to satisfactorily comply with the requirements of the MDR and ODR tables in Appendices 1 and 2. The same requirement should be followed by flight crewmembers operating under 14 CFR Part 91.

 

6.2.3 Application for and Issuance of Type Ratings. Airmen completing pertinent 14 CFR Part 61 requirements in either a BE‑300 in accordance with FSB requirements described in this report, may apply to the FAA for the BE‑300 type rating endorsement. Upon completion of required tests, and submission of an application (FAA Form 8710-1), authorized FAA inspectors or designees may issue the necessary pilot certificate with type rating.

 

6.3 Proficiency Checks

6.3.1 General. Proficiency Checks are administered as designated in 14 CFR and FAA Order 8900.1. These checks must be administered by an authorized check pilot, or FAA Aviation Safety Inspector. A proficiency check in any Model 300 suffices for the BE‑300 type rating provided the check is administered by a Designee, or FAA Aviation Safety Inspector. Satisfactory completion of the check required by 14 CFR § 135.293 may be substituted for recurrent flight training as permitted in 14 CFR Part 135.

 

6.3.2 Proficiency Checks for Mixed Fleet Flying. Proficiency Checks for Mixed Fleet Flying should alternate checks each 6 months for PICs and annually for SICs between 300 and B300 aircraft. Aircraft Differences must be addressed in accordance with the MDR and ODR tables for that operator.

 

6.4 Instructors, Check Pilot and Examiners

For the purpose of checking, FAA Aviation Safety Inspectors, Designated Pilot Examiners, Training Center Evaluators and Check Airmen must be PIC qualified in the BE‑300. Examiners and Check Airmen should have 100 hours PIC in the BE‑300 and maintain currency in accordance with this report to provide checking in the aircraft.

 

7. FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR CURRENCY

 

Currency requirements (14 CFR §§ 61.55, 61.56, 61.57, and 135.247) require BE‑300 experience in accordance with applicable 14 CFRs. No “Group” or similar type rated airplane credit is given.

 

7.1 Recent Flight Experience: 14 CFR § 61.57. BE‑300 type is considered separate experience for 14 CFR § 61.57(a)&(b).

 

7.1.1 Take off and landing credit is permitted. Takeoffs and landings performed in any Model 300 aircraft may be credited to all BE‑300 aircraft. Recency of experience should include operation/programming of the Navigation System and Flight Guidance System.

 

7.2 Instrument Currency: Instrument experience to satisfy 14 CFR § 61.57(c) is not BE‑300 exclusive provided BE‑300 Recent Flight Experience requirements are maintained.

 

7.3 Currency for Mixed Fleet Flying Operations. These are shown in MDR/ODR tables

 

7.4 Methods to Reestablish Currency

Re-establishing currency for the BE‑300 is in accordance with existing 14 CFRs and FAA guidance for Recent Flight Experience and/or Requalification.

 

7.4.1 When MDR/ODR specifies Level B Currency, currency is maintained by operating the variant aircraft within the previous 180 days. Currency may be reestablished by a review of Placards, Limitations and Operating Procedures prior to operating the variant airplane.

 

7.4.2 When MDR/ODR specifies Level C Currency, currency is maintained by operating the variant aircraft through a complete flight cycle including an instrument approach procedure within the previous 90 days. Currency may be reestablished by operating the variant with a qualified PIC for at least one flight segment, completing a Line Check with a Line Check Pilot, completing a Proficiency Check in the variant aircraft or compliance with 14 CFR § 61.57(c) or (d) recent flight experience requirements in the variant airplane.

 

7.4.3 When MDR/ODR specifies Level D Currency, currency is maintained by operating the variant aircraft through 3 complete flight cycles (takeoff, departure, arrival, approach and landing) within the previous 90 days. Currency may be reestablished by completing a Line Check with a Line Check Pilot, completion on a Proficiency Check in the variant aircraft or compliance with 14 CFR § 61.57(c) or (d) recent flight experience requirements in the variant airplane.

 

8. AIRCRAFT REGULATORY COMPLIANCE CHECKLIST

 

No Compliance Checklist has been published for the BE‑300. Appendix 4 to this report is reserved. Model 300 series aircraft have been in service for an extended period of time so the methods of compliance with regulatory requirements are established.

 

8.1 Specific Compliance Items

8.1.1 Emergency Evacuation Demonstration (Full Evacuation) has not been conducted.

8.1.2 Ditching Demonstration and compliance with 25.801 has not been demonstrated.

8.1.3 Forward Observer Seat Available forward passenger seats were evaluated and found suitable for conducting enroute inspections per 135.75(b). The right front passenger seat has been demonstrated suitable with the standard passenger seat / seatbelt, passenger oxygen and a splitter cord for audio. Audio jacks may be installed at the forward seat to provide for enroute inspection.

8.1.4 Proving Tests to satisfy 14 CFR § 135.145 have not been conducted and should be conducted in accordance with FAA Order 8900.1.

8.1.5 Validation Tests to satisfy 14 CFR § 135.145(d) should not be given credit for previous operation of turbojet airplane of the same make due to lack of similarity of aircraft system automation and integration with other aircraft of the same make. It may be acceptable to give credit for of turbojet airplanes of similar design provided design similarity can be substantiated.

8.1.3 Electronic Flight Bag

Electronic Checklists

(Proline 21 Only)

Printed Pilot Checklist remains required for compliance with 14 CFR § 91.503 & § 135.83. The Electronic Pilot Checklist does not contain all required procedures due to inability to function in all non‑normal flight operation situations. The Electronic Pilot Checklist is acceptable for use for those Normal Procedures it contains provided the aircraft operator ensures the Electronic Pilot Checklist procedures remain current for the aircraft.

 

(Proline FUSION)

Indicates new/changed information.

Printed Pilot Checklist remains required for compliance with 14 CFR § 91.503 & § 135.83. (See AFMS Limitation) The Electronic Checklist feature meets functional requirements and redundancy for Electronic Checklists, but no Electronic Checklist content has been determined operationally suitable. Option for FSA-6000 on all 3 AFD-3700 Displays is required for electronic dual redundancy. Viewing distance for PFD and MFD charts is ~24 and ~28 inches respectively. Use for chart zooming and touchscreen panning is necessary to meet view ability per FAA Document #DTFAWA-10-A-80031 Task 8 for chart legibility.

 

Electronic Charts

(Proline 21 Only)

Electronic Approach Charts (SIDS, STARS, Approach Charts & Airport Diagrams) are available through the IFIS-5000 File Server Unit. Dual redundancy is not met due to single MFD Display, File Server Unit, and Cursor Control Panel. Memory button selection on the Cursor Control Panel is required to allow single pilot action to change between Navigation Display, Electronic Checklist Display and Electronic Charts Display to mitigate single pilot workload using these functions. The enhanced map overlays do not meet requirements for Enroute charts therefore another suitable source of Enroute Chart information must be available at the pilot station.

 

Indicates new/changed information.

(Proline FUSION)

Electronic Approach Charts (SIDS, STARS, Approach Charts & Airport Diagrams) are available through the FSA-6000 File Server Application. Low Visibility Taxi Charts are also selectable but not approved for Airport Moving Map Display per AC 20-159. The option for FSA-6000 on all 3 AFD-3700 Displays is required for electronic dual redundancy

 

(G1000 Only)

Electronic Approach Charts (SIDS, STARS, Approach Charts & Airport Diagrams) are available through the GDU-1500 MFD SD Card. Dual redundancy is not met due to single MFD Display and SD Card. Display does not meet criteria for full chart displayed equally viewable to paper being replaced however the zoom and pan feature allows a single pilot action to view the remainder of a chart when set to a readable size. In addition, the chart display function has softkeys for Briefing, Plan, Profile & Minimums chart sections to be selected with single pilot action.

 

9. FSB SPECIFICATIONS FOR SIMULATORS AND DEVICES

Requests for device approval should be made in accordance with FAA procedures.

Flight Training Device and Flight Simulator characteristics must comply with applicable 14 CFRs. Credit for training, checking and currency in an approved Flight Simulation Training Device (FSTD) is allowed in accordance with the Simulator Task Credit given in accordance with Airline Transport Pilot and Aircraft Type Rating Practical Test Standards or current guidance in FAA Order 8900.1, as applicable, except where this report is more restrictive.

 

10.  APPLICATION OF FSB REPORT

All BE‑300 operations are subject to the provisions of this report. This report becomes effective when given final approval by the FAA. Training, checking and currency for the BE‑300 aircraft must be conducted in accordance with all provisions of this report. All FAA Approved Training Programs must incorporate the latest FAA Approved AFM Procedures, AFM compliant checklist, manufacturer’s recommendations for training maneuvers and all provisions of this report.

 

11.  ALTERNATE MEANS OF COMPLIANCE

11.1 Approval Level and Approval Criteria

Alternate means of compliance to the requirements of this report must be approved by the FSB. If alternate compliance is sought, operators must show that the proposed alternate means provides an equivalent level of safety to the provisions of AC 120-53(x) and this FSB report. Analysis, demonstrations, proof of concept testing, differences documentation or other evidence may be required.

 

11.2 Equivalent Safety

Significant restrictions may apply in the event alternate compliance is sought, and the reporting requirements may be increased to ensure equivalent safety. FAA will generally not consider relief through alternate compliance unless sufficient lead-time has been planned by an operator to allow for any necessary testing and evaluation.

 

11.3 Interim Programs

In the event of clearly unforeseen circumstances in which it is not possible for an operator to comply with provisions of this report, the operator may seek an interim program approval rather than a permanent alternate compliance method. Financial arrangements, scheduling adjustments and other such reasons are not considered “unforeseen circumstances” for the purposes of this provision. Interim program approvals must be approved by the FSB Chairman.

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX 1 - AIRCRAFT MDR TABLES

MASTER DIFFERENCE REQUIREMENTS TABLE

 

 

FROM Aircraft (Base Aircraft)

 

 

*

300

*

300LW

*

B300

B300C

Except Proline 21

*

B300

B300C

Proline21

**

300

(FF serial) EFS-10

***

300

(FF serial)

Proline21

 

 

 

T

O

 

A

I

R

C

R

A

T

T

 

*

300

 

A/A/A (1)(2)(3) (4)(5)(6)

B/A/B (1) (2) (3)(4)(5)

B/B/B (1)(2) (3)(4)(5)

D/C/C

Not Evaluated

D/D/D

 

 

*

300LW

 

B/A/B (1) (2) (3)(4)(5)

A/A/A (1)(2)(3) (4)(5)(6)

B/B/B (1)(2) (3)(4)(5)

D/C/C

Not Evaluated

D/D/D

 

 

*

B300

B300C

Except Proline 21

B/B/B (1)(2) (3)(4)

B/B/B (1)(2) (3)(4)

A/A/A (1)(2) (3)(4)(6)

D/C/C

Not Evaluated

D/D/D

 

 

*

B300

B300C

Proline 21

D/C/C

D/C/C

D/C/C

A/A/B (3)(7)(8)

D/C/D

B/B/C (3)

 

 

**

300

(FF serial) EFS-10

C/D/D

C/D/D

C/D/D

D/D/D

A/A/B

D/C/D

 

 

***

300

(FF serial)

Proline 21

D/D/D

D/D/D

C/D/D

C/C/C

D/C/D

A/A/B (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTES

* Pilot Type Rating BE‑300

** Pilot Type Rating BE‑300F applicable to FF serials(FF-1 to 19) Type Certificated for 2 pilots, June 12, 1990 to May 21, 2002. Pilot Type Rating BE‑300 applicable to FF serials(FF-1 to 19) Type Certificated for 2 pilots after May 21, 2002 and BE‑300F Pilot Type Rating is no longer issued after May 21, 2002.

*** Pilot Type Rating BE‑300 for FF serials(FF-1 to 19) with STC# SA01267WI-A for Proline 21 and single pilot operation.

 

(1) Primary Flight Instruments may include mechanical, electro-mechanical, Collins EFIS-74A & EFIS 85 (3, 4 or 5 tube), Sperry EDZ 600/800 (3 or 5 tube), Bendix EFS-10 (3 or 4 tube). Differences in primary flight instruments from mechanical and electro‑mechanical (servo) to EFIS or between EFIS systems installations is C/B/C. Differences in primary flight instruments from EFIS to mechanical and electro-mechanical (servo) or between mechanical and electro-mechanical (servo) is B/B/B.

 

(2) Installation of Proline 21 on aircraft equipment listed in NOTE (1) is D/C/C.

 

(3) For Collins Proline 21 equipped aircraft, the installation of IFIS-5000 FSU is C/B/C.

 

(4) Installation of Collins IDS-3000 ON EFIS 85 aircraft is D/C/C.

 

(5) Installation of Honeywell EPIC CDS/R on EDZ-600/800 aircraft is D/C/C.

 

(6) Installation of GARMIN G1000 is D/C/D.

 

(7) Installation of GARMIN G1000 is C/C/C for basic equipped or D/C/D if optional SVS & ESP.

 

(8) Installation of Proline FUSION Embedded Display System (EDS) on Proline 21 is C/C/C

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX 2 - AIRCRAFT SAMPLE ODR TABLES

SAMPLE DIFFERENCE TABLE

Definitions used in the ODR Tables:

X           = Pilot’s Operating Handbook and or Flight Manual Supplement

CPT      = Cockpit Procedure Training

SI          = Self Instruction

AI         = Aided Instruction

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: 300(FF serials)

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: Model 300

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

 

 

 

TRAINING

 CHKG/CURR

SYSTEM

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

21

Air

Conditioning

 

 

Auto Pressure Controller located at rear of Center Pedestal

No

Minor

SI

 

 

 

A

B

21

Auxiliary Air

Conditioner

Initially installed then later removed.

No

Minor

 

AI

 

 

B

B

22

Autopilot/Yaw Damper

Yaw Damper-King vs Collins. Both operate identically.

No

No

SI

 

 

 

A

A

23

Communication

Addition audio panel and communication equipment.

No

No

AI

 

 

 

B

B

24

Electrical

Power

Load Shedding

No

Yes

 

AI

 

 

B

C

25.

Flight Inspection

Panel System

Mission specific equipment installed.

No

Yes

 

 

AI

 

B

B

26

Fire Protection

 

Location of Portable Fire Extinguishers.

No

No

SI

 

 

 

A

A

34

Navigation

Bendix King EFS-10 Electronic Flight Instruments System (EFIS) – Symbol Generators.

FMS operation.

Flight Inspection Control Display Unit.

No

Yes

 

 

CPT

 

D

D


 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: 300(FF serials)

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: Model 300

COMPLIANCE METHOD

 

 

 

 

TRAINING

 CHKG/CURR

DESIGN

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

Inst Panel Layout

Dual EFS-10 EFIS and Multi‑function Displays. Caution/Warning Panel and Flight Director mode controllers relocated to glareshield.

Standby Attitude Indicator required for Dual EFS-10 system.

No

Minor

 

AI

 

 

A

B

Flight Deck

Pressurization controller relocated to rear of center console.

No

Minor

 

AI

 

 

A

B

MANUEVER

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

 

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Definitions used in the ODR Tables:

X           = Flight Manual/Pilot’s Operating Handbook and/or FM Supplement

AI          = Aided Instruction

CBT      = Computer Based Training

ICBT     = Interactive Computer Based Training

FTD      = Flight Training Device (Level 1 to 7)

FFS       = Full Flight Simulator (Level A, B, C, D)

 

 

SAMPLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: B300, B300C (commuter category)

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: 300, 300LW (SFAR 41C)

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

DESIGN

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

General Airplane Configuration

Commuter Category certification basis

34 inches longer cabin, 14 fwd, 20 aft

3 feet wingspan by 18 inch wingtips

Cockpit 14 inches fwd reference nacelles

NO

NO

 

AI

 

 

B

B

 

Weights

Increase to 15,000 pounds MGTW

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

B

 

Limitations

VMO/MMO Overspeed Aural Warning

Single Engine Reversing Prohibited

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

Placards and Markings

Numerous Annunciator Panel changes.

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

 

Servicing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Engines

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flight Deck

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instrument Panel Layout

Left side EFIS standard, Right side option.

Auto Feather annunciators relocated

NO

YES

X

 

 

 

A

B

 

Cabin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flight Controls

Flaps preset positions only

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

Aerodynamic Controls

Reduction in roll control forces

3 position Flaps, no intermediate

 

YES

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAMPLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: B300, B300C (commuter category)

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: 300, 300LW (SFAR 41C)

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

MANEUVER

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

Preflight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Engine Start

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taxi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Takeoff

Improved Performance for Commuter Category Takeoff, Climb, Approach Climb

Changes in propeller Ground Low Pitch Stop at 68 to 70% N1 prevents engine acceleration surges on takeoff.

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

RTO

Or

V1 Fail

B300 meets Engine Failure performance requirements for Commuter Category

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

Climb

Cruise

Decent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instrument Approaches

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landing

Demonstrated Crosswind no 25 Kts

 

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

B

Shutdown

Hot Battery Buss Switch

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

Normal Procedures

Changed Normal Procedures for design changes and Commuter Category

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

Abnormal Procedures

Changed and New Abnormal Procedures for design changes and Commuter Category.

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

Emergency Procedures

No Single Engine Reverse

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

In-Flight Maneuvers

Roll Control forces reduced approx. 35%

YES

NO

 

AI

 

 

A

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAMPLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: B300, B300C (commuter category)

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: 300, 300LW (SFAR 41C)

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

SYSTEM

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

21

Air Conditioning

Cabin Pressure White Annunciator at 10,000 feet with Aural Tone.

Cabin Altitude Red warning annunciator and Aural Tone at 12,000 feet.

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

22

Auto-Flight

Control Wheel Disconnect button is 2 position for trim interrupt & AP Disconnect.

Autofeather is Torque activated versus bleed air activated previous

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

23

Communications

Various radio suite options

(See MDR NOTES)

NO

YES

 

 

 

 

 

 

24

Electrical Power

Both AC Inverters ON full time

Hot Battery Buss & Switch added, several power distribution changes

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

25

Equipment / Furn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26

Fire Protection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

Flight Controls

Flap selection 3 position with no intermediate settings.

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

28

Fuel

Optional Extended Range Fuel tanks

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

B

29

Hydraulic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30

Ice / Rain

2 Deice Boot green annunciators to monitor boot operation.

NO

YES

X

 

 

 

A

B

31

Indicating/Record

Propeller Pitch Lights now White to preclude transient Master Cautions.

Pitch Trim annunciator now caution

Add Annunciators: AC Buss, Cabin Overpressure, Auto Feather OFF, Oxygen Not Armed, Rudder Boost OFF, Wing Deice, Tail Deice, 10,000 ft Cabin Altitude, Cabin Differential High, Aural Warning on Airspeed Overspeed.

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

32

Landing Gear

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33

Lights

Hot Battery Buss cockpit flood light

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

A

B

34

Navigation

Various Avionics Suites available as options and may be different from base airplane. (See MDR NOTES)

 

NO

YES

 

 

 

 

 

 

35

Oxygen

Add Passenger Oxygen Light

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

36

Pneumatics

Brake Deice now ON for Takeoff & Landing

Remove Rudder Boost from Bleed Air system.

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

37

Vacuum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

49

APU

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

52

Doors

Cargo Door Model, Large cargo door hinged at top replaces narrow passenger door airstair hinged at bottom.

NO

YES

 

AI

 

 

B

B

53

Fuselage

34 inches longer cabin, 14 in. fwd of wing, 20 in. aft of wing

 

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

A

54

Nacelles/Pylons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

55

Horizontal & Vertical Stab.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

56

Windows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

57

Wings

3 feet wingspan increase by 18 inch wingtips

 

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

A

61

Propellers

Low Pitch Stop resets from Ground Idle to Flight Idle at 68-70% N1 (or Kit # 130‑9600)

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

A

72

Engine (turbine)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

73

Fuel Controls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

74

Engine Ignitions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

75

Engine Bleed Air

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

76

Engine Controls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

77

Engine Indicating

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

78

Exhaust

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

79

Engine Oil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

80

Engine Starting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Definitions used in the ODR Tables:

X           = Flight Manual/Pilot’s Operating Handbook and/or FM Supplement

AI          = Aided Instruction

CBT      = Computer Based Training

ICBT     = Interactive Computer Based Training

FTD      = Flight Training Device (Level 1 to 7)

FFS       = Full Flight Simulator (Level A, B, C, D)

 

 

SAMPLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: 300, 300LW, B300, B300C Proline 21

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: 300, 300LW, B300, B300C Proline 2 EFIS‑85

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

DESIGN

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

General Airplane Configuration

 

Change from individual flight instruments to composite PFD format.

 

No

Yes

 

AI

 

 

C

C

 

Weights

Revised BOW

No

No

X

 

 

 

A

B

 

Limitations

New Limitations for new equipment

No

No

X

 

 

 

B

B

Placards and Markings

Changed Placards & Markings for avionics.

AFM changed to new P/N

No

Yes

X

 

 

 

B

B

 

Servicing

 

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Engines

 

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flight Deck

Configuration and controls to accommodate Proline 21 system.

No

Yes

 

AI

 

 

C

C

Instrument Panel Layout

EFIS-85 EADI, EHSI, ALT, AS, VSI, TC replaced with Proline 21 PFD(2) &
MFD(1)

No

Yes

 

AI

 

 

C

C

 

Cabin

 

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flight Controls

 

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aerodynamic Controls

 

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAMPLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: 300, 300LW, B300, B300C Proline 21

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: 300, 300LW, B300, B300C Proline 2 EFIS‑85

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

MANEUVER

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

Preflight

PFD/MFD power distribution

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

B

B

Engine Start

Use of MFD Engine Display and PFD/MFD power distribution.

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

B

B

Taxi

Flight Instrument checks.

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

B

C

Takeoff

V-speed and Altitude Selection.

Airspeed Indication on tape format.

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

B

C

RTO

Or

V1 Fail

Airspeed Indication on tape format.

Attitude indications on PFD format.

Low Speed Awareness cues.

 

No

Yes

 

 

 

FFS

B

C

Climb

Cruise

Decent

PFD format for all flight instruments.

Low Speed Awareness cues.

Selection and use of Nav Sources

Instrument scan skill in PFD format.

 

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

B

C

Instrument Approaches

Nav Source Selection & display format.

Instrument scan skill in PFD format.

No

Yes

 

 

 

FFS

C

C

Landing

V-speed and Altitude Selection.

Airspeed Indication on tape format

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

B

C

Normal Procedures

Nav Source selection, Nav Display format, Autopilot & FD control.

IFIS-5000 use procedures.

TCAS & TAWS use procedures.

 

No

Yes

 

 

 

FFS

C

C

Abnormal Procedures

Abnormal procedures for Avionics / Flight Instruments of Proline 21 system

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

B

B

Emergency Procedures

Emergency procedures for Dual Generator Failure, AC Inverter Failures, Emergency Power Management, and Standby Flight Instruments

 

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

C

C

In-Flight Maneuvers

Tape format & Low Speed Awareness for Steep Turns and Stalls.

Instrument scan skill in PFD format.

No

Yes

 

 

 

FFS

C

C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAMPLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: 300, 300LW, B300, B300C Proline 21

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: 300, 300LW, B300, B300C Proline 2 EFIS-85

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

SYSTEM

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

All System Chapters

Chapters not listed on this table are unchanged by this modification.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22

Auto-Flight

FCP-65 Control, Mode Control Panel and respective annunciation panels in pedestal replaced by FGP-3000 on glare shield and mode annunciation on PFD.

AP Mode Annunciation now on PFD.

 

No

Yes

 

AI

 

 

B

B

23

Communications

CTL-22 VHF Comm controls replaced with RTU-4200 on center instrument panel for primary control and CDU-3000 as secondary control.

Audio Panel control moved from upper center instrument panel to outboard instrument panel.

 

No

Yes

 

AI

 

 

B

B

24

Electrical Power

AC Powered use equipment reduced.

Avionics Buss items changed

ESIS Standby Power.

 

No

Yes

 

AI

 

 

B

B

31

Indicating/Record

Install Integrated Avionics Processor System.

Several Annunciations now on PFD

 

No

No

X

 

 

 

A

A

33

Lights

Display Dimming controls changed

No

No

X

 

 

 

A

A

34

Navigation

Flight Instruments

ADI, HSI, ALT, AS, VSI, TC “Basic T” replaced with Proline 21 PFD format.

DME, RMI & Radio Altimeter integrated into PFD.

 

(2) Attitude Heading Computers AHC‑3000, (2) Flux Detector Units FDU‑3000 and (2) External Concentrator Units ECU provide Attitude and Heading information to PFD

 

(2) Air Data Computers ADC-85A provide PFD data for AS, ALT & VS.

Airspeed data includes Overspeed Alerts and Low Speed Warnings on PFD.

Altitude Selector and Alerter control moved to FGP.

Altimeter Baro Selection on DCP and configurable for Ft/M & In/hPa.

 

Standby Instruments

Add GH-3100 (ESIS) Electronic Standby Instrument System provides ATT, ALT, AS, TS, HDG, Baro-set, NAV 1.

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

C

C

34

Navigation

EFIS Controls Added

(2) DCP-3000 on instrument panel

(1) FGP-3000 on glare shield

(1) CDU-3000 on center pedestal

Flight Display (FD) Bezel Buttons control display configuration.

Reversion controls on lower center Inst. Panel

 

CHP-86B Course Heading Panel replaced by Flight Guidance Panel FGP-3000

FGP-3000 includes Flight Director Mode Selection

 

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

C

C

34

Navigation

FMS UNS-1K replaced by FMS-3000 controlled by CDU-3000.

CTL-32 Nav Radio tuning replaced with RTU-4200 and CDU-3000 backup tuning.

 

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

C

C

34

Navigation

AFD-3010 MFD display replaces MFD-85. Weather Radar overlay selectable on MFD

Radar control on FD Bezel and DCP.

 

No

Yes

 

AI

 

 

B

B

34

Navigation

TAWS/GPWS display on PFD and MFD with control on FD Bezel and DCP.

Remote switch/annunciators on Inst. Panel for FLAP/OVRD, G/S INHIB, TERR INHIB and STEEP APPR.

 

No

Yes

 

AI

 

 

B

B

34

Navigation

TCAS I with Traffic Display selectable on PFD and MFD with Nav Display overlay.

TCAS control on FD Bezel and DCP.

TCAS Mode Selections On/Stby & Test/Alt on lower center Inst. Panel.

Transponder control on RTU & CDU.

 

No

Yes

 

 

ICBT

 

B

B

45

Maintenance Computer

MDC-3100 series Maintenance Computer added.

No

No

X

 

 

 

A

A

46

Information Systems

IFIS-5000 File Server Unit (FSU) option

FSU provides Charts, Geo-Political and WX Data functions on MFD.

 

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

B

C

53

Fuselage

New Exterior Antenna for Wx Data options.

No

No

X

 

 

 

A

B

61

Propellers

Propeller Syncro-Scope moved to MFD EIS

AFX green annunciation on EIS near Trq/ITT instrument.

No

No

X

 

 

 

A

B

77

Engine Indicating

Separate Analog Engine Instruments replaced Engine Display. (Normal on MFD, Reversion on PFD)

Exceedences are annunciated in Red.

Abnormal indications are annunciated in Amber.

Primary for power Torque and ITT combined round dial gauge & digital display,

Propeller RPM is round dial gauge & digital display:

N1 is round dial gauge & digital display.

Fuel Flow, Oil Pressure & Oil Temp are digital only.

Engine Fire Indication added to Engine Display inside TRQ/ITT indicator.

EIS Reversion to PFD if MFD fails

 

No

Yes

 

 

FTD

 

C

C

80

Engine Starting

Engine Instruments on MFD EIS for start

No

No

 

 

FTD

 

C

C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Definitions used in the ODR Tables:

X           = Flight Manual/Pilot’s Operating Handbook and/or FM Supplement

AI          = Aided Instruction

CBT      = Computer Based Training

ICBT     = Interactive Computer Based Training

FTD       = Flight Training Device (Level 1 to 7)

FFS        = Full Flight Simulator (Level A, B, C, D)

 

 

SAMPLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: BE‑300 (FF Serial) With Proline 21 (1 pilot)

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: BE‑300 (FF Serial) With Bendix/King EFS-10 (2 pilot)

 

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

DESIGN

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

General Airplane Configuration

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weights

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Airworthiness Limitations

See Maintenance Manual Supplement

NO

YES

X

 

 

 

B

B

Placards, Markings and Limitations

See Airplane Flight Manual Supplement

Minimum Crew 1 Pilot

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

A

 

Servicing

See Maintenance Manual Supplement

NO

YES

 

X

 

 

B

B

 

Engines

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flight Deck

Remove Bendix EFIS

Install Collins Pro Line 21

NO

YES

 

 

 

FFS

C

D

Instrument Panel Layout

Changed to accommodate Pro Line 21 Change from AS, EADI/EHSI, ALT, VSI to PFD/ND, RMI removed

Engine Gauges replaced to MFD

Replaced Standby ADI with 4 in 1 ESIS

NO

YES

 

 

 

FFS

C

D

 

Cabin

Three new avionics racks installed

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

A

Flight Controls

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aerodynamic Controls

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAMPLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: BE‑300 (FF Serial) With Proline 21 (1 pilot)

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: BE‑300 (FF Serial) With Bendix/King EFS-10 (2 pilot)

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

MANEUVER

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

Engine Start

Engine Gauges changed to electronic display

NO

NO

 

X

 

 

A

A

Preflight

Avionics Preflight

NO

YES

 

X

 

 

B

B

Taxi

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Takeoff

PFD replaces separate Basic T inst.

Engine Power Instruments changed to electronic display

NO

NO

 

 

 

FFS

C

D

RTO

Or

V1 Fail

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climb

Cruise

Decent

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instrument Approaches

All new PFD/ND, FMS, Autopilot

NO

YES

 

 

 

FFS

C

D

Landing

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Normal Procedures

See Airplane Flight Manual Supplement

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

D

Abnormal Procedures

See Airplane Flight Manual Supplement

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

D

Emergency Procedures

See Airplane Flight Manual Supplement

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

D

In-Flight Maneuvers

Steep Turns, Slow Flight, Approach to Stall,

because affected by PFD display changes

NO

NO

 

 

 

FFS

C

D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAMPLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: BE‑300 (FF Serial) With Proline 21 (1 pilot)

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: BE‑300 (FF Serial) With Bendix/King EFS-10 (2 pilot)

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

SYSTEM

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

21

Air Conditioning

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22

Auto-Flight

Bendix Autopilot with KMC-440 control panel and KMS-446 Mode control replaced by Collins Pro Line 21 with APS-300 Autopilot System & FGP-3000 control panel

YES

YES

 

 

 

FTD

C

D

23

Communications

Collins Pro Line 21 Communication Transceivers are installed (dual VHF-300E, single VHF-300)

Replaced Audio Control Panel with New panel mounted ACP(NAT-804/805)

Removed Bendix Radios and replace with CDU-3000 radio tuning with CTL-23D for Ground Comm and Standby Tuning

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

C

24

Electrical Power

Individual Circuits & Circuit Breakers change with new labels and locations, Emergency Power requirements for ESIS

NO

YES

 

X

 

 

B

B

25

Equipment / Furn.

Three New Avionics Racks

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

A

26

Fire Protection

Firewall Shutoff and Fire Extinguisher Buttons relocated on glareshield

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

A

31

Indicating/Record

Replaced A/P TRIM FAIL and A/P DISC lamp assemblies with Blank lamp assemblies on warning panel. Added RUD BOOST OFF lamp to caution panel

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

C

33

Lights

Pilot and Copilot dimming control added to the overhead panel for EFIS display system brightness control.

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

A

34

Navigation

Install Collins Pro Line 21 (dual FMS-3000, dual NAV-300 for VOR/ILS/ADF/MKR, dual DME-300, dual GPS-300S) & single Laseref V available in reversion modes.

(FMS has fixed priority for NAV Data source GPS/GPS/DME/VOR/IRS)

MMR and control head added for LAAS

Turn Coordinator removed, pointer on PFD provides slip/skid indication

Honeywell TCAS II (TPA-81A) replaces TCAS I

Additional functions added to EGPWS with Honeywell Mark V, add RAAS

Bendix/King TRA-67A Transponders replace Collins TDR-94 and tuning moves to CDU-3000 with Ident on Inst. Panel also

WX-1000 added for Lightning Detection with Storm Clear button on reversion panel

NO

YES

 

 

 

FTD

C

D

45

Maintenance Computer

MDC-3110 added for maintenance diagnostics

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

A

46

Information Systems

IFIS-5000 System installed with single CCP-3000 and single FSU-5010

XMWR-1000 XM Receiver installed

CMU-300 provides VHF Data Link for ACARS and Textual Weather only

DBU-5000 Flashdrive Data Loader installed

NO

YES

 

 

ICBT

 

C

B

77

Engine Indicating

Analog Engine Indicators replaced by digital engine indications on Pro Line 21 Muti-Function Display (MFD)

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Definitions used in the ODR Tables:

X           = Pilot’s Operating Handbook and or Flight Manual Supplement

CBT      = Computer Based Training

ICBT     = Interactive Computer Based Training

FTD       = Flight Training Device (Level 1 to 7)

CPT       = Cockpit Procedures Trainer

FFS       = Full Flight Simulator (Level A, B, C, D)

 

 

DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: 300/300LW/B300/B300C with G1000

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: 300/300LW/B300/B300C
(MDR NOTE (1) equipment only)

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

DESIGN

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

General Airplane Configuration

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weights

Reduces Basic Operating Weight

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

B

Airworthiness Limitations

New aircraft Limitations

(See Airplane Flight Manual Supplement)

NO

YES

X

 

 

 

A

A

Placards and Markings

New aircraft Placarding

(See Airplane Flight Manual Supplement)

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

A

 

Servicing

AFMS Section 8, new service & handling

(ref. G1000/GFC 700 System Maint. Manual)

NO

YES

 

X

 

 

B

B

 

Engines

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flight Deck

Remove Collins EFIS-85B, FCP-65 Mode Control Panel, Mode Control Annun. Panel, AP Control, AP Annun. Panel

Install Garmin G1000

NO

YES

 

 

 

FFS

C

D

Instrument Panel Layout

·    Separate AS, EADI/EHSI, ALT, VSI to dual PFD Format

·    RMI removed

·    Engine Gauges replaced to MFD

·    Replaced standby ADI with mechanical standby AI, altimeter and airspeed ind.

·    Prop sync switch moved to instrument panel

·    Standby instrument power switch moved to instrument panel

·    GMC 710 autopilot controller beneath glareshield in center instrument panel

·    GMA-1347 audio panels outboard of PFD

·    GCU-477 MFD control in center pedestal

NO

YES

 

 

 

FFS

C

D

 

Cabin

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flight Controls

Electric Trim has added speed schedule.

YES

NO

 

X

 

 

A

A

Aerodynamic Controls

Garmin Electronic Stability & Protection (ESP) Garmin Under Speed Protection (USP) and Overspeed Protection Systems added (option)

YES

YES

 

 

 

FFS

D

B

 

 

 

SAMPLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: 300/300LW/B300/B300C with G1000

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: 300/300LW/B300/B300C
(MDR NOTE (1) equipment only)

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

MANEUVER

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preflight

Avionics Preflight

NO

YES

 

X

 

 

B

B

Engine Start

Engine Gauges changed to electronic display on the MFD

NO

NO

 

X

 

 

B

B

Taxi

Taxi and Runup Checklist Procedures - See Airplane Flight Manual Supplement

NO

YES

 

X

 

 

B

B

Takeoff

PFD replaces separate Basic T inst.

Engine Power Instruments moved to MFD.

Speed displayed on tape with Low Speed Awareness.

Altitude displayed on tape with RAD ALT interface collocated.

NO

NO

 

 

 

FFS

C

D

RTO

Or

V1 Fail

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climb

Cruise

Decent

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In-Flight Maneuvers

Steep Turns, Slow Flight, Approach to Stall affected by PFD display changes for Low Speed Awareness cues.

SVS function and use.

ESP & USP function and use

NO

NO

 

 

 

FFS

C

D

Instrument Approaches

All new PFD, MFD, FMS, Autopilot

WAAS procedures, LNAV & LPV approaches

USP function and use

NO

YES

 

 

 

FFS

C

D

Landing

PFD Primary Flight Inst. with Vref on speed tape. RAD Alt & Mins on Altitude tape.

NO

YES

 

 

 

FFS

B

B

Shutdown

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Normal Procedures

See Airplane Flight Manual Supplement for review of all Normal Procedures

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

D

Abnormal Procedures

See Airplane Flight Manual Supplement for new or changed Abnormal Procedures

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

D

Emergency Procedures

See Airplane Flight Manual Supplement for new or changed Emergency Procedures

NO

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAMPLE DIFFERENCES TABLE

 

DIFFERENCE AIRCRAFT: 300/300LW/B300/B300C with G1000

 

BASE AIRCRAFT: 300/300LW/B300/B300C
(MDR NOTE (1) equipment only)

COMPLIANCE METHOD

TRAINING

CHKG/CURR

SYSTEM

REMARKS

FLT

CHAR

PROC

CHNG

LVL

A

LVL

B

LVL

C

LVL

D

CHK

CURR

21

Air Conditioning

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22

Auto-Flight

Collins APS-65 autopilot & FCP-65 mode control replaced by Garmin GFC 700 autopilot with GMC 710 mode control.

Alt. Alerter integrated on PFD using DCU.

Remote Mode Annun. Panel removed for GFC-700 Mode Annun. now integrated on PFD.

RED Autopilot Disconnect on yoke now single stage switch for Trim, YD, RB, AP

 

Rudder Boost using AP servo for Vmcg per Exemption 5599 (B300, B300C only)

 

YES

YES

 

 

FTD

 

C

C

22

Auto-Flight

Garmin ESP System software, default to ON

Garmin USP System software

AP coupled Go-Around only with ESP installed

 

YES

YES

 

 

 

FFS

C

D

23

Communications

Dual Garmin GIA 63W Communication Transceivers are installed.

Replaced Audio Control Panel with dual Garmin GMA 1347 audio panels outboard of each PFD.

Emer. Freq. push button add on Center Pedestal

 

NO

YES

 

X

 

 

B

B

24

Electrical Power

Individual Circuits & Circuit Breakers change with new EL Panel labels and locations.

(No circuit breaker source color code provide)

Power Distribution for new systems (AFMS Sec.7)

Standby battery powered items changed

 

AC Inverters and associated switches removed by G1000 installation

NO

YES

 

X

 

 

B

B

25

Equipment / Furn.

Several New Avionics Racks behind instrument panel and in forward avionics bay

NO

NO

X

 

 

 

A

A

26

Fire Protection

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

Flight Controls

Electric Trim Circuit Breaker Switch removed.

Trim interrupt (Yoke Trim Button) new function

Electric Pitch Trim speed schedule added.

YES

YES

 

X

 

 

B

A

28

Fuel

No Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

29

Hydraulic

No Change