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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION

National Policy

ORDER

8900.2A

 

 

Effective Date:

3/31/15

SUBJ:

General Aviation Airman Designee Handbook

1.    In 2006, Aviation Safety (AVS) published Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Order VS 1100.2, Managing AVS Delegation Programs, which provided direction for the management and oversight of AVS delegation programs, including Flight Standards Service (AFS) designees. During the next 2 years, the AVS Delegation Steering Group, which included representation from AFS, identified important goals including the integration of AFS designee policy. An AFS working group, including policy holders for each General Aviation (GA) airman designee type, was formed to work on this consolidated order. This order contains integrated procedures for the selection, appointment, oversight, training, renewal, termination, and appeal of AFS GA airman designees in accordance with Order VS 1100.2.

2.    This order contains procedures for authorized GA airman designees and inspectors to conduct certificate holder oral and practical tests and issue Temporary Airman Certificates.

3.    When differences in guidance appear between this order and the current edition of FAA Order 8900.1, Flight Standards Information Management System (FSIMS), Volume 13, Flight Standards Designees, use the document with the most current revision date. This order also applies to all aviation safety inspectors (ASI) (referred to in this order as ASIs or inspectors) who review and approve airman application and testing files for GA airman designees.

ORIGINAL SIGNED by

/s/ John S. Duncan

Director, Flight Standards Service

Table of Contents

Paragraph                                                                                                                             Page

Chapter 1. General Information

1. Purpose of This Order.......................................................................................................1-1

2. Audience...........................................................................................................................1-1

3. Where You Can Find This Order......................................................................................1-1

4. What This Order Cancels..................................................................................................1-1

5. Explanation of Policy Changes.........................................................................................1-2

6. Delegation/Rescission of a Designee Authorization.........................................................1-2

7. Role of the Designee.........................................................................................................1-2

8. Definitions.........................................................................................................................1-3

9. Office Information and Points of Contact (POC).............................................................1-5

Chapter 2. Selection and Appointment

1. Selection............................................................................................................................2-1

2. Appointment......................................................................................................................2-3

3. General Eligibility Requirements......................................................................................2-4

Chapter 3. Oversight, Training, and Renewal

1. Oversight............................................................................................................................3-1

2. Initial Training Seminar.....................................................................................................3-1

3. Recurrent Training.............................................................................................................3-2

4. Expiration..........................................................................................................................3-2

5. Renewal.............................................................................................................................3-3

6. Knowledge and Skill.........................................................................................................3-4

Chapter 4. Termination and Appeal

1. Termination.......................................................................................................................4-1

2. Types of Termination........................................................................................................4-1

3. Termination Letter............................................................................................................4-1

4. Appeal...............................................................................................................................4-1

Chapter 5. Privileges, Limitations, and Responsibilities

1. Privileges...........................................................................................................................5-1

2. Limitations........................................................................................................................5-2

3. Responsibilities.................................................................................................................5-3

Chapter 6. Designated Mechanic Examiner (DME) and Designated Parachute Rigger
Examiner (DPRE) Program

Section 1. DME—General.......................................................................................................6-1

1. Additional Requirements for Appointment.......................................................................6-1

2. DME Designations Issued.................................................................................................6-2

3. Designee Materials............................................................................................................6-2

4. Security..............................................................................................................................6-3

5. FAA Certification Policy...................................................................................................6-3

6. Aviation Mechanic Tests...................................................................................................6-3

Table of Contents (Continued)

Paragraph                                                                                                                             Page

Section 2. DME—Conducting and Grading Tests..................................................................6-4

7. Preparation: Conduct a Pretest Interview..........................................................................6-4

8. Knowledge and Skill Elements for DME..........................................................................6-5

9. Applicant Eligibility..........................................................................................................6-6

10. Conducting the Tests.......................................................................................................6-8

11. Evaluating Applicant Performance...............................................................................6-10

12. Recording the Results of Tests......................................................................................6-12

13. When the Applicant Passes...........................................................................................6-12

14. Applicants Under 18 Years of Age...............................................................................6-14

15. When the Applicant Fails..............................................................................................6-14

16. Issuance of FAA Form 8060-4 by a DME When Oral and Practical Tests are
Not Administered..........................................................................................................6-15

17. Reconstruction of a Lost Certification File...................................................................6-16

18. Disposition of Files.......................................................................................................6-16

Section 3. DPRE—General Information...............................................................................6-18

19. Additional Requirements for Appointment...................................................................6-18

20. DPRE Designations Issued............................................................................................6-19

21. Designee Materials........................................................................................................6-19

22. Security..........................................................................................................................6-19

23. FAA Certification Policy...............................................................................................6-20

24. Parachute Rigger Tests..................................................................................................6-20

Section 4. DPRE—Conducting and Grading Tests...............................................................6-20

25. Preparation: Conduct a Pretest Interview......................................................................6-20

26. Knowledge and Skill Elements for DPRE.....................................................................6-21

27. Applicant Eligibility......................................................................................................6-22

28. Conducting the Tests.....................................................................................................6-24

29. Evaluating Applicant Performance................................................................................6-25

30. Recording the Results of Tests......................................................................................6-27

31. When the Applicant Passes............................................................................................6-27

32. Applicants Under 18 Years of Age................................................................................6-28

33. When the Applicant Fails..............................................................................................6-29

34. Issuance of FAA Form 8060-4 by a DPRE When Oral and Practical Tests are
Not Administered...........................................................................................................6-30

35. Reconstruction of a Lost Certification File....................................................................6-31

36. Disposition of Files........................................................................................................6-31

Chapter 7. Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE) Program

Section 1. General....................................................................................................................7-1

1. Additional Qualifications...................................................................................................7-1

2. Specific Eligibility Requirements......................................................................................7-3

3. Types of Designation.........................................................................................................7-7

4. Additional Designations....................................................................................................7-9

5. Designee COA Letters.....................................................................................................7-10

Table of Contents (Continued)

Paragraph                                                                                                                             Page

Section 2. Conduct Practical Test/Certification Functions....................................................7-12

6. General.............................................................................................................................7-12

7. Testing Applicants Trained by the Designee...................................................................7-16

8. Designee Limitations.......................................................................................................7-17

9. Status of Designees During Practical Tests.....................................................................7-17

10. Aircraft Used for Practical Tests...................................................................................7-19

11. Aircraft Equipment........................................................................................................7-22

12. FSTDs............................................................................................................................7-23

13. Engine Shutdown on Multiengine Airplanes During the Practical Test........................7-23

14. Structure of the Practical Test........................................................................................7-24

15. Practical Test Discontinuance........................................................................................7-25

16. Repeating Maneuvers on Practical Tests........................................................................7-26

17. Practical Test Briefings..................................................................................................7-26

18. Segmented Practical Tests (Planned).............................................................................7-27

19. Retest in Event of Failure...............................................................................................7-27

20. Accidents and Incidents During Practical Tests.............................................................7-27

21. PTS.................................................................................................................................7-28

22. Prerequisites for Practical Tests.....................................................................................7-28

23. Verification of an Applicant’s Identity...........................................................................7-33

24. Illegal Substance Conviction..........................................................................................7-33

25. Completion of FAA Form 8710-1..................................................................................7-33

26. Preparation of the Certification File...............................................................................7-34

27. Review of an Designee’s Decision.................................................................................7-35

28. Issuance of FAA Form 8060-4.......................................................................................7-35

29. Limitations......................................................................................................................7-36

30. Issuance of FAA Form 8060-5.......................................................................................7-37

31. Part 141 Stage Checks....................................................................................................7-38

32. Blue Seal Certificates.....................................................................................................7-38

33. Flight and Duty Time as a DPE.....................................................................................7-38

34. Procedures......................................................................................................................7-38

Section 3. Issue a Student Pilot Certificate............................................................................7-43

35. General...........................................................................................................................7-43

36. Nonrenewable................................................................................................................7-44

37. Procedures......................................................................................................................7-44

Section 4. Special Emphasis Items.........................................................................................7-46

38. Special Emphasis Items..................................................................................................7-46

39. Dangers Associated with Simulation of Power Failure in Single-Engine Airplanes
by the Interruption of Fuel Flow.....................................................................................7-46

40. Pilot External Vigilance (Scan Program)........................................................................7-47

41. Accurate Position Reporting and Collision Avoidance...................................................7-47

42. Instrument Flying Skills—Partial Panel..........................................................................7-48

Table of Contents (Continued)

Paragraph                                                                                                                             Page

Section 5. Flight Reviews and Competency Checks..............................................................7-49

43. Flight Reviews and Competency Checks.......................................................................7-49

44. Designee or Inspector Participation................................................................................7-49

45. Application for a Flight Review or Competency Check.................................................7-49

46. Combining Flight Reviews and Competency Checks....................................................7-49

47. Evaluating the Flight Review.........................................................................................7-49

48. Length of Review...........................................................................................................7-50

49. Logbook Endorsements..................................................................................................7-50

50. Recent Instrument Experience under § 61.57.................................................................7-51

51. High Performance Airplane Check under § 61.31(f)......................................................7-51

52. Complex Airplane Check under § 61.31(e)....................................................................7-52

53. Self-Launching or Powered Sailplane Flight Checks.................................................... 7-52

54. Night Vision Goggles (NVG) Training, Endorsement, and Qualification for
Pilots and Flight Instructors............................................................................................7-52

Section 6. Conduct a Recreational Pilot Certification, Including Additional
Category/Class Ratings at the Recreational Pilot Certification Level...................7-55

55. General............................................................................................................................7-55

56. Additional Category and Class Ratings..........................................................................7-57

57. Upgrading to a Private Pilot Certificate..........................................................................7-57

58. Procedures.......................................................................................................................7-58

Section 7. Conduct a Sport Pilot Certification.......................................................................7-62

59. General...........................................................................................................................7-62

60. Procedures......................................................................................................................7-63

Section 8. Conduct a Private Pilot Certification, Including Additional
Category/Class Ratings at the Private Pilot Certification Level...........................7-66

61. General...........................................................................................................................7-66

62. Eligibility Requirements................................................................................................7-66

63. Limitations.....................................................................................................................7-68

64. Categories and Classes...................................................................................................7-69

65. Recreational Pilot Upgrades...........................................................................................7-69

Section 9. Conduct a Commerical Pilot Certification, Including Additional
Category/Class Ratings at the Commerical Pilot Certification Level...................7-70

66. General...........................................................................................................................7-70

67. Eligibility Requirements................................................................................................7-70

68. Categories and Classes...................................................................................................7-72

69. Instructor Privileges in Lighter-than-Air Aircraft..........................................................7-73

70. Complex Airplane Requirements...................................................................................7-73

71. Procedures......................................................................................................................7-73

Section 10. Conduct an Airline Transport Pilot Certification, Including Additional
Category/Class Ratings at the Airline Transport Certification Level...................7-77

72. General...........................................................................................................................7-77

Table of Contents (Continued)

Paragraph                                                                                                                             Page

Section 11. Conduct an Instrument Rating Certification........................................................7-78

73. General............................................................................................................................7-78

74. Eligibility Requirements.................................................................................................7-79

75. Types of Instrument Ratings Issued................................................................................7-80

76. Flight Controls................................................................................................................7-80

77. Use of Nonapproved Instrument Approach Procedures (IAP).......................................7-80

78. Limitations......................................................................................................................7-80

79. Procedures.......................................................................................................................7-81

Section 12. Conduct a Pilot Type Rating Certification...........................................................7-85

80. General............................................................................................................................7-85

81. Pilot Type Rating That May Be Performed as Either a Single Pilot or With an SIC.....7-87

82. Procedures.......................................................................................................................7-98

Section 13. Procedures for Issuing a Second-in-Command Pilot Type Rating....................7-102

83. General..........................................................................................................................7-102

Section 14. Conduct a Private Pilot Certification for Weight Shift Control and Powered
Parachute, Including Additional Category/Class Ratings at the Private Pilot
Certification Level...............................................................................................7-102

84. General..........................................................................................................................7-102

85. Eligibility Requirements...............................................................................................7-102

86. Limitations....................................................................................................................7-104

87. Categories and Classes..................................................................................................7-104

88. Procedures.....................................................................................................................7-105

Section 15. Conduct a Flight Instructor with a Sport Pilot Rating Practical Test for an
Initial, Renewal, or Reinstatement.......................................................................7-109

89. General..........................................................................................................................7-109

90. General Procedures Initial Certification.......................................................................7-109

91. General Procedures for Renewal or Reinstatement......................................................7-111

92. Denial of Renewal or Reinstatement............................................................................7-111

93. Gold Seal Flight Instructor Certificates........................................................................7-112

94. Category and Class Privileges for a Flight Instructor Certificate with a Sport
Pilot Rating...................................................................................................................7-112

95. Procedures.....................................................................................................................7-113

Section 16. Conduct a Flight Instructor Practical Test for an Initial, Renewal,
Reinstatement Certification, or an Additional Category/Class Rating to a
Flight Instructor Certificate.................................................................................7-116

96. General.........................................................................................................................7-116

97. Knowledge Test............................................................................................................7-118

98. Practical Test................................................................................................................7-118

99. Eligibility Requirements...............................................................................................7-119

100. General Procedures for Renewal or Reinstatement....................................................7-121

101. Denial of Renewal or Reinstatement..........................................................................7-122

Table of Contents (Continued)

Paragraph                                                                                                                             Page

102. Gold Seal Flight Instructor Certificates.......................................................................7-122

103. Category, Class, and Instrument Ratings Placed on a Flight Instructor Certificate....7-123

104. Limitations...................................................................................................................7-123

105. Procedures....................................................................................................................7-123

Section 17. Conduct Pilot Proficiency Checks as a Pilot Proficiency Examiner...................7-128

106. General.........................................................................................................................7-128

107. Limitations...................................................................................................................7-128

108. Experience Requirements for Designation as a PPE...................................................7-129

109. Practical Test...............................................................................................................7-130

110. COA Letter..................................................................................................................7-130

111. Additional Designations..............................................................................................7-130

112. PIC Proficiency Check Procedures.............................................................................7-130

113. Proficiency Check Records.........................................................................................7-131

Section 18. Accomplish Designation/Issue Certificates as an ACR, Limited to
Examining Authority under Part 141...................................................................7-131

114. General........................................................................................................................7-131

115. Selection of ACRs.......................................................................................................7-132

116. Certification of Graduates...........................................................................................7-133

Section 19. Accomplish Designation/Issue Certificates as an ACR Employed Solely
by an FIRC Sponsor.............................................................................................7-133

117. General........................................................................................................................7-133

118. Selection of ACRs.......................................................................................................7-134

119. Flight Instructor Certificate and Ratings Issued on the Basis of Military
Competence by an MCE...............................................................................................7-135

120. Certification of Graduates...........................................................................................7-138

Section 20. Accomplish Designation/Conduct Functions as an MCE, FPE, GIE,
and FIRE..............................................................................................................7-139

121. Background.................................................................................................................7-139

122. General Information for MCE and FPE Designations................................................7-140

123. Pilot Certificates and Ratings Issued on the Basis of Military Competence by
an MCE.........................................................................................................................7-143

124. Compliance with Other Provisions.............................................................................7-144

125. Designation of an FIRE..............................................................................................7-144

126. Designation of a GIE..................................................................................................7-145

Section 21. Accomplish Issuance of a U.S. Pilot Certificate Based on a Foreign Pilot
License.................................................................................................................7-146

127. General Information....................................................................................................7-146

128. Procedures...................................................................................................................7-158

Table of Contents (Continued)

Paragraph                                                                                                                             Page

Section 22. IACRA Process...................................................................................................7-163

129. General.........................................................................................................................7-163

130. Procedures....................................................................................................................7-163

Chapter 8. Adminstrative Information

1. Distribution..........................................................................................................................8-1

2. Deviations............................................................................................................................8-1

3. Suggestions or Comments...................................................................................................8-1

Appendix A. Acronyms and Abbreviations..................................................................................A-1

Appendix B. Directive Feedback Information..............................................................................B-1

List of Figures

Figure                                                                                                                                    Page

6-1. Instructions for Completing FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating
Application......................................................................................................................6-32

1. Procedures for Completing FAA Form 8610-2..........................................................6-32

2. Privacy Act.................................................................................................................6-33

3. Complete the Top Section..........................................................................................6-34

4. Block I—Applicant Information................................................................................6-34

5. Block II—Certificate or Rating Applied for On Basis of—......................................6-38

6. Block III—Record of Experience..............................................................................6-40

7. Block IV—Applicant’s Certification.........................................................................6-42

8. Block V—I Find This Applicant Meets the Experience Requirements of 14 CFR
Part 65 and is Eligible to Take the Required Tests....................................................6-43

9. For FAA Use Only.....................................................................................................6-44

10. Results of Oral and Practical Tests..........................................................................6-44

11. Designated Examiner’s Report................................................................................6-45

12. Applicant’s Certification..........................................................................................6-45

13. FAA Inspector’s Report...........................................................................................6-46

6-2A. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application...............................6-47

6-2B. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application...............................6-48

6-2C. Attachment for FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application......6-49

6-2D. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application...............................6-50

6-2E. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application...............................6-51

6-2F. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)......6-52

6-2G. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)......6-53

6-2H. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)......6-54

6-2I. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side).......6-55

6-2J. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side).......6-56

6-2K. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)......6-57

6-2L. FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate.......................................................6-58

List of Figures (Continued)

Figure                                                                                                                                    Page

6-2M. FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate......................................................6-59

6-2N. Example Statement of Additional Instructions..............................................................6-59

6-2O. Airman Computer Test Report for Aviation Mechanic Airframe (AMA)....................6-60

6-2P. Minimum Tool and Equipment List...............................................................................6-61

6-3A. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application...............................6-71

6-3B. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Front Side)..........6-72

6-3C. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)......6-73

6-3D. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)......6-74

6-3E. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)......6-75

6-3F. Example Statement of Additional Instruction................................................................6-76

6-3G. Airman Computer Test for Parachute Rigger................................................................6-77

6-3H. FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate.......................................................6-78

6-3I. FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate........................................................6-79

6-3J. FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate........................................................6-80

6-4A. Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic Oral and Practical Planning Sheet
(Front Side)....................................................................................................................6-81

6-4B. Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic Oral and Practical Planning Sheet
(Reverse Side)...............................................................................................................6-82

6-4C. Parachute Rigger Oral/Practical Test Planning Sheet...................................................6-83

7-1. Experience Required for Initial Designation as a Sport Pilot Examiner...........................7-4

7-2A. Experience Required for Initial Designation as Private Pilot Examiner........................7-5

7-2B. Experience Required for Initial Designation as Commercial Pilot Examiner................7-5

7-3A. Experience Required for Initial Designation as a Commercial and Instrument
Rating Examiner............................................................................................................7-6

7-3B. Experience Required for Initial Designation as an Airline Transport Pilot
Examiner........................................................................................................................7-6

7-4. Recent Pilot-in-Command Experience Required..............................................................7-7

7-5. Vintage Airplane Groups................................................................................................7-12

7-6. ICAO Level 4 English Language Proficiency Criteria.................................................7-165

7-7. Sample FAA Form 8410-1, Airman Proficiency/Qualification Check.........................7-166

7-8A. Pilot Examiner Test Guide.........................................................................................7-167

7-8B. Sport Pilot Examiner Test Guide................................................................................7-171

7-9A. Sample Letter of Discontinuance (Pilot)....................................................................7-175

7-9B. Sample Letter of Discontinuance (Sport Pilot)..........................................................7-176

7-10. Airman Knowledge Test Report.................................................................................7-177

7-10A. Airman Knowledge Test Report..............................................................................7-178

7-11. Letter from Part 141 School with Knowledge Test Examining Authority.................7-179

7-12. Sample Transporation Security Administration Approval Letter...............................7-180

7-13. FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Front)................7-181

7-13A. FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Back).............7-182

7-14. Sample of FAA Form 8710-11, Airman Certificate and/or Rating
Application—Sport Pilot (Front Side).......................................................................7-183

7-14A. Sample of FAA Form 8710-11, Airman Certificate and/or Rating
Application—Sport Pilot (Reverse Side).................................................................7-184

List of Figures (Continued)

Figure                                                                                                                                  Page

7-15. Sample FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Pilot).............................7-185

7-15A. Sample FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Sport Pilot)................7-186

7-16. Center Thrust Limitation..............................................................................................7-187

7-17. Sample FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application (Pilot)..................7-188

7-17A. Sample FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application (Sport Pilot).....7-189

7-18. Sample Application for a Part 141 Stage Check..........................................................7-190

7-19. Sample FAA Form 8420-2, Medical Certificate____ Class and Student Pilot
Certificate...................................................................................................................7-191

7-20. Sample Student Pilot Certificate.................................................................................7-192

7-21. Sample Recreational Pilot Certificate.........................................................................7-193

7-22. Sample Private Pilot Certificate with Recreational Pilot Category Privileges............7-194

7-23. Sample Commercial Pilot Certificate..........................................................................7-195

7-24. Sample ATP Certificate with Instrument Privileges Shown.......................................7-196

7-25. Sample Second-in-Command Limitation....................................................................7-197

7-26. Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Temporary Airman Certificate...................................7-198

7-27. Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Application for Graduates of Approved Training
Programs (Parts 141/142).........................................................................................7-199

7-28. Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Application for Graduates of Approved Training
Programs (Parts 135/121).........................................................................................7-200

7-29. Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Application for § 61.55 Applicants...........................7-201

7-30. SIC Pilot Type Rating Application Completed by an Authorized Designated
Examiner or an APD..................................................................................................7-202

7-31. Sample Gold Seal Flight Instructor Certificate (Pilot)................................................7-203

7-31A. Sample Gold Seal Flight Instructor Certificate with a Sport Pilot Rating...............7-204

7-32. Verification of Authenticity Form and Instructions....................................................7-204

Chapter 1. General Information

1.    Purpose of This Order.

a.    Mandatory Standardized Procedures and Policy. This order provides mandatory standardized procedures and policy for those who administer aviation mechanic, parachute rigger, or pilot oral and practical tests, as well as issue Temporary Airman Certificates. It also emphasizes the importance of the designee’s knowledge of administering oral and practical tests. Compliance with these mandatory procedures ensures that airman applicants meet a satisfactory level of competence and workmanship required for certification. This order does not relieve Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) personnel from instructing and providing guidance to designees.

b.    Types of General Aviation (GA) Airman Designees Covered in This Order. Throughout this order, Technical Personnel Examiner (TPE) references will refer to Designated Mechanic Examiners (DME) and Designated Parachute Rigger Examiners (DPRE) collectively. When necessary, DMEs and/or DPREs may be specifically identified if applicable only to that designee type. For the purposes of this order, Designated Pilot Examiners (DPE) will refer to Private Pilot Examiners (PE), Commercial and Instrument Rating Examiners (CIRE), Commercial Pilot Examiners (CE), Airline Transport Pilot Examiners (ATPE), Flight Instructor Examiners (FIE), National Designated Pilot Examiners, Flight Engineer Examiners (NDPE/FEE), Sport Pilot Examiners (SPE), Sport Pilot Flight Instructor Examiners (SFIE), and Pilot Proficiency Examiners (PPE), as well as pilot examiners with administrative privileges only including: Airman Certification Representatives (ACR), Flight Instructor Renewal Examiners (FIRE), Foreign Pilot Examiners (FPE), Ground Instructor Examiners (GIE), and Military Competency Examiners (MCE).

Note:  This order does not apply to check airmen/check pilots and Aircrew Designated Examiners (ADE) serving in programs approved under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) parts 91 subpart K (part 91K), 121, 125, and 135. It also does not apply to Training Center Evaluators (TCE) who serve at training centers certificated under 14 CFR part 142.

2.    Audience. The primary audience is designees responsible for administering oral and practical tests and issuing Temporary Airman Certificates.

3.    Where You Can Find This Order. You can find this order on the MyFAA employee Web site at https://employees.faa.gov/tools_resources/orders_notices. Inspectors can access this order through the Flight Standards Information Management System (FSIMS) at http://fsims.avs.faa.gov. Air carriers (operators) can find this order on the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) Web site at http://fsims.faa.gov. This order is available to the public at http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/orders_notices.

4.    What This Order Cancels. This order cancels FAA Order 8900.2, General Aviation Airman Designee Handbook, dated September 30, 2008.

Note:  Implementation procedures for the new PTS and test generator (for DMEs): Both the current PTS and the new test generator procedures will be in effect until 6 months after the effective date of this order, at which time, all tests must be administered under the new PTS and test generator guidelines. Newly appointed DMEs must use the new PTS/test generator upon completion of initial training.

5.    Explanation of Policy Changes. This revision incorporates updated information, procedural and policy changes, and new guidance. These changes include the following:

a.    Certificate of Authority (COA) Letter. FAA Form 8430-9, Certificate of Authority, and letters of authorization (LOA) are no longer issued. In this revision, all previous references to an LOA are now referred to as a COA. See Chapter 7, Section 1, paragraph 5 for further information.

b.    Test Observation. This revision changes how the designee will conduct their first test. This revision also changes DME appointment requirements. See Chapter 6, Section 1, subparagraph 1a(3).

c.    Conducting and Grading Tests. This revision changes how the designee will notify the FAA, and also changes how practical tests are developed. See Chapter 6, Section 2, paragraph 10.

d.    Original FAA Form 8610-2. This revision changes requirements for an applicant’s graduation or completion certificate from an AMTS. See Chapter 6, Section 2, subparagraph 9d(2)(a).

e.    Conducting Practical Tests. This revision requires the designee to notify the FAA before testing. See Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 6.

f.    Procedures for Issuing a Second-in-Command (SIC) Pilot Type Rating. This revision refers the designee to FAA Order 8900.1, Flight Standards Information Management System (FSIMS), Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 5 for completing the certification function.

g.    Flight Simulation Training Devices (FSTD). This revision changes requirements for FSTDs, personal computer-based aviation training devices (PCATD), basic aviation training devices (BATD), and advanced aviation training devices (AATD). See Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 12.

h.    Verification of an Applicant’s Identity. This revision adds Transportation Security Administration (TSA) requirements for foreign nationals. See Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 23.

6.    Delegation/Rescission of a Designee Authorization. Title 49 of the United States Code (49 U.S.C.) § 44702 empowers the FAA Administrator to delegate to private individuals any function relating to the examination, inspection, and testing of airman applicants.

7.    Role of the Designee. Designees have been an important part of the FAA’s support to the flying public for over 60 years. During that time, designees successfully completed thousands of certification activities on the FAA’s behalf. The designee function is vital to enhancing the FAA’s public service role and enhancing overall safety in the National Airspace System (NAS). The FAA and its designees are in a symbiotic relationship. The FAA appoints designees to leverage its workforce and provide certification services to the public, and the designee provides certification services to the public in accordance with FAA policy and guidance. One component of this relationship involves how the FAA views the designee, as well as how the designee views the FAA.

8.    Definitions. This paragraph contains definitions for FAA forms and terms commonly used in this order. Appendix A contains a list of acronyms used in this order.

a.    Airman Medical Certificate. An airman medical certificate is a valid certificate issued under 14 CFR part 67, Medical Standards and Certification.

b.    Aviation Maintenance Technician School (AMTS). An FAA-approved school for aviation mechanics. Graduation from the appropriate course of a certificated AMTS is one way for mechanic applicants to meet the experience requirement.

c.    Aviation Safety Inspector (ASI). An FAA employee with the necessary technical qualifications who is responsible for developing, administering, investigating, and enforcing safety regulations for airmen, aircraft, and aircraft operations. In most cases, ASIs are also responsible for the oversight of designees.

d.    Aviation Safety Technician (AST). An FAA employee who provides technical support and assistance to ASIs.

e.    COA Letter. A COA letter is issued to each Flight Standards GA designee to specify their authority and appropriate limitations for a given appointment period.

Note:  FAA Form 8430-9 and LOAs are no longer issued, but may remain in effect until expiration, unless surrendered or terminated before that time.

f.    Designated Mechanic Examiner (DME). A DME is an individual, appointed in accordance with 14 CFR part 183, § 183.25, who holds a valid aviation mechanic certificate, possesses technical knowledge and experience required for aviation mechanic certification, and meets the general qualification requirements set forth in Chapter 2 and the DME-specific qualifications set forth in Chapter 6 of this order.

g.    Designated Parachute Rigger Examiner (DPRE). A DPRE is an individual, appointed in accordance with § 183.25, who has a high level of knowledge in the subject areas required for parachute rigger certification, holds a master parachute rigger certificate for the particular designation, and meets the general qualification requirements in Chapter 2, and the DPRE-specific qualifications set forth in Chapter 6 of this order.

h.    Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE). A DPE is an individual, appointed in accordance with § 183.23, who meets the general qualification requirements in Chapter 2 and the DPE-specific qualifications in Chapter 7. For the purposes of this order, a DPE is a PE, CIRE, CE, ATPE, FIE, PPE, NDPE/FEE, SPE, or SFIE. It also includes designees with administrative privileges only: ACR, FIRE, FPE, GIE, and MCE.

i.    Designee. Designee is the general term used in this order to describe a representative of the FAA Administrator authorized by law and appointed in accordance with the applicable provisions of § 44702 or part 183, Representatives of the Administrator, to examine, test, and/or make inspections necessary to issue airman or aircraft certificates. For the purposes of this order, designee refers to individual examiner designations, including TPEs and DPEs.

j.    FAA Form 8000-5, Certificate of Designation. FAA Form 8000-5 is a certificate issued to a designee by the managing FAA office authorizing the designee privileges. Throughout this order, it is referenced as FAA Form 8000-5.

k.    FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate. FAA Form 8060-4 is a Temporary Airman Certificate issued to a successful airman applicant.

l.    FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application. FAA Form 8060-5 is issued by a DPE to an unsuccessful airman applicant.

m.    FAA Form 8110-28, Application and Statement of Qualification (DME/DPRE/Designated Airworthiness Representative-Maintenance (DAR-T). FAA Form 8110-28 is the application used by DME/DPRE applicants for appointment and renewal.

n.    FAA Form 8420-2, Medical Certificate _________ Class and Student Pilot Certificate. FAA Form 8420-2 is issued to an airman applicant who meets the requirements for a Student Pilot Certificate by an Aviation Medical Examiner (AME) and serves as both a medical certificate and a Student Pilot Certificate.

o.    FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application. FAA Form 8610-2 is used by mechanic and parachute rigger applicants when applying for an airman certificate and/or rating.

p.    FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application. FAA Form 8710-1 is used by pilot applicants (other than sport pilot applicants) when applying for an airman certificate and/or rating.

q.    FAA Form 8710-2, Student Pilot Certificate. FAA Form 8710-2 is issued to a qualified student pilot applicant.

r.    FAA Form 8710-10, Designated Pilot Examiner Application. FAA Form 8710-10 is the application used by DPE applicants (other than SPE/SFIE applicants) to submit to the National Examiner Board (NEB) or managing FAA office, as applicable.

s.    FAA Form 8710-11, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application – Sport Pilot. FAA Form 8710‑11 is used by sport pilot applicants when applying for an airman certificate and/or rating.

t.    FAA Form 8710-12, Light-Sport Standardization Board-Designated Pilot Examiner Candidate Application. FAA Form 8710-12 is the application used by SPE/SFIE applicants to submit to the NEB.

u.    Minimum Tool and Equipment List. Tools and equipment necessary to administer the General, Airframe, & Powerplant practical tests. See Figure 6-2P.

v.    Flight Instructor Refresher Clinic (FIRC). FIRCs provide a method by which instructors can renew their instructor certificates.

w.    Integrated Airman Certification and/or Rating Application (IACRA). The IACRA system is an Internet-based (paperless) method of processing airman applications.

x.    Managing FAA Office. The managing FAA office refers to the geographically assigned office responsible for managing and providing oversight for designees. Previous references to Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) and International Field Office (IFO) are now referenced as the managing FAA office.

y.    Pilot’s Bill of Rights (PBR). See FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 5, Section 2 for details on PBR.

z.    Scenario-Based Training (SBT). A training system that uses a highly structured script of real-world experiences to address flight-training objectives in an operational environment.

aa.    Technical Personnel Examiner (TPE). TPE encompasses many types of GA designees. In previous versions of this order, TPE was a common reference for only DME and DPRE. Although most references to TPE have been removed in this revision, any TPE references remaining still apply only to DME and DPRE.

9.    Office Information and Points of Contact (POC). The following offices play a role in designee management, from reviewing applicant qualifications to processing certification paperwork and writing policy for designee management. This list is not intended to be inclusive; however, it is provided as a resource for additional guidance where applicable.

a.    Airman Certification Branch (AFS-760). AFS-760, which is part of the FAA Civil Aviation Registry (AFS-700), has final authority for the issuance of permanent airman certificates and maintenance of certification records. AFS-760 is located at the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (MMAC) in Oklahoma City, OK.

b.    Designee Quality Assurance Branch (AFS-650). AFS-650, which is part of AFS-600, collects National Examiner Board (NEB) application materials from designee applicants.

c.    Designee Standardization Branch (AFS-640). AFS-640, which is part of AFS-600, develops and conducts a variety of standardization seminars both domestically and internationally that are used by designees, designee applicants, representatives of delegations, and FAA personnel for initial training and renewal purposes.

d.    Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA). The EAA is an international organization of aviation enthusiasts interested in flying, building, and restoring recreational aircraft. The EAA considers application materials submitted by NDPE/FEE applicants and recommends qualified designee applicants.

e.    General Aviation & Commercial Division (AFS-800). AFS-800 is the FAA AFS division responsible for developing national policies, standards, systems, procedures, and programs for GA and advising senior FAA management on GA matters.

f.    Light Sport Aviation Branch (AFS-610). AFS-610, which is part of AFS-600, manages and provides oversight of the SPE, SFIE, and the light-sport aircraft repairman training programs.

g.    National Examiner Board (NEB). A board convened to oversee the designee application and screening process for AFS.

h.    Regulatory Support Division (AFS-600). AFS-600 promotes safety by educating and advising users through the development, implementation, analysis, and distribution of technical information including airmen testing, designee standardization, and management of aviation data systems.

Chapter 2. Selection and Appointment

1.    Selection.

a.    Application. The managing Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) office selects qualified applicants for designee appointment. When selecting qualified candidates, the managing FAA office considers the recommendations from knowledgeable members of the aviation community. The National Examiner Board (NEB), or other evaluating entity, receives applications and reviews designee applications for the general eligibility requirements in paragraph 3 of this chapter.

(1)    Designee applicants must complete an application package and submit it to the NEB for review and consideration. The package must contain a letter from the FAA office where the functions will be performed specifying that the complete application package has been reviewed and the applicant meets all the general requirements specified in paragraph 3 of this chapter. The application package must be mailed to: FAA, National Examiner Board, Attn: Designee Quality Assurance Branch (AFS-650), P.O. Box 25082, Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0082. Applicants should retain a copy of all application documents submitted to the FAA.

Note:  Applicants requesting designation as an Airman Certification Representative (ACR), Flight Instructor Renewal Examiner (FIRE), Foreign PilotExaminer (FPE), Ground Instructor Examiner (GIE), Military Competency Examiner (MCE), or Pilot Proficiency Examiner (PPE) must send their completed application forms directly to the managing FAA office for processing. Applicants already holding ACR, FIRE, FPE, GIE, MCE, or PPE designations and are applying for a designation to perform certification functions in an aircraft must submit an application for designation directly to the NEB.

Note:  National Designated Pilot Examiner and Flight Engineer Examiner (NDPE/FEE) applicants must already possess an active DPE before submitting an NDPE/FEE application directly to the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) for consideration. The EAA submits recommendations of qualified designee applicants to: FAA, General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS-800), 800 Independence Avenue S.W., Washington, DC 20591 for selection and appointment consideration.

Note:  Current FAA employees will not be appointed as designees until their employment with the FAA has ended. FAA employees may not apply to the NEB earlier than 120 calendar-days before their actual date of retirement or separation from the agency. The application must include a letter of recommendation from the manager at their last assigned office. Appointments will be limited to functions performed while employed by the FAA, or other experience within the aviation industry. If a former FAA employee submits an application beyond 3 years from the date of separation, all application requirements apply.

(a)    DME/DPRE Applicants. All DME/DPRE applicants must complete FAA Form 8110-28, Application and Statement of Qualification (DME/DPRE/DAR-T). The application package must also include legible copies of the applicable airman certificates held by the designee applicant.
(b)    DPE Applicants. DPE applicants, other than Sport Pilot Examiner (SPE)/Sport Pilot Flight Instructor Examiner (SFIE) applicants, must complete FAA Form 8710-10, Designated Pilot Examiner Application. SPE/SFIE applicants must complete FAA Form 8710-12, Light-Sport Standardization Board‑Designated Pilot Examiner Candidate Application. The application package must include a legible copy of airman and flight instructor certificates held by the designee applicant, and a copy of the designee applicant’s valid medical certificate (at least third class), if appropriate.
(2)    The NEB will review designee applications (with the exception of ACR, FIRE, FPE, GIE, MCE, NDPE/FEE, and PPE) and rank those applicants meeting the requirements, when applicable. The NEB will notify the applicant (by letter) of the results.

Note:  If the NEB determines a designee applicant is not qualified, the NEB Recorder will retain the application file for 4 calendar-months from the month of the evaluation, pending an appeal or request for additional information. At the end of the 4th calendar-month, the NEB Recorder will transfer the designee applicant’s application file to the NEB’s electronic database and discard the paper copies of the application file.

(3)    The appointing FAA office will notify the NEB when it has determined a need for and possesses the ability to manage a designee.
(4)    The appointing FAA office will notify the selected designee applicant. The selected designee applicant will register for and attend an initial training seminar. After the candidate successfully completes the initial training seminar, the designee applicant will provide the appointing FAA office with the certificate of completion from the initial training seminar.

Note:  Designee applicants must successfully complete the initial training seminar before appointment. The designee applicant must be appointed within the 12-calendar-month period following completion of the initial training seminar. If the appointment process does not begin during the 12 calendar-months, the applicant must retake the initial training seminar. Once appointed, the recurrent training seminar is due 24 months after completing the initial training seminar.

b.    Need for and Ability to Manage a Designee. Successfully meeting the eligibility requirements does not guarantee appointment as a designee. The managing FAA office, within its sole discretion, determines the need for and ability to manage a designee.

(1)    Determining Need. The managing FAA office considers several factors in determining the need for a designee including, but not limited to:
(a)    Activity level of current designees performing similar work in the managing FAA office’s geographical area.
(b)    Demand/convenience to the public, as determined by the:

·    Ability to provide examinations within a reasonable period of time, and

·    Number of complaints from the public for lack of availability of certification.

(c)    Geographic dispersion as determined by the distance an applicant must travel to get to the designee.

Note:  The need for a new designee is driven by the needs of the public and not by the impact on other existing designees or the desires of air operators/agencies.

(2)    Determining the Ability to Manage. The managing FAA office reviews several criteria to determine the ability to manage a designee including, but not limited to:
(a)    Effect of workload on inspectors,
(b)    Funding (e.g., travel allocation) needed to oversee the designee workforce, and
(c)    Availability of trained ASIs (specialists) and/or managers.

2.    Appointment. The appointing FAA office will complete the FAA Form 8000-5, Certificate of Designation, and a Certificate of Authority (COA) letter for presentation to the designee.

Note:  By signing the designee application, the designee applicant acknowledges that the designation is a privilege, not a right, and that the FAA Administrator can terminate any designation at any time or for any reason he or she deems appropriate.

a.    Applying for Reinstatement. Reinstatement is used in instances where a former designee is applying for privileges, after the not-for-cause termination of his or her designation, to the last managing FAA office that previously had jurisdiction over the designee. Former designees wishing to apply for reinstatement must submit the completed application directly to the managing FAA office and are not required to apply to the NEB if they previously held the same type of designation. The managing FAA office, in its sole discretion, will determine if there remains a need for the designee, and if it possesses the ability to manage the designee as described in subparagraph 1b. The former designee must meet the applicable training requirements described in this order.

b.    Applying for Relocation. Designees may relocate to a different geographical area without applying to the NEB if the receiving FAA office agrees to the transfer. The designee must submit a new application to the receiving FAA office. The originating office must transfer the entire designee file to the gaining office.

c.    Serving Outside the United States. A designee may be appointed to serve outside the United States if there is a demonstrated need that such designation will serve U.S. citizens abroad and that an FAA office can properly supervise the designee’s activities. The designee is subject to limitations as provided by current FAA policy regarding the certification of airmen outside the United States.

3.    General Eligibility Requirements. The managing office must carefully consider all of the requirements before designating an applicant or renewing a designee. The general requirements for appointment, which are reviewed by the NEB, are:

a.    Minimum Age. Minimum age of 23 years for all designees.

b.    Personality Traits. Must exhibit integrity, professionalism, and sound judgment.

c.    Training Requirement. Must have satisfactorily completed the applicable training requirement before appointment/renewal as a designee.

d.    Knowledge of Guidance Materials. Must have access to, and adequate knowledge of, the current regulations, policies, directives, and related guidance material appropriate to authorized functions.

e.    Command of English Language. Must be able to fluently read, write, speak, and understand the English language.

f.    Objectivity. Must maintain the highest degree of objectivity while performing authorized functions.

g.    Good Record. Must have a good record in the aviation industry.

h.    Technology Access. Must have internet access, as well as access to a computer and printer with hardware/software sufficient to support the required activities.

Note:  A designee is not required to be a U.S. citizen.

Note:  Additional eligibility requirements for specific designee types are included in the applicable designee type specific chapters (Chapters 6 and 7) of this order.

Chapter 3. Oversight, Training, and Renewal

1.    Oversight. Each designee operates under the direct supervision of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) office that holds the designation file, referred to as the managing FAA office. Supervision of designees includes the following functions:

a.    Resolve Questions. FAA personnel who supervise the activities of designees must always welcome the opportunity to discuss current rules, procedures, and standards with designees upon request to resolve any questions the designee may have relating to their performance and responsibilities. Designees will direct any questions to their managing FAA office.

b.    Test Observation. The FAA will observe Designated Mechanic Examiners (DME), Designated Parachute Rigger Examiners (DPRE), and Designated Pilot Examiners (DPE) when conducting their first test. Thereafter, FAA personnel may inspect or observe the designee at any time with or without prior notice.

c.    Instruction. The designee must receive specific instructions from the managing FAA office regarding the proper conduct of his or her authorized functions.

d.    Document and Submit Certification Files. Designees must submit certification files to the managing FAA office regardless of test results (pass or fail) within 7 calendar-days of the test date. DMEs must submit certification files to the managing FAA office regardless of test results (pass, fail, or not tested) within 7 calendar-days of the test date.

e.    Check Knowledge and Accuracy of Certification Files. A critical component of the certification process is the accuracy of the certification files. The managing FAA office may check the designee’s aeronautical knowledge and certification procedures at any time.

2.    Initial Training Seminar. Successful completion of the initial standardization seminar is a prerequisite for designation. Under most circumstances, if a designee applicant arrives after a course has started, the course manager will not permit that person to attend the remainder of the seminar. If he/she is more than 1 hour late, the course manager will not permit completion of the seminar. Should circumstances warrant accepting a late arrival, the course manager will require the applicant to make up the missed instruction with the instructor outside of normal class hours. Once the applicant has accomplished this, he/she will take the final examination with the class. Designees or applicants will be marked absent after 15 minutes has elapsed from the announced start time at the beginning of each day or after the announced start time following a scheduled break. Designees or applicants marked absent twice in the same seminar will not receive credit for the training and will not be allowed to complete the final examination with the class.

Designee Type

Initial Training Requirement

DME/DPRE

Initial Technical Personnel Examiner (TPE) Standardization Seminar

DPE

Initial Pilot Examiner Standardization Seminar

Note:  Information regarding designee standardization seminars is available on the Designee Registration System Web site at https://av-info.faa.gov/DsgReg/default.aspx.

Note:  Currently, initial training for certain designee types, including Airman Certification Representative (ACR), Flight Instructor Renewal Examiner (FIRE), Foreign Pilot Examiner (FPE), Ground Instructor Examiner (GIE), Military Competency Examiner (MCE), and Pilot Proficiency Examiner (PPE) applicants, are conducted by the managing FAA office.

3.    Recurrent Training. Each designee is encouraged to attend safety meetings, aviation seminars, and other programs that contribute to the technical skills required for the designation. The designee is responsible for ensuring their training currency. Only after successful completion of the initial training (or initial standardization seminar) can the designee register for the recurrent training seminar. Attendance at a recurrent training seminar is mandatory. Designees or applicants will be marked as absent after 15 minutes has elapsed from the announced start time at the beginning of each day, or after the announced start time following a scheduled break. Designees or applicants marked as absent twice in the same course will not receive credit for the training and will not be allowed to complete the final examination with the class. The Certificate of Completion issued to those who successfully complete a recurrent training seminar will expire in the specified time period (see below) from the date shown on the certificate. The designee must forward a copy of the Certificate of Completion to the managing FAA office. The recurrent training requirements are set forth below:

Designee Type

Recurrent Training Requirement

DPE performing flight checks in an aircraft or FSTD

24 calendar-months—Recurrent Designated Pilot Examiner Course Part I (Web-based) and Part II (one-day seminar)

Administrative Privileges: ACR, FIRE, FPE, GIE, or MCE

24 calendar-months—Administrative Pilot Examiner Standardization Course (Web-based only)

Note:    Designees may complete the Designated Pilot Examiner Initial Standardization seminar, conducted by AFS-640, in lieu of the recurrent training seminar to meet the recurrent requirement set forth in Chapter 3, paragraph 3 of this order.

Note:  A designee must not exercise his or her designation privileges unless his or her training is current and up to date.

4.    Expiration. Initial appointment is for a period of 1 year. After the initial appointment period, the managing FAA office will determine the duration of the designation. The duration of the designation cannot exceed 3 years. The expiration date appears on the designee’s Certificate of Authority (COA) letter.

5.    Renewal. A designee may be renewed if the continuation of the designation is justified, and the designation is in the FAA’s interest. The designee is responsible for submitting a timely renewal package. The FAA office must notify the designee that renewal has occurred and issue a new COA letter. A designation will be renewed under the following conditions:

·    The managing FAA office determines that a need still exists;

·    The managing FAA office still has the ability to manage the designee; and

·    The designee continues to meet the eligibility requirements in Chapter 2, paragraph 3 and the specific requirements listed in the applicable designee type-specific chapter of this order.

a.    Annual Meeting. The designee must attend an annual meeting held by the managing FAA office to discuss designee procedures, problems, and designation renewal.

b.    Designee Maintains Designation. When conducting tests, each designee must maintain the applicable airman certificate(s), the general eligibility requirements listed in Chapter 2, paragraph 3 and the specific eligibility requirements in the designee type-specific chapters (Chapter 6 for DME/DPRE, and Chapter 7 for DPE) of this order.

c.    Training Requirements. The recurrent training requirements in Chapter 3, paragraph 3 of this order must be completed.

d.    Renewal Application Package. The designee must apply for renewal to the managing FAA office at least 45 calendar-days before the expiration of the designation. It is the designee’s responsibility to complete the renewal application package. The package must include:

(1)    A copy of the designee’s current COA letter or previously issued FAA Form 8430-9, Letter of Authority;
(2)    A record of all designee activity conducted since the issuance or last renewal of their designation;
(3)    A current certificate of training showing the designee has successfully completed an initial or recurrent training seminar; and
(4)    Additional application materials (as indicated below).

Designee Type

Renewal Application Requirements

DME/DPRE

FAA Form 8110-28 with blocks 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, and 23a completed. The managing FAA office will approve the application for renewal by completing applicable blocks on the FAA application form.

DPE

FAA Form 8710-6.

e.    COA Letter. After expiration of the designee’s COA letter, the designee may not exercise the privileges of the designation unless he or she has a current COA letter signed by the managing FAA office.

6.    Knowledge and Skill. The determination that the designee’s knowledge of and application of current procedures and standards are adequate for renewal of the designation may be based on oversight of the designee and the designee’s attendance at a meeting or seminar conducted for the purpose of standardization.

Chapter 4. Termination and Appeal

1.    Termination. Termination is the action by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to rescind a designation at any time for any reason the Administrator considers appropriate.

2.    Types of Termination.

a.    Termination for Cause. Termination for cause is a negative finding based on a designee’s performance. In the event that a reexamination of an airman under Title 49 of the United States Code (49 U.S.C) § 44709 becomes necessary due to an inadequate test performed by the designee, the managing office must immediately terminate the designee.

b.    Termination Not-for-Cause. Termination not-for-cause can be for any reason not specific to a designee’s performance (e.g., lack of need for the designee or ability to manage the designee by the managing FAA office).

Note:  A designee may voluntarily surrender a designation at any time. This voluntary surrender should be made in writing, sent to the managing FAA office manager, and be accompanied by the designee’s Certificate of Authority (COA) letter or previously issued FAA Form 8430-9, Letter of Authority.

3.    Termination Letter. Designations are terminated under the general conditions contained in Title 49 of the United States Code (49 U.S.C.) § 44702. The managing FAA office manager makes the decision to terminate a designee. The decision regarding the termination of a designation will be provided to the designee in writing. Upon notification of termination (verbal or written) by the designee's managing FAA office, the designee must immediately cease the exercise of his or her designee privileges. In the case of verbal notification, the managing FAA office must follow up with written notification.

4.    Appeal. The designee or designee applicant may request an appeal under certain circumstances. (Refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Flight Standards Information Management System (FSIMS), Volume 13, Chapter 5, Section 3, Termination and Appeal).

a.    Appeal of Nonselection/Nonappointment. The National Examiner Board (NEB) handles appeals of nonselection. Contact the Designee Quality Assurance Branch (AFS-650) for further information.

b.    Nonappeal Termination. Termination based on the lack of need, the inability of the managing FAA office to manage the designee, loss of a prerequisite certification, or failure to meet training requirements cannot be appealed.

c.    Written Termination Appeal. If the designee wishes to appeal his or her termination, the designee must make the request in writing within 14 calendar-days of receipt of the written notification of the FAA office manager’s decision to the regional appeal panel by sending a letter to the FAA office manager requesting an appeal.

d.    Written Notification. The designee will be notified in writing of the appeal panel’s decision within 60 calendar-days.

Note:  The regional appeal panel’s decision is final.

Chapter 5. Privileges, Limitations, and Responsibilities

1.    Privileges. A designee is authorized to:

a.    Accept Airman Certificate/Rating Application. Accept applicable airman certificate and/or rating applications for airman certificates and ratings.

Designee Type

FAA Form

Designated Mechanic Examiner (DME)/Designated Parachute Rigger Examiners (DPRE)

FAA Form 8610-2

Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE)

FAA Form 8710-1 or FAA Form 8710-11

b.    Conduct Tests. All tests must be in the English language, appropriate to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Certificate of Authority (COA) letter held by the designee, and in accordance with the appropriate practical test standards (PTS).

c.    Charge Reasonable Applicant Fees. The designee must ensure that the applicant understands all fees charged, including the fee for retesting after failure, before the designee accepts the airman certificate and/or rating application.

Note:  Ensure that the DME/DPRE only accepts payment from the applicant or on behalf of the applicant and that the designee remains a private person acting as a representative of the Administrator in accordance with Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 183, subpart C.

d.    Issue Temporary Airman Certificates. Issue Temporary Airman Certificates only to applicants who have been tested and found qualified for the certificate or rating sought. The managing FAA office may remove this authorization and retain this privilege. In this case, limitations will be entered on the COA.

e.    Accept Pilot Applications (DPE Only). DPEs may accept pilot applications for new pilot certificates and/or ratings (for which the DPE holds that designation and authority) and any pilot certificate that is administrative in nature (e.g., second-in-command (SIC) type rating or English language endorsement), provided the DPE has received initial training from the managing FAA office and recurrent training, offered by AFS-640 every 24 calendar-months thereafter.

(1)    If the applicant has a valid verification letter of authenticity and makes an appropriate application, DPEs may accept applications for 14 CFR part 61, § 61.75 pilot certification that are issued on the basis of a foreign pilot license, for adding the “English Proficient” endorsement, paper to plastic pilot certificates, as well as replacement of the § 61.75 pilot certificate. Section 61.75 pilot certificate holders will not be able to apply via the web. This requires the applicant to apply in person so there will be positive identification at the time of application to an appropriately authorized DPE, Foreign Pilot Examiner (FPE), FAA aviation safety technician (AST), or FAA aviation safety inspector (ASI). DPEs and FPEs must comply with the guidance in Chapter 7, Sections 20 and 21.
(2)    DPEs may not accept an application for a name change, citizenship change, DOB change, gender change, dual citizenship, any other changes to personal data, or for the removal of an English language limitation. If the guidance in the appropriate FAA order specifically requires a managing FAA office to handle the applicant, then a DPE may not perform that function. Changes of a personal nature (name change, sex change, removal of the English language limitation, etc.) that specifically require the applicant to perform the certification action at the managing FAA office must be performed by authorized FAA personnel at the managing FAA office.

2.    Limitations.

a.    Observing a Test. A designee must not allow anyone other than an ASI to observe a test. For designee training purposes only, exceptions may be authorized in writing by the managing FAA office.

b.    Locations. DMEs/DPREs must not conduct tests at locations not listed as a base of operation on the current COA letter held by the designee, unless authorized by the managing FAA office. DPEs must not conduct tests at locations outside their geographically assigned area, unless geographic expansion is authorized (see subparagraph 2l).

c.    Computerized Airman Knowledge Tests. A designee must not conduct or monitor any portion of computerized airman knowledge tests.

d.    Expired Temporary Airman Certificate. A designee must not reissue or amend any expired Temporary Airman Certificate.

e.    Permanent Airman Certificate. A designee must not endorse, amend, alter, or issue any permanent airman certificate.

f.    Applicable PTS. A designee must not exempt any applicant from the testing requirements in the applicable PTS.

g.    Teaching/Testing. A designee must not combine teaching with testing during the testing of an applicant.

h.    Proof of Eligibility. A designee must not conduct tests unless an applicant presents proof of eligibility as prescribed in the applicable 14 CFR part (as set forth below):

Designee Type

14 CFR

DME/DPRE

Part 65

DPE

Part 61 and Part 141

Note:    Additional limitations that are designee type specific are located within the designee type-specific chapters of this order.

i.    Airman Knowledge Test. When a knowledge test is required, a designee must not conduct an oral and a practical test unless the applicant provides the required airman knowledge test results with a passing score.

Note:  This does not apply to aviation mechanic applicants authorized to test in accordance with 14 CFR part 65, § 65.80 or master parachute rigger applicants that hold a senior certificate.

j.    Applicant Further Study. A designee must not temporarily suspend a test to allow the applicant further study, and then continue the same test later.

k.    Number of Applicants. A designee conducting an oral and/or practical test must not test more than one applicant at a time. To clarify “at a time”: when a designee begins a test with an applicant, prior to accepting an application from another airman, the designee will terminate the first test with the issuance of a Temporary Airman Certificate, a notice of disapproval, or a letter of discontinuance.

l.    Geographical Area. A designee must not test an applicant outside the authorized geographical area. For a DPE, the test must start and conclude within the authorized geographical area. If a designee wants to administer tests outside the geographical area of the managing FAA office, the designee must:

(1)    Request authorization in writing from the managing FAA office.
(a)    Provide the date and address of the testing site in writing.
(b)    Make the request in writing at least 7 working days prior to the scheduled activity.

Note:  The managing FAA office with jurisdiction over the test site may evaluate the facilities, equipment, current publications, and test materials required to conduct a test for the certificate and/or rating(s) sought.

(2)    Receive approval in writing from the designee’s managing FAA office, as appropriate. The managing FAA office will coordinate with the geographical office (receiving office).
(3)    The designee submits the certification file to his or her managing FAA office. The receiving FAA office with jurisdiction over the test location may request copies of any files for tests conducted by the designee in their area.

m.    Language Requirement. A designee must not conduct tests in any language other than English.

n.    Applications Not Accepted. Designees must not accept applications for medical Statements of Demonstrated Ability (SODA) or for the reexamination of airmen under Title 49 of the United States Code (49 U.S.C.) § 44709.

3.    Responsibilities. Each designee must represent the Administrator in a manner that reflects positively on the FAA.

a.    Honor Appointments. Designees should honor appointments made as promptly as possible. The designee is also expected to make his or her services available to all applicants on an equitable basis.

b.    Undivided Attention. Designees must give undivided attention to the applicant during the entire testing period.

c.    Private/Confidential Discussion. Designees must ensure that discussion following any test is private and is confidential.

d.    FAASTeam Seminars/Events. The FAA encourages designees to participate in FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) seminars and events. The FAA values the participation of designees as FAASTeam representatives in providing support for safety meetings.

e.    Knowledge and Skill. A designee must maintain a high degree of knowledge and skill in the subject areas required for airman certification, evaluation, and testing techniques.

Chapter 6. Designated Mechanic Examiner (DME) and Designated Parachute Rigger Examiner (DPRE) Program

Section 1. DME—General

1.    Additional Requirements for Appointment. The procedures contained in this chapter apply to inspectors, DMEs, authorized to conduct aviation mechanic or parachute rigger oral and practical tests and issue Temporary Airman Certificates. DMEs will conduct tests in accordance with the applicable practical test standards (PTS). Inspectors must carefully consider all of the following issues before designating or renewing a designee. In addition to meeting the general designee eligibility requirements in Chapter 2, a designee applicant must meet the following additional requirements, which will be reviewed by the appointing Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) office:

a.    For DME Appointment.

(1)    Evidence of a high level of knowledge and experience in the subject areas required for aviation mechanic certification in both reciprocating and turbine-engine aircraft.
(2)    Previously held a valid aviation mechanic certificate for 5 years with the rating(s) for which a designation is to be issued.
(3)    Applicants must also meet one of the following experience requirements listed below.

Note:  These requirements may not be combined.

(a)    Five years experience actively exercising the privileges of a valid aviation mechanic certificate in accordance with Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 65, § 65.81(a) on U.S.-registered civil aircraft. Three of the 5 years of experience required must be immediately before designation.
(b)    Five years experience performing maintenance on U.S.-registered civil aircraft while employed by an FAA Repair Station 14 CFR part (145). Three of the 5 years of experience required must be immediately before designation.
(c)    Five years experience performing maintenance on U.S.-registered civil air carrier aircraft operating under 14 CFR part 121 or 135. Three of the 5 years of experience required must be immediately before designation.
(d)    Five years continuous experience immediately before designation instructing aviation maintenance while employed by an FAA Aviation Maintenance Technician School (AMTS) 14 CFR part (147). Also, the applicant must have been concurrently (in addition to the 5 years of experience as an instructor for an AMTS 14 CFR part 147 certificate) and actively exercising the privileges of a valid aviation mechanic certificate in accordance with § 65.81(a) for three years on U.S.-registered civil aircraft (certificated and maintained in accordance with 14 CFR.)

Note:  Applicants should provide enough verifiable detail in their application package to allow the National Examiner Board (NEB) to determine that they meet the general eligibility requirements of Chapter 2 of this order as well as those requirements specific to the applicable designee type.

(4)    Have a fixed base of operation equipped to support testing in accordance with the required equipment contained in the Minimum Tools and Equipment List (MTEL) located in Figures 6-2P. This includes both reciprocating and/or turbine engine aircraft.
(a)    The fixed base of operation, equipment, and materials must allow an applicant to demonstrate the basic skills for the certificate and rating sought. The managing FAA office will monitor the status of equipment periodically to ensure compliance.
(b)    Use Airworthy aircraft, other aircraft, aircraft subassemblies, operational mockups, or other aids for testing airman applicants.
(c)    All tools, equipment, current publications, materials, etc., required to complete a project assignment are included in the computer-generated practical tests. See Figure 6-2P for the required equipment list.

b.    Limitations. In addition to the general limitations in Chapter 5, DMEs:

(1)    Must not conduct oral and practical tests at any location unless it is adequately equipped with available equipment and material necessary for conducting the tests. For DMEs, this includes the required equipment contained in the Minimum Tools and Equipment List (see Figure 6-2P).
(2)    Must not conduct an oral or practical test in any language other than the English language.

2.    DME Designations Issued. The DME can be issued the following designations:

a.    Airframe. Conducts aviation mechanic airframe rating oral and practical tests and the general oral and practical test, when required.

b.    Powerplant. Conducts aviation mechanic powerplant rating oral and practical tests and the general oral and practical test, when required.

c.    Airframe and Powerplant (A&P). Conducts aviation mechanic A&P ratings, oral and practical tests, and the general oral and practical test, when required.

3.    Designee Materials. The managing FAA office should provide each designee with materials appropriate to the designation. The managing FAA office may issue some or all of the designee materials at the time of appointment. With the exception of the FAA Form 8060-4, the material can also be found on the Internet, or through common sources such as the Government Printing Office (GPO). The following materials (current editions) are necessary to perform DME duties:

a.    FAA Order 8900.2, General Aviation Airman Designee Handbook.

b.    FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Stock No. 0052-00-026-8004).

c.    FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Stock No. 0052-00-049-5001).

d.    FAA Form 337, Major Repair and Alteration (Stock No. 0052-00-025-8000).

e.    Title 14 CFR Part 65, Certification: Airmen Other Than Flight Crewmembers.

f.    Title 14 CFR Part 183, Representatives of the Administrator.

g.    FAA-S-8081-26, Aviation Mechanic General Practical Test Standards (PTS).

h.    FAA-S-8081-27, Aviation Mechanic Airframe Practical Test Standards (PTS).

i.    FAA-S-8081-28, Aviation Mechanic Powerplant Practical Test Standards (PTS).

4.    Security. Each DME is responsible for establishing and carrying out appropriate security procedures. The security of the controlled material is important to prevent compromise, and to ensure the applicants meet the aeronautical skill standards for aviation mechanic certificates and ratings.

a.    Materials. The DME must ensure adequate security of all test questions or projects (printed or downloaded). These materials must not be used for any other purpose.

b.    Access. The DME must secure the aforementioned material in a manner that will not allow unauthorized access (e.g., a locked drawer, cabinet, or closet). Only authorized representatives of the FAA Administrator will receive access to secured material. The DME should refer any public request for the secured material to the managing FAA office.

5.    FAA Certification Policy. DME must evaluate the oral and practical tests to determine if an applicant’s performance is acceptable or unacceptable. The primary discriminator in the airman certification process is the oral and practical test. Standard grading criteria and objective examination ensure a level of basic knowledge and skills in all subjects required for the rating sought.

6.    Aviation Mechanic Tests. The PTS are contained in three separate booklets (General, Airframe, and Powerplant), which consist of knowledge (oral question) elements and skill (practical project) elements in each of the 5 sections. Section I, General, is required for either the airframe or powerplant rating and applies to both. Sections I, II, and III are required for the airframe rating. Sections I, IV, and V are required for the powerplant rating. See Chapter 6, Section 2, paragraph 8 for information concerning previously passed section I. These test sections include:

·    I—General.

·    II—Airframe Structures.

·    III—Airframe Systems and Components.

·    IV—Powerplant Theory and Maintenance.

·    V—Powerplant Systems and Components.

Note:  Aviation mechanics oral and practical tests are required to be downloaded from the Designee Standardization Branch’s (AFS-640) oral and practical test generator.

Section 2. DME—Conducting and Grading Tests

7.    Preparation: Conduct a Pretest Interview. The DME must accomplish the pretest interview face-to-face, by telephone/fax, through email, or by other methods that will allow the DME to:

a.    Discuss Testing Details. Discuss fees, testing procedures, projects, and type of equipment to be used and what the applicant should expect if they pass, fail, or do not complete the test.

(1)    Charge a Reasonable Fee. The DME may charge a reasonable fee to each applicant for handling the forms and reports incident to the issuance of an aviation mechanic certificate, for the use of the DME’s facilities, equipment, and materials, and service in administering the oral and practical tests.
(2)    Fee Agreement. The DME and the applicant should reach a mutual understanding and agreement of the total fee for the services before beginning the tests. An agreement in writing may be to the advantage of both the DME and the applicant

b.    Advise of Testing Schedule. Advise the applicant when the day’s activities terminate, and when testing resumes if more than 1 day is needed.

c.    Ensure the Applicant’s Eligibility. (See paragraph 9.)

(1)    Review the applicant’s FAA Form 8610-2 for completeness and correctness. The DME must have the applicant correct any errors. This may require the applicant to return to the FAA office where authorization was obtained.
(2)    Review the applicant’s current written test results that are applicable to the rating(s) sought.
(3)    Have the applicant indicate, in the event that he or she passes all of the required tests, how he or she will respond to the two questions listed in block IV, “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION,” located on the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2. There may be a need to have managing FAA office involvement if the applicant would be required to answer “YES” to either of the questions.

d.    Advise of Retesting. Advise applicant of § 65.19 retesting after failure provisions and restrictions.

Note:  DME must notify the managing FAA office, in writing, before conducting all oral and practical tests. This can be done by email, fax, or other written means acceptable to the managing FAA office. The managing FAA office will establish specific procedures for this notification.

Note:  These procedures must include annotation to indicate if the applicant was authorized to test by an inspector from an FAA office other than the DME’s managing FAA office.

8.    Knowledge and Skill Elements for DME.

a.    Download Knowledge and Skill Elements. DMEs must use the knowledge (oral) and skill (practical) elements downloaded from AFS-640’s Web site (https://av-info.faa.gov/DsgReg/Login.aspx) to administer the oral and practical tests. The completed test planning sheet must be included in the certification package sent to the managing FAA office.

(1)    If the DME downloads and administers a test, the test planning sheet must be forwarded with the certification package to the managing FAA office. The tests must not be copied or reused. Generated tests not used must be destroyed.
(2)    The DME is required to use questions and projects obtained from the Internet based Oral and Practical Test Question Generator at: https://av-info.faa.gov/DsgReg/Login.aspx. Select and develop required tests and then download the applicable types of tests to be administered.
(3)    Each test is downloaded for each specific applicant and must not be copied or reused.

b.    Prescribed Length of Time. The testing period must be long enough to make a valid determination in each subject area/Area of Operation for the rating sought. Take appropriate time to ensure that all required knowledge element questions and skill element practical projects have been completed for the rating sought.

(1)    Progressive Tests Must Not Be Given. Although it may be necessary to continue a test for more than 1 day, tests must not be allowed to continue for long periods. Progressive testing is defined as testing which continues for more than 4 sessions in a 4-day period. Suspending the test to allow the applicant further study is not allowed. Both the applicant and the designee should plan the testing times so the applicant completes most of the test once it commences.

Note:  A session is defined as any break in testing that is separated by more than 2 hours.

(2)    For the DME: The General Section of the Test. The DME should not begin a test with the intent of testing the General section only. Applicants for an airframe rating must take sections I, II, and III. Applicants for a powerplant rating must take sections I, IV, and V. An applicant is not required to take section I, General, of a knowledge or skill test for a mechanic rating if it was previously passed. Proof of passing may be in the following forms:

·    A mechanic certificate with the alternate rating; or

·    FAA Form 8610-2 that shows section I, General, has been passed within the preceding 24 calendar-months (although other sections may not have been passed).

9.    Applicant Eligibility.

a.    Furnish Current, Government-Issued Identification. Applicants must furnish current, valid, government-issued identification with a photograph and signature. If FAA Form 8610-2 is completed at an FAA office, the approving inspector will record the method of identification (e.g., passport, U.S. military identification, or U.S. driver’s license, including state of issuance), number, and expiration date in the “REMARKS” area of FAA Form 8610-2. The DME will verify the applicant’s identification before testing. If the means of identification was provided in the “REMARKS” area, the DME will verify the identification and initial the inspector’s entry. (Sample entry: Oklahoma Driver’s License #123456789 exp. 01/31/20XX.) If the means of identification was not previously entered in the “REMARKS” area or the means of identification provided by the applicant is different from the one listed in the “REMARKS” area, the DME will make the entry in the “REMARKS” area and initial the entry. (See Figures 6-2F to 6-2K (mechanic applicants).)

Note:  The aviation safety inspector (ASI)/DME will have the applicant fill out the Pilot’s Bill of Rights (PBR) acknowledgement (refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Flight Standards Information Management System (FSIMS), Volume 7, Chapter 8, Section 1) prior to filling out FAA Form 8610-2.

b.    Meet English Language Requirements. Both designees and ASIs share the responsibility for determining if applicants meet the English language requirements. (Before accepting the application and beginning the practical test for certificate or rating, the designee/ASI must evaluate the applicant’s English fluency using the appropriate guidance.) The current edition of Advisory Circular (AC) 60-28, English Language Skill Standards Required by 14 CFR Parts 61, 63, and 65, provides guidance for airman applicants, designees, and ASIs in determining English language skills required for airman certification.

c.    Original FAA Form 8610-2.

(1)    Only maintenance or avionics inspectors who hold the mechanic certificate with airframe and/or powerplant ratings are authorized to review and endorse block V of FAA Form 8610-2.
(2)    All applicants claiming civilian and/or military experience as a basis for qualification must have the experience evaluated and verified by an inspector before taking the required test. The inspector may, as a matter of office procedures, reproduce and retain copies of FAA Form 8610-2 and documented evidence presented by the applicant. The ASI will:
(a)    Evaluate the experience documents and verify them, if necessary.
(b)    Have the applicant complete FAA Form 8610-2 (two originals). (See Figures 6-2A, 6-2B, 6-2D, and 6-2E.) Provide a copy of Figure 6-1 to the applicant. Instruct the applicant to detach, if necessary, and read the “PRIVACY ACT” area of FAA Form 8610-2.
(c)    Review FAA Form 8610-2 for completeness, sign, and complete block V of FAA Form 8610-2 (both originals), and return them if the applicant meets the experience requirements. Return all experience documents to the applicant. Both original FAA Form 8610-2 applications must be retained by the applicant to present to a DME or ASI for the oral and practical tests.

d.    Two Originals.

(1)    The applicant submits two originals of FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, before testing begins. The applicant must complete FAA Form 8610-2 in accordance with Figure 6-1, Instructions for Completing FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, which includes the instructions for completing FAA Form 8610-2. The ASI or designee should provide FAA Form 8610-2, which can be found at www.faa.gov, and give detailed instructions for completing it correctly. (The ASI or designee must copy Figure 6-1 and provide it to the applicant until FAA Form 8610-2 is revised with written instructions attached.) Advise the applicant to read the supplemental information attached to FAA Form 8610-2 (see Figure 6-1).

Note:  All signatures must be original, in dark ink, with the name printed or typed below or next to the signature.

Note:  The block V endorsement must not be restricted to a specific FAA office or region.

Note:  An applicant is not required to present his or her application to an FAA office for reauthorization unless there is evidence that his or her original authorization is in question. Any evidence should be attached on a separate sheet of paper or annotated in the remarks section.

(2)    For the DME: Applicants attending or graduating from an approved AMTS.
(a)    The designee must ensure the graduation certificate or certificate of completion includes the following:

·    Name and certificate number of the AMTS;

·    Graduation date;

·    Curriculum from which the applicant graduated (i.e., airframe and/or powerplant);

·    Name of the applicant; and

·    Signature from authorized school official.

Note:  If the designee has reason to question the validity of the graduation certificate, contact the managing FAA office prior to starting the test.

Note:  A copy of the graduation certificate or certificate of completion will be attached to the certification file, and must be sent to AFS-760 through the DME’s managing FAA office.

(b)    Taking Oral and Practical Tests Before Taking Airman Knowledge Tests. AMTS students may be authorized by the managing FAA office to take the oral and practical tests before the computerized airman knowledge test in accordance with § 65.80.

1.    Each student must complete the front of FAA Form 8610-2 (both originals). FAA Form 8610-2 must show the AMTS’s name and location (block II, item D1), AMTS’s certificate number (block II, item D2), curriculum in which student is enrolled (block II, item D3), and graduation date (block II, item D4). Applicants should not check block II, item D, “GRADUATE OF APPROVED COURSE.”

2.    AMTSs must show that each student is in the final phase of training and has maintained satisfactory progress at the school.

Note:  The student must be within 45 calendar-days of completing that phase of the curriculum. If enrolled in the airframe only or powerplant only curriculum, the student must be within 45 calendar-days of completion of the general and airframe curriculum or the general and powerplant curriculum. If the applicant is enrolled in the powerplant curriculum, and has completed the general and airframe curriculum, he or she must be within 45 calendar-days of completion of the powerplant curriculum. If the student is enrolled in the combined A&P curriculum, he or she must be within 45 calendar-days of completion of the complete curriculum for the combined A&P, have made satisfactory progress, and be prepared for the test. The proper AMTS official must complete block II, item E, (1) and (2).

3.    Inspectors must complete block II, item F, (1), (2), (3), and (4). The FAA authorization expiration date must not be later than the anticipated graduation date. Process the completed file through the managing FAA office. (The managing FAA office has authorized testing of any student by a DME by completing block II, item F, (1), (2), (3), and (4).)

10.    Conducting the Tests.

a.    Conducting the Oral Test.

(1)    Oral questions may be used at any time during the practical test.
(a)    For the DME: All oral test questions must be downloaded from the Designee Registration System (DRS) test generator. Results of oral questions must only be recorded as Pass, Fail, or Not Tested. Ask a minimum of four but no more than seven questions in each subject area. (Example: one question missed in the minimum of four required questions equals 75 percent; two questions missed in the minimum of four questions will require an additional three questions to be asked. Provided the applicant did not fail any further questions, the applicant would score 71 percent). The applicant must successfully answer at least 70 percent of the oral questions asked in each subject area. Each subject area must be passed in order to pass a section.

Note:  All unused generated tests must be destroyed.

(2)    An applicant’s answers to oral questions must show an understanding of the subject and ability to apply knowledge. Do not allow an applicant’s skill of oral expression or ability to memorize details affect oral test evaluation. If necessary, additional exploratory questions may be used to verify the applicant’s understanding of the subject area, but will not be considered as part of the test.
(3)    To determine if the oral questions are answered correctly, the DME must be able to reference information (e.g., manufacturer’s data, ACs, and 14 CFR), and be objective in making the determination.
(4)    Although the answers to the oral questions should be available in the CFRs, manufacturer’s maintenance data, or other aviation related data, the applicant must be able to successfully answer all oral questions without the use of any reference materials.

b.    Conducting the Practical Test. All questions and practical projects downloaded from the DRS test generator must be tested. Results of practical questions must only be recorded as Pass, Fail, or Not Tested.

(1)    Make an objective determination of the applicants performance in each subject area tested.

Note:  All required projects shall be successfully accomplished on the first attempt.

(2)    Personally observe all practical projects in their entirety performed by the applicant.
(3)    Determine if the applicant’s completed project is acceptable. Be objective in making this determination. The applicant must be able to demonstrate satisfactory proficiency and competency using basic aircraft mechanic skills. The applicant must demonstrate an approval for return to service standard, where applicable, and demonstrate the ability to locate and apply the required reference materials, where applicable. For instances where an approval for return to service standard cannot be achieved, the applicant must be able to explain why the return to service standard cannot be met (e.g., when tolerances are outside of a product’s limitations).
(4)    Provide all tools, equipment, and reference materials for the subject area elements downloaded from the oral and practical test generator. These materials must include, but are not limited to: 14 CFR, Type Certificate Data Sheets (TCDS), Airworthiness Directives (AD), ACs, manufacturer’s technical and parts manuals, service information, and any other instructions and/or reference materials that are necessary for the objective accomplishment of the assigned subject area element(s). All reference material must be unmarked and in good condition. The applicant’s use of other reference material, not provided by the DME, is prohibited. Use of nonprogrammable calculators is permitted where appropriate. The use of electronic devices with camera capabilities (i.e., tablets, cell phones, etc.) is prohibited. Applicants may use personal tools and equipment at the discretion of the DME.

11.    Evaluating Applicant Performance. Do not expect an applicant to be competent in all phases of overhaul, maintenance, alteration, and repair, or be highly skillful in performing complex manipulative operations. However, expect the applicant to have developed basic skills and be able to demonstrate them during the practical test. Inform the applicant of the level of performance expected before beginning each project. DMEs can find the required performance levels in the PTS.

a.    For the DME. When it becomes obvious during the test that an applicant cannot perform at an acceptable level and has already failed a subject area, the DME must discontinue testing in that section. The DME must discontinue the testing any time there is a failure of a subject area in a section.

Note:  Knowledge Questions (Oral). Once the applicant has failed a subject area in the Knowledge Questions (Oral) test in a section, the entire oral section must be retested. The applicant must retake the appropriate section failed at the next retest examination. The applicant will be retested on all oral questions from each subject area in the previous failed section. This process will continue until the applicant passes each section.

Note:  Skill Element Projects (Practical). Once the applicant has failed a subject area in the Skill Element practical test in a section, the entire section must be retested. The applicant must retake the appropriate section failed at the next retest examination. The test generator will carry over the last failed project in a section to the retest examination. This process will continue until the applicant passes each section.

b.    Standards. Include the following standards in DME observations for evaluating applicant performance:

(1)    Approach to the project; proper information and tools; preparation of the equipment; and observation of safety precautions.
(2)    Cleaning, preparing, and protecting parts; skill in handling tools; thoroughness and cleanliness.
(3)    The functions of the units or systems of the assigned project; use of current maintenance and/or overhaul procedures.
(4)    Final inspection for safety and operation.
(5)    Completion of required forms and records.
(6)    Application of appropriate rules.
(7)    Attitude toward safety, manufacturer’s recommendations, and acceptable industry practices.

c.    Test Planning Sheets Are Required for Each Oral and Practical Test Given. Forward test planning sheets to the managing FAA office with the certification file. An example of a planning sheet is included in Figure 6-4A. The managing FAA office may also require additional information on the planning sheets.

Note:  The applicant’s signature on the planning sheet verifies the test was given to the applicant and the test times and dates listed are accurate, and the designee should explain the significance of the signature on the planning sheet.

Note:  Copies of test planning sheets are no longer required to be kept in the managing FAA office file and should be included in certification packages forwarded to the Airmen Certification Branch (AFS-760). However, FAA offices may choose to retain a copy of the test planning sheet in the designee’s file.

d.    Tests Not Completed.

(1)    If the test cannot be completed in the allotted timeframe, the designee will correctly mark both FAA Forms 8610-2 (two originals) on the reverse side. Forward this test not completed file to the managing FAA office within 7 calendar-days. When practical, schedule a retest for the areas not completed at the time the test is discontinued. Treat this retest as if the applicant had failed those portions not tested. (See subparagraphs 11e.)
(2)    For the DME: Correctly mark for the subject areas completed. Incomplete subject areas will not be marked as a failure on the FAA Form 8610-2 (two originals). In addition, the DME shall place a statement in the “REMARKS” area indicating why the test was not completed. Some examples are located in the figures at the end of this chapter.

Note:  Do not start any test without the intent to complete the testing for the issuance of a certificate and at least one rating or an added rating.

e.    Retests. Retest applicants in all areas of the oral and/or practical tests in the section(s) listed as failed, that were not tested, or that have expired. When application is made for a retest after failure of a previous test or tests not completed, the applicant must:

(1)    Complete FAA Form 8610-2 (both originals) in accordance with the instructions furnished by the DME or ASI.

Note:  FAA Form 8610-2, block V does not need to be signed by an ASI if a copy of the original FAA Form 8610-2 (with authorizing signature) is attached to the file.

(2)    Present an appropriate computerized Airman Knowledge Test Report (AKTR). All sections of the test must have been passed within the previous 24 calendar-months.
(3)    Present his or her original of FAA Form 8610-2 from the previous oral and practical tests showing the sections or Areas of Operation failed, not completed, or for which passing credit has expired (mechanic applicants only).
(4)    If the retest is within 30 calendar-days of the previous test, present a statement by a person authorized in § 65.19 that the applicant received additional instruction for each subject failed and the applicant is ready for retesting. This statement of training is required only when the applicant failed portions of the test. This statement of training is not required for subject areas not completed on the previous test. (See Figures 6-2N.)

12.    Recording the Results of Tests. Record the results of oral and practical tests on the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2.

a.    When the applicant has demonstrated an acceptable level of competence, workmanship, and safety in each subject area, check the “PASS” box for that portion of the section (oral or practical test) and enter the expiration date. If the applicant fails, check the “FAIL” box and fill out the QUES. NO and/or PROJ. NO. box, as appropriate, with the project number or the oral question number(s) that was (were) failed, but do not enter an expiration date when the applicant fails the section. Make all entries in permanent dark ink. See paragraph 15 for procedures to follow if an applicant fails.

b.    The expiration date for each oral and practical test section is 24 calendar-months after the section is passed. (Example: A test section passed on any day in August 2011 will expire on 08/31/2013.)

13.    When the Applicant Passes. When the applicant has passed all the required sections of both the oral and practical tests, the designee who administered the test must:

a.    Complete Reverse Side of FAA Form 8610-2. Complete as follows:

(1)    Enter the date the test was completed, sign the form, and enter his or her designation number in the spaces provided on the reverse of FAA Form 8610-2 (both originals).
(2)    Require the applicant (at the time the Temporary Airman Certificate is issued) to complete the “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area on the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2 (both originals), following the Designated Examiners Report. Use the “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area to verify the applicant still meets the conditions and requirements of §§ 65.11 and 65.12.

Note:  At the time of issuance of FAA Form 8060-4, the inspector and/or the designee must request a telephone number where the applicant may be reached during the next 120 calendar‑days in the event of application problems. The telephone number must be recorded in the “REMARKS” area on the back of the application. If a telephone number is not available, write “NO TELEPHONE.” The inspector and/or the designee may also request an email address.

b.    Return Original. Give one original of FAA Form 8610-2 to the applicant.

c.    Prepare Temporary Airman Certificate. If authorized on the COA, prepare FAA Form 8060-4 unless otherwise directed by the managing FAA office. (See Figures 6-2L to 6-2M.) Issue the duplicate copy to the applicant. Forward the original typed copy with the certification file to the managing FAA office. Ensure FAA Form 8060-4 reflects the applicant’s current information. Changes involving the applicant’s name, gender, nationality (including dual citizenship), and/or date of birth (DOB) must be referred to the managing FAA office.

(1)    Entries for the applicant’s copy may be printed in ink; however, a typed original, signed by the issuing DME, must accompany the certification file, which must be forwarded to the managing FAA office. The applicant need not sign the copy sent to the managing FAA office.
(2)    AFS-760 will issue all original airman certificates with a unique certificate number during the processing of the airman file. The airman’s Social Security Number (SSN) can still be collected on FAA Form 8610-2, but the word “PENDING” must be placed in the certificate number block III of FAA Form 8060-4. If the airman does not wish to provide his or her SSN to the FAA, the applicant must place the words “DO NOT USE” in the SSN block of the application. Airman certificates presently using the SSN as a certificate number will continue to be issued with that number unless the applicant requests a unique number. If the airman requests a unique number when applying for an added rating, the word “PENDING” must be placed in the certificate number block of FAA Form 8060-4.

d.    When Authorized under § 65.80 (Mechanic Applicants Only). If the applicant has been authorized under § 65.80 to take the oral and practical tests before the computerized airman knowledge tests and passes them, the designee will do the following:

(1)    Give the applicant a completed and signed original of FAA Form 8610-2. This original is required when the applicant applies for a certificate after passing the computerized airman knowledge tests.
(2)    Send the applicant’s other signed original of FAA Form 8610-2, the test planning sheet, and the PBR to the managing FAA office within 7 calendar-days. The managing FAA office will forward the file to AFS-760.
(3)    When the applicant passes the airman knowledge tests, the applicant may present the computerized AKTR(s) along with an original of FAA Form 8610-2 to the nearest FAA office or an appropriately rated DME. At that time, an FAA Form 8060-4 will be issued with the appropriate ratings. The applicant must complete and sign the “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area. The “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area and the “FAA INSPECTOR’S REPORT” area are the only entries required. AFS-760 is aware of testing procedures for applicants under § 65.80. Provide the applicant with a copy of the original FAA Form 8610-2 (for use in case the certification file is lost).
(4)    Forward the typed original FAA Form 8060-4, the computerized AKTR(s), and the original of FAA Form 8610-2 will be forwarded to the managing FAA office within 7 calendar-days after completion of the file.

Note:  A copy of the graduation certificate or certificate of completion will be attached to the certification file, and be sent to AFS-760 through the designee’s managing FAA office.

14.    Applicants Under 18 Years of Age. An applicant who meets the requirements of part 65, except for § 65.71(a)(1) or 65.113, may take the oral and practical tests. For applicants under 18 years of age who have been authorized to take the oral and practical tests and passes them, the Temporary Airman Certificate will not be issued until the applicant’s 18th birthday. For applicants under 18 years of age:

a.    FAA Form 8060-4. Do not issue FAA Form 8060-4.

b.    FAA Form 8610-2. On the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2, under the “REMARKS” area put the following statement: The applicant is under 18 years of age. Temporary Airman Certificate was not issued. (See Figures 6-2J and 6-3E.)

c.    FAA Form 8610-2 FAA Office Original. Send one original of FAA Form 8610-2, the test planning sheet, and the PBR to the managing FAA office.

d.    FAA Form 8610-2 Applicant Original. Give the applicant one original (completed and signed) of FAA Form 8610-2 and the computerized test report(s).

e.    Issuance of FAA Form 8060-4. Instruct the applicant that upon reaching 18 years of age, the applicant may present their original of FAA Form 8610-2 and the computerized AKTR(s), to the nearest FAA office or appropriately rated DME, whereupon an FAA Form 8060-4 will be issued with appropriate ratings. At this time, the applicant certification on the FAA Form 8610-2 must be completed.

Note:  A copy of the graduation certificate or certificate of completion will be attached to the certification file, and sent to AFS-760 through the designee’s managing FAA office.

f.    Applicant Certification Area. When the applicant reaches 18 years of age and presents the appropriate documents, the inspector or DME must forward the typed original FAA Form 8060-4, FAA Form 8610-2 after the applicant signs the “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area (this is the original that was returned to the applicant at the time certification testing was completed), and the computerized AKTR(s) to the managing FAA office within 7 calendar-days after completion of the file. The “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area and the “FAA INSPECTOR’S REPORT” area are the only entries allowed. AFS-760 is aware of testing procedures for applicants less than 18 years of age. The inspector or designee must make a copy of the completed FAA Form 8610-2 for the applicant’s records.

15.    When the Applicant Fails. When the applicant has failed all or any part of the oral and practical tests:

a.    Give a Completed and Signed Original of FAA Form 8610-2 to the Applicant. The form will serve as notification of the areas passed, failed, or not completed, and the form must be presented to a DME for retest. Identify the subject area(s)/section(s) or task(s)/Area(s) of Operation failed and record them in the “REMARKS” block and fill out the QUES. NO. and/or PROJ. NO. box, as appropriate, with the project number or the oral question number(s) that was (were) failed on the reverse side of the FAA Form 8610-2. Use these subject areas/sections for reference when receiving additional instruction and when the FAA Form 8610-2 is presented for a retest.

Note:  For retest procedures, see subparagraph 11e.

b.    Return to the Applicant:

(1)    The computerized AKTR(s).
(2)    FAA Form 8610-2 (original) from all previously failed oral and practical tests.

c.    Send the Certification File to the Managing FAA Office.

Note:  Do not hold the file until retesting.

16.    Issuance of FAA Form 8060-4 by a DME When Oral and Practical Tests are Not Administered.

a.    New FAA Form 8610-2. A new FAA Form 8610-2 is not required in the following instances:

(1)    The applicant was under 18 years of age when the required tests were passed. (Refer to
§§ 65.71(a)(1) or 65.113.)
(2)    The applicant passed the oral and practical tests before taking the computerized airman knowledge tests. (Refer to § 65.80.)

b.    Determine the Required Tests Were Passed. When an applicant requests an airman certificate based on passing the tests under any of the conditions listed in paragraph 15, carefully determine the required tests were passed during a 24 calendar-month period. (Refer to § 65.71(a)(3).)

c.    Complete Reverse Side of FAA Form 8610-2. Require the applicant to complete the “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area on the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2 following the “DESIGNATED EXAMINER’S REPORT.” The “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area is used to verify the applicant still meets the conditions and requirements of §§ 65.11 and 65.12.

d.    Entries Above the Designee’s Signature on FAA Form 8610-2. The inspector or designee issuing the FAA Form 8060-4 and submitting the file must not make any entries above the designee’s signature on the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2 (with the exception of the “REMARKS” area). At this time, provide the applicant with a copy (for use in case the certification file is lost).

e.    Applicant Meets § 65.71. If the applicant meets § 65.71 for the certificate requested, the designee must provide the following:

(1)    To the managing FAA office:
(a)    FAA Form 8610-2;
(b)    Computerized AKTR(s);
(c)    FAA Form 8060-4 (typed original);
(d)    Acknowledgement portion of the PBR; and
(e)    The applicant’s graduation certificate or certificate of completion.
(2)    To the applicant:
(a)    FAA Form 8060-4 (duplicate); and
(b)    A machine copy of the original FAA Form 8610-2 (for use in case the certification file is lost).

17.    Reconstruction of a Lost Certification File.

a.    Copy of FAA Form 8610-2 and FAA Form 8060-4. A copy of the original FAA Form 8610-2 and FAA Form 8060-4 complete with all signatures and dates on both forms is required. If no copy exists, the information that appeared on the original application must be provided on a new FAA Form 8610-2 and FAA Form 8060-4 complete with all signatures and dates (applicant, designee, and inspector). Ensure that the dates shown on the new application are the original dates of the practice test, etc.

b.    Duplicate Reports. AFS-760 will furnish the duplicate test report(s) provided they are furnished with the approximate date(s) and location(s) of the computer knowledge test(s).

c.    Reconstructed File. In the upper right hand block of FAA Form 8610-2 the wording “RECONSTRUCTED FILE” must appear in red ink.

d.    Forward Certification File. All information regarding the certification file must be forwarded through the Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) or International Field Office (IFO) to: FAA, Attn: Airmen Certification Branch (AFS-760), P.O. Box 25082, Oklahoma City, OK 73125-4940.

18.    Disposition of Files. DMEs must carefully check the FAA Form 8610-2 to ensure that all entries have been recorded properly. Have the applicant sign their copy of the FAA Form 8060-4. Check the complete certification file before the applicant departs from the testing area.

a.    Attachments. Check the boxes for each required attachment on the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2. Record the number of documents in parenthesis following the attachment’s name. (See Figures 6-2F to 6-2K.) The FAA cannot issue a permanent airman certificate unless all required documents are completed and on file to support the issuance of the certificate. AFS-760 will return files without supporting information or required documents.

b.    Files. Files must be forwarded to the managing FAA office within 7 calendar-days. The managing FAA office will forward the files to: Airmen Certification Branch (AFS 760), P.O. Box 25082, Oklahoma City, OK 73125-4940. On 2-page electronic applications not printed on a duplex printer, ensure that the applicant’s full name and DOB are annotated on the second page, either in the “Remarks” section or in the top border of the FAA Form 8610-2. This information is required for identification purposes.

c.    Retain Copy. The DME is encouraged to keep a copy of the FAA Form 8610-2 for a record of oral and practical tests administered.

d.    Applicant Passes. If the applicant passes, the DME must provide the following:

(1)    To the managing FAA office:
(a)    One original FAA Form 8610-2;
(b)    Computerized test report(s);
(c)    FAA Form 8060-4 (typed original);
(d)    Superseded certificate;
(e)    If retest is within 30 calendar-days of the previous test, a statement complying with § 65.19(b);
(f)    Test planning sheets; and
(g)    Acknowledgement portion of the PBR.
(2)    To the applicant:
(a)    FAA Form 8060-4 (duplicate) if the managing FAA office has authorized the DME to issue FAA Form 8060-4; and
(b)    Original FAA Form 8610-2 (second copy).

e.    Applicant Fails. If the applicant fails, the DME must provide the following:

(1)    To the managing FAA office:
(a)    One original FAA Form 8610-2;
(b)    If retest is within 30 calendar-days of the previous test, a statement complying with § 65.19(b);
(c)    Test planning sheets; and
(d)    PBR.
(2)    To the applicant:
(a)    One original FAA Form 8610-2;
(b)    Computerized AKTR(s); and
(c)    If retest, FAA Form 8610-2 (original) from previously failed test(s).

f.    Files. See the appropriate paragraphs of this order for handling of files for applicants who are under 18 years of age (paragraph 14) or who take the oral and practical tests before the computerized airman knowledge tests under the provisions of § 65.80. (See paragraph 13d.)

Section 3. DPRE—General Information

19.    Additional Requirements for Appointment. The procedures contained in this chapter apply to inspectors, and DPREs authorized to conduct parachute rigger oral and practical tests and issue Temporary Airman Certificates. DPREs will conduct tests in accordance with the applicable PTS. Inspectors must carefully consider all of the following issues before designating or renewing a designee. In addition to meeting the general designee eligibility requirements in Chapter 2, a designee applicant must meet the following additional requirements, which will be reviewed by the appointing FAA office:

a.    For DPRE Appointment.

(1)    Evidence of a high level of knowledge and experience in the Areas of Operation required for parachute rigger certification.
(2)    Held a valid master parachute rigger certificate for 2 years with the rating(s) for which the managing FAA office will issue a designation.
(3)    Actively exercised the privileges of a valid master parachute rigger certificate for 2 years immediately before the designation.
(4)    Have a fixed base of operation adequately equipped to support testing in each required Area of Operation for the designation held.
(a)    The fixed base of operation, equipment, and materials must be adequate for an applicant to demonstrate the basic skills for the certificate and rating sought. The managing FAA office will periodically monitor the status of equipment to ensure compliance.
(b)    Tools, equipment, current publications, materials, etc., required to complete a project assignment must be the type parachute manufacturers recommend or accept in the industry.
(c)    The fixed base of operation must, as a minimum, have tools and equipment necessary to perform, in each required Area of Operation, the tasks the DPRE will assign as part of his or her developed test.

Note:  The DPRE is required by the managing FAA office to report any significant change in the equipment or materials available to test applicants.

b.    Limitations. In addition to the general limitations in Chapter 5, DPREs:

(1)    Must not conduct oral and practical tests at any location unless it is adequately equipped with available equipment and material necessary for conducting the tests.
(2)    Must not conduct an oral or practical test in any language other than the English language.

20.    DPRE Designations Issued. The DPRE will be issued one designation, Parachute Rigger Examiner. The DPRE conducts senior and master parachute rigger oral and practical tests for the parachute types for which the DPRE is rated.

21.    Designee Materials. The managing FAA office should provide each designee with materials appropriate to the designation. The managing FAA office may issue some or all of the designee materials at the time of appointment. With the exception of the FAA Form 8060-4, the material can also be found on the Internet, or through common sources such as the GPO. The following materials (current editions) are necessary to perform DPRE duties:

a.    FAA Order 8900.2, General Aviation Airman Designee Handbook.

b.    FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Stock No. 0052-00-026-8004).

c.    FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Stock No. 0052-00-049-5001).

d.    Title 14 CFR Part 65, Certification: Airmen Other Than Flight Crewmembers.

e.    Title 14 CFR Part 183, Representatives of the Administrator.

f.    FAA-S-8081-25, Parachute Rigger Practical Test Standards (PTS).

22.    Security. Each DPRE is responsible for establishing and carrying out appropriate security procedures. The security of the controlled material is important to prevent compromise, and to ensure the applicants meet the aeronautical skill standards for aviation mechanic certificates and ratings.

a.    Materials. The DPRE must ensure adequate security of all test questions or projects (printed, developed, or downloaded). These materials must not be used for any other purpose.

b.    Access. The DPRE must secure the aforementioned material in a manner that will not allow unauthorized access (e.g., a locked drawer, cabinet, or closet). Only authorized representatives of the FAA Administrator will receive access to secured material. The DPRE should refer any public request for the secured material to the managing FAA office.

23.    FAA Certification Policy. DPREs must evaluate the oral and practical tests to determine if an applicant’s performance is acceptable or unacceptable. The primary discriminator in the airman certification process is the oral and practical test. Standard grading criteria and objective examination ensure a level of basic knowledge and skills in all subjects required for the rating sought.

24.    Parachute Rigger Tests. The PTS consist of knowledge/oral question elements and skill/practical project elements in each of the seven Areas of Operation. The tasks are broken down by elements. All elements of a selected task must be accomplished to successfully complete the task. These Areas of Operation include:

·    I—Certification.

·    II—Privileges, Limitations, and Operating Rules.

·    III—Packing Parachutes.

·    IV—Parachute Operation and Care.

·    V—Parachute Construction Details.

·    VI—Parachute Repair.

·    VII—Parachute Alteration.

Section 4. DPRE—Conducting and Grading Tests

25.    Preparation: Conduct a Pretest Interview. The DPRE must accomplish the pretest interview face-to-face, by telephone/fax, through email, or by other methods that will allow the DPRE to:

a.    Discuss Testing Details. Discuss fees, testing procedures, projects, and type of equipment to be used and what the applicant should expect if they pass, fail, or do not complete the test.

(1)    Charge a Reasonable Fee. The DPRE may charge a reasonable fee to each applicant for handling the forms and reports incident to the issuance of an aviation mechanic certificate, and for the use of the DPRE’s facilities, equipment and materials, and service in administering the oral and practical tests.
(2)    Fee Agreement. The DPRE and the applicant should reach a mutual understanding and agreement of the total fee for the services before beginning the tests. An agreement in writing may be to the advantage of both the DPRE and the applicant.

b.    Advise of Testing Schedule. Advise the applicant when the day’s activities terminate, and when testing resumes if more than 1 day is needed.

c.    Ensure the Applicant’s Eligibility. (See paragraph 27.)

(1)    Review the applicant’s FAA Form 8610-2 for completeness and correctness. The DPRE must have the applicant correct any errors. This may require the applicant to return to the FAA office where authorization was obtained.
(2)    Review the applicant’s current written test results that are applicable to the rating(s) sought.
(3)    Have the applicant indicate, in the event that he or she passes all of the required tests, how he or she will respond to the two questions listed in block IV, “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION,” located on the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2. There may be a need to have managing FAA office involvement if the applicant would be required to answer “YES” to either of the questions.

d.    Advise of Retesting. Advise applicant of § 65.19 retesting after failure provisions and restrictions.

Note:  DPREs must notify the managing FAA office, in writing, before conducting all oral and practical tests. This can be done by email, fax, or other written means acceptable to the managing FAA office. The managing FAA office will establish specific procedures for this notification.

Note:  These procedures must include annotation to indicate if the applicant was authorized to test by an inspector from an FAA office other than the DPRE’s managing FAA office.

26.    Knowledge and Skill Elements for DPRE.

a.    Developing Knowledge (Oral) Element Tests. This type of questioning intends to measure an applicant’s basic knowledge of an Area of Operation. The design of the knowledge question is directly relational to the accuracy of this measurement.

(1)    Knowledge and Skill Elements. The completed test planning sheet must be included in the certification package sent to the managing FAA office.
(2)    For the DPRE: Area of Operation. Test in each Area of Operation required for certificate/rating sought. An applicant must perform satisfactorily in each selected task in each required Area of Operation.

b.    Prescribed Length of Time.

(1)    The testing period must be long enough to make a valid determination in each subject area/Area of Operation for the rating sought. Take appropriate time to ensure that all required knowledge element questions and skill element practical projects have been completed for the rating sought.
(2)    Progressive tests must not be given. Although it may be necessary to continue a test for more than 1 day, tests must not be allowed to continue for long periods. Progressive testing is defined as testing which continues for more than 4 sessions in a 4-day period. Suspending the test to allow the applicant further study is not allowed. Both the applicant and the designee should plan the testing times so the applicant completes most of the test once it commences.

Note:  A session is defined as any break in testing that is separated by more than 2 hours.

27.    Applicant Eligibility.

a.    Furnish Current, Government-Issued Identification. Applicants must furnish current, valid, government-issued identification with a photograph and signature. If FAA Form 8610-2 is completed at an FAA office, the approving inspector will record the method of identification (e.g., passport, U.S. military identification, or U.S. driver’s license, including state of issuance), number, and expiration date in the “REMARKS” area of FAA Form 8610-2. The DPRE will verify the applicant’s identification before testing. If the means of identification was provided in the “REMARKS” area, the DPRE will verify the identification and initial the inspector’s entry. (Sample entry: Oklahoma Driver’s License #123456789 exp. 01/31/20XX.) If the means of identification was not previously entered in the “REMARKS” area or the means of identification provided by the applicant is different from the one listed in the “REMARKS” area, the DME/DPRE will make the entry in the “REMARKS” area and initial the entry. (See Figures 6-2F to 6-2K (mechanic applicants) and Figures 6-3C to 6-3E (parachute rigger applicants).

Note:  The ASI/DPRE will have the applicant fill out the Pilot’s Bill of Rights (PBR) acknowledgement (refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 7, Chapter 8, Section 1) prior to filling out FAA Form 8610-2.

b.    Meet English Language Requirements. Both designees and ASIs share the responsibility for determining if applicants meet the English language requirements. (Before accepting the application and beginning the practical test for certificate or rating, the designee/ASI must evaluate the applicant’s English fluency using the appropriate guidance.) AC 60-28 provides guidance for airman applicants, designees, and ASIs in determining English language skills required for airman certification.

c.    Original FAA Form 8610-2.

(1)    Only Maintenance or Avionics inspectors who hold the mechanic certificate with airframe and/or powerplant ratings are authorized to review and endorse block V of FAA Form 8610-2.
(2)    All applicants claiming civilian and/or military experience as a basis for qualification must have the experience evaluated and verified by an inspector before taking the required test. The inspector may, as a matter of office procedures, reproduce and retain copies of FAA Form 8610-2 and documented evidence presented by the applicant. The ASI will:
(a)    Evaluate the experience documents and verify them, if necessary.
(b)    Have the applicant complete FAA Form 8610-2 (two originals). (See Figures 6-3A and 6-3B.) Provide a copy of Figure 6-1 to the applicant. Instruct the applicant to detach, if necessary, and read the “PRIVACY ACT” area of FAA Form 8610-2.
(c)    Review FAA Form 8610-2 for completeness, sign, and complete block V of FAA Form 8610-2 (both originals), and return them if the applicant meets the experience requirements. Return all experience documents to the applicant. Both original FAA Form 8610-2 applications must be retained by the applicant to present to a DPRE or ASI for the oral and practical tests.

d.    Two Originals.

(1)    The applicant submits two originals of FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, before testing begins. The applicant must complete FAA Form 8610-2 in accordance with Figure 6-1, Instructions for Completing FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, which includes the instructions for completing FAA Form 8610-2. The ASI or designee should provide FAA Form 8610-2, which can be found at www.faa.gov, and give detailed instructions for completing it correctly. (The ASI or designee must copy Figure 6-1 and provide it to the applicant until FAA Form 8610-2 is revised with written instructions attached.) Advise the applicant to read the supplemental information attached to FAA Form 8610-2 (see Figure 6-1).

Note:  All signatures must be original, in dark ink, with the name printed or typed below or next to the signature.

Note:  The block V endorsement must not be restricted to a specific FAA office or region.

Note:  An applicant is not required to present his or her application to an FAA office for reauthorization unless there is evidence that his or her original authorization is in question. Any evidence should be attached on a separate sheet of paper or annotated in the remarks section.

(2)    For the DPRE: Senior, Master, Added Ratings, and Military.
(a)    Senior parachute rigger applicants for an original certificate must show proof to an inspector or a DPRE of having passed the parachute rigger computer knowledge test (RIG) by presenting a computerized AKTR. (See Figure 6-3G.)
(b)    Master parachute rigger applicants for an original certificate:

1.    An applicant who does not hold a senior certificate must show proof to an inspector or a DPRE of having passed the RIG by presenting a computerized AKTR.

2.    An applicant who holds a senior certificate must present the airman certificate to the designee. No knowledge test is required.

(c)    Adding a Rating. An applicant must present his or her senior or master certificate to the designee. No knowledge test is required.
(d)    Military Parachute Riggers. Current and former military parachute riggers may be tested in accordance with § 65.117 at an authorized computer testing center.

28.    Conducting the Tests.

a.    Conducting the Oral Test.

(1)    Oral questions may be used at any time during the practical test.

Note:  For the DPRE: At a minimum, the applicant must be tested on each knowledge element for each objective in a selected task. The minimum passing grade is 70 percent of the number of knowledge questions asked in each selected task. Applicants must pass each task to pass the Area of Operation. The DPRE is not required to use oral questions for skill only tasks.

(2)    An applicant’s answers to oral questions must show an understanding of the subject and ability to apply knowledge. Do not allow an applicant’s skill of oral expression or ability to memorize details affect oral test evaluation. If necessary, additional exploratory questions may be used to verify the applicant’s understanding of the subject area, but will not be considered as part of the test.
(3)    To determine if the oral questions are answered correctly, the DPRE must be able to reference information (e.g., manufacturer’s data, ACs, and 14 CFR), and be objective in making the determination.
(4)    Although the answers to the oral questions should be available in the CFRs, manufacturer’s maintenance data, or other aviation related data, the applicant must be able to successfully answer all oral questions without the use of any reference materials.

b.    Conducting the Practical Test. The DPRE must test the applicant in each Area of Operation that corresponds with each certificate and/or rating sought.

(1)    In areas where a selected task is identified, the DPRE must test the applicant on that task and may select additional tasks, if necessary. DPREs must evaluate all selected tasks in their entirety. The applicant must pass each Area of Operation required for the rating(s) sought.
(2)    The DPRE may combine Areas of Operation and/or tasks, as needed, to facilitate the applicant in taking the test.
(3)    The DPRE must personally observe all tasks in their entirety performed by the applicant.
(4)    The DPRE must objectively determine if the applicant’s project is acceptable. The applicant must demonstrate proficiency and competence using basic skills. Where applicable, the applicant must demonstrate an approval for return to service standard, and the ability to locate and apply the required reference materials. For instances where an approval for return to service standard is not achievable, the applicant must explain why the standard cannot be met (e.g., tolerances that are outside the manufacturer’s limitations).
(5)    The DPRE must provide all tools, equipment, and reference materials to support the test. These materials must include, but are not limited to 14 CFR, ADs, ACs, manufacturers’ technical and parts manuals, service information, and any other instructions and/or reference material that are necessary for the objective accomplishment of the assigned task(s). All reference material must be unmarked and in good condition. The applicant may not use reference material the DPRE has not provided. The applicant may use nonprogrammable calculators where appropriate. Applicants may use personal tools and equipment at the discretion of the DPRE.
(6)    Designees must select the applicable Areas of Operation and supporting tasks for an oral and practical test. Test criteria applicability is determined by the current edition of the Parachute Rigger PTS, FAA‑S-8081-25, based on the certificate ratings sought by the applicant.

29.    Evaluating Applicant Performance. Do not expect an applicant to be competent in all phases of overhaul, maintenance, alteration, and repair, or be highly skillful in performing complex manipulative operations. However, expect the applicant to have developed basic skills and be able to demonstrate them during the practical test. Inform the applicant of the level of performance expected before beginning each project. DPREs should inform their applicants that they must demonstrate an approval for return to service proficiency on the assigned tasks.

a.    For the DPRE. When it becomes obvious during the test that an applicant cannot perform at an acceptable level and has already failed:

(1)    An Area of Operation. The DPRE may discontinue testing in that Area of Operation and go to the next. There is no maximum number of projects the DPRE may evaluate in an Area of Operation.
(2)    A Task (Or More Than One Task). The DPRE may discontinue testing in that Area of Operation or go on with the next task. The DPRE or the applicant may discontinue the testing any time after the failure of a task. In any case, the applicant is entitled to credit for only those tasks satisfactorily completed.

Note:  If testing for a certificate/rating was terminated, the DPRE will make an appropriate note listing the Area(s) of Operation and associated task(s) failed, or not tested, in the “REMARKS” area on the reverse side of Form 8610-2. Some examples are located in the figures at the end of this chapter.

b.    Standards. Include the following standards in DPRE observations for evaluating applicant performance:

(1)    Approach to the project; proper information and tools; preparation of the equipment; and observation of safety precautions.
(2)    Cleaning, preparing, and protecting parts; skill in handling tools; thoroughness and cleanliness.
(3)    The functions of the units or systems of the assigned project; use of current maintenance and/or overhaul procedures.
(4)    Final inspection for safety and operation.
(5)    Completion of required forms and records.
(6)    Application of appropriate rules.
(7)    Attitude toward safety, manufacturer’s recommendations, and acceptable industry practices.

c.    Test Planning Sheets Are Required for Each Oral and Practical Test Given. Forward test planning sheets to the managing FAA office with the certification file. An example of a planning sheet is included in Figure 6-4. Planning sheets developed by the designee must contain the information included in the Figure 6-4 example (both sides). The managing FAA office may also require additional information on the planning sheets.

Note:  The applicant’s signature on the planning sheet verifies the test was given to the applicant and the test times and dates listed are accurate, and the designee should explain the significance of the signature on the planning sheet.

Note:  Copies of test planning sheets (for both DPRE) are no longer required to be kept in the managing FAA office file and should be included in certification packages forwarded to AFS‑760. However, FAA offices may choose to retain a copy of the test planning sheet in the designee’s file.

d.    Test Not Completed.

(1)    If the test cannot be completed in the allotted timeframe, the designee will correctly mark both FAA Forms 8610-2 (two originals) on the reverse side. Forward this test file to the managing FAA office within 7 calendar-days. When practical, schedule a retest for the areas not tested at the time the test is discontinued. Treat this retest as if the applicant had failed those portions not tested. (See subparagraphs 29d.)
(2)    Do not mark as a failure. Place a statement in the “REMARKS” area indicating why the test was not completed on both FAA Form 8610-2. Some examples are located in the figures at the end of this chapter.

e.    Retests. Retest applicants in all areas of the oral and/or practical tests in the section(s) or Area(s) of Operation listed as failed, that were not tested, or that have expired. When application is made for a retest after failure of a previous test or test not completed, the applicant must:

(1)    Complete FAA Form 8610-2 (both originals) in accordance with the instructions furnished by the DPRE or ASI.

Note:  FAA Form 8610-2, block V does not need to be signed by an ASI if a copy of the original FAA Form 8610-2 (with authorizing signature) is attached to the file.

(2)    Present an appropriate computerized AKTR. All sections of the test must have been passed within the previous 24 calendar-months.
(3)    Present his or her original of FAA Form 8610-2 from the previous oral and practical tests showing the Areas of Operation failed, not completed, or for which passing credit has expired (mechanic applicants only).
(4)    If the retest is within 30 calendar-days of the previous test, present a statement by a person authorized in § 65.19 that the applicant received additional instruction for each subject failed and the applicant is ready for retesting. This statement of training is required only when the applicant failed portions of the test. This statement of training is not required for Areas of Operation not completed on the previous test. (See Figure 6-3G.)

f.    Test in All Required Areas.

(1)    Test applicants for retest in all areas of the oral and/or practical tests in the Area(s) of Operation listed as failed, that was/were not taken, or that has/have expired.
(2)    For the DPRE: Applicants who apply for retesting within 60 calendar-days to the same DPRE who administered the failed test may, at the option of the DPRE, be tested in only the task(s) failed or that were not taken on the previous test, provided the applicant has successfully passed all other tasks.

Note:  During a retest and at the discretion of the DPRE, any task may be re-evaluated, including those previously passed.

30.    Recording the Results of Tests. Record the final results of oral and practical tests on the reverse side of Form 8610-2. When the applicant has demonstrated an acceptable level of competence, workmanship, and safety, check the “PASS” box for that rating, or check the “FAIL” box if the applicant has not demonstrated an acceptable level of competence. Make all entries in permanent ink. See paragraph 33 for procedures to follow if an applicant fails.

Note:  For areas not tested, mark as Not Tested. Do not check "PASS" or "FAIL."

31.    When the Applicant Passes. When the applicant has passed all the required sections of both the oral and practical tests, the designee who administered the test must:

a.    Complete Reverse Side of FAA Form 8610-2. Complete as follows:

(1)    Enter the date the test was completed, sign the form, and enter his or her designation number in the spaces provided on the reverse of FAA Form 8610-2 (both originals).
(2)    Require the applicant (at the time the Temporary Airman Certificate is issued) to complete the “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area on the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2 (both originals), following the Designated Examiners Report. Use the “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area to verify the applicant still meets the conditions and requirements of §§ 65.11 and 65.12.

Note:  At the time of issuance of FAA Form 8060-4, the inspector and/or the designee must request a telephone number where the applicant may be reached during the next 120 calendar-days in the event of application problems. The telephone number must be recorded in the “REMARKS” area on the back of the application. If a telephone number is not available, write “NO TELEPHONE.” The inspector and/or the designee may also request an email address.

b.    Return Original. Give one original of FAA Form 8610-2 to the applicant.

c.    Prepare Temporary Airman Certificate. Prepare FAA Form 8060-4 unless otherwise directed by the managing FAA office. (See Figures 6-3H to 6-3J.) Issue the duplicate copy to the applicant. Forward the original typed copy with the certification file to the managing FAA office. Ensure FAA Form 8060-4 reflects the applicant’s current information. Changes involving the applicant’s name, gender, nationality (including dual citizenship), and/or DOB must be referred to the managing FAA office.

(1)    Entries for the applicant’s copy may be printed in ink; however, a typed original, signed by the issuing DPRE, must accompany the certification file, which must be forwarded to the managing FAA office. The applicant need not sign the copy sent to the managing FAA office.
(2)    AFS-760 will issue all original airman certificates with a unique certificate number during the processing of the airman file. The airman’s Social Security Number (SSN) can still be collected on FAA Form 8610-2, but the word “PENDING” must be placed in the certificate number block III of FAA Form 8060-4. If the airman does not wish to provide his or her SSN to the FAA, the applicant must place the words “DO NOT USE” in the SSN block of the application. Airman certificates presently using the SSN as a certificate number will continue to be issued with that number unless the applicant requests a unique number. If the airman requests a unique number when applying for an added rating, the word “PENDING” must be placed in the certificate number block of FAA Form 8060-4.

d.    Assign Seal Symbol—DPRE Only. At the time of initial certification, each parachute rigger will be assigned an identification seal symbol. An FAA office in need of seal symbols must contact AFS-760 and request seal symbols. AFS-760 will send them a list of seal symbols that can be assigned.

Note:  When the current supply of FAA Form 3318, Parachute Rigger Seal Symbol Assignment Card, has been used, FAA Form 3318 will be discontinued.

32.    Applicants Under 18 Years of Age. An applicant who meets the requirements of part 65, except for § 65.113, may take the oral and practical tests. For applicants under 18 years of age who have been authorized to take the oral and practical tests and passes them, the Temporary Airman Certificate will not be issued until the applicant’s 18th birthday. For applicants under 18 years of age:

a.    FAA Form 8060-4. Do not issue FAA Form 8060-4.

b.    FAA Form 8610-2. On the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2, under the “REMARKS” area put the following statement: The applicant is under 18 years of age. Temporary Airman Certificate was not issued. (See Figures 6-2J and 6-3E.)

c.    FAA Form 8610-2 FAA Office Original. Send one original of FAA Form 8610-2, the test planning sheet, and the PBR to the managing FAA office.

d.    FAA Form 8610-2 Applicant Original. Give the applicant one original (completed and signed) of FAA Form 8610-2 and the computerized test report(s).

e.    Issuance of FAA Form 8060-4. Instruct the applicant that upon reaching 18 years of age, the applicant may present their original of FAA Form 8610-2 and the computerized AKTRs, to the nearest FAA office or appropriately rated DPRE, whereupon an FAA Form 8060-4 will be issued with appropriate ratings. At this time, the applicant certification on the FAA Form 8610-2 must be completed.

f.    Applicant Certification Area. When the applicant reaches 18 years of age and presents the appropriate documents, the inspector or DPRE must forward the typed original FAA Form 8060-4; FAA Form 8610-2 after the applicant signs the “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area (this is the original that was returned to the applicant at the time certification testing was completed); and the computerized AKTR(s), to the managing FAA office within 7 calendar-days after completion of the file. The “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area and the “FAA INSPECTOR’S REPORT” area are the only entries allowed. AFS-760 is aware of testing procedures for applicants less than 18 years of age. The inspector or designee must make a copy of the completed FAA Form 8610-2 for the applicant’s records.

33.    When the Applicant Fails. When the applicant has failed all or any part of the oral and practical tests:

a.    Give a Completed and Signed Original of FAA Form 8610-2 to the Applicant. The form will serve as notification of the areas passed, failed, or not completed, and the form must be presented to a DPRE for retest. Identify the Area of Operation failed and record them in the “REMARKS” block on the reverse side of the FAA Form 8610-2. Use these tasks/Areas of Operation for reference when receiving additional instruction and when the FAA Form 8610-2 is presented for a retest.

Note:  For retest procedures, see subparagraph 29e.

b.    Return to the Applicant:

(1)    The computerized AKTR(s).
(2)    FAA Form 8610-2 (original) from all previously failed oral and practical tests.

c.    Send the Certification File to the Managing FAA Office.

Note:  Do not hold the file until retesting.

34.    Issuance of FAA Form 8060-4 by a DPRE When Oral and Practical Tests are Not Administered.

a.    New FAA Form 8610-2. A new FAA Form 8610-2 is not required if the applicant was under 18 years of age when the required tests were passed. (Refer to §§ 65.113.)

b.    Determine the Required Tests Were Passed. When an applicant requests an airman certificate based on passing the tests under any of the conditions listed in paragraph 31, carefully determine the required tests were passed.

c.    Complete Reverse Side of FAA Form 8610-2. Require the applicant to complete the “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area on the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2 following the “DESIGNATED EXAMINER’S REPORT.” The “APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION” area is used to verify the applicant still meets the conditions and requirements of §§ 65.11 and 65.12.

d.    Entries Above the Designee’s Signature on FAA Form 8610-2. The inspector or designee issuing the FAA Form 8060-4 and submitting the file must not make any entries above the designee’s signature on the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2 (with the exception of the “REMARKS” area). At this time, provide the applicant with a copy (for use in case the certification file is lost).

e.    Applicant Meets § 65.113. If the applicant meets § 65.113 for the certificate requested, the designee must provide the following:

(1)    To the managing FAA office:
(a)    FAA Form 8610-2;
(b)    Computerized AKTR(s);
(c)    FAA Form 8060-4 (typed original); and
(d)    Acknowledgement portion of the PBR.
(2)    To the applicant:
(a)    FAA Form 8060-4 (duplicate); and
(b)    A machine copy of the original FAA Form 8610-2 (for use in case the certification file is lost).

35.    Reconstruction of a Lost Certification File.

a.    Copy of FAA Form 8610-2 and FAA Form 8060-4. A copy of the original FAA Form 8610-2 and FAA Form 8060-4 complete with all signatures and dates on both forms is required. If no copy exists, the information that appeared on the original application must be provided on a new FAA Form 8610-2 and FAA Form 8060-4 complete with all signatures and dates (applicant, designee, and inspector). Ensure that the dates shown on the new application are the original dates of the practice test, etc.

b.    Duplicate Reports. AFS-760 will furnish the duplicate test report(s) provided they are furnished with the approximate date(s) and location(s) of the computer knowledge test(s).

c.    Reconstructed File. In the upper right hand block of FAA Form 8610-2, the wording “RECONSTRUCTED FILE” must appear in red ink.

d.    Forward Certification File. All information regarding the certification file must be forwarded through the FSDO or IFO to: FAA, Attn: Airmen Certification Branch (AFS-760), P.O. Box 25082, Oklahoma City, OK 73125-4940.

36.    Disposition of Files. DPREs must carefully check the FAA Form 8610-2 to ensure that all entries have been recorded properly. Have the applicant sign their copy of the FAA Form 8060-4. Check the complete certification file before the applicant departs from the testing area.

a.    Attachments. Check the boxes for each required attachment on the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2. Record the number of documents in parenthesis following the attachment’s name. (See Figures 6-3C to 6-3F.) The FAA cannot issue a permanent airman certificate unless all required documents are completed and on file to support the issuance of the certificate. AFS-760 will return files without supporting information or required documents.

b.    Files. Files must be forwarded to the managing FAA office within 7 calendar-days. The managing FAA office will forward the files to: Airmen Certification Branch (AFS-760), P.O. Box 25082, Oklahoma City, OK 73125-4940. On 2-page electronic applications not printed on a duplex printer, ensure that the applicant’s full name and DOB are annotated on the second page, either in the “Remarks” section or in the top border of the FAA Form 8610-2. This information is required for identification purposes.

c.    Retain Copy. The DPRE is encouraged to keep a copy of the FAA Form 8610-2 for a record of oral and practical tests administered.

d.    Applicant Passes. If the applicant passes, the DPRE must provide the following:

(1)    To the managing FAA office:
(a)    One original FAA Form 8610-2;
(b)    Computerized test report(s);
(c)    FAA Form 8060-4 (typed original);
(d)    Superseded certificate;
(e)    If retest is within 30 calendar-days of the previous test, a statement complying with § 65.19(b);
(f)    Test planning sheets; and
(g)    Acknowledgement portion of the PBR.
(2)    To the applicant:
(a)    FAA Form 8060-4 (duplicate) if the managing FAA office has authorized the DPRE to issue FAA Form 8060-4; and
(b)    Original FAA Form 8610-2 (second copy).

e.    Applicant Fails. If the applicant fails, the DPRE must provide the following:

(1)    To the managing FAA office:
(a)    One original FAA Form 8610-2;
(b)    If retest is within 30 calendar-days of the previous test, a statement complying with § 65.19(b);
(c)    Test planning sheet; and
(d)    PBR.
(2)    To the applicant:
(a)    One original FAA Form 8610-2;
(b)    Computerized AKTR(s); and
(c)    If retest, FAA Form 8610-2 (original) from previously failed test(s).

f.    Files. See the appropriate paragraphs of this order for handling of files for applicants who are under 18 years of age (paragraph 32).

Figure 6-1.  Instructions for Completing FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

1.    Procedures for Completing FAA Form 8610-2. This figure explains the procedures to be followed when applicants, designees, and inspectors complete FAA Form 8610-2.

a.    FAA Form 8610-2. The designee or inspector must provide FAA Form 8610-2 to the applicant.

b.    Two Originals. The applicant must complete two originals of FAA Form 8610-2 before testing begins.

c.    Detailed Instructions. The designee or inspector must give detailed instruction(s) for correctly completing FAA Form 8610-2.

Note:  The inspector or designee must copy Figure 6-1 and provide it to the applicant until FAA Form 8610-2 is revised with written instructions attached.

d.    Use Permanent Dark Ink or Use a Typewriter. For hard copy submissions, all entries must be made with permanent dark ink or typewritten. An electronic version of FAA Form 8610-2 can be found at www.faa.gov.

Note:  When a correction is made, line through the error and initial the mistake. Provide a reason for the correction in the “REMARKS” block. Do not use correction fluid (white out) or correction tape.

e.    Signatures. All signatures must be original, in dark ink, with name printed in dark ink or typewritten below or beside the signature.

f.    Dates. Unless otherwise specified, all dates must be entered using eight digit numeric characters (e.g., 05/05/2002) (month, day, year). (The dates must not be entered as May 5, 2002 or 05/05/02.)

FAA Form 8610 2. Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Privacy Act

2.    Privacy Act. The designee or inspector must advise the applicant to read the “PRIVACY ACT” on FAA Form 8610-2. The Privacy Act must be removed before FAA Form 8610-2 is used. (See box above.) On 2-page electronic applications not printed on a duplex printer, ensure that the applicant’s full name and date of birth (DOB) are annotated on the second page, either in the “Remarks” section or in the top border of the FAA Form 8610-2. This information is required for identification purposes.

FAA Form 8610 2. Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Top Section

3.    Complete the Top Section. The applicant must complete the top section of FAA Form 8610-2. (See box above.)

a.    “MECHANIC” and “PARACHUTE RIGGER” Boxes. The applicant must check the appropriate box.

b.    Ratings Box(es). The applicant must check the appropriate box(es) for the rating(s) sought (e.g., Airframe and/or Powerplant or Senior/Master, Seat, Back, Chest, and/or Lap).

c.    Check Original Issuance or Added Rating Box. The applicant must check either the “ORIGINAL ISSUANCE” or the “ADDED RATING” box. The “ADDED RATING” box will only be checked when the applicant has an airman certificate and is actually adding a rating to that certificate.

Note:  Line through the rating(s) not applied for unless it is currently held by the applicant. (For an example, see Figures 6-2A and 6-3A.)

FAA Form 8610 2. Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Applicant Information

4.    Block I—Applicant Information. The designee or inspector must urge the applicant to read the fine print. (See box above.)

a.    Item A—Name (First, Middle, Last).

(1)    The applicant must enter his or her legal name. The applicant’s name must not be changed on the subsequent FAA Form 8610-2 unless it is done in accordance with Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 65, § 65.16. If the applicant’s name exceeds the number of characters allowed (50, including spaces), the Airmen Certification Branch (AFS-760) will make necessary changes to allow for computer acceptance.
(2)    If the applicant has no middle name, the applicant must enter “NMI” (no middle initial) or “NMN” (no middle name).
(3)    If the applicant has initial(s) only, the applicant must enter those initials and then enter “INITIAL ONLY.”
(4)    If the applicant is a junior, III, IV, etc., the applicant will so indicate.

Note:  If the applicant already has an FAA airman certificate, the name on FAA Form 8610-2 must be the same as the name on the FAA airman certificate unless it is changed in accordance with § 65.16.

b.    Item B—SSN.

(1)    Disclosure of the Social Security Number (SSN) is optional (see “PRIVACY ACT”). However, item B cannot be left blank. It is highly recommended that the SSN not be used on the application.
(2)    The applicant must either enter his or her SSN or enter one of the following notations: “DO NOT USE.” or “NONE.”

c.    Item C—DOB (Mo., Day, Yr.).

(1)    The applicant must enter dates using eight digit numeric characters (e.g., 07/09/1965). (Month, Day, Year.) (The dates must not be entered as July 9, 1965 or 07/09/65.)
(2)    The designee or inspector must verify the DOB. The DOB is a problem area.
(3)    If the applicant has other FAA certificate(s), the designee or inspector must verify that the “DOB” is the same as that entered on the FAA Form 8610-2.

d.    Item D—Height.

(1)    The applicant must enter his or her height in inches. (Example: If the applicant were 5’ 9”, the applicant would enter “69.”
(2)    The applicant will use whole inches only. (Use no fractions.)

e.    Item E—Weight.

(1)    The applicant must enter his or her weight in pounds.
(2)    The applicant will use whole pounds only. (Use no fractions.)

f.    Item F—Hair.

(1)    The applicant must spell out the color of his or her hair or use an abbreviation that cannot be confused with another color.
(2)    Acceptable hair colors are brown, black, blonde, gray, and red.
(3)    If the applicant is bald, enter “BALD.”
(4)    If the applicant is wearing a wig or toupee, enter the color of hair under the wig or toupee.

g.    Item G—Eyes.

(1)    The applicant must spell out the color of his or her eyes or use an abbreviation that cannot be confused with another color.
(2)    Acceptable eye colors are brown, black, blue, hazel, gray, and green.

h.    Item H—Sex.

(1)    If the applicant is a male, he will enter “M.”
(2)    If the applicant is a female, she will enter “F.”

i.    Item I—Nationality (Citizenship).

(1)    The applicant must enter the country in which he or she maintains citizenship. Applicants other than United States citizens will be required to provide proof of nationality (e.g., a current passport) to the FAA.
(2)    Dual citizenship will be accepted. Because of limited space on the permanent certificate, only show one citizenship reference under “NATIONALITY.” Annotate dual citizenship in the “REMARKS” area. (e.g., Citizenship: U.S.A./Canada.) The other will be shown as a limitation on the certificate (e.g., dual citizenship includes Canada). Applicants will be required to show proof of dual citizenship to the FAA.

j.    Item J—Place of Birth.

(1)    If the applicant was born in the United States, the applicant must enter the city and state.
(2)    If the city is unknown, enter the county and state.
(3)    If the applicant was born outside of the United States, the applicant must enter the name of the city and country, or province and country.

k.    Item K—Permanent Mailing Address.

(1)    Number and Street, P.O. Box, Etc.—The applicant must enter this information above the first dotted line. This information must not exceed 33 characters, including spaces.
(2)    City—The applicant must enter this information above the second dotted line. The city name must not exceed 17 characters, including spaces. When necessary, the applicant must abbreviate the address (not to exceed 17 characters, including spaces).
(3)    State—The applicant must enter this information above the third dotted line.
(4)    ZIP Code—The applicant must enter this information above the third dotted line.

Note:  A post office box, rural route, Aviation Maintenance Technician School (AMTS) address, personal mailbox, commercial, or other mail drop can be used as the applicant’s preferred mailing; however, the applicant must also furnish a physical residential address, a map or written directions to the applicant’s physical address, 911 address, or Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates. This information must be included with the application. In special cases where the applicant resides on a boat, the name of the boat and the doc number should be included. If the applicant resides in a recreational vehicle (RV), the tag number, Vehicle Identification Section (VIS) number, and registration number should be included.

l.    Item L—Have You Ever Had an Airman Certificate Suspended or Revoked?

(1)    The applicant must check either the “YES” box or the “NO” box. (A Student Pilot Certificate is a pilot certificate.)
(2)    If the “YES” box is checked, refer to §§ 65.11(c), 65.11(d)(2), and 65.12.
(3)    If the designee or applicant does not understand the requirements of part 65 as it applies to a particular situation, contact the managing FAA office for clarification and assistance.

m.    Item M—Do You Now or Have You Ever Held an FAA Airman Certificate?

(1)    The applicant must check either the “YES” box or the “NO” box.
(2)    If the applicant checks the “YES” box, the applicant must make an entry by the “SPECIFY TYPE” area.
(3)    The types of certificates that must be entered in the “SPECIFY TYPE” area are: pilot, mechanic, repairman, etc. (A Student Pilot Certificate is a pilot certificate.)

Note:  An Inspection Authorization (IA), Designated Mechanic Examiner (DME), Designated Parachute Rigger Examiner (DPRE), etc., are not FAA certificates.

n.    Item N—Have You Ever Been Convicted for Violation of Any Federal or State Statutes Pertaining to Narcotic Drugs, Marijuana, and Depressant or Stimulant Drugs or Substances?

(1)    The applicant must check either the “YES” box or the “NO” box.
(2)    If the applicant checks the “YES” box, the applicant must make an entry by the “DATE OF FINAL CONVICTION” area. (Refer to § 65.12.)
(3)    If the DME or applicant does not understand the requirements of part 65 as it applies to a particular situation, contact the managing FAA office or International Field Office (IFO) for clarification and assistance.

FAA Form 8610 2. Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Certificate or Rating Applied on the Basis of-

5.    Block II—Certificate or Rating Applied for On Basis of —. (See box above.)

a.    Graduate of AMTS. When the applicant is a graduate of an approved AMTS, the applicant must complete block II as follows:

(1)    Item D—Graduate of Approved Course. The applicant will check item D, if he or she is a graduate of an AMTS.
(2)    Item D(1)—Name and Location of School. The applicant will enter the name and location of the AMTS, as shown on the graduation certificate.
(3)    Item D(2)—School No. The applicant will enter the AMTS certificate number.
(4)    Item D(3)—Curriculum From Which Graduated. The applicant will enter the approved curriculum from which he or she graduated, as shown on the graduation certificate.

Note:  To accommodate those students attending an AMTS having separate curriculums who choose to complete the airframe curriculum and the powerplant curriculum before testing. Example: The student completes the airframe curriculum on 01/15/2002, completes the powerplant curriculum on 10/15/2002, and requests to be tested on 10/20/2002. Item D(3) of the FAA Form 8610-2 shows, curriculum completed as “AIRFRAME,” “POWERPLANT.” The inspector or DME will attach a copy of all certificates of completion, or make a statement in the “REMARKS” area indicating the date of completion for all certificates.

(5)    Item D(4)—Date. The applicant will enter the date of graduation or the date on the certificate of completion.

Note:  If copies of applicant’s certificates are attached, enter “SEE ATTACHED” in item D(4). If dates of completion/graduation are used in the “REMARKS” area, enter “SEE REMARKS” in item D(4).

b.    Authorization to Take the Oral and Practical Tests. When the applicant wishes to receive authorization to take the oral and practical tests before taking the computerized airman knowledge test, the following items must be completed:

(1)    Item D—Graduate of Approved Course. The applicant must not check item D. (The applicant has not graduated from an AMTS.)
(2)    Item D(1)—Name and Location of School. The applicant must enter the name and location of the AMTS.
(3)    Item D(2)—School No. The applicant will enter the AMTS certificate number.
(4)    Item D(3)—Curriculum From Which Graduated. The applicant must enter the approved curriculum from which he or she will graduate.
(5)    Item D(4)—Date. The applicant must enter the date he or she will graduate or when the certificate of completion will be issued. The applicant must enter dates using eight digit numeric characters (e.g., 04/20/20XX). (Month, Day, Year.) (The dates must not be entered as April 20, 20XX or 04/20/XX.)
(6)    Item E—Student Has Made Satisfactory Progress and is Recommended to Take the Oral/Practical Test (§ 65.80). An authorized AMTS official must indicate that the student meets the requirements of § 65.80 by checking item E.
(7)    Item E(1)—School Name-No. An authorized AMTS official will enter the AMTS’s name and number.
(8)    Item E(2)—School Official’s Signature. The authorizing AMTS official must enter his or her signature above or beside his or her typed or printed name.
(9)    Item F—Special Authorization to Take the Mechanic’s Oral/Practical Test (§ 65.80). After an inspector has reviewed the AMTS record and documents of the applicant and is satisfied that the applicant meets the requirements of § 65.80, item F will be checked.
(10)    Item F(1)—Date Auth. The inspector must enter the date of the authorization.
(11)    Item F(2)—Date Auth Expires. The inspector must enter the date the authorization will expire. The date in item F(2) must never be subsequent to the date appearing in item D(4). The provision of § 65.80 does not apply after the student graduates.
(12)    Item F(3)—FAA Inspector Signature. The inspector must enter his or her signature above or beside his or her typed or printed name.
(13)    Item F(4)—FAA Dist Office. The inspector must enter his or her managing FAA office identification (e.g., EA05, NM04).

Note:  DMEs must not administer the mechanic oral and practical tests before the applicant has passed the appropriate mechanic written test, unless items D, E, and F are completed.

c.    When the Applicant is Applying on the Basis of Experience.

(1)    Item A—Civil Experience. If practical experience was gained in civil activity, the applicant will check item A.
(2)    Item B—Military Experience. If practical experience was gained in military activity, the applicant will check item B.

Note:  If practical experience was gained in both civil activity and military activity, the applicant will check item A and item B.

(3)    Item C—Letter of Recommendation for Repairman (Attach copy). An applicant must never check item C.

FAA Form 8610 2. Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Record of Experience

6.    Block III—Record of Experience. (See box above.)

a.    Item A—Military Competence Obtained In (Mechanic Applicants). When the applicant has gained all or part of the required experience in the military, the following items will be completed:

(1)    Item A(1)—Service. The applicant must enter the branch of service where the experience was gained (e.g., Army, Navy).
(2)    Item A(2)—Rank or Pay Level. The applicant must enter his or her highest rank or pay level.
(3)    Item A(3)—Military Specialty Code. The applicant must enter his or her military specialty code (or equivalent depending on the branch of military service applicable).

Note:  Before an applicant will be authorized to take a computerized airman knowledge test, an inspector will review the applicant’s documents and records. The applicant’s documents and records must show that the applicant received the required experience in civil activity and/or military activity. The inspector will determine if the applicant is eligible to take the appropriate aviation mechanic computerized airman knowledge test as required by § 65.77(a) and (b) or the parachute rigger computerized airman knowledge test as required by §§ 65.115, 65.117, and 65.119. The inspector who reviews these documents must hold a mechanic certificate with an Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) rating.

b.    Item B—Mechanic Applicants Other Than FAA Certificated School Graduates. List Experience Relating to Certificate and Rating Applied For. (Continue on separate sheet, if more space is needed.)

(1)    When the applicant’s experience was gained in civil and/or military activity, the applicant’s experience will be entered in item B. (Refer to § 65.77(a) and (b).)
(2)    The applicant’s experience must meet the requirements listed in § 65.77(a) and (b).
(3)    The inspector must advise applicants that the experience used to show qualifications must be recorded in item B. The applicant will enter his or her experience as follows:
(a)    Dates—“MONTH AND YEAR.” The applicant may enter his or her dates of employment using 6‑digit numeric characters (e.g., 01/2012). (Month, Year.) (The dates must not be entered as January 2012 or 1/12.)
(b)    “EMPLOYER AND LOCATION.” The applicant will enter the employer’s name and location (city and state) in this area.
(c)    Type Work Performed. The applicant will enter the type of work performed in this area. If not all of the applicant’s experience can be recorded in item B, the applicant may use additional sheets of paper.

Note:  Applicants presenting a Form CG-G-EAE-4, Certificate of Eligibility, reflecting completion of the FAA/Military Certification of Performance of Job Tasks program, must list their total length of military service. The applicant must also include the Issuance Control number from the Form CG-G-EAE-4 under “TYPE WORK PERFORMED.”

(4)    DMEs are not required to review the applicant’s documents and records to verify the experience listed. However, the DME will verify that the applicant has entered sufficient experience on FAA Form 8610-2 to satisfy the experience and time requirements of § 65.77(a) and (b).

c.    Item B—Parachute Rigger Applicants. List Experience Relating to Certificate and Rating Applied For. (Continue on separate sheet, if more space is needed.)

(1)    The applicant’s experience must meet the requirements listed in § 65.115, § 65.117, or § 65.119.
(2)    For a senior parachute rigger applicant, entries into block III, item B are not required.
(3)    For a master parachute rigger applicant, there must be enough time and experience documented to satisfy the requirements of § 65.119(a) (at least 3 years of experience as a parachute rigger). The master parachute rigger applicant must complete the following parts of item B:
(a)    Dates– “MONTH AND YEAR” The applicant may enter his or her dates of employment using 6 digit numeric characters (e.g., 01/2012).(Month, Year.) (The dates must not be entered as January 2012 or 01/12.)
(b)    Employer and Location. The applicant will enter the employer’s name and location (city and state) in this area.
(c)    Type Work Performed. The applicant will enter the type of work performed in this area. The type of work must meet the experience requirements of § 65.119(b)(1) and/or § 65.119(b)(2). If the applicant is unable to record all of his or her experience in item B, the applicant may use additional sheets of paper.
(4)    It is not necessary for DPREs to see the physical documents and records reflected on Form 8610-2 for applicants to satisfy the experience requirements of § 65.119.

d.    Item C—Parachute Rigger Applicants: Indicate by Type How Many Parachutes Packed.

(1)    Seat, Chest, Back, and/or Lap. Senior and master parachute rigger applicants must indicate the number of parachutes packed in each appropriate box.
(2)    Senior Rigger or Military Rigger. Master parachute rigger applicants must indicate if any of the parachutes were packed as a senior rigger and/or military rigger by checking the appropriate box.

Note:  A master parachute rigger applicant may have packed the necessary number of parachutes without being either a senior or a military rigger. In this case, the applicant may leave the boxes blank.

Figure A-6. Applicant's Certification

7.    Block IV—Applicant’s Certification. (For an example, see box above.) Before the applicant signs Block IV, the following must be completed:

a.    Item A—Signature. The inspector will have the applicant review the FAA Form 8610-2 before the applicant signs his or her name. (If the FAA Form 8610-2 was prepared by someone other than the applicant, the applicant should review the FAA Form 8610-2 carefully.)

(1)    The FAA Form 8610-2 must be signed as the applicant normally signs his or her name above or beside his or her typed or printed name.
(2)    For verification purposes, the inspector must require the applicant to provide a current and valid identification issued by a domestic or foreign government entity (state, local, or national) showing a photograph and signature.
(a)    A passport, U.S. driver’s license, or U.S. military identification may be used for verification. A foreign passport is acceptable. A driver’s license may be used for identification purposes if that driver’s license has been issued by a U.S. state or territory. A foreign driver’s license cannot be used for identification purposes.
(b)    The name, number, and expiration date of the document used for verification will be recorded in the “REMARKS” area. (See Chapter 6, Section 2, paragraph 10.)
(c)    The inspector or designee must explain that the applicant’s signature is a certification of true and correct information appearing on the FAA Form 8610-2. False statements or false information for which the applicant has signed may be grounds to revoke all FAA certificates he or she may possess.

b.    Item B—Date. The applicant must enter the date the FAA Form 8610-2 was signed. For applicants graduating from an AMTS, the date of application in block IV must not be earlier than the graduation date in block II(d) (except for applicant’s under § 65.80).

Note:  Before giving the oral and practical tests, the designee will ask the applicant for identification to reverify the information shown on the FAA Form 8610-2. If identification has been recorded in the “REMARKS” area, the Technical Personnel Examiner (TPE) will initial this to verify the same identification. If identification was not entered in the “REMARKS” area, the designee will enter this information.

Figure A-7. I Find This Applicant Meets the Experience Requirements of FAR 65 and is Eligible to Take the Required Tests

8.    Block V—I Find This Applicant Meets the Experience Requirements of 14 CFR Part 65 and is Eligible to Take the Required Tests. (See box above.) Before the inspector signs block V, the following must be completed:

a.    Date. The inspector must enter the date the authorization took place. The inspector must enter all dates using 8 digit numeric characters (e.g., 01/04/2012). (Month, Day, Year.) (The dates must not be entered as January 4, 2012 or 01/04/12.)

b.    Inspector’s Signature. The inspector will sign his or her name and print his or her name in this area.

c.    FAA District Office. The inspector will provide the office identifier (e.g., EA05, NM04).

Note:  The block V endorsement must not be restricted to a specific field office or region.

FAA Form 8610 2. Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application,  For FAA Use Only

9.    For FAA Use Only. Applicants and TPEs are to disregard this area. This area is for FAA use only. (See box above.)

FAA Form 8610 2. Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Results of Oral and Practical Tests

10.    Results of Oral and Practical Tests. (See box above.)

a.    The DME Will Annotate Passed/Failed Subject Areas as Follows:

(1)    Enter the section(s) and subject area(s) failed and/or not tested in the “REMARKS” column. (See Figure 6-2G.) For failed oral and/or practical tests, the unique identifier for the failed oral question or practical project must be entered in the QUES. NO. and/or PROJ. NO. box for the applicable section.
(2)    For all Oral/Knowledge areas and/or Practical/Skill areas passed, enter an expiration date 24 calendar-months from the date of the test. (See Figures 6-2F to 6-3K.)

b.    The DPRE will Annotate Passed/Failed Areas of Operation as follows:

(1)    When the applicant passes all Areas of Operation for a rating, place an “X” in the appropriate “PASS” box. (See Figures 6-3C and 6-3E.)
(2)    When an Area of Operation for a rating is failed, place an “X” in the appropriate “FAIL” box, and enter the Area(s) of Operation and the task(s) failed and/or not completed in the “REMARKS” column. (See Figure 6-3D.)

FAA Form 8610 2. Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Designated Examiner's Report

11.    Designated Examiner’s Report. (See box above.)

a.    DME. For details on how a DME completes this area, see Figures 6-2F, 6-2G, 6-2H, 6-2I, 6-2J, and 6-2K.

b.    DPRE. For details on how a DPRE completes this area, see Figures 6-3C, 6-3D, and 6-3E.

FAA Form 8610-2. Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Applicant's Certification

12.    Applicant’s Certification. (See box above.) This block must be completed by the applicant at the time of the issuance of the FAA Form 8060-4 (see also Chapter 6, Section 2, subparagraph 15a).

a.    Have You Ever Had an Airman Certificate Suspended or Revoked?

(1)    The applicant must check either the “YES” box or the “NO” box. (A Student Pilot Certificate is a pilot certificate.)
(2)    If the “YES” box is checked, refer to §§ 65.11(c), 65.11(d)(2), and 65.12.
(3)    If the DME or applicant does not understand the requirements of part 65 as it applies to a particular situation, contact the managing FAA office for clarification and assistance.

b.    Have You Ever Been Convicted for Violation of Any Federal or State Statutes Pertaining to Narcotic Drugs, Marijuana, and Depressant or Stimulant Drugs or Substances? The applicant must check either the “YES” box or the “NO” box.

(1)    If the applicant checks the “YES” box, the applicant must make an entry by the “DATE OF FINAL CONVICTION” area. (Refer to § 65.12.)
(2)    If the DME or applicant does not understand the requirements of part 65 as it applies to a particular situation, contact the managing FAA office for clarification and assistance.

FAA Form 8610-2. Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, FAA Inspector's Report

13.    FAA Inspector’s Report. (See above and the reverse side of FAA Form 8610-2.)

a.    Approved Box and Disapproved Box. The inspector will not check the “APPROVED” box or the “DISAPPROVED” box unless he or she has personally given the applicant the oral and practical test or if the application and Temporary Airman Certificate are signed by the ASI. In these cases, “APPROVED” or “DISAPPROVED” must be checked by the ASI issuing the Temporary Airman Certificate.

b.    Examined This Applicant’s Papers. The inspector must check only the “EXAMINED THIS APPLICANT’S PAPERS” box. However, if the inspector is the one that issued the Temporary Airman Certificate, then the “APPROVED” box must be checked.

(1)    The inspector must complete the “DATE” box using eight digit numeric characters (e.g., 01/04/2013). (Month, Day, Year.) (The dates must not be entered as January 4, 2013 or 01/04/13.)
(2)    The inspector must sign above or beside his or her typed or printed name in the “INSPECTOR’S SIGNATURE” box.
(3)    The inspector will enter his or her managing FAA office identification in the “FAA DISTRICT OFFICE” box (e.g., EA05, NM04).

c.    Parachute Seal Symbol Assigned. The inspector will annotate the parachute seal symbol assigned by the DPRE as annotated in block XIII on the FAA Form 8060-4. (See Figures 6-3H, 6-3I, and 6-3J.)

Figure 6-2A.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

Figure 6-2A. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

Figure 6-2B.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

(Applicant cannot list all experience required in block III.)

Figure 6-2B. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

Figure 6-2C.  Attachment for FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

(Applicant cannot list all experience required in block III.)

Figure 6-2C. Attachment for FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

Figure 6-2D.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

(Applicant is a graduate of an AMTS.)

Figure 6-2D. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

Figure 6-2E.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

(Applicant is authorized to take the oral and practical tests before the computerized airman knowledge test.)

Figure 6-2E. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

Figure 6-2F.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

(Reverse Side)

(Typical entries for oral and practical tests administered by a DME. All sections passed. Application approved.)

Figure 6-2F. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

Figure 6-2G.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

(Reverse Side)

(Typical entries for oral and practical tests administered by a DME. Applicant failed Section IV. Application disapproved.)

Figure 6-2G. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

Figure 6-2H.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

(Reverse Side)

(Typical entries for oral and practical tests administered by a DME using PTS. In this pass/fail example, the applicant passes powerplant and fails airframe. Application for the powerplant rating is approved, but the airframe rating is disapproved.)

Figure 6-2H. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

Figure 6-2I.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

(Reverse Side)

(Typical entries for oral and practical tests administered by a DME. Credit shown for previously passed General Section.)

Figure 6-2I. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

Figure 6-2J.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

(Reverse Side)

(Typical entries when applicant is under 18 years of age.)

Figure 6-2J. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

Figure 6-2K.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

(Reverse Side)

(Typical entries when applicant is testing under § 65.80.)

Figure 6-2K. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

Figure 6-2L.  FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate

(Original Issuance)

Figure 6-2L. FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Original Issuance)

Figure 6-2M.  FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate

(Reissuance retaining original certificate number.)

Figure 6-2M. FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Reissuance retaining original certificate number.)

Figure 6-2N.  Example Statement of Additional Instructions

Figure 6-2N. Example Statement of Additional Instructions

Figure 6-2O.  Airman Computer Test Report for Aviation Mechanic Airframe (AMA)

Figure 6-2O. Airman Computer Test Report for Aviation Mechanic Airframe (AMA)

Figure 6-2P.  Minimum Tool and Equipment List

Figure 6-2P. Minimum Tool and Equipment List

Figure 6-2P.  Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P. Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P.  Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P. Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P.  Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P. Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P.  Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P. Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P.  Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P. Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P.  Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P. Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P.  Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P. Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P.  Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P. Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P.  Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-2P. Minimum Tool and Equipment List (Continued)

Figure 6-3A.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application

(Typical Entries for Senior Parachute Rigger)

Figure 6-3A. FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Typical Entries for Senior Parachute Rigger)

Figure 6-3B.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Front Side)

(Typical Entries for Master Parachute Rigger)

Figure 6 3B. FAA Form 8610 2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Front Side) (Typical Entries for Master Parachute Rigger)

Figure 6-3C.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

(Typical Entries for Senior/Master Parachute Rigger)

Figure 6-3C, FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

Figure 6-3D.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

(Typical Entries for Senior/Master Parachute Rigger When Test is Failed)

Figure 6-3D, FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

Figure 6-3E.  FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

(Typical Entries When Applicant is Under 18 Years of Age)

Figure 6-3E, FAA Form 8610-2, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Reverse Side)

Figure 6-3F.  Example Statement of Additional Instruction

Figure 6-3F. Example Statement of Additional Instruction

Figure 6-3G.  Airman Computer Test for Parachute Rigger

Figure 6-3G. Airman Computer Test for Parachute Rigger

Figure 6-3H.  FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate

(Original Issuance)

Figure 6-3H. FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Original Issuance)

Figure 6-3I.  FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate

(Original Issuance with Superseded Airman Certificate Block Filled In)

Although this is an original issuance, the superseded airman certificate block will be used if the applicant holds a senior parachute rigger certificate.

Figure 6-3I. FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Original Issuance with Superseded Airman Certificate Block Filled In)

Figure 6-3J.  FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate

(Reissuance Retaining Original Certificate Number)

Figure 6-3J. FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Reissuance Retaining Original Certificate Number)

Figure 6-4A.  Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic Oral and Practical Planning Sheet (Front Side)

Figure 6-4A. Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic Oral and Practical Planning Sheet (Front Side) 

Figure 6-4B.  Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic Oral and Practical Planning Sheet (Reverse Side)

Figure 6-4B. Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic Oral and Practical Planning Sheet (Reverse Side)

Figure 6-4C.  Parachute Rigger Oral/Practical Test Planning Sheet

Figure 6-4C. Parachute Rigger Oral/Practical Test Planning Sheet

Chapter 7. Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE) Program

Section 1. General

1.    Additional Qualifications. DPE applicants must be technically qualified and must hold all pertinent category, class, and type ratings for each aircraft for which designation is sought. All DPEs must meet the requirements of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 61, §§ 61.56 and 61.57, as appropriate.

a.    Section 61.58. Except as specifically noted for National Designated Pilot Examiners and Flight Engineer Examiners (NDPE/FEE) in Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 9d, all designees must meet the requirements of § 61.58, if appropriate, and be current and qualified to act as pilot in command (PIC) of each aircraft for which they are authorized throughout the duration of the designation.

b.    Medical Certificate. A designee with flight privileges must maintain at least a third-class medical certificate throughout the duration of the designation, except in the case of a designation limited to examining in balloons, gliders, or flight simulation training devices (FSTD) for which no medical certificate is required.

c.    Flight Instructor Certificate. Any required flight instructor certificate must be kept current for the duration of the designation. Pilot Proficiency Examiners (PPE) must have a current flight instructor certificate.

d.    Sport Pilot Examiner (SPE). An SPE must maintain a current Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight instructor certificate and a valid U.S. driver’s license or an airman medical certificate.

e.    Rotorcraft/Helicopter Designation. In order for a DPE to conduct a practical test in a specific make and model of helicopter, the DPE must have that make and model of helicopter listed on his or her Certificate of Authority (COA) letter. In order for a DPE to conduct a practical test in a helicopter that requires the PIC to hold the appropriate pilot type rating, the DPE must have that type of helicopter listed on his or her COA letter. Prior to being designated to administer a practical test in a specific make and model/type of helicopter, a DPE must have logged at least 5 hours of PIC flight time in that specific helicopter make and model/type.

f.    Additional Requirements. In addition to meeting the preceding technical qualifications (reviewed by the appointing FAA office) and the general designee eligibility requirements in Chapter 2 (reviewed by the National Examiner Board (NEB)), a DPE applicant must meet the following additional requirements, which will be reviewed by the appointing FAA office. The applicant must:

(1)    Have a good record as a pilot and flight instructor in regard to accidents, incidents, and violations. Candidates who have had an airman certificate (i.e., any pilot certificate, flight instructor certificate, ground instructor certificate, mechanic certificate, inspection airworthiness certificate, parachute rigger certificate, etc.) revoked are ineligible. However, as with any prerequisite eligibility requirement, an applicant may be granted a waiver provided that he or she has received a written recommendation from the managing FAA office and regional Flight Standards division (RFSD), in accordance with the exception provision in the note in Chapter 7, Section 1, paragraph 2 and FAA Order 8900.1, Flight Standards Information Management System (FSIMS), Volume 13, Chapter 5, Section 1, subparagraph 13-403D.
(2)    Meet all eligibility and experience requirements for the specific designation sought.
(a)    A designee applicant must have logged at least 5 hours as PIC in each make and model of multiengine airplane and helicopter in which that designee conducts tests.
(b)    Glider designees must show experience and demonstrate skill in at least one of the following launch procedures, for which they have a logbook endorsement: aero tow, ground tow, and self-launch. The designee is then authorized to conduct examining activity for all launch procedures for which they have a logbook endorsement.
(c)    Private Pilot Examiners (PE) and Commercial Pilot Examiners (CE) with balloon designations may have flight time in gas balloons, hot air balloons, or a combination of the two in order to meet the flight time requirements for designation. If the designee’s pilot certificate is restricted to balloons with airborne heater or gas balloons only, the designee may conduct practical tests only in that kind of balloon (e.g., hot air or gas balloon).

g.    Former Aviation Safety Inspectors (ASI). Former ASIs applying for DPE authority are required to successfully complete the same application procedures, training, and evaluations as are required for all other designee applicants. However, the following exceptions are listed below. During the rating and evaluation process, the NEB may credit former ASIs (Operations) 5 hours of PIC currency for certain tests/checks administered. This recent PIC credit may be offered under the following three conditions:

(1)    A former ASI (Operations) must have attended the annual designee meeting held by the appointing FAA office within the preceding 12 calendar-months.
(2)    A former ASI (Operations) must be current in accordance with the training requirements of the Practical Application Workshop (PAW).
(3)    The former ASI (Operations) must show documentation from the FAA national Program Tracking and Reporting Subsystem (PTRS) that substantiates having met this following alternative criteria:
(a)    For each proficiency check that was administered under 14 CFR parts 121, 125, or 135, 5 hours of PIC currency within the preceding 12 calendar-months.
(b)    For each proficiency check, 5 hours of PIC currency that was administered to a chief instructor, assistant chief instructor, or check instructor under 14 CFR part 141 within the preceding 12 calendar-months.
(c)    For each stage check and end of course check, 5 hours of PIC currency that was administered under part 141 within the preceding 12 calendar-months.
(d)    For each pilot certification/additional aircraft rating practical test, 5 hours of PIC currency that was administered in accordance with the practical test standards (PTS) under part 61 within the preceding 12 calendar-months.
(e)    For each pilot certification/additional aircraft rating practical test, 5 hours of PIC currency that was administered in accordance with the PTS under part 141 within the preceding 12 calendar-months.
(f)    For each pilot certification/additional aircraft rating practical test, 5 hours of PIC currency that was administered in accordance with the PTS under 14 CFR part 142 within the preceding 12 calendar-months.

2.    Specific Eligibility Requirements. Designee applicants must meet all specific eligibility and experience requirements for the specific designation sought. If a designee applicant does not meet all of the appropriate eligibility and experience requirements in this order, he or she must obtain a written recommendation from the managers of both the managing FAA office and the RFSD. The designee applicant may contact the managing FAA office for additional information.

a.    Eligibility. A designee applicant must hold the appropriate level of certificate(s) and ratings that would allow the individual to provide flight instruction in that category, class, and type (if applicable) of aircraft. For example, an applicant who was applying for designation in helicopters would be required to hold at least a commercial pilot certificate with rotorcraft and helicopter ratings as well as a flight instructor certificate with rotorcraft and helicopter ratings. An applicant who was applying for designation in balloons would be required to hold a commercial pilot certificate with lighter-than-air and balloon ratings. A designee must not administer a test for a higher grade of certificate than he/she holds or for a rating that is not held by the designee. For example, a designee who holds a commercial pilot certificate with rotorcraft category and helicopter class ratings, would not be eligible to be designated as an Airline Transport Pilot Examiner (ATPE) in helicopters, but may be designated as a CE.

Figure 7-1.  Experience Required for Initial Designation as a Sport Pilot Examiner

 

Balloon

Weight Shift Control

Powered Parachute

Airship

Airplane

Gyroplane

Glider

Hours Acting as PIC

200 total, 100 in balloons AND in the past 12 months: 20 hours. in balloons which included at least 10 flights that were of at least a 30 minute duration

500 total, 250 in weight shift control AND in the past 12 months: 50 hours in weight shift aircraft

250 total, 100 in powered parachutes AND in the past 12 months: 25 hours in powered parachutes

200 total, 100 in airships AND in the past 12 months: 20 hours in airships

500 total, 250 in light‑sport airplanes AND in the past 12 months: 50 hours in airplanes

500 total, 250 in gyroplanes AND in the past 12 months: 50 hours in gyroplanes

250 total, 100 in gliders AND in the past 12 months: 10 hours in gliders, which involved at least 10 flights

Hours as a Flight Instructor

100 in balloons

200; at least 100 in weight shift control

100; at least 50 in powered parachutes

100 in airships

200; at least 100 in light sport airplanes

200 in gyroplanes

100; at least 50 in gliders

Note:  If adding SPE or Sport Pilot Flight Instructor Examiner (SFIE) authority in a category of aircraft for which the designee already holds PE privileges, the designee need not meet the requirements listed above.

Figure 7-2A.  Experience Required for Initial Designation as Private Pilot Examiner

 

Airplanes

Rotorcraft

Gliders

L-T-A Airship

L-T-A Balloon

Hours Acting as PIC

2,000 total; 1000 in airplanes, of which at least 300 in airplane class for designation, 100 hours were at night, AND in the past 12 months: 300 hours in airplanes

1,000 total; 500 in rotorcraft, of which at least 250 were in helicopters or 150 were in gyroplanes, as appropriate, AND in the past 12 months: 100 hours in rotorcraft

500 total, 200 in gliders AND in the past 12 months: 10 hours in gliders, which included at least 10 flights

1,000 total; 500 in airships, of which at least 50 were at night AND in the past 12 months: at least 200 hours in airships

200 total; 100 in balloons, AND in the past 12 months: 20 hours in balloons, which included at least 10 flights of at least 30 minute duration

Hours as a Flight Instructor

500 in airplanes

100 in class

200 in helicopters or gyroplanes, as appropriate

100 in gliders

100 in airships

50 in balloons

Figure 7-2B.  Experience Required for Initial Designation as Commercial Pilot Examiner

 

Rotorcraft (VFR Only)

Gliders

L-T-A Airship

L-T-A Balloon

Hours Acting as PIC

2,000 total; 500 in rotorcraft, of which at least 250 were in helicopters or 150 were in gyroplanes, as appropriate, AND in the past 12 months: 100 hours in rotorcraft.

If applying for large helicopters to be listed on COA, the additional requirement is 100 hours acting as PIC in large helicopters, including at least 50 hours in the type sought. (25 hours required for each additional type sought)

500 total, 250 in gliders AND in the past 12 months: 20 hours in gliders, which included at least 50 flights

2,000 total; 500 in airships, of which at least 50 were at night AND in the past 12 months: at least 200 hours in airships

200 total; 100 in balloons, AND in the past 12 months: 20 hours in balloons, which included at least 10 flights of at least 30 minute duration. AND airman must have held a commercial pilot certificate with lighter‑than‑air category and balloon rating for at least one year

Hours as a Flight Instructor

200 in helicopters or gyroplanes, as appropriate. AND 50 in helicopters or gyroplanes, as appropriate, preparing an airman for a commercial pilot certificate

100 in gliders

100 in airships

50 in balloons

Figure 7-3A.  Experience Required for Initial Designation as a Commercial and Instrument Rating Examiner

 

Airplane

Rotorcraft Helicopter

Hours Acting as PIC

2,000 total; which includes:

1,000 in airplanes, 500 in class, 100 at night, 200 in complex, 100 instrument flight (actual or simulated). AND in the past 12 months: 300 hours in airplanes.

If applying for large, turbine-powered aircraft to be listed on COA, the additional requirement is 300 hours acting as PIC in large, turbine-powered aircraft, of which at least 50 hours were in the type sought. (25 hours required for each additional type sought.)

2,000 total, 500 in helicopters, which includes: 100 instrument flight (actual or simulated) AND in the past 12 months: 100 hours in helicopters.

If applying for large helicopters to be listed on COA, the additional requirement is 100 hours acting as PIC in large, helicopters, of which at least 50 hours were in the type sought. (25 hours required for each additional type sought.)

Hours as a Flight Instructor

500 in airplanes, of which 100 are in the class of airplane for designation sought AND 250 hours of instrument flight instruction, of which at least 200 hours were in airplanes

250 in helicopters, 50 hours instrument instruction in helicopters and at least 100 hours were preparing pilots for commercial pilot certificates with rotorcraft helicopter ratings

Figure 7-3B.  Experience Required for Initial Designation as an Airline Transport Pilot Examiner

 

Airplane

Rotorcraft Helicopter

Hours Acting as PIC

2,000 total; which includes:

1,500 in airplanes, 500 in class, 100 at night, 200 in complex, 100 instrument flight (actual or simulated). AND in the past 12 months, 300 hours in airplanes

If applying for designation in large, turbine‑powered aircraft to be listed on COA, the additional requirement is 300 hours acting as PIC in large, turbine-powered aircraft, of which at least 50 hours were in the type sought. (25 hours required for each additional type sought)

2,000 total, 1,200 in helicopters, which includes: 100 instrument flight (actual or simulated) AND in the past 12 months: 100 hours in helicopters

If applying for large helicopters to be listed on COA, the additional requirement is 100 hours acting as PIC in large helicopters, of which at least 50 hours were in the type sought. (25 hours required for each additional type sought)

Hours as a Flight Instructor

500 in airplanes, of which 100 are in the class of airplane for designation sought, AND 250 hours of instrument flight instruction, of which at least 200 hours were in airplanes, and 150 hours preparing airmen for commercial or ATP certificates with airplane categories OR airplane type ratings or instrument airplane ratings

250 in helicopters, 50 hours instrument instruction in helicopters and at least 100 hours preparing pilots in helicopters for the commercial or ATP certificates, or instrument helicopter ratings or type ratings

b.    Experience Required for Renewal of Designation. While exercising the privileges of their designation, designees must continue to maintain their currency and proficiency. Currency requirements are outlined in §§ 61.56 and 61.57. For designees who administer tests in large, turbine-powered aircraft, currency in accordance with § 61.58 must also be maintained, regardless of which seat the designee occupies.

Note:  PIC experience obtained while administering practical tests will not be considered for the purposes of the recent PIC experience required of the designation (see Figure 7-4). The designee is responsible to maintain at least the following recent pilot-in-command experience. The FAA will check this during the yearly required oversight.

Figure 7-4.  Recent Pilot-in-Command Experience Required

Aircraft Type

PIC Experience in the Preceding 12 Months

Airplane

60 hours (10 hours in each class authorized)

Airplane—Light Sport

12 hours

Rotorcraft

25 hours (5 hours in each class authorized)

Gliders

3 hours, which included at least 3 flights

Lighter-than-Air—Airship

40 hours

Lighter-than-Air—Balloon

5 hours, which included at least 3 flights

Weight Shift Control

12 hours

Powered Parachute

5 hours

3.    Types of Designation. DPEs are designated for specific testing functions and may perform only the functions authorized by their designations. DPE designations have been aligned to conform with part 61 certificates and ratings.

a.    SPE/SFIE. An SPE/SFIE may perform testing only in aircraft that meet the definition of light-sport aircraft and may issue a sport pilot certificate or flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating.

b.    Private Pilot Examiner (PE). A PE conducts private and recreational pilot certification tests and additional aircraft rating tests as specifically authorized.

c.    Commercial and Instrument Rating Examiner (CIRE). A CIRE conducts commercial pilot certification tests, instrument rating practical tests, and additional aircraft rating tests as specifically authorized for airplanes, powered-lifts, and rotorcraft-helicopters.

d.    Commercial Pilot Examiner (CE). A CE conducts commercial pilot certification tests in rotorcraft, gliders, lighter-than-air aircraft, and additional ratings as specifically authorized.

e.    Air Transport Pilot Examiner (ATPE). An ATPE conducts ATP practical tests for the original issuance of an ATP certificate and additional ratings as specifically authorized. ATPEs must hold category and class, and, if appropriate, type ratings on their pilot certificates pertinent to the tests to be conducted.

f.    Flight Instructor Examiner (FIE). An FIE, as authorized by the managing FAA office, conducts practical tests for the original issuance, renewal, and reinstatement of flight instructor certificates and ratings. An FIE is authorized to issue flight instructor renewals or reinstatements on the basis of practical tests only.

g.    Flight Instructor Renewal Examiner (FIRE). An FIRE is authorized by the managing FAA office to accept applications for renewal of a flight instructor certificate that is still current and where the renewal process is merely administrative (meaning, a practical test is not required for renewal of the applicant’s flight instructor certificates). The FIRE must identify himself/herself as an FIRE on FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, when processing certificated flight instructor (CFI) renewals. A current FIRE is authorized to perform Airman Certification Representative (ACR) duties and responsibilities for any airman certificate or rating. A FIRE who performs ACR duties and responsibilities is not required to have his or her COA letter revised in order to perform ACR duties and responsibilities.

h.    National Designated Pilot Examiner and Flight Engineer Examiner (NDPE/FEE). An NDPE/FEE conducts airman certification practical tests and proficiency tests in vintage/former military airplanes that are identified and listed as vintage airplanes under the NDPE/FEE program.

i.    Flight Engineer Examiner (FEE). A person authorized to conduct practical tests for the issuance of flight engineer certificates and ratings and to administer proficiency checks required by § 91.529(b). Tests and checks administered by a FEE do not pertain to operations conducted under part 121 or 125.

j.    Pilot Proficiency Examiner (PPE). A PPE conducts the PIC proficiency checks required by § 61.58 for airmen who act as PIC of aircraft that are type certificated for more than one required pilot flightcrew member or are turbojet powered, and are operated under other than parts 121, 125, 129, or 135. A PPE does not conduct certification practical tests.

k.    Airman Certification Representative (ACR). An ACR accepts applications for airman certificates and/or ratings from the graduates of a pilot school that holds appropriate examining authority under part 141. An ACR employed solely by a flight instructor refresher clinic (FIRC) reviews applicants’ attendance/training records and determines applicants’ eligibility for the renewal of a current flight instructor certificate. A current DPE is authorized to perform ACR duties and responsibilities for any airman certificate or rating. A DPE who performs ACR duties and responsibilities is not required to have his or her COA letter revised in order to perform ACR duties and responsibilities. The eligibility and experience requirements for the ACR position are covered in Chapter 7, Section 18. The designee must identify himself/herself as an ACR on the FAA Form 8710-1 application when processing CFI renewals.

l.    Military Competency Examiner (MCE). The MCE reviews a military pilot’s records, verifies computer test reports of the military competence knowledge test, and issues commercial pilot certificates and instrument ratings to qualified military pilot applicants as specifically authorized (e.g., § 61.73). The MCE may issue/upgrade pilot certificates bearing type ratings based on the applicant’s military pilot qualifications. A current MCE is authorized to perform ACR duties and responsibilities for any airman certificate or rating. An MCE who performs ACR duties and responsibilities is not required to have his or her COA letter revised in order to perform ACR duties and responsibilities. The eligibility and experience requirements for the MCE position are covered in Chapter 7, Section 20.

m.    Foreign Pilot Examiner (FPE). An FPE may issue private pilot certificates and ratings at the private pilot certification level on the basis of an applicant’s foreign license qualifications. The FPE reviews applicants’ records, verifies computer test reports for the Foreign Pilot Instrument knowledge tests, and issues private pilot certificates to qualified foreign applicants in accordance with § 61.75. A current FPE is authorized to perform ACR duties and responsibilities for any airman certificate or rating. An FPE who performs ACR duties and responsibilities is not required to have his or her COA letter revised in order to perform ACR duties and responsibilities. The eligibility and experience requirements for the FPE position are covered in Chapter 7, Section 20.

Note:  See Chapter 7, Section 21 for guidance information on the issuance of the U.S. pilot certificate based on a person holding a foreign pilot license.

n.    Ground Instructor Examiner (GIE). A GIE reviews an applicant’s knowledge test report for the issuance of a Ground Instructor Certificate for the basic, advanced, or instrument ratings, as specifically authorized (as per §§ 61.213 and 61.215). A current GIE is authorized to perform ACR duties and responsibilities for any airman certificate or rating. A GIE who performs ACR duties and responsibilities is not required to have his or her COA letter revised in order to perform ACR duties and responsibilities. The eligibility and experience requirements for this designee type are covered in Chapter 7, Section 20.

4.    Additional Designations. The designee must hold the certificate and rating(s), without limitation, appropriate to the additional designation sought. Additionally, the designee must meet the appropriate flight experience required for initial designation of the examining authority desired.

Note:  If adding SPE or SFIE privileges in a category of aircraft for which the designee already holds private examiner privileges, the designee need not meet the requirements in Figure 7-1.

a.    Requirements. Except for placing an additional grouping of vintage airplanes on an existing NDPE/FEE authorization, each additional designation requires a demonstration of competency appropriate to the aircraft or FSTD and the designation sought.

(1)    When a designation is added, a new certificate of authority showing all designations held will be issued to the designee. The designee’s current designation number will be used.
(2)    At the time a new designation is added, the designee’s existing designation(s) may be renewed.
(3)    The Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) may request that an additional grouping of vintage airplanes be placed on an existing NDPE/FEE authorization at any time the EAA deems the addition(s) necessary to provide adequate national resources for the NDPE/FEE program.
(a)    The EAA will make the request in writing to the General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS-800).
(b)    AFS-800 will approve or disapprove the request.

b.    Test Criteria for Additional Designations. Although all required maneuvers and procedures from the appropriate PTS must be tested for an initial designation, testing on the same maneuvers and procedures for an additional designation need not be repeated if the new designation is to be added within 12 months of the initial evaluation. A DPE was initially authorized as a PE. Within 12 calendar-months CE is to be added to the COA. The only procedures and maneuvers that the DPE must demonstrate are those unique to the commercial pilot certificate, which have not been previously demonstrated. If more than 12 calendar-months have lapsed, the entire PTS must be demonstrated.

5.    Designee COA Letters. Designees who are authorized to conduct practical tests in helicopters, powered‑lifts, turbine-powered airplanes, large aircraft, vintage airplanes, and each FAA qualified FSTD will be issued a special authorization in the form of a COA letter.

a.    Helicopters, Type Rated Aircraft, FSTDs, Multiengine Airplanes, and Single-Engine Airplanes.

(1)    For DPEs authorized to administer practical tests in helicopters that do not require the PIC to hold a type rating, the COA letter must list each make and model of helicopter. Prior to being designated to administer a practical test in a specific make and model of helicopter, a DPE must have logged at least 5 hours as PIC flight time in that helicopter make and model.
(2)    For DPEs authorized to administer practical tests in aircraft that require the PIC to hold a pilot type rating, the COA letter must list that type of aircraft. Prior to being designated to administer a practical test in an aircraft that requires the PIC to hold the appropriate pilot type rating, the DPE must have logged at least 50 hours of PIC (25 hours for each additional type) flight time in that aircraft type. However, in the case of a designee on the National Designated Pilot Examiner Registry (NDPER), that designee, when performing NDPER privileges, need only hold authorization in that group of experimental aircraft.
(3)    For DPEs authorized to administer practical tests in an FSTD that is representative of an aircraft that requires the PIC to hold a pilot type rating, the phrase “Aircraft or FSTD” must be listed on the DPE’s COA letter.
(4)    For DPEs authorized to administer practical tests in a piston-powered multiengine airplanes or turbopropeller multiengine airplanes that do not require the PIC to hold a pilot type rating, the phrase “Small Multiengine Airplanes” must be listed on the DPE’s COA letter. Prior to being designated to administer a practical test in a small multiengine airplane, the DPE must have logged at least 5 hours of PIC flight time in that multiengine airplane make and model.
(5)    For DPEs authorized to administer practical tests in single-engine airplanes that do not require the PIC to hold a pilot type rating, the phrase “Airplane Single Engine [Land or Sea (as appropriate)]” must be listed on the DPE’s COA letter. Prior to being designated to administer a practical test in a single-engine airplane that is turbine powered, the DPE must have logged at least 5 hours of PIC flight time in that single‑engine airplane make and model (emphasis added: turbine-powered single-engine airplanes).

b.    Vintage Airplanes. A separate NDPE/FEE COA letter, stating the aircraft grouping in which the NDPE/FEE is authorized to conduct certification practical tests and proficiency checks under the provisions of the NDPE/FEE program, will be issued to each NDPE/FEE by AFS-800.

(1)    There is no specific limit to the number of vintage airplanes for which an NDPE/FEE may receive authorization.
(2)    Due to the nature of vintage airplanes, some of which are rarely flown, the EAA may request that a designee be authorized in numerous types of vintage aircraft to ensure sufficient national availability of NDPE/FEEs (Figure 7-5).

c.    Interim Authorization. If a DPE is qualified and current in a specific make and model of aircraft for which designee services are rarely requested and the designee holds a current DPE authorization for a comparable type rating, the managing FAA office may issue the designee an interim COA letter authorizing onetime testing privileges in that airplane. The COA letter must state the aircraft make and model, restrictions (if any), and the expiration date. The expiration date of the COA letter is determined by the managing FAA office but must not exceed 30 days from the date of issuance.

d.    Infrequently Requested Aircraft. The managing FAA office may elect not to issue a COA letter to a DPE for a specific make and model of aircraft that the managing FAA office has received infrequent requests for certification practical tests in that particular type of aircraft. In the case of an infrequently requested aircraft, the managing FAA office may assign an ASI to conduct certification practical tests in that aircraft.

Figure 7-5.  Vintage Airplane Groups

The following airplanes are identified as vintage airplanes under the provisions of the NDPER program:

GROUP A

GROUP D

GROUP E

GROUP F – Land & Sea

AD-4N

C-46

C-82

SK-43

G-TBM

C-47

CV-240

SK-44

G-F3

DC-2

CV-340

CV-PBY

 

DC-3

CV-440

G-111

GROUP B

DC-B18

DC-A20

G-73

B-17

DC-B23

DC-A24

SA-16

B-247

HW-500

DC-B26

 

FO-5

L-14

DH-4

GROUP G

B-307

L-18

FA-119

VC-700

 

LB-34

FA-C123

VC-800

GROUP C

PV-1

L-P38

 

B-24

PV-2

M-202

 

B-377

 

M-404

 

CV-LB30

 

M-B26

 

CV-P4Y

 

N-B25

 

DC-4

 

NH-P61

 

DC-6

 

L-P2V

 

DC-7

 

CV-PBY (land only)

 

L-1049

 

G-111 (land only)

 

 

 

G-73 (land only)

 

 

 

G-S2

 

 

 

G-52

 

 

 

G-F7F

 

Section 2. Conduct Practical Test/Certification Functions

6.    General. Designees must notify the managing FAA office before conducting all practical tests. The managing FAA office will establish specific procedures for this notification. Designees must conduct the entire practical test in English using a written plan of action developed from the Examiner Test Guide (Figures 7-8A or 7-8B) and appropriate PTS. The plan of action includes a scenario. The DPE must develop a scenario that allows the evaluation of most of the Areas of Operations and tasks required in the practical tests with minimum disruptions. Some maneuvers (stalls, steep turns, performance maneuvers) are not normally done during routine flight operations; however, these maneuvers must still be demonstrated, preferably after the scenario is complete. Practical test scenarios can be suspended to do maneuvers, and then resumed, if the situation, due to time and efficiency as the practical test dictates. The designee must conduct the practical test in accordance with the appropriate regulations, PTS, operating limitations of the aircraft, and procedures prescribed in the Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM). Designees must not use, or ask the applicant to use, procedures contrary to those specified by the AFM. Under no circumstances may a designee intentionally allow an applicant to violate a regulation, fail to comply with an air traffic control (ATC) clearance, or create a potentially hazardous situation. Practical tests not conducted in accordance with the applicable PTS, regulations, and safe operating practices may be invalid and be grounds for termination of the designee’s authorization. If a designee becomes aware of a procedure in any AFM that is potentially hazardous or contrary to FAA policies, then he or she must notify the managing FAA office.

a.    Personal Prejudices. A designee must not allow personal prejudices to interfere with the objective evaluation of an applicant. If a personality conflict or disagreement develops between the designee and the applicant before any unsatisfactory performance by the applicant, the designee or the applicant may discontinue the practical test. In this case, the designee issues a letter of discontinuance.

b.    Appointments. A designee is expected to honor appointments unless special circumstances warrant cancellation or postponement. If the cancellation or postponement is at the designee’s request, it is the designee’s responsibility to reschedule the practical test. If a designee cancels a practical test without rescheduling, the designee should recommend another designee or instruct the applicant to contact the managing FAA office. The managing FAA office will provide the names of other designees in the district or may arrange to conduct the practical test if the applicant requests it.

c.    Test Environment. The designee must conduct the oral portion of the practical test in a private area free from distractions. The designee must give the applicant his or her undivided attention during the test and ensure that any discussion of test results with the applicant is in private.

d.    English Language Skill Standards. All practical tests will be conducted in English. The designee must comply with the current edition of Advisory Circular (AC) 60-28, English Language Skill Standards Required by 14 CFR Parts 61, 63, and 65, and International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Level 4 Language Proficiency Criteria (Figure 7-6) to ensure that applicants meet regulatory requirements. If the applicant is unable to read, speak, write, and understand the English language in accordance with the criteria listed in this paragraph, the designee must terminate the practical test and refer the applicant to the managing FAA office. If the lack of English proficiency is determined after the test has begun, a notice of disapproval will be issued noting lack of English proficiency.

e.    Evaluating Single Pilot Resource Management (SRM) Skills. Emphasis must be placed on evaluating SRM skills including judgment and aeronautical decisionmaking skills. New flight training and evaluation methods have been developed to enhance these skills in order to reduce general aviation accidents. New techniques and methods for measuring the applicant’s SRM skills are also needed to ensure the SRM skills are being mastered. Scenarios are the recommended method for both training and evaluating SRM skills. Developing a scenario that will effectively evaluate all required tasks of an appropriate PTS may present a challenge to the designee. For that reason, this section is added.

(1)    What is a scenario? Air Carriers call them Line-Oriented Flight Training (LOFT); the military call them sorties. There are at least two requirements for a scenario. The mission must have a purpose (reason to go) and consequences if the mission is not completed. Scenarios, as typically used in flight training, set up a set of circumstances that can be used to teach a specific (canned) response to an in-flight event. For example, an engine failure—pitch for best glide, etc. The method may be effective in teaching a critical response to the single-engine engine failure, but it does not promote the development of critical thinking skills and would not be useful in evaluating them. This example may be effective in evaluating a response to an emergency situation, but it would not allow a designee to observe the SRM skills of an applicant. For a practical test, a scenario is a single mission that is planned and carried out. That mission, plus trigger events that the designee implements during the flight, should allow the applicant to demonstrate most of the Areas of Operations and tasks required in the practical tests with minimum disruptions.
(2)    For the purpose of training and evaluating SRM skills:
(a)    A scenario is a flight that the applicant can and may do with the certificate or rating he or she is seeking. For example, the private pilot applicant is planning a flight to an airport 50 miles away to pick up his mother-in-law and fly her to another town to attend his wife’s graduation, and then fly them both back to the original departure airport for a celebration. The scenario described above has a purpose; that is, to take the applicant and his mother-in-law to his wife’s graduation and the celebration following. It will also very likely have consequences if the flights are not accomplished; that is, the wife and mother-in-law will never forgive the applicant.
(b)    The scenario should be something that the applicant may want to do and it should provide opportunities to complete the various tasks required in the appropriate PTS. If the scenario is something the applicant is likely to do, it is likely that the applicant will take a real interest in making the flight and will not simply treat it as a training exercise.
(c)    The scenario should be a complete flight that includes the planning, the flight, and the postflight phases appropriate for the certificate or rating being sought.
(3)    The scenario should allow the evaluation of the appropriate required Areas of Operation, tasks, and SRM skills during the course of the scenario with minimum disruptions. In other words, develop a scenario that incorporates as many of the required tasks as you can within a realistic setting. This statement is not meant to limit or restrict the designee’s plan of action, but rather it should be considered a goal for which the designee should strive. Fewer interruptions will enhance the quality of the evaluation and provide a better testing environment for the applicant to demonstrate his or her aeronautical skills (both SRM and psychomotor).
(a)    Many factors may cause a need to suspend the scenario to accomplish required tasks. For example, the scenario calls for a flight over a duck pond to count the number of ducks (turns around a point). The designee may suspend the scenario to accomplish other maneuvers, such as the climb to altitude and demonstrate stalls, while they are at a place where the other tasks or maneuvers can be done safely and efficiently. Many required tasks are not normally conducted during a normal flight mission (e.g., steep turns); therefore, these tasks are more appropriately done during a break in the scenario. It is desirable to include situations within the basic scenario that would accommodate most tasks and maneuvers.
(b)    Keep in mind that trigger events will likely alter the flight planned by the applicant and several required Areas of Operation may fit in the altered flight. For example, a trigger event prompts the applicant to divert to a short strip with an obstacle. In this case, a trigger event that leads to a diversion would be built into the designee’s plan of action but not provided to the applicant for flight planning if the applicant is to be evaluated on the aeronautical decision-making (ADM) skills to respond to a problem and take appropriate actions.
(c)    Because there are numerous possible responses to a given situation, the designee will need to consider the possible responses the applicant may apply to an event. For example, the designee has given the applicant an alternator failure and the applicant has decided to divert to the nearest airport. The airport the applicant has decided to use is not an airport that allows the designee to accomplish the type of approach or type of landing the designee wanted to accomplish next. The plan of action must allow the applicant to make a decision on an event or situation that has occurred, the trigger event, and then carry that decision to a logical conclusion. Since malfunctioning equipment, typically, does not repair itself, the airplane must land. For the sake of this discussion, the decision to divert was good and the choice of airports was okay, but not necessarily the best choice. The applicant’s decision should be graded on whether or not the applicant achieved an appropriate safe outcome and that the outcome was never in doubt, not on whether the applicant chose to do what the designee would have chosen.
(4)    Develop a plan of action that, as much as practical, covers all required Areas of Operation and tasks, and provide the designee the opportunity to evaluate the applicant’s SRM skills. The technique for evaluating SRM skills is to introduce an event or situation, called an event trigger, which requires the applicant to consider the event and/or take some action.
(a)    One way the designee can control the applicant’s range of options or choices is to present the event or situation at a position/time where the choice, decision to divert for example, the desired airport is the only reasonable choice. The designee may need to create and provide additional circumstances that would limit the applicant’s choices. For example, an airport’s runway is closed for repair. This circumstance should be a part of the initial planning factors and should not be a surprise provided during the execution of the diversion. Failure by the applicant to consider these factors during the flight would be a factor the designee considers in the evaluation.
(b)    Note that advanced avionics may make it difficult for the designee to provide realistic diversion circumstances. For example, the designee wants to eliminate one or more airports as potential diversion airports by providing weather that is below minimums; however, during the decision process the applicant obtains an updated weather report through the installed advanced avionics that gives good weather reports for the airports involved. On the other hand, the applicant’s SRM skills may not be satisfactory, if the applicant fails to use the advanced avionics or other sources of information during the decision process. Most likely this evaluation will depend on how much time the applicant has to make the decision.
(5)    How to develop a scenario for evaluating an applicant’s aeronautical skills. The discussion thus far has addressed the reasons and considerations of a scenario, but now it is time to discuss how to develop a scenario.
(a)    The process should begin with the development of a list of the required tasks, including the SRM tasks, in accordance with the appropriate PTS.
(b)    Next, create a scenario that will encompass as many of the required tasks as you can. The scenario should include the reason or purpose of the flight. If the purpose of the flight cannot be tailored to a specific applicant, it must be at least realistic. This is to entice the applicant to strive to complete the scenario, which should lead to a more realistic evaluation of the applicant’s SRM skills. The scenario will need to include the trigger events that will ensure that the pilot demonstrates the required tasks and cause the applicant to take some action that will allow opportunities to evaluate SRM skills. Revise the scenario as needed to make this a workable plan of action.
(c)    Finally, produce the written plan of action. Designees should develop multiple scenarios for each practical test they are authorized to conduct. Instructors and applicants soon find out that a designee gives the same test over and over. They will then prepare for that test, which defeats the purpose of the applicant making decisions and demonstrating SRM. PTS scenarios should be tweaked periodically to ensure that the applicant does not know exactly what will happen during the practical test, just like in real flight operations.
(6)    Additional information and guidance on SRM training and evaluation may be found on the FAA/Industry Training Standards (FITS) Web site at http://www.faa.gov/training_testing/training/fits/training/.

7.    Testing Applicants Trained by the Designee. Except as noted in subparagraphs 7a, 7b, and 7c, a designee who trains an applicant for a certificate or rating may only test that applicant if another instructor has given the applicant at least 3 hours of flight instruction in the 2 calendar-months prior to the test, in preparation for the test, and is the recommending instructor. (For sport pilot privileges, the hours are reduced to 1.5 hours if the test is in a glider or balloon; 1.0 hours if the test is in a powered parachute; 2.0 hours if the test is in all other light‑sport aircraft categories.) A designee may also test an applicant trained by that designee for an additional aircraft class rating if the applicant has obtained the written recommendation of another CFI who has personally checked the applicant and found the applicant prepared for the practical test.

a.    FIE. An FIE may test an applicant that he or she trained for a flight instructor certificate or rating if the designee obtains written permission from the managing FAA office. In the case of a test to be conducted outside the United States, the designee must obtain the permission of the managing FAA office.

b.    ATPE. An ATPE may test an applicant that he or she trained for an ATP certificate or rating if the designee obtains the written permission of the managing FAA office. In the case of a test to be conducted outside the United States, the ATPE must obtain the permission of the managing FAA office.

c.    NDPE/FEE. In cases where an NDPE/FEE is the only readily available instructor qualified in a rare airplane, the NDPE/FEE may conduct a certification practical test for an applicant that he or she trained if the designee obtains permission from the NDPE/FEE manager, General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS‑800), 800 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591.

8.    Designee Limitations.

a.    Altered/Amended Certificate. A designee must not alter or amend any pilot or instructor certificate. Applicants who have passed a practical test to add an additional rating or to upgrade their certificate are issued a new Temporary Airman Certificate. When issuing an unrestricted U.S. certificate, limitations (such as issued on the basis of and valid only when accompanied by XXX) are not carried forward to the new certificate. If an applicant adds additional ratings to a restricted U.S. certificate, the notation "U.S. TEST PASSED" is entered. If the applicant has a restricted U.S. certificate which bears the notation "U.S. TEST PASSED" on a rating, that notation is carried forward to the new certificate.

b.    Authorized Aircraft. A designee must not conduct a practical test in any aircraft for which the designee does not hold a category, class, and, if appropriate, aircraft type rating or authorization. A designee must not conduct a practical test in any vintage airplane, helicopter, powered-lift, turbine-powered aircraft, or large aircraft other than those shown on a COA letter.

c.    Medical Flight Tests. Unless specifically authorized by the managing FAA office, a designee must not accept an application for an airman certificate or rating from an applicant requiring a special medical flight test. Such applicants should be referred to an FAA office.

d.    English Language Requirement. A designee is not authorized to issue an airman certificate with the limitations “NOT VALID FOR FLIGHTS REQUIRING THE USE OF ENGLISH” or “NOT VALID FOR FLIGHTS REQUIRING THE USE OF RADIO.” A certificate with such limitations can only be issued by an FAA office when based on FAA Form 8500-15, Statement of Demonstrated Ability (SODA). If the deficiency is not due to a medical reason, the applicant is not eligible for the certificate. Only the FAA office may remove the English language limitation.

e.    Airman Knowledge Tests. A DPE may not be involved in conducting or monitoring any portion of airman knowledge tests.

9.    Status of Designees During Practical Tests. A designee conducts a practical test to observe and evaluate an applicant’s ability to perform the procedures and maneuvers required for the certificate or rating sought. The designee is not PIC of the aircraft during a practical test unless the designee agrees to act in that capacity by prior arrangement with the applicant. The FAA strongly recommends that a designee not agree to act as PIC of a flight during a practical test.

a.    Physical Location of the Designee During a Practical Test.

(1)    A designee must accompany the applicant in the aircraft during all practical tests in accordance with § 61.45(b)(1)(iii). Except for conducting practical tests in an aircraft that requires a pilot flightcrew of two or more, as provided in subparagraph 9c, an examiner is expected to be physically located in the other pilot crewmember station when conducting a practical test in an aircraft that only requires one pilot crewmember. However, it is acceptable for a designee to give the practical test from a designated jump seat or place in the cabin from which the applicant can be adequately observed, provided another pilot who is qualified to act as the PIC occupies the other pilot crewmember station. This kind of arrangement is permitted provided the designee agrees. For a designee to agree to such an arrangement, such factors as aircraft seating configuration; the designee’s personal knowledge of the person proposing to occupy the other pilot crewmember station; and the designee’s own skills, recent experience, and qualifications should be considered. However, it is normal procedure and expected that the designee occupy the other pilot crewmember station.
(2)    When a designee agrees to give the practical test from a designated jump seat or place in the cabin from which the applicant can be adequately observed, the designee must conduct a preflight briefing with the applicant and the other pilot about safety precautions, procedures, duties, and responsibilities of each crewmember before beginning the flight portion of the practical test.
(3)    For sport pilot examinations, an SPE must accompany the applicant in the aircraft during all practical tests in accordance with § 61.45(b)(1)(iii) unless the aircraft only has one seat. If the applicant presents a single-seat aircraft, the examiner can proceed with the practical test. The pilot will have a limitation placed on his or her sport pilot certificate, which limits operation to a single-seat light-sport aircraft; he or she will not be authorized to carry passengers. The SPE must refer to the appropriate PTS to ensure the required maneuvers are performed for single pilot aircraft.

b.    Designee Station in an Aircraft Requiring a Flightcrew of Two or More. During practical tests given on aircraft requiring a flightcrew of two or more, the designee should give the practical test from a designated jump seat or place in the cabin from which the flight can be adequately observed. When a designee conducts a practical test from a jump seat or station in the cabin, a pilot who is qualified to act as PIC in that aircraft must occupy a pilot seat.

(1)    This arrangement allows the designee to devote full attention to the practical test rather than being involved with performing the duties of a flightcrew member. It also allows the designee to assess the command ability of the applicant and to observe crew coordination.
(2)    This is not intended to preclude a designee from electing to occupy a pilot seat during the practical test. Consideration should be given to such factors as aircraft seating configuration, the designee’s personal knowledge of the person proposing to occupy the pilot seat, and the designee’s skills, recent experience, and qualifications.

c.    Designee Elects to Serve as a Required Crewmember. Designees must observe special considerations when electing to serve as a required flightcrew member during a practical test. In addition to being appropriately rated and holding a current medical certificate, the designee must also be current in accordance with §§ 61.55, 61.56, 61.57, and 61.58, as applicable. Due to liability considerations, the FAA strongly recommends that designees not conduct practical tests in which they will serve as a required crewmember.

d.    NDPE/FEE. An NDPE/FEE must meet the requirements of all applicable regulations, including § 61.58, to conduct a practical test from the pilot seat of a vintage airplane except in unusual circumstances where no qualified and current designees are available for that aircraft.

(1)    When there are no qualified and/or current examiners available for a vintage aircraft, the best qualified NDPE/FEE may apply to the AFS-800 NDPE/FEE manager for a COA letter to conduct the required tests.
(2)    Except as stated in subparagraph (1), under no circumstances may an NDPE/FEE conduct a practical test from the pilot seat of a vintage airplane unless that designee is qualified and current to act as PIC of that aircraft.
(3)    An NDPE/FEE may conduct a practical test from the jump seat of a vintage airplane in which the designee is qualified but not current if:
(a)    The designee is type rated in the airplane,
(b)    The designee is authorized as an NDPE/FEE to give practical tests in that airplane,
(c)    The designee holds the current § 61.58 proficiency check in any vintage airplane, and
(d)    A qualified and current PIC occupies a pilot seat.
(4)    The NDPE/FEE does not need a current § 61.58 proficiency check in the vintage airplane in which the test is to be conducted if the test is conducted from the jump seat and all conditions in subparagraph 9d(3) are met.
(a)    The applicant and the qualified/current PIC must be thoroughly briefed by the NDPE/FEE regarding PIC responsibilities, the respective duties of each participant during the flight, and the procedures to be used during the test.
(b)    All three pilots must understand the briefing and be in agreement regarding PIC responsibility and all of the points covered in the briefing.
(5)    For single-seat vintage/former military airplane examinations, the designee may observe the practical test from the ground. The examiner must refer to the appropriate PTS to ensure the required maneuvers are performed for single pilot aircraft.

e.    Other Commercial Flying. If a designee administers a practical test from a jump seat or cabin station of an aircraft requiring a flightcrew of two or more, or from a pilot seat of an aircraft requiring a flightcrew of only one pilot, flight time accrued as an examiner is not deemed to be other commercial flying with respect to the flight and duty time limitations stated in parts 121, 125, and 135. However, if a designee serves as a required crewmember during a practical test on an aircraft requiring a flightcrew of two or more, that flight time is deemed to be other commercial flying.

10.    Aircraft Used for Practical Tests. An applicant for an airman certificate or rating must furnish an Airworthy aircraft appropriate for the certificate or rating sought. At the designee’s discretion, the aircraft may be a U.S. military aircraft, a properly certificated aircraft of foreign registry, or an experimental aircraft that can be identified as a category and class of aircraft (if class of aircraft is appropriate).

a.    Experimental Aircraft. An applicant may request a practical test in an experimental aircraft. The aircraft may be certificated as amateur-built or for exhibition purposes. A designee may conduct a practical test in such experimental aircraft provided that all the following conditions are met:

(1)    The designee is willing to conduct the test.
(2)    The applicant is not prohibited from accomplishing the required tasks by the operating limitations issued for the experimental aircraft.
(3)    If the experimental aircraft is not capable of performing all required tasks, another aircraft of the same category, class, and type, as appropriate, must be provided for those tasks that cannot be accomplished in the experimental aircraft.

b.    Self-launching Gliders. Aircraft that have been certificated as gliders with self-launching capability cannot be used for a practical test for an airplane category. There are no dual airplane/glider category designations. The designee can determine the category of an aircraft by examining the aircraft airworthiness certificate or Type Certificate Data Sheet (TCDS).

c.    Aircraft Limitations. A limitation will be placed on an applicant’s pilot certificate if the applicant provides an aircraft that has operating characteristics that preclude it from performing all the tasks required during the practical test (per § 61.45(b)(2)). However, this situation and the kind of aircraft to be used must be specifically identified and approved by the FAA, General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS-800), at 800 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591 or the Light Sport Aviation Branch (AFS-610) in Oklahoma City, OK (phone: (405) 954-6400) for experimental light-sport aircraft, on a case-by-case basis.

(1)    The FAA generally disapproves the use of such aircraft, but it may grant approval on a case‑by‑case basis. The approval is only given as a reasonable accommodation to an applicant with a disability requiring such accommodation.

Note:  For example, in the past, AFS-800 has approved the Engineering and Research Corporation (ERCO) Ercoupe for use in a practical test. Persons seeking to use an Ercoupe for a practical test would receive the limitation “Limited to Ercoupe Without Rudder Pedals.”

(2)    In accordance with § 61.45(f), a practical test may be conducted in a light-sport aircraft that has a single-pilot station with certain limitations. The practical test for a sport pilot certificate can be conducted from the ground by a designee, provided the examiner agrees to conduct the single-seat aircraft practical test, is in a position to observe the operation of the aircraft, and evaluate the proficiency of the applicant. Finally, the designee must ensure that the practical test is conducted in accordance with the Sport Pilot PTS for single-seat aircraft. Upon successful completion of the practical test, the following limitation will be placed on the sport pilot certificate: “NO PASSENGER CARRIAGE AND FLIGHT IN A SINGLE-PILOT STATION AIRCRAFT ONLY.” Only a designee or an ASI is authorized to remove the limitation. This can be accomplished when the sport pilot takes a practical test in a two-place light-sport aircraft and conducts additional tasks identified in the PTS. It can also be accomplished if the sport pilot completes the certification requirements for a higher certificate, rating, or privilege in a two-place aircraft. A sport pilot who is issued a certificate with a single-seat limitation must complete a flight review, as required by § 61.56. If the flight review will be accomplished in an aircraft, it must be in an aircraft with a minimum of two seats, in which the pilot is rated, and with an authorized instructor that is current and qualified to act as PIC.

d.    Public Aircraft. In accordance with Title 49 of the United States Code (49 U.S.C.) § 40102(a)(41), public aircraft are aircraft owned and operated by a State government, the District of Columbia, or a territory or possession of the United States or a political subdivision of one of those governments, except as provided in 49 U.S.C. § 40125(b). Section 40125(b) provides, in pertinent part, that an aircraft described in 49 U.S.C. § 40102(a)(41)(A), (B), (C), or (D) does not qualify as a public aircraft under such section when the aircraft is used for commercial purposes or to carry an individual other than a crewmember or a qualified noncrewmember.

(1)    Public aircraft that do not hold an FAA airworthiness certificate are not authorized for use in a practical test. A pilot may not use a public aircraft that does not hold an FAA airworthiness certificate for a practical test or for maintaining recency of experience under part 61.
(2)    In accordance with Public Law (PL) 106-424, Sec. 14, Crediting of Law Enforcement Flight Time, if a pilot for a Federal, State, county, or municipality law enforcement agency is engaged in a law enforcement flight activity in a public aircraft, the pilot may log that flight time for the purposes of § 61.51(a)(1) and (2). However, in accordance with PL 103-411 and 49 U.S.C. § 40102, a public aircraft is not authorized to be used for the purposes of receiving pilot training for the furtherance of a certificate, rating, or recency of experience or for conducting a practical test for an airman certificate or rating.
(3)    The prohibition on conducting a practical test in a public aircraft does not apply to military aircraft. An acceptable U.S. military aircraft is one that is under the direct operational control of the U.S. military (e.g., Regular, Reserve, National Guard, or U.S. Coast Guard) forces. Former U.S. military aircraft that are not under the direct operational control of the U.S. military forces may not be used for practical tests, unless the aircraft holds a U.S. airworthiness certificate and can be identified as a category and class of aircraft (if class of aircraft is appropriate). U.S. military aircraft or former U.S. military aircraft used by an applicant for a practical test must be capable of performing all operations and tasks required by the PTS. The applicant must not be restricted from accomplishing the required maneuvers and procedures by military directives or aircraft limitations.
(a)    The designee must advise an individual who requests a practical test in a U.S. military aircraft that the applicant must provide a letter from the commanding officer or the operations officer of the U.S. military organization having jurisdiction over that aircraft. The letter must state that the applicant is authorized to use the aircraft for a practical test from the FAA and that all maneuvers required for the test are authorized to be conducted in the aircraft.
(b)    Without the official, original letter accompanying the application, a designee must not conduct any part of a practical test involving a U.S. military aircraft or FSTD.
(c)    A clear understanding of responsibility between the designee and the U.S. military organization must be maintained so that no question of accident or injury claim liability exists.
(4)    An area of concern is the administration of an ATP certification practical test in a large U.S. military aircraft for which there is no civil counterpart (for example, F-4, A-10, and T-38). Tests may be given in such aircraft even though an aircraft type rating is not concurrently issued. The aircraft must be able to perform all flight maneuvers and all equipment must be functional before flight. Additionally, the aircraft must be properly equipped to accommodate a designee. If a designee receives a request for a practical test in a U.S. military aircraft for which there is no civil counterpart, he or she must coordinate with the managing FAA office to ensure that all aircraft requirements are met and that the correct limitations for the certificate are determined. There are provisions for practical tests in vintage/former U.S. military aircraft under the NDPE/FEE program.

11.    Aircraft Equipment. Except as provided by § 61.45(b)(2), an aircraft furnished for a practical test by an applicant must have the equipment required to accomplish each Area of Operation on the practical test. The applicant may need to use two or more aircraft to accomplish all of the practical test requirements (for simulated instrument flight, see the additional requirements of § 61.45(e)(2)).

a.    Adequate Visibility. The aircraft must have pilot seats with adequate visibility for safe operation and, when the designee conducts the test from a jump seat, have cockpit and outside visibility adequate for the designee to evaluate the applicant’s performance.

b.    View Limiting Device. During the practical test for an instrument rating or other certificates/ratings requiring a demonstration of instrument proficiency, the applicant must provide equipment, satisfactory to the designee, which prevents flight by visual reference.

c.    Required Controls. An aircraft (other than lighter-than-air) must have engine power and flight controls that are easily reached and operable in a conventional manner by both pilots, as provided by § 61.45(c), unless the designee determines that the practical test can be conducted safely without them.

d.    Aircraft with Single Controls. At the discretion of the designee, an aircraft furnished by the applicant may have a single set of controls. Tests for the addition of aircraft category, class, or aircraft type ratings to private and commercial pilot certificates may be conducted in single-control aircraft under the provisions of § 61.45(e).

e.    Aircraft with Stability Control Augmentation Systems. Some aircraft are equipped with stability and augmentation systems which are designed to operate at all times when the aircraft is in flight. Aircraft equipped with such devices may be used on practical tests if they are operated in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations and the appropriate operating limitations.

12.    FSTDs: Personal Computer-Based Aviation Training Devices (PCATD), Basic Aviation Training Devices (BATD), and Advanced Aviation Training Devices (AATD). All FSTDs used for training or testing during a practical test must be qualified and approved in accordance with § 61.4(a). BATDs and AATDs must comply with the requirements in the current edition of AC 61-136, FAA Approval of Aviation Training Devices and Their Use for Training and Experience. PCATDs, BATDs, AATDs, and FSTDs Levels 1 through 3 are prohibited from use during a practical test.

Note:  Only FSTDs Level 4 through 7 and FSTDs Levels A through D are authorized, and only for those Areas of Operation that are individually listed in the tasks vs. Simulation Device Credit in the applicable PTS.

Note:  Such devices must be used pursuant to and in accordance with a curriculum approved for use at a part 141 pilot school or part 142 training center.

13.    Engine Shutdown on Multiengine Airplanes During the Practical Test.

a.    Preflight Discussion Item. A designee who conducts a practical test in a multiengine airplane must discuss methods of simulating engine failure with the applicant during the required preflight briefing. Both the designee and the applicant must discuss and follow the aircraft manufacturer’s recommended procedures.

b.    Feathering Propellers. An appropriately equipped airplane must be provided by the applicant.

(1)    The feathering of one propeller must be demonstrated in flight in multiengine airplanes equipped with propellers which can be feathered and unfeathered. However, as is the case for all practical tests, the PTS requires that the applicant bring an aircraft that is “capable of performing all appropriate tasks for the certificate or rating and have no operating limitations that prohibit the performance of those tasks.”
(2)    If due to environmental considerations the feathering demonstration cannot be safely performed, a letter of discontinuance must be issued.
(3)    A propeller that cannot be unfeathered during the practical test must be treated as an emergency.
(4)    Feathering and engine shutdown must be performed at altitudes, in areas, and from positions where safe landings on established airports can be readily accomplished.

c.    Simulated Engine Failure. At altitudes lower than 3,000 feet above the surface, simulated engine failure must be performed by adjusting the throttle to simulate zero thrust. This safety provision does not negate the PTS that requires testing of the task “Maneuvering with One Engine Inoperative” 3,000 feet above the surface.

Note:  Some manufacturers recommend altitudes greater than 3,000 feet above ground level (AGL). The higher of the two altitudes must be used.

14.    Structure of the Practical Test. The practical test consists of a demonstration of aeronautical knowledge and skill. The two demonstrations are not intended to be separate tests. They should be conducted concurrently.

a.    Number of Practical Tests Per Day. A DPE may not conduct more than 2 practical tests in 1 calendar‑day (i.e., midnight to midnight), unless that DPE has received specific written permission from the managing FAA office. Initial tests, retests, discontinuances, or continuations of practical tests are all considered practical tests, and the DPE must have received specific written permission from the managing FAA office to do more than 2 practical tests in any 1 calendar-day. In the case of a designee administering an initial flight instructor practical test, the designee will not conduct more than one test per day. If the initial flight instructor test is not a complete practical test (i.e., a retest or continuance), the designee may seek permission from the managing FAA office to conduct an additional test on the same calendar day. If the managing office approves, specific permission will be provided in writing and maintained in the designee’s file.

b.    Sport DPE. A Sport DPE may conduct 2 sport pilot practical tests or 1 CFI practical test in one calendar-day. In this context, a practical test means a certificate action that is completed (i.e., issuance of FAA Form 8060-4, FAA Form 8060-5, or a letter of discontinuance).

c.    Demonstration of Aeronautical Knowledge. The demonstration of aeronautical knowledge consists of a question and answer exchange between the designee and the applicant. The knowledge which should be tested is identified in the applicable PTS and part 61. It is required that the oral portion of the practical test precede the flight portion of the practical test. In accordance with Chapter 5, paragraph 2, applicants will be tested individually and separately.

Note:  An example where simultaneous testing may be permitted is a practical test for an aircraft type rating for a Learjet 35 type rating (meaning an aircraft that requires two-pilot crewmembers) that involves two applicants graduating from an FAA-approved course.

(1)    Trick questions should be avoided. The correct answers to all questions must be available in the regulations, AFM, or other references listed in the applicable PTS.
(2)    The designee should maintain a relaxed atmosphere. The designee must not give an applicant training during the practical test. If the applicant consistently gives incorrect, confused, or unrelated answers to the designee’s questions, a Notice of Disapproval of Application must be issued. An applicant must meet the acceptable standards of knowledge on each task.
(3)    It is not uncommon for only one or two incorrect answers to require the issuance of a notice of disapproval during the oral portion of a practical test. For example, an applicant may be asked a scenario kind of question to explain his or her actions on a cross-country flight. If the applicant were to state that an ATC clearance is not required for operation in Class B airspace, then it may be appropriate for a designee to allow the applicant to complete his or her explanation. The designee should then follow up with another scenario kind of question about operations into Class B airspace to determine whether the applicant’s knowledge was satisfactory or unsatisfactory. If after that question the designee is certain that the applicant’s knowledge is unsatisfactory or incomplete, then the practical test would be terminated and a notice of disapproval should be issued. This same example could apply to scenario based questions that produce incorrect responses about visual flight rules (VFR) weather minimums, aircraft limitations, etc.

d.    Airman Knowledge Test Report (AKTR). A designee conducting a practical test must note the failed areas coded on the applicant’s knowledge test report to identify possible deficiencies which may affect the applicant’s flight performance. Designees should have a current copy of the Learning Statement Reference Guide for Airman Knowledge Testing to review the deficient areas on the airman knowledge test. The instructor must endorse the applicant’s logbook, training record, or bottom of the airman knowledge test, verifying that the applicant has received the required training in the deficient areas.

e.    Demonstration of Aeronautical Skill. The demonstration of aeronautical skill is the flight portion of the practical test where the applicant demonstrates flight proficiency for the certificate or rating sought.

(1)    The PTS details the Areas of Operation and tasks required for the certificate or rating. If the applicant does not meet the standards of performance of any task performed, the Area of Operation is failed and, therefore, the practical test is failed. The applicant is not eligible for the certificate or rating until the failed Area of Operation is passed on a subsequent test.
(2)    The designee or the applicant may discontinue the test at any time when the failure of a required Area of Operation makes the applicant ineligible for the certificate or rating sought. If the test is discontinued, the applicant must receive credit for only those Areas of Operations which were successfully performed. With the consent of the designee, the applicant may also elect to continue the test after failing a required task. The applicant must receive credit only for those Areas of Operations which are satisfactorily completed.
(3)    The designee will evaluate the applicant’s ability throughout the practical test to use good ADM procedures in order to evaluate risks. The designee will accomplish this requirement by developing scenarios that incorporate as many PTS tasks as possible to evaluate the applicants’ risk management (RM) in making safe aeronautical decisions. For example, the designee may develop a scenario that incorporates weather decisions and performance planning.

15.    Practical Test Discontinuance. Environmental, mechanical, or personal situations can occur which could cause the test to be discontinued. In such cases, the designee should assure the applicant that he or she has not failed the practical test and should attempt to reschedule the test as soon as possible.

a.    Incomplete Practical Test. The intent of the designee must be to complete the entire practical test in one day. Designees must not schedule the test to be planned as a multiple day event. Extenuating circumstances may allow for deviations, but must be approved by the managing FAA office. An example of a situation that may warrant a deviation is a lighter-than-air practical test, which requires the flight portion to begin at sunrise. In this case, an office may authorize the designee to plan all lighter-than-air practical tests to be conducted over a 2-day period. This authorization should be maintained in the designee's file.

b.    Letter of Discontinuance. When a practical test is discontinued for reasons other than unsatisfactory performance, FAA Form 8710-1 or Form 8710-11, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application—Sport Pilot, and the knowledge test report (if applicable) should be returned to the applicant. At that time, the designee signs and issues a letter of discontinuance identifying the portions of the practical test that the applicant successfully completed. The designee should retain a copy of the letter (Figures 7-9A and 7-9B).

(1)    Within 60 calendar-days of the original date of application, the applicant may use the letter to show a designee which portion of the practical test was successfully completed. The letter must be included in the applicant’s certification file.
(2)    When more than 60 calendar-days have elapsed since the original date of application, the designee must test the applicant on all Areas of Operation required for that certificate or rating.

Note:  A letter of discontinuance does not extend the validity of a knowledge test.

c.    Designee Authority to Reexamine. Whenever the designee has reason to doubt the applicant’s competence in areas for which the applicant received credit during a previous practical test, the designee must reexamine the applicant on all Areas of Operation required for that certificate or rating.

16.    Repeating Maneuvers on Practical Tests. A completed unsatisfactory maneuver may not be repeated. The criteria for allowing the repeat of a maneuver are contained in the applicable PTS.

17.    Practical Test Briefings. The designee must conduct a pretest, preflight, and postflight briefing in accordance with the Examiner Test Guide (Figures 7-8A or 7-8B). These briefings must be included in the designee's written plan of action and accomplished regardless of the experience and abilities of the participants. The preflight briefing must include a discussion of the methods to be used to simulate an engine failure if a multiengine aircraft is to be used for the test. The manufacturer’s recommendations must be discussed and used.

a.    PIC. During the preflight briefing, the designee must ensure that the applicant understands that he or she will be evaluated on his or her ability to exercise PIC authority.

b.    Safety Pilot. When a designee conducts a practical test from a station other than a pilot seat, a qualified pilot must be designated as the safety pilot for the practical test and must occupy a pilot station during the test. When the designee occupies a pilot station, he or she may perform the role of safety pilot.

(1)    The safety pilot protects the overall safety of the flight to whatever extent necessary and ensures that all maneuvers, procedures, and/or alternate courses of action are performed safely.
(2)    The designee, when not occupying a pilot station, must rely on the safety pilot to override any decision by the designee, the applicant, or other person, if safety requirements demand that action.

c.    Performance Criteria. The pretest briefing must include a discussion of the applicable PTS which the designee will use to determine satisfactory performance.

d.    Repetition of Maneuvers. The preflight briefing must also include a discussion of the circumstances under which a maneuver may be repeated on the test.

e.    ADM and RM. During the preflight briefing, the designee must ensure that the applicant understands that he or she will be evaluated on his or her ability to apply ADM and RM principles.

18.    Segmented Practical Tests (Planned). A designee may be asked to conduct a practical test as a planned, segmented practical test.

a.    Preferred Method. A segmented practical test normally involves conducting a practical test when an aircraft and an FSTD are used. The oral portion of the practical test must be satisfactorily completed prior to administering the flight portion of the test. After the applicant has satisfactorily completed the oral portion of the practical test, the applicant should be administered the FSTD portion of the practical test. After the applicant satisfactorily completes the FSTD portion of the practical test, the applicant should be administered the flight/aircraft portion of the practical test. However, the FAA recognizes that there may be times when inclement weather or aircraft maintenance discrepancies may cause the order of flight testing to be altered.

b.    FSTD and Flight Portions of Practical Test. The applicant has 60 calendar-days from the date the oral portion of the practical test was passed to satisfactorily accomplish the FSTD and flight portions of the practical test. The designee may use oral questioning at any time during the practical test. The applicant is required to present an airman application with the appropriate endorsements to substantiate that portion of the test was satisfactory.

c.    Perform Maneuvers. Designees may request that the applicant perform maneuvers in the aircraft which were completed satisfactorily during the FSTD portion of the test if they desire or need to further test the applicant’s competency and proficiency on those maneuvers.

19.    Retest in Event of Failure. An applicant who fails a practical test may apply for retesting after receiving the necessary training from an authorized instructor. The applicant must present a logbook or training record endorsement by an authorized instructor who has given the applicant the necessary additional training. On FAA Form 8710-1 or FAA Form 8710-11, as appropriate, the authorized instructor must legibly complete the “INSTRUCTOR’S RECOMMENDATION” block indicating that the applicant is proficient to pass the test. These requirements apply to all retesting after failure, including ATP certificate and aircraft type rating applicants.

20.    Accidents and Incidents During Practical Tests. If an accident or incident occurs during a practical test, the designee should ensure that the PIC follows the prescribed procedures for reporting the occurrence. The safeguarding of lives and property is the highest priority. As soon as possible, the designee must notify the managing FAA office of the accident or incident. SPEs must notify AFS-610 in the event of an accident during a practical test.

21.    PTS. The regulations specify the areas in which an applicant must demonstrate knowledge and skill before a certificate can be issued. The PTS contain the specific tasks in which knowledge and skill must be demonstrated.

a.    Practical Test Correlation to Part 61. The Areas of Operation specified by part 61 for each grade of certificate are encompassed by the Areas of Operation and tasks contained in the PTS. The flight proficiency required by the regulations is stated in terms of Areas of Operation. The specific tasks used to ensure competence in the required Areas of Operation are detailed in the applicable PTS.

b.    Public Availability. The public may obtain copies of the PTS from the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO), FAA Web site at http://www.faa.gov, or from several of the many commercial vendors that sell the PTS to the public.

c.    PTS Introduction. The introductory section of the PTS gives detailed instructions on the use of the standards for conducting a practical test.

(1)    The PTS is arranged into sections by specific Areas of Operation. Areas of Operation are phases of flight in a logical sequence, beginning with the preflight preparation and ending with postflight.
(2)    The oral portion of the practical test must be accomplished and satisfactorily completed before the aircraft or FSTD portion of the practical test.
(3)    Practical tests must be conducted in accordance with part 61 and the applicable PTS. In some cases, it may be necessary to use more than one PTS. For example, an aircraft type rating test for an applicant with no instrument rating requires the use of both the instrument rating PTS and the ATP/type rating PTS.
(4)    The designee must not allow the conduct of successive practical tests to degenerate into a predictable pattern that can be recognized by applicants or instructors.
(5)    Evaluation of an applicant’s performance must be based on the applicant’s ability to satisfactorily meet the objectives of each required task.

22.    Prerequisites for Practical Tests. To be eligible for a practical test, an applicant must meet all requirements of part 61 applicable to the certificate or rating sought and comply with the following prerequisites.

a.    Knowledge Test. Except as provided by § 61.39, the applicant must have passed any required knowledge test within the 24 calendar-months preceding the practical test. An appropriate knowledge test report for the aircraft category and/or rating must be presented to the designee at the time of application for the practical test (e.g., a private pilot applicant must present a satisfactory private pilot knowledge test report; a commercial pilot applicant must present a satisfactory commercial pilot knowledge test report) (Figures 7-10 and 7-10A).

Note:  The knowledge test report will be good for 60 calendar-months for an applicant for an ATP certificate with an airplane category and a multiengine class rating who passes the knowledge test after July 31, 2014. The applicant must also present a graduation certificate from an ATP certification training program in addition to the knowledge test report.

(1)    The FAA has designated industry entities to give airman knowledge tests through computer testing. These companies issue a computer test report to the applicant upon completion of the test. This report will have an embossed seal, similar to a notary public seal, on it which identifies the computer testing company. Designees must accept this computer test report and ensure that the applicant’s name and identification appear on the aeronautical knowledge test results and the embossed seal is legible. Duplicate copies of the report (Figures 7-10 and 7-10A) are not acceptable.
(2)    When a student has graduated from an approved pilot ground school with knowledge test examining authority, that student receives a graduation certificate or a ground school knowledge test report. The ground school knowledge test report or graduation certificate (Figure 7-11) is valid for 24 calendar-months from the date of graduation.
(3)    When an applicant presents an approved school graduation certificate in lieu of a knowledge test report, the designee giving the practical test checks the appropriate boxes in the FAA Form 8710-1 Designated Examiner’s Report section. The ground school graduation certificate is then returned to the applicant.
(4)    When the holder of a ground school knowledge test report or an approved school graduation certificate completes flight training under part 61, the applicant must meet all the certification requirements of part 61. The ground school knowledge test report or graduation certificate is valid for 24 calendar-months from the date of ground school graduation.
(5)    When the holder of a ground school knowledge test report or graduation certificate completes flight training in an approved pilot school flight course without practical test examining authority, the applicant must be tested in accordance with the appropriate PTS. The ground school knowledge test report or graduation certificate is valid for 24 calendar-months from the date of ground school graduation.
(6)    When the holder of a ground school knowledge test report or graduation certificate completes training in a part 141 pilot school flight course with examining authority, the applicant, upon graduation from that course, is eligible to receive the airman certificate or rating sought without further testing by the FAA. Such applicants must apply for the certificate at an FAA office or with the school’s ACR in accordance with § 61.71. A graduate from such a course has 60 calendar-days to apply for the appropriate certificate or rating. After 60 calendar-days from the graduation date, the applicant must meet all the requirements of part 61. The ground school knowledge test report or graduation certificate is accepted for 24 calendar-months from the date of graduation.
(7)    If the applicant is a graduate of an approved pilot school, the designee must check the applicant’s graduation certificate to ensure that the practical test can be passed within 60 calendar-days from the date on the graduation certificate. If not, the applicant must apply for the pilot certificate or rating under part 61 and meet all the applicable aeronautical experience requirements under part 61 for the pilot certificate or rating sought.

b.    Medical Certificate. If any portion of the practical test is being performed in an aircraft, an applicant for original issuance of an airman certificate or a rating to be added to an existing certificate (except for a glider category rating or a balloon class rating) must hold at least a third class medical certificate. An applicant for an original issuance, renewal, or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate is not required to hold a medical certificate; however, the designee must be the PIC for such practical tests and for this reason may choose not to administer the test. Balloon and glider applicants are no longer required to certify their medical qualification on FAA Form 8710-1 to be PIC for a practical test. An applicant for sport pilot or sport pilot instructor certificate must hold at least a third-class airman medical certificate or a valid U.S. driver’s license.

c.    SODA. If a designee accepts an application from an airman who has FAA Form 8500-15, the designee must verify the appropriate limitations relating to the SODA with the managing FAA office. Any appropriate limitations relating to operational privileges must be placed on any airman certificate issued.

d.    FAA Forms.

(1)    FAA Form 8710-1 must be completed in ink or typewritten and signed by the applicant prior to beginning the test. The applicant must complete sections I, II, III, IV, and V. Section I must have parts A through O1 completed in their entirety. If a flight test is administered, section IIA(1) must indicate the aircraft used during the flight test and the “Total Time” in 2a. The aircraft listed must match the aircraft listed in the designated examiner’s report. Section IIC must be completed when the applicant graduated from an FAA‑approved course. Ensure the applicant has given the school name and location (city and state). Per § 61.39(a)(7), the applicant must complete section III, Record of Pilot Time. As a special emphasis item, the designee must review the applicant’s aeronautical experience recorded on FAA Form 8710-1 and in the applicant’s logbook/training record to ensure compliance with the appropriate aeronautical experience requirements for the certificate and/or rating sought. Section IV must be answered “YES” or “NO” if a flight test was administered. If “YES,” ensure the airman’s notice of disapproval is included with the approved application. If the applicant has lost the notice of disapproval, attach a statement to that affect. Section V must be signed and dated by the applicant.
(a)    In section III on FAA Form 8710-1, Record of Pilot Time, the applicant must list at least the aeronautical experience required for the airmen certificate and rating sought. Graduates of part 141 pilot schools or part 142 training centers must provide their aeronautical experience in section III even though the graduation certificate is evidence of having completed the course of training.
(b)    If the applicant is removing a restriction due to obtaining the minimum qualifications for the restriction to be removed from his/her pilot certificate, the record of flight time must be entered and display the appropriate flight time in accordance with 14 CFR.
(c)    If aeronautical experience has no bearing on the airman certification action being sought, it is not necessary for an applicant to complete section III. For example, flight instructor renewal applications, flight instructor reinstatement applications, ground instructor qualification applications, pilot type rating applications, and utilization of a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) would be examples for which aeronautical experience would not have a bearing on the airmen certification action; thus, the applicant would not be required to complete section III of the application. However, all applicants are encouraged to complete section III because it remains on file with the FAA and can be used to substantiate past aeronautical experience in the case of a lost logbook.
(2)    For practical tests which require an authorized instructor’s endorsement (per § 61.39(a)(6)), an appropriately rated and qualified instructor must complete and sign the Instructor’s Recommendation section. The designee must verify that the required aeronautical experience/flight training has been logged within the 60 calendar-days preceding the date of application.
(3)    For an applicant applying for an added aircraft type rating to be placed on a private, commercial, or ATP certificate or for the original issuance of an ATP certificate, the Instructor’s Recommendation section of the form need not be signed. However, the applicant must have the appropriate endorsements in the applicant’s logbook or training records from an authorized instructor. If the applicant previously failed a practical test for the Airline Transport Pilot Certificate or type rating, a flight instructor recommendation is required.
(4)    A sport pilot applicant must complete FAA Form 8710-11. The applicant must complete sections I, II, III, IV, and V. Section I must have parts A through Z completed in their entirety. If a flight test is administered, section IIA1) must indicate the aircraft used during the flight test and the “Total Time” in 2a. The aircraft listed must match the aircraft listed in the designated examiner’s report. Section IIC must be completed when the applicant graduated from a FAA-approved course. Ensure the applicant has given the school name and location (city and state). The applicant must complete section III, Record of Pilot Time. Per § 61.39(a)(7), an applicant must have a completed and signed application that includes completion of section III. As a special emphasis item, the designee must review the applicant’s aeronautical experience recorded on the FAA Form 8710-11 and in the applicant’s logbook/training record to ensure compliance with the appropriate aeronautical experience requirements for the sport pilot certificate. Section IV must be answered “YES” or “NO” if a flight test was administered. If “YES,” ensure the airman’s notice of disapproval is included with the approved application. If the applicant has lost the notice of disapproval, attach a statement to that affect. Section V must be signed and dated by the applicant.

Note:  This requirement includes persons who are applying for a flight instructor certificate, renewal, or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate.

(5)    ASIs and designees are authorized to use the FAA’s Integrated Airmen Certification and/or Rating Application (IACRA) system to process applications at the request of the airman applicant. This can be done by accessing https://iacra.faa.gov . The designee will destroy the superseded certificate by punching a hole in the FAA symbol with a hole-punch. If a letter of discontinuance is involved, the designee must print it, complete it, and give it to the applicant. The designee will validate the information on the knowledge test provided by the applicant with the information in IACRA. When the designee confirms the information is accurate, IACRA will electronically submit the required documentation to the Airmen Certification Branch (AFS-760).

Note:  If extenuating circumstances do not allow the use of the IACRA, follow the instructions in this chapter for completing FAA Form 8710-1 or FAA Form 8710-11 (see paragraphs 26 and 27). If IACRA is unavailable when the DPE is beginning the test, the applicant must submit a paper application (Form 8710-1). The entire certification process must then be completed using the paper application and the certification file must be sent to the managing FAA office. The DPE cannot, under any circumstances, complete the certification in IACRA at the conclusion of the test, even if it is available. If the test is started with paper, it must be completed with paper. The DPE must also notify the managing FAA office of the reason for using paper instead of IACRA.

Note:  At the time of publication, IACRA is not able to process applications for a restricted privileges ATP certificate. Future updates to IACRA may allow for the processing of a restricted privileges ATP certificate online. Until such upgrade, FAA Form 8710-1 must be utilized for the application file.

e.    Airman Records/Logbooks. An applicant for a certificate or rating for which there are aeronautical training and experience requirements must present a reliable record to the designee which clearly shows the accomplishment of those requirements. The designee must verify that the applicant meets all eligibility and experience requirements for the certificate or rating sought.

(1)    Where required by the rules in part 61, an authorized instructor’s endorsement is required in the applicant’s logbook or training record.
(2)    An authorized instructor’s endorsement is required to show the training time accomplished for each session.
(3)    Where required by the rules in part 61, the applicant applying for an added aircraft type rating or for the original issuance of an ATP certificate in an aircraft requiring an aircraft type rating must have the appropriate endorsement in the applicant’s logbook or training records from an authorized instructor.
(4)    If the applicant presents reconstructed records, U.S. military records, or the examiner cannot positively determine the applicant’s eligibility, the designee should contact the managing FAA office for guidance.
(5)    The designee should sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the outcome of the test, and the designee’s designation number.

f.    Pilot Certificate Requirements and the Logging of Flight Time in Hang Gliders, Ultralights, Powered (Motorized) Gliders, and Other Vehicles. The following guidance is designed to clarify issues concerning the logging of flight time and minimum pilot certificate requirements for hang gliders, ultralights, and similar vehicles.

(1)    Logging Time. Unless the vehicle is type-certificated (TC) as an aircraft which would require a rating listed in § 61.5(b)(1), or as an experimental aircraft, or otherwise holds an airworthiness certificate, flight time acquired in such a vehicle may not be used to meet the requirements of part 61 for a certificate or rating or to meet the recency of experience requirements.
(2)    Minimum Certificate Requirements. To operate a small aircraft with an experimental airworthiness certificate, at least a student pilot certificate is required. The certificate must be properly endorsed in accordance with § 61.87, except in the case of an aircraft operating limitation that requires the PIC to hold an appropriate category/class rating. In that case, the pilot must hold at least a private pilot certificate.
(3)    Logging Time in Powered Gliders. Flight time in a powered glider cannot be logged as required airplane pilot flight time unless the aircraft is TC’d as an airplane. Flight time used to meet recency of experience requirements or the requirements for a certificate or rating may only be logged according to the category in which the aircraft is TC’d (airplane, glider, etc.). Powered gliders may be TC’d either as gliders or airplanes.

23.    Verification of an Applicant’s Identity. Designees shall refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 1, Section 3 for guidance and procedures associated with the verification of an applicant’s identity.

24.    Illegal Substance Conviction. Designees shall refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 1, Section 3 for guidance and procedures associated with the completion of FAA Form 8710-1.

25.    Completion of FAA Form 8710-1. Designees shall refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 1, Section 3 for guidance and procedures associated with the completion of FAA Form 8710-1.

a.    Special Emphasis Items. The examiner must complete all applicable blocks specific to Designated Examiner’s Report and the certificate and/or rating tested.

(1)    The examiner must complete all applicable blocks in the “Designated Examiner’s Report” section. If more than one aircraft was used, the type/registration numbers of all aircraft used must be provided. Under “LOCATION OF TEST,” the term “FACILITY” refers to the name of the airport, city, and state from which the test originated or, in the case of a practical test in a balloon, the name of the town nearest to the launch site. The “DURATION OF TEST” must include the time of the ground and flight tests. The “CERTIFICATE OR RATING FOR WHICH TESTED” must indicate the Level, Category, and Class rating of the rating being applied for (Retest should be entered, if applicable). Even if a test is not given, this section should explain the reason for the application.
(2)    The examiner must complete and sign the appropriate lines in the “Evaluator’s Record for the ATP/Rating Only” section for an applicant applying for an ATP certificate and/or an aircraft type rating, even if the aircraft type rating is applied for at the commercial or private level. An ATPE also completes the “Designated Examiner’s Report” section.
(3)    Except for ACRs and FIREs, examiners do not normally mark any blocks/boxes in the “Aviation Safety Inspector or Technician Report” section of the FAA Form 8710-1. Where and when appropriate, ACRs and FIREs are authorized to complete the following areas in the “Aviation Safety Inspector or Technician Report” section of the FAA Form 8710-1: “Flight Instructor’s” box, “Renewal” box, “Instructor Renewal Based” area by completing either “Activity” box or “Training Course” box, as appropriate. The areas identified as “Training Course (FIRC) Name” block, “Graduation Certificate No.” block, and “Date” block will be completed when the renewal is based on graduation from a FIRC.

b.    Change of Name, Nationality, Gender, DOB, and Dual Citizenship. A designee must compare the applicant’s name, nationality, gender, DOB, and dual citizenship on FAA Form 8710-1 and this same information on the person’s current certificate, if any. If the applicant’s personal data as shown above has changed since the current certificate was issued, the designee must refer the applicant to an FAA office. The FAA office will process the applicant’s request for a change to personal data and issue a Temporary Airman Certificate bearing the applicant’s correct information. After this is accomplished, the designee may accept the airman’s FAA Form 8710-1 for the practical test.

26.    Preparation of the Certification File. The designee who conducts a certification practical test is responsible for the completeness and accuracy of the certification file. The designee must not accept FAA Form 8710-1 until he or she has determined that the applicant is eligible for the certificate or rating sought. A practical test begins when the designee accepts the airman’s application. At the conclusion of the practical test, the designee must complete the certification file, indicating approval or disapproval of the application, as appropriate.

a.    Approved Application Form. The designee must approve the FAA Form 8710-1 or Form 8710-11 application form for an airman certificate and/or rating and issue an FAA Form 8060-4 only after the designee determines that:

(1)    The applicant meets all the prerequisite eligibility requirements and has satisfactorily met the applicable PTS;
(2)    The prepared Temporary Airman Certificate bears the correct ratings and limitations; and
(3)    The certification file is accurate and complete.

b.    Disapproved Application. If the designee disapproves an application, he or she prepares FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application.

(1)    A legible original of FAA Form 8060-5 is made a part of the certification file.
(2)    The designee ensures that the certification file is accurate and complete.

c.    Disposition of File. The designee must mail the completed certification file to the managing FAA office within 7 calendar-days after completion of the practical test. If the certification is accomplished by the IACRA process, the file may be processed directly to AFS-760 instead of through the managing FAA office.

d.    NDPE/FEEs. An NDPE/FEE who conducts a practical test in a vintage airplane under the provisions of the NDPE/FEE program must mail the completed certification file to the FAA office holding the designee’s COA, regardless of where the test was conducted, not later than 7 calendar-days after the completion of the practical test. NDPE/FEEs who use IACRA may send the completed file directly to AFS-760.

27.    Review of a Designee’s Decision. An applicant who is not satisfied with a designee’s decision may obtain another practical test or appropriate reevaluation from an ASI without prejudice. In such cases, the applicant must be given the complete test, including any Areas of Operation already approved by the designee. The applicant must prepare a new FAA Form 8710-1 or FAA Form 8710-11, as appropriate, and the ASI must complete a new certification file. Following the test, both the designee’s and the ASI’s certification files are forwarded to AFS-760. The ASI’s report determines if a certificate is issued. The ASI should discuss the test results with the designee.

28.    Issuance of FAA Form 8060-4. A designee must issue an FAA Form 8060-4 each time he or she issues or reissues an airman certificate.

a.    Preparation of FAA Form 8060-4. Information entered on FAA Form 8060-4 must match the information contained on the applicant’s Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, not the data on the superseded certificate. All entries made on FAA Form 8060-4 must be legible. It is acceptable to use capital letters. Because FAA Form 8060-4 is scanned and prepared in duplicate, a sharp, clear original is essential. Designees must legibly enter their pilot certificate number in the “Examiner’s Designation No.” or “Inspector’s Reg. No.” block on the original copy of FAA Form 8060-4 that is submitted to AFS-760. The typed original becomes part of the certification file and the carbon copy is given to the applicant. If there are any entries that might be misunderstood, the designee should write an explanation of the entries on a separate sheet of paper and attach it to the certification file.

(1)    When FAA Form 8060-4 changes an airman’s certificate to a higher grade, all aircraft type ratings shown on the superseded certificate within category and class are brought forward to the higher grade of certificate. If an aircraft type rating on the superseded certificate is limited to VFR, that limitation is carried forward to the higher grade of certificate. (Aircraft type ratings limited to VFR may be upgraded to the ATP level without further testing, but will bear the same limitation.)
(2)    An aircraft type rating for a single-place (single-pilot station) airplane may not be upgraded to the ATP level.
(3)    If an applicant qualifies for more ratings and/or limitations than can be placed on one FAA Form 8060-4, additional Temporary Airmen Certificates should be used. Each certificate must fully identify and describe the holder and bear a notation to show how many forms comprise the complete certificate (e.g., Card 1 of 2).

b.    Issuance of a Handwritten Temporary Airman Certificate. An examiner in the field who has no access to a typewriter may issue a handwritten Temporary Airman Certificate provided the designee prints all necessary information legibly, in ink. The handwritten copy can be issued to the applicant, but a typed original, signed by the issuing designee, must accompany the certification file. The applicant must sign the handwritten issued certificate.

c.    Reissuance of a Certificate. Applicants requesting reissuance of an airman certificate to correct or change personal data must be referred to an FAA office. A sport pilot applicant can request reissuance through their local FAA office or AFS-610.

29.    Limitations. Limitations related to a specific grade of certificate are detailed in the chapter for that grade of certificate. The following limitations are general and may apply to more than one grade of certificate.

a.    Hearing- and/or Speech-Impaired Airmen. If the applicant cannot read, speak, write, or understand English, then the pilot/instructor certification process should be terminated unless the reason is because of a medical disability. If the reason for the applicant not being able to read, speak, write, and understand English is because of a medical disability (meaning a hearing impairment or speech impairment that is medically substantiated by a certified medical physician), the designee must refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.

b.    Center Thrust. A certificate issued for a multiengine class or aircraft type rating based on a practical test in a multiengine airplane which has no published minimum controllable airspeed with the critical engine inoperative (VMC), as determined by the manufacturer, must bear the limitation “AIRPLANE MULTIENGINE LAND—LIMITED TO CENTER THRUST.” (See Figure 7-16.)

(1)    To have a center thrust limitation removed from an airman certificate, an applicant must have logged the required training and performed a practical test in a multiengine airplane having a published VMC as determined by the manufacturer. This also applies to an airman applying for an initial ATP/type rating when the airman is basing his eligibility on military competence obtained in an aircraft without a published VMC. (Had this airman obtained a commercial pilot certificate based on military competence, he/she would have been issued a certificate with a center thrust limitation.)
(2)    The civilian and U.S. military aircraft listed below have no VMC established by the manufacturer. Other aircraft not listed, and for which there is no published data on VMC, are also restricted to center thrust only. The designee should refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 1, Section 4, paragraph 5-88 for the most complete listing of aircraft with no published VMC.

·    C-336 Cessna Skymaster;

·    C-337 Cessna Super Skymaster;

·    T-2B/C Rockwell Buckeye;

·    T-37 Cessna 318;

·    T-38 Northrop Talon;

·    F-4 McDonnell-Douglas Phantom;

·    F-111 General Dynamics F-111;

·    F-18A Northrop/McDonnell-Douglas Hornet;

·    A6-E Grumman American Intruder;

·    A-10 Fairchild Republic Thunderbolt II;

·    F-15 McDonnell-Douglas Eagle;

·    F-14 Grumman F-14;

·    F-117 Lockheed Stealth; and

·    F-22 Boeing/McDonnell F-22.

(3)    The center thrust restriction is not placed on the airman certificate when the airplane has a VMC established in its TCDS or published in its approved flight manual.
(4)    If the holder of a certificate with the center thrust restriction can show that the limitation was issued in error, the limitation can be removed upon application by the airman. A new Temporary Airman Certificate is issued without the center thrust limitation.
(5)    The designee must consult the managing FAA office if there is any question whether the airplane requires a center thrust limitation. If necessary, the managing FAA office may contact the General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS-800), Certification and General Aviation Operations Branch (AFS‑810), at 800 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591 to inquire whether a certain airplane requires a center thrust limitation.

30.    Issuance of FAA Form 8060-5. In case of the disapproval of a practical test, the designee completes FAA Form 8060-5. (See Figures 7-17 and 7-17A.)

a.    Preparation of FAA Form 8060-5. A designee in the field who has no access to a typewriter may issue a handwritten FAA Form 8060-5 provided he or she prints all necessary information legibly, in ink. The handwritten copy can be issued to the applicant, but a typed original, signed by the issuing designee, must accompany the certification file.

b.    Unsatisfactorily Performed or Not Completed Areas of Operation. Tasks that were unsatisfactorily performed and those Areas of Operation not completed must be listed on FAA Form 8060-5.

(1)    The number of practical test failures by the applicant for the certificate or rating sought must be placed on FAA Form 8060-5 (FIRST FAILURE, SECOND FAILURE, etc.).
(2)    If an applicant fails the practical test because of deficiencies listed in § 61.43(a) or a PTS special emphasis item, it must be tied to a specific task and must be noted on FAA Form 8060-5.
(3)    If the test has already begun and the designee determines that the applicant does not satisfactorily demonstrate English proficiency, FAA Form 8060-5 will be issued. Form 8060-5 will list the Areas of Operation found deficient, including the specific task with the notation “Lack of English Proficiency”.

c.    Credit Given for Satisfactorily Completed Areas of Operation or Tasks. An applicant for retesting may receive credit for those Areas of Operation satisfactorily completed; however, a designee may reexamine an applicant on any Area of Operation required for the certificate or rating sought. If a designee has reason to doubt an applicant’s competence in Areas of Operation for which the applicant received credit during a previous test, or if more than 60 calendar-days have elapsed since the previous practical test, he or she must reexamine the applicant on all Areas of Operation required for that certificate or rating. Applicants who do not have their FAA Form 8060-5 must take the entire practical test. The applicant may obtain a duplicate FAA Form 8060-5 from AFS-760 or the issuing DPE.

31.    Part 141 Stage Checks. Designees may conduct part 141 stage checks. Students enrolled in part 141 pilot school courses are required to take stage checks to determine that the student has accomplished the objectives of the completed stages of training.

a.    Syllabus and Course Standards. Designees who administer part 141 stage checks must review the pilot school’s syllabus and use the appropriate stage completion standards to determine that the student satisfactorily completes the stage check.

b.    Application. An applicant for a part 141 stage check must present FAA Form 8710-1. The designee should verify that the form is marked to indicate application for a part 141 stage check and that it indicates the number of the stage to be checked.

c.    Completion of the Form. The designee notes on the form the number of the stage check which has been accomplished, the pilot school’s name, and the outcome of the stage check (Figure 7-18). The designee gives the completed form to the pilot school. If the pilot school is without the services of a chief flight instructor, the designee makes an additional copy of the form and forwards it to the appropriate FAA office.

32.    Blue Seal Certificates. If a pilot applicant, other than a light-sport pilot applicant, applies to a designee for the exchange of a pilot certificate with a black seal for a pilot certificate with a blue seal, the designee should refer the person to the managing FAA office. This action can be accomplished only by an ASI.

Note:  Light-sport pilots are not entitled to receive blue seal certificates.

33.    Flight and Duty Time as a DPE. If a DPE administers a practical test from a jump seat or cabin station of an aircraft requiring a flightcrew of two or more, or from a pilot seat of an aircraft requiring a flightcrew of only one pilot, flight time accrued as a DPE is not deemed to be other commercial flying with respect to the flight and duty time limitations stated in parts 121, 125, and 135. However, if a DPE serves as a required crewmember during a practical test on an aircraft requiring a flightcrew of two or more, that flight time is deemed to be other commercial flying.

34.    Procedures.

a.    Verify Applicant’s Identity.

b.    Inspect FAA Form 8710-1.

c.    Issue Letter of Discontinuance. If the practical test is discontinued for reasons other than unsatisfactory performance by the applicant, prepare a letter of discontinuance (see Chapter 7, Section 1, subparagraph 17b).

(1)    Include the date of the test and all pertinent applicant, aircraft, and practical test information. (See Figures 7-9A and 7-9B.)
(2)    Note the reason for the discontinuance and add a brief explanation.
(3)    List the Areas of Operation of the practical test that were successfully completed.
(4)    State that the letter of discontinuance does not extend the expiration date of the knowledge test report.
(5)    State that the applicant may use the letter of discontinuance to show portions of the test that have been completed satisfactorily if application is made within 60 calendar-days from the date of the letter.
(6)    State the date the entire practical test must be repeated.
(7)    Return the application and all submitted documents to the applicant with the original copy of the letter of discontinuance.
(8)    Retain one copy of the letter.

d.    Issue a Temporary Airman Certificate. Issue FAA Form 8060-4 when the applicant has met all requirements for the certificate/rating sought.

(1)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-4, making all entries in the appropriate blocks. Prepare a typed original and a typed duplicate or a handwritten copy.
(2)    All original airman certificates will be issued with a unique certificate number. This unique number will be assigned by AFS-760 during processing of the airman file. The airman’s SSN will still be collected on FAA Form 8710-1. However, the word “PENDING” will be placed on the certificate number block of the Temporary Airman Certificate. The airman will be told that the FAA will not use his or her SSN as a certificate number. If the airman still does not wish to provide his or her SSN to the FAA, the words “DO NOT USE” will be placed in the SSN block of the application.
(3)    Airman certificates presently using the SSN as a certificate number will continue to be issued with that number unless the airman requests a unique number. If the airman requests a unique number when applying for a certificate and/or rating, the word “PENDING” will be placed in the certificate number block of the Temporary Airman Certificate.
(4)    On a reissued airman certificate, the previously assigned certificate number will continue to be shown below line III.
(5)    Enter the applicant’s name as it appears on the application on line IV. However, when “NMN” is used on the application, omit the acronym on FAA Form 8060-4.
(6)    Enter the applicant’s address as it is shown on line V of FAA Form 8060-4. If the applicant wants the permanent certificate mailed to a different address, have the applicant write a note showing the address to which the permanent certificate should be sent and attach the note to the file.
(7)    Enter the applicant’s DOB. Use eight-digit numbers in the following order: month, day, and year (MM/DD/YYYY).
(8)    Enter the applicant’s height in inches rounded to the nearest inch.
(9)    Enter the applicant’s weight in pounds rounded to the nearest pound.
(10)    Enter the color of the applicant’s hair. Do not use abbreviations. Enter the color as black, red, brown, blond, or gray. If the applicant is bald, enter “bald.”
(11)    Enter the color of the applicant’s eyes. Do not use abbreviations. Enter the color as blue, brown, black, hazel, green, or gray.
(12)    Enter the applicant’s gender as M or F.
(13)    If the applicant is a citizen of the United States, enter the applicant’s nationality as USA. If the applicant is a citizen of another country, enter the name of that country (e.g., Germany, not German).
(14)    Enter the grade of certificate below line IX, e.g., recreational pilot, private pilot, commercial pilot, ATP, or flight instructor.
(15)    Enter the ratings associated with the certificate on line XII.
(16)    Enter the applicable limitations, if any, above line XIII. If there is insufficient room to include all ratings and limitations on one Temporary Airman Certificate, use more than one certificate.
(17)    Check the appropriate box to indicate whether this is an original issuance or a reissuance of this grade of certificate.
(18)    Enter the date of the superseded airman certificate. This date is the date of issuance on the airman’s previous certificate. Use eight-digit numbers in the following order: month, day, year (MM/DD/YYYY).
(19)    Enter the date of issuance below line X in the same format as explained in subparagraph (18) above. The date of issuance is the date of completion of the practical test.
(20)    Type the designee’s name, leaving room for the designee’s signature above the typewritten name.
(21)    Enter the designee’s pilot certificate number. If the certificate number is the same as their SSN, this number need only be shown on the typed original copy that is sent to AFS-760.

Note:  The FAA has initiated a renumbering of all original FAA airman certificates which will negate the need for using SSNs as the airman certificate number in the future.

(22)    Enter the date the designee’s designation expires. Use eight-digit numbers in the following order: month, day, year (MM/DD/YYYY).
(23)    Ensure that all entered information is correct and corresponds to information on the application.
(24)    Ask the applicant to verify that all data on the certificate is correct and sign the Temporary Airman Certificate on line VII in ink.
(25)    Sign the Temporary Airman Certificate below line X in ink and give the applicant the duplicate copy.
(26)    Give the applicant the typed duplicate or a handwritten copy of the Temporary Airman Certificate and attach the typed original copy to the certification file.

e.    Issue FAA Form 8060-5. When the applicant’s performance is unsatisfactory in the demonstration of knowledge and/or skill, inform the applicant of the reasons for the disapproval and issue FAA Form 8060-5.

(1)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-5, making all entries in the indicated blocks. Prepare a typed original and a typed duplicate or a handwritten copy.
(2)    Enter the applicant’s name and address as they appear on the application.
(3)    Indicate the certificate or rating sought.
(4)    Check the box marked “PRACTICAL” if there were unsatisfactory items on the test. Oral and flight blocks are not used.
(5)    Enter the make and model of the aircraft used for the test.
(6)    Enter the applicant’s PIC or solo, instrument, and dual flight times as recorded in the applicant’s logbook.
(7)    Enter all Areas of Operation and tasks that were performed unsatisfactorily, to include the specific tasks and those Areas of Operation not completed during the practical test. Enter the date the practical test was first discontinued, in accordance with § 61.43(f)(1) (emphasis on the start of “the 60-day period after the date the practical test was discontinued” provision). That date will be maintained on FAA Form 8060-5 for all subsequent discontinuances. For example, if an applicant fails the oral portion of the practical test, that date will be entered on FAA Form 8060-5 in the section noted as “Upon Reapplication You Will Be Reexamined on the Following” and will be maintained on the FAA Form 8060-5 for all subsequent discontinuances.
(8)    Enter the number of practical test failures by the applicant for the certificate or rating sought.
(9)    Enter the date of the practical test.
(10)    Sign FAA Form 8060-5 in ink.
(11)    Enter the designee’s designation number.
(12)    Give the applicant the typed duplicate or a handwritten copy of FAA Form 8060-5 and attach the typed original copy to the certification file.

f.    Prepare Certification File. At the conclusion of the practical test, or if no practical test takes place, at the conclusion of the certification function, complete the certification file.

(1)    Complete the “Designated Examiner’s Report” of FAA Form 8710-1, entering the required information.
(a)    Check the box indicating that the designee has personally reviewed the applicant’s logbook/training record that certifies that the individual meets the pertinent requirements of part 61 for the pilot certificate or rating sought.
(b)    Check all other appropriate boxes and enter the required information in all applicable blocks in the “Designated Examiner’s Report” section. Ensure that the ground, FSTDs, and flight times, as applicable, are noted.
(c)    If more than one aircraft was used for the practical test, provide the type/registration numbers of all aircraft used.
(d)    Enter the date of the practical test and sign the Designated Examiner’s Report section.

Note:  This must be the date the practical test was concluded and must be the same date shown on Form 8060-4 or Form 8060-5.

(2)    If the applicant is applying for an ATP certificate and/or an aircraft type rating, complete and sign the appropriate lines in the “Evaluator’s Record” section.
(3)    Verify that the airman identification information entered in the Attachments section is complete.
(4)    Check all of the appropriate boxes in the “Attachments” section and add the attachments to the completed FAA Form 8710-1.
(5)    Forward the completed certification file to the managing FAA office no later than 7 calendar-days after the completion of the practical test.
(a)    If the designee is on an itinerary, the certification file must be sent to the managing FAA office.
(b)    If the test was conducted under the provisions of the NDPE/FEE program, send the certification file to the managing FAA office regardless of the location where the test originated.

g.    Prepare Record of a Part 141 Stage Check. Accept FAA Form 8710-1 from the applicant before the stage check. Ensure that the “OTHER” box in section I has been checked and “141 STAGE CHECK” has been entered on the adjacent line.

(1)    Verify the applicant’s identity and ensure that the applicant has completed the appropriate blocks of FAA Form 8710-1 correctly. (No entry is made in section II of the FAA Form 8710-1 for a part 141 stage check.)
(2)    Enter the airman identification information in the Attachments section of the form.
(3)    After conducting the stage check, mark the box in the “Designated Examiner’s Report” section indicating that the designee has personally tested and/or verified the applicant in accordance with pertinent procedures and standards.
(4)    Check the “APPROVED” or “DISAPPROVED” box, as appropriate.
(5)    Enter the name of the pilot school on page 2 of FAA Form 8710-1 in the block noted as “LOCATION OF TEST (FACILITY, CITY, STATE),” and indicate the stage number of the check conducted on page 2 in the block noted as “CERTIFICATE OR RATING FOR WHICH TESTED.”
(6)    Enter “141 STAGE CHECK (STAGE X)” on page 2 of FAA Form 8710-1 in the block noted as “CERTIFICATE OR RATING FOR WHICH TESTED.”
(7)    Enter the remaining information indicated in the “Examiner’s Report” section and sign the “Examiner’s Signature” block.
(8)    Give the applicant’s FAA Form 8710-1 to the pilot school. If the pilot school is without the services of a chief pilot, send an additional copy of the form to the FAA office.

Section 3. Issue a Student Pilot Certificate

35.    General. There are two types of student pilot certificates. An Aviation Medical Examiner (AME) issues an FAA Form 8420-2, “Medical Certificate _____ Class and Student Pilot Certificate” (Figure 7-19), to an applicant who meets the requirements of part 61 subpart C, for a Student Pilot Certificate. FAA Form 8420-2 serves as both a medical certificate and a Student Pilot Certificate. DPEs issue FAA Form 8710-2, “Student Pilot Certificate” (Figure 7-20), to qualified student pilot applicants. FAA Form 8710-2 serves only as a Student Pilot Certificate.

a.    Applicants with Medical Certificates. An applicant may hold FAA Form 8500-9, Medical Certificate _____ Class (white copy). This certificate does not impart student pilot privileges. The applicant must obtain a Student Pilot Certificate from an examiner or the managing FAA office in order to exercise privileges as a student pilot.

b.    Applicants Who Need Medical Certificates. For aircraft that require medical certificates, the applicant must hold at least a valid third class medical.

c.    Gliders and Balloons. An applicant who intends to pilot only balloons or gliders, including self-launch gliders, need not have an airman medical certificate. The applicant is issued FAA Form 8710-2.

d.    Designee Authorization. A designee may issue a Student Pilot Certificate to a qualified applicant without regard to the category or class of aircraft the applicant intends to pilot. Any designee may issue an FAA Form 8710-2 (Figure 7-20) regardless of the category and class of aircraft or grade of pilot certification authorized by the designee’s COA. However, if the student pilot has medical limitations that need to be shown on the medical portion of the Student Pilot Certificate then only an AME or an FAA office may issue the Student Pilot Certificate.

36.    Nonrenewable. Student Pilot Certificates are not renewable. Upon expiration of a Student Pilot Certificate, the airman may apply for a new Student Pilot Certificate, using the same process as for the original issuance.

a.    Endorsements. The student pilot should keep the original certificate bearing all of the endorsements that remain valid. The holder of an expired Student Pilot Certificate must meet the same requirements as for the original certificate.

b.    Additional Aircraft Endorsements. If the space for instructor endorsements is full, and the student is seeking endorsements for additional types of aircraft, a DPE may issue a second Student Pilot Certificate clearly marked “FOR RECORD PURPOSES ONLY.” The second Student Pilot Certificate will have the same expiration date as the original. The original is issued to the student and the duplicate copy destroyed (Figure 7-20). There is no requirement for FAA Form 8710-1.

37.    Procedures.

a.    Review Application. Verify that the information on the FAA Form 8710-1 is presented accurately and legibly and is complete.

(1)    In section I, ensure that the applicant has checked the box labeled “Student.”
(2)    Ensure that the remainder of the application is filled out according to the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 26.

Note:  Sections II and III of FAA Form 8710-1 do not have to be completed for issuance of an original Student Pilot Certificate.

b.    Verify Applicant’s Identity. Ensure acceptable forms of identification establish the applicant’s identity in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 24.

(1)    Compare the forms of identification with the personal information provided by the applicant on FAA Form 8710-1.
(2)    When the applicant’s identity is verified, continue.
(3)    If the applicant’s identity cannot be verified because of lack of identification or inadequate identification, explain what types of identification are acceptable. Instruct the applicant to return with appropriate identification.
(4)    If the applicant’s identity appears to be different from the information supplied on the application, or it appears that an attempt at falsification has been made, immediately report the matter to the managing FAA office and discontinue the task.

c.    Establish Eligibility. Determine that the applicant meets the eligibility requirements for a Student Pilot Certificate (refer to § 61.83).

(1)    Determine which category of aircraft the applicant intends to fly.
(a)    If the applicant intends to fly gliders or balloons, the applicant must be at least 14 years of age and complete section I.
(b)    If the applicant intends to fly light-sport aircraft, the applicant must be at least 16 years of age and hold a current airman medical certificate or valid U.S. driver’s license.
(c)    If the applicant intends to fly airplanes or rotorcraft, the applicant must be at least 16 years of age and hold a current medical certificate and complete section I.
(2)    If a medical certificate is required and the applicant does not have one, advise the applicant to obtain an airman medical certificate or a student medical certificate from an AME.
(3)    If the applicant is ineligible, inform the applicant how the discrepancies may be corrected. An FAA Form 8060-5 is not required and need not be issued.

d.    Applicant Meets Requirements. If the applicant meets all of the requirements for a Student Pilot Certificate, prepare an FAA Form 8710-2, sign, and have the applicant sign, in ink, both the original and the copy.

(1)    The FAA Form 8710-2 should be typewritten, but may be handwritten.

Note:  The designee should advise the applicant that an airman medical certificate or valid U.S. driver’s license is required to solo airplanes, airships, weight shift control, powered parachutes, and/or gyroplanes.

(2)    The designee should inform a student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate that he or she will not act as PIC:
(a)    Of an aircraft other than a light-sport aircraft;
(b)    At night;
(c)    At an altitude of more than 10,000 feet mean sea level (MSL);
(d)    In Class B, C, and D airspace, at an airport located in Class B, C, or D airspace, and to, from, through, or on an airport having an operational control tower without having received the ground and flight training specified in § 61.94 and an endorsement from an authorized instructor; and
(e)    Must comply with the provisions of § 61.89(a) and 61.89(b).
(3)    The designee should issue the original to the applicant and inform the applicant that the certificate expires 24 or 36 calendar-months after the date it was issued, as appropriate.

e.    Complete Certification File. Complete and sign the “Designated Examiner’s Report” section of FAA Form 8710-1 or FAA Form 8710-11, as appropriate. Attach the duplicate copy of the Student Pilot Certificate to the form and forward the certification file to the managing FAA office within 7 calendar-days. Unless otherwise directed by the FAA office, IACRA certification files may be sent directly to AFS-760.

f.    Subsequent Issuance. If a Student Pilot Certificate has expired, issue a new certificate, following the same procedures as for an original issuance. The flight instructor’s endorsements on the expired certificate may not be transferred to the new certificate. The student pilot retains the expired certificate as a record of the endorsements.

g.    Second Certificate. If there is insufficient space for instructor endorsements for additional types of aircraft on a valid Student Pilot Certificate, issue a second Student Pilot Certificate and clearly mark on the front of the second certificate “For Record Purposes Only.”

(1)    Enter the same expiration date on the second certificate as that shown on the original certificate.
(2)    Cross out the certificate number on the second certificate.
(3)    Issue the original of the second certificate to the student and destroy the duplicate copy.
(4)    An FAA Form 8710-1 is not required for a second certificate, and a certification file is not sent forward to the FAA office.

Section 4. Special Emphasis Items

38.    Special Emphasis Items. This section discusses additional areas of consideration when conducting a practical test. Many of these special emphasis items are the result of accident investigation findings and statistical analysis of pilot operational errors.

39.    Dangers Associated with Simulation of Power Failure in Single-Engine Airplanes by the Interruption of Fuel Flow. Although not a widespread practice, flight instructors occasionally simulate engine failure in single-engine airplanes by turning the fuel selector valve “off” or by placing the mixture control in the “idle cutoff” position.

a.    Accident History. A recent study of fuel starvation accidents showed that most accidents in which simulated engine failure was a factor involved single-engine airplanes. Use of the above procedures can result in an actual emergency depending on factors such as engine wind-milling characteristics, fuel quantity remaining, and fuel selector and mixture control system design.

b.    Alternatives. ASIs or designees should ensure that the subject of simulated engine failure in single‑engine airplanes is given special emphasis during appropriate contacts with pilot schools and flight instructors. Alternative means of engine-out simulation should be discussed; for example, retarding the engine throttle control or power/thrust lever.

40.    Pilot External Vigilance (Scan Program). The occurrence of midair collisions highlights a need to place special emphasis on the importance of cockpit external vigilance. While some operators have taken action to train crews in effective scan techniques, all pilots need to make a more conscious effort to search outside the cockpit for conflicting traffic.

a.    Scanning Technique. The probability of spotting a potential collision threat increases with the time spent looking outside, but certain techniques may be used to increase the effectiveness of the scan time. The human eye tends to focus somewhere, even in a featureless sky. To be most effective, the pilot should shift glances and refocus at intervals. Most pilots do this in the process of scanning the instrument panel, but it is also important to focus outside to set up the visual system for effective target acquisition.

b.    Head Movement. Pilots should be reminded that it is necessary to move the head to search around the physical obstructions, such as door and window posts. The doorpost can cover a considerable amount of sky, but a small head movement can reveal a threat these areas could be concealing.

c.    Peripheral Vision. Peripheral vision can be most useful in spotting collision threats from other aircraft. Each time a scan is stopped and the eyes are refocused, the peripheral vision takes on more importance because it is through this element that movement is detected. Apparent movement is almost always the first perception of collision threat and probably the most important because it is the discovery of a threat that triggers the events leading to proper evasive action and safe operation.

d.    Scanning Emphasis. Designees and ASIs should ensure that the subject of scanning and cockpit vigilance is included in training programs and is emphasized on all practical tests. Special emphasis should be given during contacts with pilot schools, flight instructors, during practical examinations, and while conducting flight reviews. Designees and ASIs should be keenly aware of flight operations near navigational aids, high‑density traffic areas, visual traffic patterns, and during simulated instrument practice where a tendency to “look inside” is common among pilots.

41.    Accurate Position Reporting and Collision Avoidance.

a.    Accident History. A fatal midair collision between a helicopter and a light twin engine airplane, inbound to the same airport, demonstrated the importance of accurate position reporting by pilots when communicating with ATC facilities. The events contributing to this accident are as follows:

(1)    Because of radio frequency congestion, the airplane, which was on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan, was unable to communicate with the control tower upon arriving at the requested report fix. When the pilot of the airplane was able to contact the tower, he gave his position as inside the requested fix. The controller, based on this report, was convinced that the airplane was within 5 miles of the final approach fix. The helicopter pilot contacted the same control tower and reported “coming up on” a known visual fix approximately 2 miles from the airport.
(2)    The controller, having received these two indefinite position reports, believed that there was no conflict of traffic and did not issue a traffic advisory to either aircraft.
(3)    If the pilots of both aircraft had reported their positions more accurately, this accident may not have occurred.

b.    Importance of Accurate Position Reporting. Designees and ASIs should ensure that the subject of accurate position reporting and collision avoidance is discussed frequently and that relevant information is given the widest possible dissemination during contact with flight instructor, DPEs, approved schools, and the aviation community. Designees and ASIs should make clear that pilots are responsible for exercising diligent scanning and accurately reporting procedures during aircraft operations.

c.    Consideration of Military Training Routes (MTR) During Flight Planning. FAA records for near midair collisions (NMAC) indicates several incidents involving military aircraft operating within MTR and civilian aircraft traversing these routes. The reports indicated that in a majority of these cases, a collision was avoided when the military flightcrews observed maneuvered to avoid general aviation aircraft. Designees and ASIs should emphasize the importance of determining locations and times of activity of MTR during flight planning, to pilots, flight instructors, pilot schools, and pilot examiners.

42.    Instrument Flying Skills—Partial Panel.

a.    Partial Panel Training. Data gathered during accident investigations show a need for emphasis on the skills required for control of aircraft in instrument conditions without the use of the attitude indicator. Partial panel operations involving control of an airplane by the use of the primary flight instruments develops skills that are needed if the attitude indicator fails during flight in instrument conditions. These skills apply to all pilot certificates.

b.    Ensuring Basic Instrument Skills in Partial Panel Operations. Inspectors are directed to reemphasize to pilot examiners and flight instructors the need for the following:

(1)    On all pilot proficiency and competency checks in which instrument flying skill is a requirement, the pilot’s competency in partial panel instrument flying skills must be evaluated.
(2)    Pilots must demonstrate competency levels in basic aircraft control with partial panel using “turn coordinator, ball, and airspeed” appropriate to the certificate and ratings held, with pilot privileges authorized for the check, to be fully satisfactory.

Note:  The above procedures are to be reemphasized, by inspectors, to the extent possible, to ensure that all DPEs and flight instructors are kept aware of this requirement.

Section 5. Flight Reviews and Competency Checks

43.    Flight Reviews and Competency Checks. This section contains guidance on the background and conduct of various flight reviews and competency checks required by part 61. These reviews are in addition to airman certification tasks and include:

·    Flight reviews,

·    High performance airplane competency checks,

·    Instrument proficiency checks, and

·    PIC proficiency checks for aircraft requiring more than one pilot.

44.    Designee or Inspector Participation. The flight reviews and competency checks listed above are required by part 61 and are usually conducted by CFIs, DPEs, or PPEs. However, if a pilot has obtained a flight review or competency check and, in that pilot’s opinion, the outcome of the check was not satisfactory, the pilot may request a flight review or competency check from another instructor, an examiner, or an FAA inspector. If an inspector conducts the flight review or competency check and finds the pilot does not meet the standards for the original issuance of the pilot certificate or ratings that the pilot holds, the inspector should request the pilot to appear for a subsequent reexamination practical test. In this event, the inspector should follow the guidelines in the current edition of FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 7, Section 1, Conduct a Reexamination Test of an Airman Under Title 49 of the United States Code.

45.    Application for a Flight Review or Competency Check. Designees or ASIs will require airman applying for any proficiency review or competency check to complete the top portion of FAA Form 8410-1, Airman Proficiency/Qualification Check (Figure 7-7). Maneuvers listed on the form that are not applicable to the review given (e.g., a flight review for a VFR-only pilot would not include “instrument procedures”) would not be graded; the boxes would be left blank. The FAA Form 8410-1 should be kept in the appropriate district office file. Copies can be provided to employers, if applicable, or to the airman.

46.    Combining Flight Reviews and Competency Checks. A pilot may elect to combine required flight reviews and checks. For example, a pilot who satisfactorily demonstrates competency in an aircraft requiring more than one pilot (§ 61.58) may also use this demonstration to meet the flight review requirement of § 61.56. For the purposes of the flight review, a single showing of competency in any aircraft will suffice for all other categories or classes of aircraft for which the pilot is rated. Demonstrations of competency may also be associated with proficiency checks required by part 121 or 135, or when the airman is applying for an additional category or class of pilot certificate or for a type rating.

47.    Evaluating the Flight Review. The word “satisfactory” is used under § 61.56, even though a flight review is not considered to be a practical test. The term is used only to provide the person giving the flight review a minimum standard on which to base judgment and comment as described in the regulation. If a pilot is denied a satisfactory endorsement for flight review, the pilot may continue to exercise certificate privileges, provided the time period prescribed by the regulation has not elapsed since the last flight review. However, if the review has been conducted by an inspector, the pilot would not be able to exercise the certificate privileges until successfully completing a reexamination practical test under 49 U.S.C. § 44709.

48.    Length of Review. A flight review consists of the general operating and flight rules of part 91 and those maneuvers and procedures that are necessary for the pilot to demonstrate the safe exercise of the privileges of the pilot certificate. There are no specific requirements for the particular items or maneuvers to be reviewed. These matters are left to the discretion of the person giving the flight review.

a.    Minimum Training Time. The flight review consists of a minimum of 1 hour of ground instruction and 1 hour of flight instruction, except as provided for in § 61.56(d) and (e). A flight review may require more than 1 hour of ground instruction and 1 hour of flight instruction to complete a flight review. The regulations do not restrict the review to the minimum hour requirement. The person conducting the review determines whether more than 1 hour of flight and 1 hour of ground instruction are required for the review, depending on the experience and skills of the applicant.

b.    Current Flight Instructor. Section 61.197(a)(2)(iii) states in pertinent part that “the person has successfully completed an approved flight instructor refresher course consisting of ground training or flight training, or both.” Thus, flight instructor applicants who have successfully completed an approved FIRC do not need to have accomplished the 1 hour of ground training as required by § 61.56 for the flight review. Additionally, if the approved FIRC required at least 1 hour of flight training and the flight instructor applicant successfully completed that flight training, then the applicant does not need to complete the 1 hour of flight training as required by § 61.56 for the flight review. Otherwise, the applicant would be required to complete the 1 hour of flight training as required by § 61.56 for the flight review.

49.    Logbook Endorsements.

a.    Logbook Endorsement When Satisfactory. When a pilot has satisfactorily accomplished a flight review or competency check, the pilot’s logbook or personal record must be endorsed by the person who gave the review. That endorsement should read substantively as follows: MR./MS. [insert name of airman as it appears on airman certificate], HOLDER OF PILOT CERTIFICATE NO. [insert number as it appears on the airman certificate], HAS SATISFACTORILY COMPLETED A [insert type of review or competency check] ON [insert date] IN A [insert type of aircraft].

b.    Logbook Endorsement When Unsatisfactory. If, in the opinion of the person conducting the flight, the pilot has not accomplished a flight review satisfactorily, that person will endorse the pilot’s logbook only to indicate the training received. There is no provision in the regulation for the failure of a flight review; therefore, there should be no logbook endorsement reflecting a failure.

50.    Recent Instrument Experience under § 61.57. Section 61.57 requires a pilot to perform certain instrument tasks (in lieu of the old rule that required performance of minimum recurrency time requirements). The tasks required are six instrument approaches, holding procedures, and intercepting and tracking courses through the use of navigation systems. Section 61.57 specifically does not identify the kinds of approaches or navigation systems to be used. To maintain instrument currency for glider rated pilots, the rule remains unchanged. In accordance with § 61.57(c)(2), glider-rated pilots are required to have performed and logged under actual or simulated instrument conditions at least 3 hours of instrument time in flight, of which 1.5 hours may be acquired in an airplane or a glider if no passengers are to be carried. If passengers are to be carried, the rule requires 3 hours of instrument time in flight in a glider.

a.    Failure to Meet Instrument Currency. A pilot not meeting the instrument recency of experience requirement may not exercise the privileges of the instrument rating until the requirements are met. If the pilot fails to meet this recency of instrument experience for a period of 1 year, the pilot must pass an instrument proficiency check in the category of aircraft involved.

b.    Instrument Proficiency Check. An instrument proficiency check must be accomplished in a category of aircraft in which the pilot is rated and will consist of one or all of the procedures and maneuvers from the instrument pilot PTS. (See the Rating Task Table on page 16 of the current edition of FAA-S-8081-4, under the column labeled Instrument Proficiency Check in the Instrument Rating PTS.) The instrument proficiency check must be given by:

·    An FAA inspector,

·    An instrument pilot examiner,

·    A certificated instrument flight instructor, or

·    An authorized U.S. Armed Forces instrument examiner when conducted as an instrument proficiency check.

c.    Proficiency Check Unsatisfactory. If, in the opinion of the person conducting the instrument proficiency check, the pilot has not performed satisfactorily, no logbook endorsement is required. Flight instructors should be aware that the regulations do not provide for the failure of an instrument proficiency check; therefore, persons conducting instrument proficiency checks should not endorse a pilot’s logbook to reflect failure. If the instrument proficiency check is overdue, the pilot will not conduct IFR operations until an instrument check is satisfactorily accomplished.

d.    FSTDs. Any FAA inspector may, at the request of the pilot involved, authorize the use, or partial use, of an FSTD that meets the requirements of § 61.4, for all or part of the instrument proficiency check only, provided the device is authorized by the FAA for such use.

51.    High Performance Airplane Check under § 61.31(f). If a person has not logged flight time as PIC of a high-performance airplane (an airplane with an engine of more than 200 horsepower) before August 4, 1997, the pilot must have received and logged ground and flight training from an authorized instructor in a high-performance airplane, or in an FSTD that is representative of a high-performance airplane, and have been found proficient in the operation and systems of the airplane. Additionally, the person must have received a one-time endorsement in the pilot’s logbook from an authorized instructor who certifies the person is proficient to operate a high-performance airplane.

52.    Complex Airplane Check under § 61.31(e). A complex airplane is defined as having a retractable landing gear, flaps, and a controllable pitch propeller, including airplanes equipped with an engine control system consisting of a digital computer and associated accessories for controlling the engine and propeller such as full-authority digital engine control (FADEC). In the case of a seaplane, “complex” means having flaps and a controllable pitch propeller, including seaplanes equipped with an engine control system consisting of a FADEC. If a person has not logged flight time as PIC of a complex airplane, before August 4, 1997, the pilot must have received and logged ground and flight training from an authorized instructor in a complex airplane, or in an FSTD that is representative of a complex airplane, and have been found proficient in the operation and systems of the airplane. Additionally, the person must have received a one-time endorsement in the pilot’s logbook from an authorized instructor who certifies the person is proficient to operate a complex airplane.

53.    Self-Launching or Powered Sailplane Flight Checks. Self-launching sailplanes, powered sailplanes, motorized sailplanes, or motor gliders have become an increasingly common and popular type of aircraft for use in aviation sport flying. As a result of the revision to § 61.31(j), the glider rating will no longer contain limitations on the person’s pilot certificate. In place of the limitations, the new § 61.31(j) requires a person to receive training and a logbook endorsement to perform a certain kind of launch operation. For example, if a person seeks ground launch privileges, that person will be required to receive training from an authorized instructor and receive a logbook endorsement authorizing ground launch privileges. When that person seeks aero tow launch privileges, again that person will be required to receive training from an authorized instructor and receive a logbook endorsement authorizing aero tow launch privileges. The same procedure applies for the self‑launching privileges. However, persons currently holding those limitations will continue to hold those limitations until that person upgrades their launch privileges and then the person may surrender his or her certificate and receive a new certificate without the limitations.

54.    Night Vision Goggles (NVG) Training, Endorsement, and Qualification for Pilots and Flight Instructors. On August 21, 2009, the FAA issued the “Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification” final rule (74 FR 42500 42571, August 21, 2009). ASIs can retrieve and download this final rule at the following FAA Web site: http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/rulemaking/recently_published/.

a.    Pilots Policy for NVG Operations. Per § 61.31(k), this new rule requires ground and flight training and a one-time instructor endorsement for a pilot to act as PIC during NVG operations. This final rule “grandfathers” PICs previously qualified as a PIC for NVG operations under § 61.31(k). Under new subparagraph (k)(3) a pilot will not need the “one-time” NVG training and endorsement, provided the pilot can document satisfactorily accomplishing any of the following pilot checks for using NVG in an aircraft:

(1)    A U.S. Armed Forces-conducted pilot proficiency check on NVG operations.
(2)    A designee- or check airman-conducted pilot proficiency check on NVG operations under part 135.
(3)    An NVG manufacturer- or authorized instructor-conducted pilot proficiency check on NVG operations, when the pilot:
(a)    Is employed by a Federal, State, county, or municipal law enforcement agency; and
(b)    Has logged at least 20 hours as PIC in NVG operations.

b.    Pilots’ Recency of Experience Requirements for NVG Operations. The new § 61.57(f) establishes, as a recent flight experience requirement, that pilots remain PIC qualified for NVG operations. For a pilot to act as PIC using NVG with passengers onboard, the pilot, within the preceding 2 calendar-months, will have to perform and document the tasks under new § 61.57(f) as the sole manipulator of the controls during the time period beginning 1 hour after sunset and ending 1 hour before sunrise. If the pilot did not perform and log the tasks under § 61.57(f), then the FAA will allow the pilot an additional 2 calendar-months to perform and log the tasks under § 61.57(f). However, the FAA will not allow the pilot to carry passengers during this second 2-month period. If the pilot still did not perform and log the NVG tasks in revised § 61.57(f), during those additional 3 calendar-months, then the FAA will require the pilot to pass an NVG proficiency check to act as PIC using NVG. Section 61.57(f) lists the recent flight experience requirements for maintaining PIC qualifications for NVG operation. Those recent flight experience requirements are:

(1)    NVG Operating Experience. An individual may act as PIC in an NVG operation with passengers onboard only if, within 2 calendar-months preceding the month of the flight, that individual performs and logs the following tasks as the sole manipulator of the controls on a flight during an NVG operation:
(a)    Three takeoffs and three landings, with each takeoff and landing including a climb-out, cruise, descent, and approach phase of flight (only required if the pilot wants to use NVG during the takeoff and landing phases of the flight).
(b)    Three hovering tasks (only required if the pilot wants to use NVG when operating helicopters or powered-lifts during the hovering phase of flight).
(c)    Three area departure and area arrival tasks.
(d)    Three tasks of transitioning from aided night flight (i.e., the pilot uses NVG to maintain visual surface reference) to unaided night flight (i.e., the pilot does not use NVG) and back to aided night flight.
(e)    Three NVG operations, or when operating helicopters or powered-lifts, six NVG operations.
(f)    An individual may act as PIC using NVG only if, within the 4 calendar-months preceding the month of the flight, that pilot performs and logs the tasks listed in § 61.57(f)(1)(i) through (v) as the sole manipulator of the controls during an NVG operation.
(2)    NVG Proficiency Check. A pilot must either meet the NVG experience requirements of § 61.57(f)(1) or (f)(2) or pass an NVG proficiency check to act as PIC using NVG. The pilot must perform the proficiency check in the category of aircraft that is appropriate to the NVG operation for which the individual is seeking the NVG privilege or in a FSTD that is representative of that category of aircraft. The check must consist of the tasks listed in § 61.31(k) and one of the following people must perform the check:
(a)    A designee qualified to perform NVG operations in that same aircraft category and class;
(b)    An individual authorized by the U.S. Armed Forces to perform NVG proficiency checks, provided the person being administered the check is also a member of the U.S. Armed Forces;
(c)    A company check pilot authorized to perform NVG proficiency checks under parts 121, 125, or 135, provided that both the check pilot and the pilot being tested are employees of that operator;
(d)    An authorized flight instructor qualified to perform NVG operations in that same aircraft category and class;
(e)    An individual qualified as PIC for NVG operations in accordance with subparagraph (f); or
(f)    An individual who is FAA-approved to perform NVG proficiency checks.

c.    Policy for Flight Instructor Requirements for NVG Qualifications. Per the new § 61.195(k), a flight instructor authorized to conduct NVG training and endorsements must:

(1)    Hold the appropriate pilot and flight instructor certificate with the applicable category and class rating;
(2)    If appropriate, hold a type rating on his or her pilot certificate for the aircraft that the NVG training is given in;
(3)    Be PIC-qualified for NVG operations, in accordance with § 61.31(k);
(4)    Have logged 100 NVG operations as the sole manipulator of the controls;
(5)    Have logged 20 NVG operations as the sole manipulator of the controls in the category and class, and type of aircraft, if aircraft class and type is appropriate, that the training will be given in;
(6)    Be qualified to act as PIC in NVG operations under § 61.57(f) or (g); and
(7)    Have a logbook endorsement from an FAA ASI, or an FAA-authorized individual to provide that logbook endorsement, that states the FAA authorizes the flight instructor to perform the NVG PIC qualification and recent flight experience requirements under § 61.31(k) and § 61.57(f) and (g).
(a)    Per § 61.195(k)(7), an FAA ASI or an FAA authorized individual is permitted to sign the logbook of a flight instructor to authorize a flight instructor to conduct NVG PIC qualification and recent flight experience training. It is expected that the FAA ASI and FAA-authorized individual have met the requirements of § 61.31(k)(3) and are NVG current in accordance with § 61.57(f) or (g).
(b)    However, depending on the qualifications and experience levels of our ASIs in the managing FAA offices and Regional Offices (RO), we may have to consider “best qualified” criteria in selecting ASIs to perform this endorsement job assignment. AFS-810 is available for consultations with our managing FAA offices and ROs on this subject matter.

Section 6. Conduct a Recreational Pilot Certification, Including Additional Category/Class Ratings at the Recreational Pilot Certification Level

55.    General. The recreational pilot certificate was established in 1989 for persons seeking a lower cost alternative to the private pilot certificate. The recreational pilot certificate is intended for those persons interested in flying basic, experimental, or amateur-built airplanes and rotorcraft. Recreational pilots must operate in proximity to a home airport and in airspace that does not require communication with ATC facilities.

a.    Fifty Nautical Mile (NM) Limitation. The recreational pilot may not operate beyond 50 NM of an airport at which the pilot has received ground and flight instruction from an authorized flight instructor. If a recreational pilot wishes to conduct flight(s) more than 50 NM from the original point of departure, that person must:

(1)    Receive the cross-country ground and flight training of part 61 subpart E that applies to aircraft rating held.
(2)    Be found proficient and receive from an authorized instructor a logbook endorsement, which is carried in the person’s possession in the aircraft.

b.    Eligibility Requirements.

(1)    If the applicant cannot read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, then the pilot/instructor certification process should be terminated unless the reason is because of a medical disability. If the reason for the applicant not being able to read, speak, write, and understand English is because of a medical disability, the designee must refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.
(2)    To be eligible for a recreational pilot certificate, an applicant must be at least 17 years of age, hold at least a current third class medical certificate, hold a Student Pilot Certificate, and meet the applicable requirements of part 61 subpart D. The medical certificate may be FAA Form 8420-2 or FAA Form 8500-9. If the medical certificate bears any limitation which would require a special medical flight test, refer the applicant to the applicable FAA office.

c.    Logbook Endorsements.

(1)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies the applicant has received and logged 3 hours of flight training within the 60 calendar‑days preceding the date of FAA Form 8710-1 in preparation for the practical test.
(2)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies the applicant is prepared to pass the practical test. In addition, the applicant must have a signed FAA Form 8710-1 with the authorized instructor’s signature.
(3)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor that states the applicant has demonstrated satisfactory knowledge of the subject areas in which the applicant was deficient on the airman knowledge test.
(4)    An applicant for a recreational pilot certificate must have logged training and received a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor on the training required by § 61.98(b) that is appropriate for the recreational pilot rating sought.

d.    Aeronautical Knowledge. The applicant must meet the aeronautical knowledge requirements of § 61.97.

(1)    The applicant must present a recreational pilot knowledge test report.
(2)    The holder of a recreational pilot certificate is not required to take a knowledge test in order to add a category rating to a recreational pilot certificate.

e.    Aeronautical Experience. The applicant must present acceptable evidence of meeting the minimum aeronautical experience requirements of § 61.99 or § 61.100, as applicable.

f.    Training. The applicant must have met the applicable pre-solo training criteria required by § 61.87 and have received instruction in the flight proficiency requirements of § 61.98. The examiner must ensure that all required instruction is documented and all instructor logbook endorsements are present.

g.    Aeronautical Skill. The applicant must demonstrate aeronautical skill by satisfactorily completing the practical test prescribed by § 61.96(b)(7). The test will be conducted in accordance with the appropriate recreational pilot PTS.

h.    Category and Class Ratings. The category and class of aircraft used for the practical test is placed on a recreational pilot certificate. The following category and class ratings may be originally issued or added to recreational pilot certificates.

(1)    Airplane class ratings:
(a)    SINGLE-ENGINE LAND.
(b)    SINGLE-ENGINE SEA.
(2)    Rotorcraft class ratings:
(a)    HELICOPTER.
(b)    GYROPLANE.

i.    Limitations. The DPE will enter the notation “HOLDER DOES NOT MEET ICAO REQUIREMENTS” on all recreational pilot certificates issued (Figure 7-21). Other possible limitations may include “Passenger carrying prohibited on flights more than 10 NM from [enter name of appropriate island]” on the certificate of an applicant whose aeronautical experience qualifies the applicant under § 61.100. This limitation may be removed by a DPE upon presentation of satisfactory evidence of compliance with the requirements of § 61.99(a)(1).

56.    Additional Category and Class Ratings. A recreational pilot seeking an additional category/class rating must meet the appropriate aeronautical knowledge, experience, and instruction requirements, carry a logbook that has been endorsed by an authorized instructor for each solo flight in an aircraft for which the pilot is not rated, and satisfactorily complete the appropriate practical test. An additional knowledge test is not required.

57.    Upgrading to a Private Pilot Certificate. A recreational pilot who desires certification as a private pilot must meet all the eligibility requirements for the private pilot certificate, appropriate to the category and class rating sought.

a.    Knowledge Test. The applicant must present an appropriate knowledge test report for the private pilot certificate and rating sought.

b.    Flight Instructor Endorsements. In order to complete all of the additional aeronautical experience required for the private pilot certificate, the recreational pilot must have a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor for each flight conducted that was not allowed under recreational pilot privileges and limitations.

c.    Upgrading to a Different Category. If an applicant holds a recreational pilot certificate in one category of aircraft and satisfactorily completes a practical test for a private pilot certificate in another category of aircraft, the recreational pilot certificate is superseded. The new private pilot certificate notes the category and class of the aircraft used for the private pilot practical test and indicates recreational pilot privileges in the category and class of aircraft that was on the superseded certificate.

Note:  For those aircraft category and class ratings that remain at the recreational pilot certification level, the certificate will continue to show the limitation “HOLDER DOES NOT MEET ICAO REQUIREMENTS.”

58.    Procedures.

a.    Schedule Appointment. Advise the applicant to bring the following documents and records to the appointment:

(1)    FAA Form 8710-1 must be completed in ink or typewritten and signed by the applicant. Per § 61.39(a)(7), the applicant must complete section III, Record of Pilot Time. As a special emphasis item, the designee must review the applicant’s aeronautical experience recorded on FAA Form 8710-1 and in the applicant’s logbook/training record to ensure compliance with the appropriate aeronautical experience requirements for the certificate and/or rating sought.
(a)    In section III on FAA Form 8710-1, Record of Pilot Time, the applicant must list at least the aeronautical experience required for the airmen certificate and rating sought. Graduates of part 141 pilot schools or part 142 training centers must provide their aeronautical experience in section III even though the graduation certificate is evidence of having completed the course of training.
(b)    If aeronautical experience has no bearing on the airman certification action being sought, it is not necessary for an applicant to complete section III. For example, flight instructor renewal applications, flight instructor reinstatement applications, ground instructor qualification applications, and pilot type rating applications would be examples for which aeronautical experience would not have a bearing on the airmen certification action; thus, the applicant would not be required to complete section III of the application. However, all applicants are encouraged to complete section III because it remains on file with the FAA and can be used to substantiate past aeronautical experience in the case of a lost logbook.
(2)    A Student Pilot Certificate, or an airman certificate if for an additional category/class rating.
(3)    FAA Form 8420-2 or FAA Form 8500-9.
(4)    A recreational pilot or private pilot knowledge test report, if applicable.
(5)    A logbook or other records substantiating the aeronautical experience shown on the applicant’s FAA Form 8710-1.
(6)    The aircraft maintenance records.
(7)    The aircraft airworthiness certificate.
(8)    The aircraft registration.
(9)    An acceptable form of photo identification.

b.    Applicant Arrives for Appointment. Collect and review the applicant’s FAA Form 8710-1 and logbook/training record.

(1)    If the applicant has not brought all of the necessary documents, explain what is needed and return the documents to the applicant.
(2)    Reschedule the appointment if requested to do so.

c.    Review Application. Verify that the information on FAA Form 8710-1 is accurate, legible, and complete.

(1)    In section I, ensure that the applicant has checked “Recreational.” If the applicant is seeking an additional aircraft rating, ensure that the applicant has checked “Additional Aircraft Rating” and the appropriate aircraft category.
(2)    Ensure that the remainder of FAA Form 8710-1 is completed in accordance with the instructions attached to the form and the information in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 26.
(3)    Ensure that the flight instructor has signed an endorsement no more than 60 calendar-days before FAA Form 8710-1 was submitted. This endorsement should be on the signed FAA Form 8710-1. Review the applicant’s training record or logbook to ensure the applicant has received at least 3 hours of training within the 60 calendar-days before the practical test.

d.    Verify Applicant’s Identity. Inspect acceptable forms of identification to establish the applicant’s identity in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 24.

(1)    Compare the identification with the personal information provided on FAA Form 8710-1.
(2)    When the applicant’s identity is verified, continue with the practical test.
(3)    If the applicant’s identity appears to be different from the information supplied on FAA Form 8710-1, or it appears that an attempt at falsification has been made, discontinue the task and immediately report this to the managing FAA office.

e.    Establish Eligibility. Determine that the applicant meets the specific eligibility, knowledge, and experience requirements for certification as a recreational pilot. (Refer to §§ 61.96, 61.97, 61.98, 61.99, and 61.100, as applicable.)

(1)    If the applicant cannot read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, then the pilot/instructor certification process should be terminated unless the reason is because of a medical disability. If the reason for the applicant not being able to read, speak, write, and understand English is because of a medical disability (meaning a hearing impairment or speech impairment that is medically substantiated by a certified medical physician), the designee must refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.
(2)    Ensure that the applicant holds at least a third class medical certificate.
(3)    Inspect the applicant’s medical certificate to ensure that it does not bear any limitation that would make a special medical flight test necessary.
(4)    Inspect the applicant’s Student Pilot Certificate for current solo and solo cross-country endorsements.
(5)    Check the record of flight time in section III of FAA Form 8710-1 to determine that the applicant has the minimum aeronautical experience required for the certificate and rating sought.
(6)    Examine the applicant’s logbook and/or other reliable record(s)/training record(s) to verify that all aeronautical knowledge, aeronautical experience, and required instructor endorsements are recorded.
(7)    Examine the knowledge test report.
(8)    If the applicant has checked the “YES” box of section IV of FAA Form 8710-1, verify that the applicant meets the requirements of § 61.49.
(9)    If the applicant is located on an island from which the required flights cannot be accomplished without flying over water, refer to § 61.100.
(10)    If the applicant is applying for a test on the basis of graduation from an approved training program, inspect the applicant’s graduation certificate to verify that the applicant is in compliance with the requirements of § 61.71.
(11)    If the applicant is a graduate of an approved pilot school, the designee should check the applicant’s graduation certificate to ensure that the applicant will be able to pass the practical test within 60 calendar-days from the date on the graduation certificate. If not, the applicant must apply for the pilot certificate or rating under part 61 and meet all the applicable aeronautical experience requirements under part 61 for the pilot certificate or rating sought.

f.    Requirements for an Additional Category/Class Rating. The requirements are the same as in subparagraph 60e except that the knowledge test is not required.

g.    Aircraft Requirements. Ensure the applicant has the proper aircraft maintenance records, logbooks, airworthiness certificate, and aircraft registration to determine that the aircraft is Airworthy and suitable for the practical test. After review, return the documents to the applicant.

h.    Discrepancies. If a discrepancy that cannot be immediately corrected exists in any of the documents, return FAA Form 8710-1 and all documents to the applicant.

(1)    Inform the applicant of the reasons for ineligibility and explain how the applicant may correct the discrepancies.
(2)    Reschedule the appointment if requested to do so.

i.    Conduct Practical Test. After determining that the applicant is eligible and meets all prerequisites for the certificate sought, accept FAA Form 8710-1 and conduct the practical test in accordance with the guidance in the recreational pilot PTS. If the practical test is not completed for reasons other than unsatisfactory performance, issue a letter of discontinuance to the applicant (see Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 16b).

j.    Unsatisfactory Performance. If the applicant did not meet the applicable standards for the certificate sought, inform the applicant of the reasons for the unsatisfactory performance.

(1)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-5 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 32.
(2)    Sign, date, and check the appropriate boxes on the form. Give the applicant a copy of the Notice of Disapproval of Application and retain the original for the certification file.
(3)    Retain FAA Form 8710-1 and return all other submitted documents to the applicant.
(4)    Sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the unsatisfactory outcome of the test, and the examiner’s designation number.

k.    Satisfactory Performance. When the applicant has met all requirements for the certificate sought, prepare FAA Form 8060-4 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 30.

(1)    Enter the notation “HOLDER DOES NOT MEET ICAO REQUIREMENTS” and enter all appropriate limitations.
(2)    Verify that all information on FAA Form 8060-4 is correct. Sign the Temporary Airman Certificate and direct the applicant to sign line VII.
(3)    Retain the original for the certification file and give the applicant the copy of the Temporary Airman Certificate.
(4)    Sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the successful outcome of the test, and the examiner’s designation number.

l.    Complete the Certification File. Complete the certification file in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 28.

(1)    Mail the completed certification file to the managing FAA office not later than 7 calendar-days after the completion of the practical test.
(2)    IACRA certification files may be sent directly to AFS-760.

Section 7. Conduct a Sport Pilot Certification

59.    General. The sport pilot certificate was established in 2004 for persons seeking a certificate to fly aircraft that meet the definition of light-sport aircraft as defined in 14 CFR part 1, § 1.1.

a.    Eligibility Requirements. To be eligible for a sport pilot certificate for airplane, gyroplane, weight shift control, powered parachute, and airship, an applicant must be at least 17 years of age, hold at least a current third class airman medical certificate or a valid U.S. driver’s license, Student Pilot Certificate, and meet the applicable requirements of part 61 subpart J. The airman medical certificate may be an FAA Form 8420-2 or FAA Form 8500-9. If the airman medical certificate bears any limitation, which would make a special medical flight test necessary, refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.

Note:  If you are applying to operate a balloon or glider, you must be 16 years of age, and a valid U.S. driver’s license or airman medical certificate is not required.

b.    Logbook Endorsements.

(1)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies the applicant has received and logged 3 hours of flight training within the 60 calendar‑days preceding the date of an FAA Form 8710-11, in preparation for the practical test.
(2)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies the applicant is prepared to pass the practical test. In addition, the applicant must have a signed FAA Form 8710-11 with the authorized instructor’s signature.
(3)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor that states the applicant has demonstrated satisfactory knowledge of the subject areas in which the applicant was deficient on the airman knowledge test.
(4)    An applicant for a sport pilot certificate must have logged training and received a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor on the training required by part 61 subpart J that is appropriate for the sport pilot privilege sought.

c.    Aeronautical Knowledge. The applicant must meet the aeronautical knowledge requirements of part 61 subpart J.

(1)    The applicant must present a sport pilot airmen knowledge test report, if required.
(2)    The holder of a sport pilot certificate is not required to take a knowledge test in order to receive a logbook entry for a category/class privilege.

d.    Aeronautical Experience. The applicant must present acceptable evidence of meeting the minimum aeronautical experience requirements of § 61.313 as applicable.

e.    Training. The applicant must have met the applicable presolo training criteria required by § 61.87 and have received instruction in the flight proficiency requirements of § 61.313. The designee must ensure that all required instruction is documented and all instructor logbook endorsements are present.

f.    Aeronautical Skill. The applicant must demonstrate aeronautical skill by satisfactorily completing the practical test prescribed by § 61.307(b). The test will be conducted in accordance with the appropriate Sport Pilot PTS.

g.    Category and Class Privileges. The category and class of aircraft used for the practical test will not be placed on a sport pilot certificate. A logbook entry will be required for each category/class and make and model privilege.

60.    Procedures.

a.    Schedule Appointment. Advise the applicant to bring the following documents and records to the appointment:

(1)    FAA Form 8710-11 may be completed using IACRA. The applicant will complete section III, Record of Pilot Time. A special emphasis item, the designee must review the applicant’s aeronautical experience recorded on the FAA Form 8710-11 and in the applicant’s logbook/training record to ensure compliance with the appropriate aeronautical experience requirements for the certificate and/or privilege sought. The completion of section III, Record of Pilot Time, is required to be accurately and fully completed by the applicant. Per § 61.39(a)(7), an applicant must have a completed application and that includes completion of section III, Record of Pilot Time.
(2)    A Student Pilot Certificate.
(3)    An FAA Form 8420-2, FAA Form 8500-9, or a valid U.S. driver’s license.
(4)    A sport pilot or sport pilot instructor knowledge test report, if applicable.
(5)    A logbook or other records substantiating the aeronautical experience shown on the applicant’s FAA Form 8710-11.
(6)    The aircraft maintenance records.
(7)    The aircraft airworthiness certificate.
(8)    The aircraft registration.
(9)    An acceptable form of photo identification.

b.    Applicant Arrives for Appointment. Collect and review the documents and records listed in subparagraph 62a.

(1)    If the applicant has not brought all of the necessary documents, explain what is needed and return the documents to the applicant.
(2)    Reschedule the appointment, if requested to do so.

c.    Review Application. Verify that the information on the FAA Form 8710-11 is presented accurately and is complete.

(1)    In section I, ensure that the applicant has checked “SPORT PILOT.”
(2)    Ensure that the remainder of the FAA Form 8710-11 is completed in accordance with the instructions attached to the form and the information in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 27.
(3)    Ensure that the flight instructor has signed an endorsement no more than 60 calendar-days before the FAA Form 8710-11 was submitted. Review the applicant’s logbook or training record to ensure the applicant has received at least 3 hours of training within the preceding 60 calendar-days before the practical test.

d.    Verify Applicant’s Identity. Inspect acceptable forms of identification to establish the applicant’s identity in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 24.

(1)    Compare the identification with the personal information provided on the FAA Form 8710-11.
(2)    When the applicant’s identity is verified, continue with the practical test.
(3)    If the applicant’s identity appears to be different from the information supplied on FAA Form 8710-11 or it appears that an attempt at falsification has been made, immediately report this to AFS-610 and discontinue the task.

e.    Establish Eligibility. Determine if the applicant meets the specific eligibility, knowledge, and experience requirements for certification as a sport pilot. (Refer to §§ 61.305, 61.307, 61.309, 61.311, and 61.313, as applicable.)

(1)    Ensure that the applicant holds at least a third class airman medical certificate or valid U.S. driver’s license.
(2)    Inspect the applicant’s airman medical certificate, if appropriate, to ensure that it does not bear any limitation that would make a special airman medical flight test necessary.
(3)    Inspect the applicant’s Student Pilot Certificate for current solo and solo cross-country endorsements.
(4)    Check the record of flight time in section III of FAA Form 8710-11 to determine if the applicant has the minimum aeronautical experience required for the certificate and privileges sought.
(5)    Examine the applicant’s logbook and/or training record(s) to verify that all aeronautical knowledge, aeronautical experience, and required instructor endorsements are recorded (see Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 23e).
(6)    Examine the knowledge test report.
(7)    If the applicant has checked the “YES” box of section IV of FAA Form 8710-11, verify that the applicant meets the requirements of § 61.49.
(8)    If the applicant is applying for a test on the basis of graduation from an approved training program, inspect the applicant’s graduation certificate to verify that the applicant is in compliance with the requirements of § 61.71.
(9)    If the applicant is a graduate of an approved pilot school, the designee should check the applicant’s graduation certificate to ensure that the practical test will be able to be passed within 60 calendar‑days from the date on the graduation certificate. If not, the applicant must apply for the pilot certificate or privilege under part 61 and meet all the applicable aeronautical experience requirements under part 61 for the pilot certificate or privilege sought.

f.    Aircraft Requirements. Ensure the applicant has the proper aircraft maintenance records, logbooks, airworthiness certificate, and aircraft registration to determine if the aircraft is Airworthy and suitable for this practical test. After review, return the documents to the applicant.

g.    Discrepancies. If a discrepancy that cannot be immediately corrected exists in any of the documents, return all documents to the applicant.

(1)    Inform the applicant of the reasons for ineligibility and explain how the applicant may correct the discrepancies.
(2)    Reschedule the appointment, if requested to do so.

h.    Conduct Practical Test. After determining that the applicant is eligible and meets all prerequisites for the certificate sought, accept the FAA Form 8710-11 and conduct the practical test in accordance with the guidance in the Sport Pilot PTS and this section.

(1)    If the practical test is not completed for reasons other than unsatisfactory performance, issue a letter of discontinuance to the applicant (see Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 16b).
(2)    Return all submitted documents to the applicant with the original of the letter of discontinuance.
(3)    Explain how the applicant may complete the test at a later date and reschedule the test if requested to do so.

i.    Unsatisfactory Performance. If the applicant did not meet the applicable standards for the certificate sought, inform the applicant of the reasons for the unsatisfactory performance.

(1)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-5 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 32.
(2)    Sign, date, and check the appropriate boxes on the FAA Form 8060-5. Give the applicant a copy of the FAA Form 8060-5.
(3)    Keep FAA Form 8710-11 and send FAA Form 8060-5 to AFS-610. Return all other submitted documents to the applicant.
(4)    The designee should sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the unsatisfactory outcome of the test, and the designee’s designation number.

j.    Satisfactory Performance. When the applicant has met all requirements for the certificate sought, prepare FAA Form 8060-4 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 30.

(1)    Verify that all information on FAA Form 8060-4 is correct. Sign the FAA Form 8060-4 and direct the applicant to sign line VII of FAA Form 8060-4.
(2)    Give the applicant the copy of the FAA Form 8060-4. Ensure that the limitation “HOLDER DOES NOT MEET ICAO REQUIREMENTS” is noted on the Temporary Airman Certificate.
(3)    The designee should sign an entry in the applicant’s logbook or training records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the successful outcome of the test, and the designee’s designation number.

k.    Complete the Certification File. Complete the certification file in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 28.

Section 8. Conduct a Private Pilot Certification, Including Additional Category/Class Ratings at the Private Pilot Certification Level

61.    General. The designee conducting the practical test reviews the applicant’s aircraft maintenance records, aircraft logbooks, airworthiness certificate, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) aircraft station license (if applicable), and aircraft registration to determine that the aircraft is Airworthy and suitable for the practical test.

62.    Eligibility Requirements. The applicant must meet all the applicable requirements of part 61 subpart E.

a.    Graduate of an Approved Training Program. Under the provisions of § 61.71(a), an applicant who presents an appropriate graduation certificate within 60 calendar-days after graduating from an approved training program certificated under part 141 and who passed the appropriate practical test is considered to have met the prerequisite aeronautical experience requirements of § 61.109.

b.    Graduate of an Approved School with Examining Authority. Under the provisions of § 61.71(a), an applicant who graduated from an approved pilot school that holds examining authority is considered to have met the prerequisite eligibility requirements for the private pilot certificate if the applicant applies within 60 calendar-days of graduation and passed the appropriate practical test from the school that holds the appropriate examining authority.

c.    Not a Graduate of an Approved School. If the applicant is not a graduate of an approved pilot school, or has not applied and passed the practical test for the private pilot certificate within the times specified for approved school graduates, the applicant must meet all the applicable prerequisite eligibility requirements of part 61 subpart E.

d.    Aeronautical Knowledge. A private pilot knowledge test report or private pilot test report from an approved school with knowledge test examining authority is the only acceptable form of evidence to verify the applicant has passed the private pilot knowledge test for a private pilot certificate.

(1)    The format of the knowledge test report from an approved school or Computer Test Provider must include an embossed seal in the lower right corner and the testing facility’s name and air agency designation number.
(2)    The holder of a category rating for powered aircraft is not required to take a knowledge test for the addition of another category rating to a private pilot certificate.

e.    Aeronautical Experience. The applicant must present a pilot logbook or other acceptable and reliable record(s) as evidence of having met the required aeronautical experience for the certificate and rating sought and to substantiate the aeronautical experience shown on FAA Form 8710-1.

(1)    Military pilot flight time records may be used to show the required flight time if the records meet the requirements of § 61.51.
(2)    If the designee is unable to determine whether the records presented show clear evidence of the required aeronautical experience, the applicant must be referred to the managing FAA office.
(3)    In accordance with § 61.109, an applicant for a private pilot certificate must have received at least 3 hours of flight training in the control and maneuvering of an airplane solely by reference to instruments.
(4)    An applicant for a private pilot certificate must have received at least 3 hours of night flight training (except for the glider and balloon ratings) and an instructor endorsement in accordance with the appropriate provisions of § 61.109. Except as provided in § 61.110, the applicant’s records must indicate that all required night flight training has been received.

f.    Logbook Endorsements.

(1)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies that the applicant has received and logged 3 hours of flight training within the 60 calendar-days preceding the date of the application in preparation for the practical test.
(2)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies that the applicant is prepared to pass the practical test. In addition, the applicant must have a signed FAA Form 8710-1 with the authorized instructor’s signature.
(3)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who states that the applicant has demonstrated satisfactory knowledge of the subject areas in which the applicant was deficient on the airman knowledge test.
(4)    An applicant for a private pilot certificate must have logged training and received a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor on the training required by § 61.107(b) that is appropriate for the private pilot rating sought.
(5)    The applicant’s Student Pilot Certificate and logbook must contain the appropriate solo flight endorsement(s).
(6)    The applicant’s Student Pilot Certificate and logbook must contain the appropriate solo cross-country endorsement(s).

63.    Limitations.

a.    Night Flying Limitations. In accordance with § 61.110, a person who receives flight training in and resides in the state of Alaska:

(1)    May be issued a pilot certificate with the limitation “NIGHT FLYING PROHIBITED.”
(2)    Must comply with the appropriate night flight training requirements of this subpart within 12 calendar-months after the issuance of the pilot certificate.

b.    Cross-Country Limitations. The limitations “PASSENGER CARRYING PROHIBITED ON FLIGHTS MORE THAN 10 NM FROM [the appropriate island]” and “HOLDER DOES NOT MEET THE CROSS-COUNTRY FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS OF ICAO” will be entered on the certificate of an applicant whose cross-country experience qualifies under the provisions of § 61.111(c). Cross-country limitations may be removed by an examiner when the certificate holder has complied with the applicable solo cross-country requirements and has passed a practical test on cross-country flying.

c.    English Language. If the applicant cannot read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, then the pilot/instructor certification process should be terminated unless the reason is because of a medical disability. If the reason for the applicant not being able to read, speak, write, and understand English is because of a medical disability (meaning a hearing impairment or speech impairment that is medically substantiated by a certified medical physician), the designee must refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.

d.    Lighter-Than-Air Limitations. If appropriate, the designee places one of the following limitations on a certificate with lighter-than-air category and balloon class ratings:

(1)    LIMITED TO HOT AIR BALLOONS WITH AIRBORNE HEATER.
(2)    LIMITED TO HOT AIR BALLOONS WITHOUT AIRBORNE HEATER.

64.    Categories and Classes. The category of aircraft used for the practical test is placed on a private pilot certificate. With the exception of private pilot glider and powered-lift certificates, the class rating is also placed on the certificate.

a.    Airplane Class Ratings. The following class ratings are originally issued or added to private pilot airplane certificates:

(1)    SINGLE-ENGINE LAND.
(2)    MULTIENGINE LAND.
(3)    SINGLE-ENGINE SEA.
(4)    MULTIENGINE SEA.

b.    Rotorcraft Class Ratings. The following class ratings are originally issued or added to private pilot rotorcraft certificates:

(1)    HELICOPTER.
(2)    GYROPLANE.

c.    Lighter-Than-Air Class Ratings. The following class ratings are originally issued or added to private pilot lighter-than-air certificates:

(1)    AIRSHIP.
(2)    BALLOON.

d.    Powered-Lift Category Rating. Only the powered-lift category rating is added to a private pilot certificate to read: POWERED-LIFT.

e.    Glider Category Rating. Only the glider category rating is added to a private pilot certificate to read: GLIDER.

65.    Recreational Pilot Upgrades. A recreational pilot who desires certification as a private pilot must meet all the prerequisite eligibility requirements appropriate to the category and class sought for the private pilot certificate. Since a recreational pilot is limited to flight within 50 NM of the departure airport, the recreational pilot’s logbook must be endorsed by a flight instructor for each operation not allowed by the recreational pilot certificate.

a.    Knowledge Test. The applicant for an upgrade to a private pilot certificate must pass the appropriate private pilot knowledge test, unless the applicant previously passed the appropriate private pilot knowledge test when the applicant obtained his or her recreational pilot certificate. In the case of an applicant who claims to have previously passed the private pilot knowledge test, that applicant must obtain documentation from AFS‑760 (FAA, Airmen Certification Branch (AFS-760), PO Box 25082, Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0082; Fax number: (405) 954-9922) that shows satisfactory completion of that private pilot knowledge test. That documentation must accompany the applicant’s submitted FAA Form 8710-1 application. There are short private pilot knowledge tests authorized for holders of recreational pilot certificates with airplane, helicopter, and gyroplane privileges who wish to upgrade to a private pilot certificate for the same category of aircraft.

b.    Certificate. The private pilot certificate supersedes the recreational pilot certificate. If a different category of aircraft is used for the practical test, the recreational pilot privileges from the superseded certificate are shown on the private pilot certificate under recreational pilot privileges. (See Figure 7-22.)

Section 9. Conduct a Commercial Pilot Certification, Including Additional Category/Class Ratings at the Commercial Pilot Certification Level

66.    General. The designee will determine whether the applicant’s aircraft is Airworthy and suitable for the practical test after the review of the aircraft’s maintenance records, aircraft logbooks, airworthiness certificate, FCC aircraft station license (if applicable), and aircraft registration.

a.    Commercial Pilot Privileges. The provisions of § 61.133 allow a commercial pilot to act as PIC of an aircraft for compensation or hire. During the practical test, the examiner should determine whether the applicant is aware of the types of flight operations and regulatory requirements found in 14 CFR parts 91, 119, 133, 135, and 137 that affect these privileges.

b.    Limitations. An airman must observe any operating limitation that is placed on a pilot certificate until the limitation is removed from the certificate. Any limitations on the applicant’s private pilot certificate that were not removed before the commercial certificate is issued must be placed on the commercial certificate unless the applicant presents evidence that the limitations no longer apply.

67.    Eligibility Requirements. The applicant must meet all the applicable prerequisite requirements of part 61 subpart F. Except for glider or balloon pilots, the applicant must hold at least a third class medical certificate to be eligible for the original issuance of a commercial pilot certificate.

a.    English Requirement. If the applicant cannot read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, then the pilot/instructor certification process should be terminated unless the reason is because of a medical disability. If the reason for the applicant not being able to read, speak, write, and understand English is because of a medical disability (meaning a hearing impairment or speech impairment that is medically substantiated by a certified medical physician), the designee must refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.

b.    Graduate of an Approved Training Program. Under the provisions of § 61.71(a), an applicant who presents an appropriate graduation certificate within 60 calendar-days after graduating from an approved training program certificated under part 141 or 142 is considered to have met the prerequisite aeronautical experience requirements of § 61.129.

c.    Graduate of an Approved School with Examining Authority. Under the provisions of § 61.71(a), an applicant who graduated from an approved pilot school that holds examining authority is considered to have met the prerequisite eligibility requirements for the commercial pilot certificate if the applicant applies within 60 calendar-days of graduation and the school holds the appropriate examining authority.

d.    Not a Graduate of an Approved School. If the applicant is not a graduate of an approved pilot school, or has not applied for a commercial pilot certificate within the times specified for approved school graduates, the applicant must meet all the applicable prerequisite eligibility requirements of part 61 subpart F.

e.    Second-in-Command (SIC) Time. The designee will ensure that SIC time credited toward the commercial pilot certification requirements was accrued in an aircraft that required more than one pilot (per § 61.51(f)).

f.    Added Category Ratings to a Commercial Certificate. The holder of a commercial certificate with a category rating for powered aircraft need not take an additional knowledge test for the addition of another aircraft category rating to that commercial certificate. The applicant must present at least a third-class medical certificate to take a practical test for an additional category/class rating in a powered aircraft.

g.    Logbook Endorsements.

(1)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies that the applicant has received and logged 3 hours of flight training within the 60 calendar-days preceding the date of the practical test.
(2)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies that the applicant is prepared to pass the practical test. In addition, the applicant must have a signed FAA Form 8710-1 with the authorized instructor’s signature.
(3)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who states that the applicant has demonstrated satisfactory knowledge of the subject areas in which the applicant was deficient on the airman knowledge test.
(4)    An applicant for a commercial pilot certificate must have logged training and received a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor on the training required by § 61.127(b) that is appropriate for the commercial pilot rating sought.
(5)    The applicant’s logbook must contain the appropriate solo flight endorsement(s), if applicable.

68.    Categories and Classes. The category of aircraft used for the practical test is placed on a commercial pilot certificate. With the exception of commercial pilot glider or powered-lift certificates, the class rating is also placed on the certificate.

a.    Airplane Class Ratings. The following class ratings are originally issued or added to commercial pilot airplane certificates:

(1)    SINGLE-ENGINE LAND.
(2)    MULTIENGINE LAND.
(3)    SINGLE-ENGINE SEA.
(4)    MULTIENGINE SEA.

b.    Rotorcraft Class Ratings. The following class ratings are originally issued or added to commercial pilot rotorcraft certificates:

(1)    HELICOPTER.
(2)    GYROPLANE.

c.    Lighter-than-Air Class Ratings. The following class ratings are originally issued or added to commercial pilot lighter-than-air certificates:

(1)    AIRSHIP.
(2)    BALLOON.

d.    Lighter-than-Air Limitations. If appropriate, the designee places one of the following limitations on a certificate with lighter-than-air category and balloon class ratings:

(1)    LIMITED TO HOT AIR BALLOONS WITH AIRBORNE HEATER.
(2)    LIMITED TO HOT AIR BALLOONS WITHOUT AIRBORNE HEATER.

e.    Powered-Lift Category Rating. Only the powered-lift category rating is added to a commercial pilot certificate to read: POWERED-LIFT.

f.    Glider Category Rating. Only the glider category rating is added to a commercial pilot certificate to read: GLIDER.

g.    Private Pilot Privileges. The commercial pilot certificate supersedes the private pilot certificate. If a different category of aircraft is used for the practical test, the private pilot privileges from the superseded certificate are shown on the commercial pilot certificate under private privileges.

69.    Instructor Privileges in Lighter-than-Air Aircraft. A commercial pilot with a lighter-than-air category rating on the airman’s pilot certificate may give instruction in balloons or airships as appropriate to the rating held.

a.    Test Requirements. The Commercial Pilot PTS for the Lighter-than-Air Category—Balloon Class contains Areas of Operations that specifically test flight instructor responsibilities for lighter-than-air applicants.

b.    Holders of Instructor Certificates. Designees may omit Areas of Operation I, fundamentals of instructing (FOI), when conducting a practical test for an airman who already holds a current flight instructor certificate and is applying for a commercial pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air category rating and a balloon class rating.

70.    Complex Airplane Requirements. A complex airplane for the Airplane Single-Engine Land (ASEL) or Airplane Multiengine Land (AMEL) rating is one that has retractable landing gear, flaps, and controllable propeller. A complex airplane for the Airplane Single-Engine Sea (ASES) or Airplane Multiengine Sea (AMES) rating is one having flaps, floats, and a controllable propeller. A controllable propeller may be controlled manually by the pilot or automatically controlled by a FADEC system.

71.    Procedures.

a.    Schedule Appointment. Advise the applicant to bring the following documents and records to the appointment:

(1)    FAA Form 8710-1, which must be completed in ink or typewritten and signed by the applicant. The applicant must complete sections I, II, III, IV, and V. Section I must have parts A through O1 completed in their entirety. If a flight test is administered, section IIA(1) must indicate the aircraft used during the flight test and the “Total Time” in block 2a. The aircraft listed must match the aircraft listed in the designated examiner’s report. Section IIC must be completed when the applicant graduated from an FAA-approved course. Ensure the applicant has given the school name and location (city and state). Section IID must also be completed if the commercial application is based off the airman’s foreign license. Also the airman must have had his or her foreign license verified for validity prior to making application. The verification letter must be attached to the commercial application. Per § 61.39(a)(7), the applicant must complete section III, Record of Pilot Time. As a special emphasis item, the examiner must review the applicant’s aeronautical experience recorded on FAA Form 8710-1 and in the applicant’s logbook/training record to ensure compliance with the appropriate aeronautical experience requirements for the certificate and/or rating sought. Section IV must be answered “YES” or “NO” if a practical test was administered. If “YES,” ensure the airman’s notice of disapproval is included with the approved application. If the applicant has lost the notice of disapproval, attach a statement to that affect. Section V must be signed and dated by the applicant.
(a)    In section III on FAA Form 8710-1, the applicant must list at least the aeronautical experience required for the airmen certificate and rating sought. Graduates of part 141 pilot schools or part 142 training centers must provide their aeronautical experience in section III even though the graduation certificate is evidence of having completed the course of training.
(b)    If aeronautical experience has no bearing on the airman certification action being sought, it is not necessary for an applicant to complete section III. For example, flight instructor renewal applications, flight instructor reinstatement applications, ground instructor qualification applications, and pilot type rating applications would be examples for which aeronautical experience would not have a bearing on the airmen certification action; thus, the applicant would not be required to complete section III of the application. However, all applicants are encouraged to complete section III because it remains on file with the FAA and can be used to substantiate past aeronautical experience in the case of a lost logbook.
(2)    An appropriate airman certificate per § 61.123(h).
(3)    At least a current third class medical certificate (FAA Form 8500-9), if applicable.
(4)    A commercial pilot knowledge test report, if applicable.
(5)    An FAA-approved pilot school graduation certificate, if applicable.
(6)    A pilot logbook or other acceptable and reliable record(s) as evidence of having met the required aeronautical experience for the certificate and rating sought and to substantiate the aeronautical experience shown on FAA Form 8710-1.
(7)    The aircraft maintenance records.
(8)    The aircraft airworthiness certificate.
(9)    The aircraft registration.
(10)    The FCC aircraft station license, if applicable.
(11)    An acceptable form of photo identification.

b.    Applicant Arrives for Appointment. Collect and review the documents and records listed in subparagraph 73a(1) through (11).

c.    Review Application. Verify that the information on FAA Form 8710-1 is accurate, legible, and complete.

(1)    In section I on the form, ensure that the applicant has checked “COMMERCIAL.” If the applicant is seeking an additional airplane rating, ensure that the applicant has checked “ADDITIONAL AIRCRAFT RATING” and the appropriate aircraft category/class.
(2)    Ensure that the remainder of the form is completed in accordance with the instructions attached to the form and the information in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 26.
(3)    Ensure that the flight instructor has signed an endorsement no more than 60 calendar-days before FAA Form 8710-1 was submitted.

d.    Verify Applicant’s Identity. Inspect acceptable forms of identification to establish the applicant’s identity in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 24.

(1)    Compare the identification with the personal information provided on FAA Form 8710-1.
(2)    When the applicant’s identity is verified, continue with the practical test.
(3)    If the applicant’s identity cannot be verified because of lack of identification or inadequate identification, explain what types of identification are acceptable. Advise the applicant to return with appropriate identification.
(4)    If the applicant’s identity appears to be different from the information supplied on FAA Form 8710-1, or it appears that an attempt at falsification has been made, discontinue the task and immediately report the matter to the FAA office.

e.    Establish Eligibility. Determine that the applicant meets the specific eligibility, aeronautical knowledge, aeronautical experience, and flight proficiency requirements for certification as a commercial pilot.

(1)    If the applicant cannot read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, then the pilot/instructor certification process should be terminated unless the reason is because of a medical disability. If the reason for the applicant not being able to read, speak, write, and understand English is because of a medical disability (meaning a hearing impairment or speech impairment that is medically substantiated by a certified medical physician), the designee must refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.
(2)    If the applicant is applying for a powered aircraft rating, ensure that the applicant holds at least a current third class medical certificate.
(3)    If the applicant’s medical certificate or SODA, if any, bears any limitation that would make a special medical flight test necessary, refer the applicant to the FAA office.
(4)    Check the record of aeronautical experience in section III of FAA Form 8710-1 to determine that the applicant has the minimum flight experience required for the certificate and rating sought (under § 61.129).
(5)    If the applicant is applying for a test on the basis of graduation from an approved training program, inspect the applicant’s graduation certificate to verify that the applicant is in compliance with the requirements of § 61.71.
(6)    If the applicant is a graduate of an approved pilot school, check the applicant’s graduation certificate to ensure that the practical test will be passed within 60 calendar-days from the date on the graduation certificate. If not, the applicant must apply for the pilot certificate or rating under part 61 and meet all the applicable aeronautical experience requirements for the pilot certificate or rating sought.
(7)    Examine the applicant’s logbook and/or other reliable record(s) to verify that all aeronautical knowledge, aeronautical experience, and required instructor endorsements are recorded.
(8)    If the applicant has checked the “YES” box of section IV on FAA Form 8710-1, verify that the applicant has the necessary instruction and appropriate endorsement.
(9)    Examine the commercial pilot knowledge test report or test report from an approved school with knowledge test authority, as applicable.

f.    Requirements for an Additional Category/Class Rating. The requirements are the same as in subparagraph 73e except that the knowledge test is not required if the applicant already has a powered aircraft rating. The applicant must hold at least a current third class medical certificate when applying for an additional category/class rating in a powered aircraft.

g.    Aircraft Requirements. In the presence of the designee, the applicant will review the aircraft maintenance records, logbooks, airworthiness certificate, FCC aircraft station license (if applicable), and aircraft registration to determine that the aircraft is Airworthy and suitable for this practical test. After the review, the examiner will return the documents to the applicant.

h.    Discrepancies. If a discrepancy that cannot be immediately corrected exists in any of the documents, return FAA Form 8710-1 and all submitted documents to the applicant.

(1)    Inform the applicant of the reasons for ineligibility and explain how the applicant may correct the discrepancies.
(2)    Reschedule the appointment if requested to do so.

i.    Conduct the Practical Test. After determining that the applicant is eligible and meets all prerequisites for the certificate and/or rating sought, accept FAA Form 8710-1 and conduct the practical test in accordance with the guidance in the Commercial Pilot PTS and this section.

(1)    Practical Test Not Completed for Reasons Other Than Unsatisfactory Performance. Issue a letter of discontinuance to the applicant (see Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 16b).
(2)    Unsatisfactory Performance. If the applicant does not meet the applicable standards for the certificate sought, inform the applicant of the reasons for the unsatisfactory performance.
(a)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-5 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 32.
(b)    Sign, date, and check the appropriate boxes on the form. Give the applicant a copy of the notice of disapproval and retain the original for the certification file.
(c)    Retain FAA Form 8710-1 and return all other submitted documents to the applicant.
(d)    Sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the unsatisfactory outcome of the test, and the designee’s designation number.
(3)    Satisfactory Performance. When the applicant has satisfactorily met all requirements for the certificate and/or rating sought, prepare FAA Form 8060-4 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 30.
(a)    Enter the correct limitations, if appropriate.

1.    Enter “NOT VALID FOR FLIGHTS REQUIRING THE USE OF RADIO” if the applicant is hearing-impaired and/or speech impaired. (Only an inspector may remove this limitation.)

2.    Enter “NOT VALID FOR CARRIAGE OF PASSENGERS FOR HIRE IN AIRPLANES ON CROSS-COUNTRY FLIGHTS OF MORE THAN 50 NM, OR AT NIGHT” if the airman has no instrument rating. (See Figure 7-25.)

3.    Enter any limitations carried forward from the private pilot certificate if the applicant has not met the requirements for removal of those limitations.

(b)    Verify that all information on the Temporary Airman Certificate is correct. Sign the Temporary Airman Certificate and direct the applicant to sign line VII of the Temporary Airman Certificate.
(c)    Retain the original for the certification file and give the applicant the copy of the Temporary Airman Certificate.
(d)    Sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the successful outcome of the test, and the designee’s designation number.

j.    Complete the Certification File. Complete the certification file in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 28.

(1)    Mail the completed certification file to the managing FAA office no later than 7 calendar-days after the completion of the test.
(2)    IACRA files may be sent directly to AFS-760.

Section 10. Conduct an Airline Transport Pilot Certification, Including Additional Category/Class Ratings at the Airline Transport Certification Level

72.    General. Designees shall refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 18 for tasks associated with conducting an ATP certification, including additional category/class ratings at the ATP certification level.

Section 11. Conduct an Instrument Rating Certification

73.    General. An applicant for an instrument rating must meet all applicable requirements of § 61.65(a).

a.    Instrument Rating Practical Test. When taking the Instrument Rating practical test, the applicant must pass the required Areas of Operation listed in § 61.65(c). If an FSTD is used for any portion of the instrument approach task on the practical test, the instrument approach tasks are limited to one precision and one nonprecision approach. At least one instrument approach must be performed in the aircraft in flight. At least one precision and one nonprecision approach not selected for being performed during the actual flight portion of the practical test may be performed in an approved FSTD that meets the requirements of appendix 1 of the Instrument Rating PTS.

b.    FSTDs. Instrument training conducted in an FSTD may only be logged when given by an authorized instructor (refer to § 61.1(b)(2) and (10)). The applicant may use an FSTD for 20 hours of the required instrument training time if the training was not administered under part 142. The applicant may use an FSTD for 30 hours of instrument training if the training was administered under part 142. Such time should be logged by the applicant as instrument training time received. The training must be received from an authorized instructor (refer to § 61.1(b)(2) and (10)). An applicant may use a BATD or AATD for a maximum of 10 hours of the required instrument training that is allowed to be performed in an FSTD. (Refer to the current edition of AC 61‑126, Qualification and Approval of Personal Computer-Based Aviation Training Devices.)

c.    Knowledge Test. The applicant must satisfactorily complete the instrument knowledge test for the category of aircraft to be used for the practical test (airplane, powered-lift, or helicopter). An applicant for the instrument rating knowledge test must have received “a logbook or training record endorsement from an authorized instructor certifying that the person is prepared to take the required knowledge test” (refer to § 61.65(a)(4)). Therefore, the knowledge test results report alone is not acceptable as meeting the requirements of § 61.65(a)(4) for the logbook or training record endorsement. An additional knowledge test is not required if the applicant already holds an unrestricted instrument rating on a U.S. pilot certificate.

d.    Practical Test. The Instrument Rating PTS requires an applicant to be tested on three different kinds of instrument approaches, consisting of one precision approach and two nonprecision approaches. The precision approach may be an ILS approach, a GLS approach, or an MLS approach. A PAR is not authorized as a precision approach on the practical test. Additionally, although LPV is technically not considered a precision approach, it can be used as a precision approach. The GPS equipment must be instrument certified and contain the current database. Although LPV and LNAV/VNAV approaches are technically nonprecision approaches, because of the availability of a glidepath they may not be used to demonstrate nonprecision approaches.

(1)    For the selection of the nonprecision approaches, the designee may choose to test on any two of the following nonprecision instrument approaches using different kinds of navigation systems:

·    Non-Directional Beacon (NDB),

·    Localizer-type directional aid (LDA),

·    Very High Frequency (VHF) Omnidirectional Range (VOR) station,

·    GPS,

·    Simplified Directional Facility (SDF), and

·    Localizer (LOC).

(2)    Although LPV approaches are technically nonprecision, due to the precision of its glidepath and its localizer-like LNAV characteristics, an LPV can be used to demonstrate precision approach during the instrument practical test. Consequently, ILS, GLS, MLS, or LPV can be used to demonstrate a precision approach.
(3)    The required radio equipment that must be installed and operational on the aircraft must provide for communications with ATC, and for the performance of the required nonprecision approaches and precision approaches.
(4)    If the practical test is conducted in the aircraft, and the aircraft has an operable and properly installed GPS, the designee will require and the applicant must demonstrate GPS approach proficiency. If the applicant has contracted for training in an approved course that includes GPS training in the system that is installed in the FSTD, and the FSTD used for the checking/testing has the same system properly installed and operable, the applicant must demonstrate GPS approach proficiency.

Note:  If any avionics/navigation unit, including GPS, in the aircraft used for the practical test is placarded inoperative, the examiner will review the maintenance log to verify that the discrepancy has been properly documented.

74.    Eligibility Requirements. The applicant for an instrument rating must meet all the applicable requirements of § 61.65 and hold at least a private pilot certificate and a current third class medical certificate.

a.    Graduate of an Approved School. Under the provisions of § 61.71(a), an applicant who presents an appropriate graduation certificate within 60 calendar-days after graduating from an approved pilot school certificated under part 141 is considered to have met the prerequisite applicable aeronautical experience requirements of § 61.65. The applicant must hold at least a private or commercial pilot certificate.

b.    Not a Graduate of an Approved School. If the applicant is not a graduate of an approved pilot school, or has not applied for an instrument rating within the times specified for approved school graduates, the applicant must meet all the applicable prerequisite eligibility requirements of § 61.65.

c.    Logbook Endorsements.

(1)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies that the applicant has received and logged 3 hours of instrument training within the 60 calendar-days preceding the date of the application in preparation for the practical test.
(2)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who states that the applicant has demonstrated satisfactory knowledge of the subject areas in which the applicant was deficient on the airman knowledge test.
(3)    The applicant must have logged training and received a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor on the training required by § 61.65(c) that is appropriate for the instrument rating sought.
(4)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies that the applicant is prepared to pass the practical test. In addition, the applicant must have a signed FAA Form 8710-1.

75.    Types of Instrument Ratings Issued. Three types of instrument ratings are issued.

a.    Airplane. An applicant who qualifies for an instrument rating in an airplane is issued an INSTRUMENT—AIRPLANE rating.

b.    Helicopter. An applicant who qualifies for an instrument rating in a helicopter is issued an INSTRUMENT—HELICOPTER rating.

c.    Powered-lift. An applicant who qualifies for an instrument rating in a powered-lift is issued an INSTRUMENT—POWERED-LIFT rating.

d.    Additional Category. The holder of an instrument rating who applies for an instrument rating in another category of aircraft is not required to take another knowledge test, but is required to take the practical test for the category of aircraft to be added.

76.    Flight Controls. An aircraft provided for an instrument rating practical test must have engine power controls and flight controls that are easily reached and operable in a conventional manner by both pilots. A throw-over yoke is not acceptable for the practical test.

77.    Use of Nonapproved Instrument Approach Procedures (IAP). The use of any IAP not approved under 14 CFR part 97 for a certification practical test is not authorized. Nonapproved approach procedures do not meet the instrument instruction requirements of § 61.65(d) and may not be used to satisfy the requirements of any portion of an instrument rating practical test. Examples of nonapproved approach procedures would be substituting a published approach procedure for one VOR at a different VOR location or using a published NDB approach procedure at a commercial radio station.

78.    Limitations. If an applicant holds both single-engine and multiengine class ratings on a pilot certificate and takes the instrument rating practical test in a single-engine airplane, the certificate issued must bear the limitation “MULTIENGINE LIMITED TO VFR ONLY.” If the applicant takes the test in a multiengine airplane, the instrument privileges will be automatically conferred for the airplane single-engine rating.

a.    Limited to Center Thrust. An applicant may accomplish an Instrument-Airplane rating practical test in a multiengine airplane that is limited to center thrust. There is no need to place the “LIMITED TO CENTER THRUST” limitation on the applicant’s pilot certificate provided the AMEL rating is not limited to center thrust. If the applicant’s AMEL rating is limited to center thrust then the limitation will already be on the pilot certificate.

b.    ATP Certificate. An instrument rating may be added to an ATP certificate if it is associated with a category/class rating held at the commercial or private pilot level (e.g., AIRLINE TRANSPORT PILOT, AIRPLANE SINGLE- AND MULTIENGINE LAND, COMMERCIAL PRIVILEGES ROTORCRAFT—HELICOPTER, and INSTRUMENT—HELICOPTER).

79.    Procedures.

a.    Schedule Appointment. Advise the applicant to bring the following documents and records to the appointment:

(1)    FAA Form 8710-1, which must be completed in ink or typewritten and signed by the applicant. The applicant must complete sections I, II, III, IV, and V. Section I must have parts A through O1 completed in its entirety. If a flight test is administered, section IIA(1) must indicate the aircraft used during the flight test and the “Total Time” in block 2a. (If tested in an FSTD, this section can be omitted.) The aircraft listed must match the aircraft listed in the designated examiner’s report. Section IIC must be completed when the applicant graduated from an FAA-approved course. Ensure the applicant has given the school name and location (city and state). If the application is a § 61.75 and the applicant is adding instrument U.S. TEST PASSED, section IID must also be completed if the application is based off the airman’s foreign license. Also the airman must have had his or her foreign license verified for validity prior to making application. The verification letter must be attached to the application. The applicant must ensure he or she completes section III, Record of Pilot Time. A special emphasis item, the designee must review the applicant’s aeronautical experience on FAA Form 8710-1 and in the applicant’s logbook/training record to ensure compliance with the appropriate aeronautical experience requirements for the certificate and/or rating sought. Section IV must be answered “YES” or “NO” if a practical test was administered. If “YES,” ensure the airman’s notice of disapproval is included with the approved application. If the applicant has lost the notice of disapproval, attach a statement to that affect. Section V must be signed and dated by the applicant.
(a)    In section III on FAA Form 8710-1, the applicant must list at least the aeronautical experience required for the airmen certificate and rating sought. Graduates of part 141 pilot schools or part 142 training centers must provide their aeronautical experience in section III even though the graduation certificate is evidence of having completed the course of training.
(b)    If aeronautical experience has no bearing on the airman certification action being sought, it is not necessary for an applicant to complete section III. For example, flight instructor renewal applications, flight instructor reinstatement applications, ground instructor qualification applications, and pilot type rating applications would be examples for which aeronautical experience would not have a bearing on the airmen certification action; thus, the applicant would not be required to complete section III of the application. However, all applicants are encouraged to complete section III because it remains on file with the FAA and can be used to substantiate past aeronautical experience in the case of a lost logbook.
(2)    The appropriate pilot certificate and aircraft rating per § 61.65(a)(1).
(3)    A current FAA Form 8500-9, third class medical certificate, and SODA, if applicable.
(4)    An instrument knowledge test report for the applicable category of aircraft (initial instrument rating only).
(5)    An FAA-approved pilot school graduation certificate, if applicable.
(6)    A pilot logbook or other acceptable and reliable record(s) as evidence of having met the required aeronautical experience for the instrument rating sought and to substantiate the aeronautical experience shown on FAA Form 8710-1.
(7)    The aircraft maintenance records.
(8)    The aircraft airworthiness certificate.
(9)    The aircraft registration.
(10)    A view limiting device (approved by the DPE).
(11)    An acceptable form of photo identification.

b.    Applicant Arrives for Appointment. Collect and review the documents and records listed in subparagraphs 84a(1) through (11).

c.    Review Application. Verify that the information on FAA Form 8710-1 is accurate, legible, and complete.

(1)    In section I on the form, ensure that the applicant has checked “INSTRUMENT.”
(2)    Ensure that the remainder of the form is completed in accordance with the instructions attached to the form and the information in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 26.
(3)    Ensure that the flight instructor has signed an endorsement no more than 60 calendar-days before the practical test.

d.    Verify Applicant’s Identity. Inspect acceptable forms of identification to establish the applicant’s identity in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 24.

(1)    Compare the identification with the personal information provided on FAA Form 8710-1.
(2)    When the applicant’s identity is verified, continue with the practical test.
(3)    If the applicant’s identity cannot be verified because of lack of identification or inadequate identification, explain what types of identification are acceptable. Advise the applicant to return with appropriate identification.
(4)    If the applicant’s identity appears to be different from the information supplied on FAA Form 8710-1, or it appears that an attempt at falsification has been made, discontinue the task and immediately report the matter to the managing FAA office.

e.    Establish Eligibility. Determine if the applicant meets the specific eligibility, aeronautical knowledge, aeronautical experience, and instrument training requirements for an instrument rating per § 61.65.

(1)    If the applicant cannot read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, then the certification process should be terminated unless the reason is because of a medical disability. If the reason for the applicant not being able to read, speak, write, and understand English is because of a medical disability (meaning a hearing impairment or speech impairment that is medically substantiated by a certified medical physician), the designee must refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.
(2)    Verify that the applicant holds at least a valid private pilot certificate with an aircraft rating appropriate to the instrument rating sought.
(3)    Ensure that the applicant holds at least a current third class medical certificate.
(4)    Check the record of aeronautical experience in section III on FAA Form 8710-1 application to determine that the applicant has the minimum aeronautical experience required for the instrument rating sought. (Refer to § 61.65(d).)
(5)    Verify that the applicant has used no more than 20 hours of instrument training in an FSTD (§ 61.65(e)(2)) to meet the aeronautical experience requirements and that the time has been certified by an authorized instructor. If the applicant has been trained under part 142, the applicant may use a maximum of 30 hours in an FSTD (§ 61.65(e)(1)). Of the 20 or 30 hours, as appropriate, only 10 hours is authorized in a BATD or AATD.
(6)    If the applicant is applying for a test on the basis of graduation from an approved pilot school, inspect the applicant’s graduation certificate to ensure that it is dated within the previous 60 calendar-days.
(7)    Examine the applicant’s logbook and/or other reliable record(s) to verify that all aeronautical knowledge, aeronautical experience, and required instructor endorsements are recorded (see Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 23e).
(8)    Examine the applicant’s instrument knowledge test report or instrument test report from an approved school with knowledge test authority, as applicable. Verify that the applicant has passed the instrument knowledge test appropriate to the category of aircraft for which the instrument rating is sought. If the applicant already holds an instrument rating, a knowledge test is not required.
(9)    If the applicant has checked the “YES” box of section IV on FAA Form 8710-1, verify that the applicant meets the requirements of § 61.49.

f.    Aircraft Requirements. The applicant will review the aircraft maintenance records, logbooks, airworthiness certificate, and aircraft registration for the purpose of demonstrating aeronautical knowledge about how to determine whether an aircraft is Airworthy and suitable for flight.

g.    Discrepancies. If a discrepancy that cannot be immediately corrected exists in any of the documents, return FAA Form 8710-1 and all submitted documents to the applicant.

(1)    Inform the applicant of the reasons for ineligibility and explain how the applicant may correct the discrepancies.
(2)    Reschedule the appointment, if requested to do so.

h.    Conduct the Practical Test. After determining that the applicant is eligible and meets all prerequisites for the instrument rating sought, accept the FAA Form 8710-1 and conduct the practical test in accordance with the guidance in the Instrument Rating PTS and Chapter 7, Section 2.

(1)    Practical Test Not Completed for Reasons Other Than Unsatisfactory Performance. Issue a letter of discontinuance to the applicant (see Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 16b).
(2)    Unsatisfactory Performance. If the applicant does not meet the applicable standards for the instrument rating sought, inform the applicant of the reasons for the unsatisfactory performance.
(a)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-5 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 32.
(b)    Sign, date, and check the appropriate boxes on the form. Give the applicant a copy of the notice of disapproval and retain the original for the certification file.
(c)    Retain the FAA Form 8710-1 and return all other submitted documents to the applicant.
(d)    Sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the unsatisfactory outcome of the test, and the designee’s designation number.
(3)    Satisfactory Performance. When the applicant has satisfactorily met all requirements for the instrument rating sought, prepare FAA Form 8060-4 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 30.
(a)    Indicate the appropriate instrument rating, e.g., “INSTRUMENT—AIRPLANE,” “INSTRUMENT—HELICOPTER,” or “INSTRUMENT—POWERED-LIFT.”
(b)    Enter any appropriate limitation(s) if the applicant holds an airplane multiengine class rating (land or sea) and completes the practical test in a single-engine airplane or in a multiengine airplane limited to center thrust.
(c)    Sign the applicant’s FAA Form 8060-4 and direct the applicant to sign line VII of the form.
(d)    Retain the original for the certification file and give the applicant the copy of the Temporary Airman Certificate.
(e)    Sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the successful outcome of the test, and the designee’s designation number.

i.    Complete the Certification File. Complete the certification file in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 28.

(1)    Mail the completed certification file to the managing FAA office no later than 7 calendar-days after the completion of the test.
(2)    IACRA files may be sent directly to AFS-760.

Section 12. Conduct a Pilot Type Rating Certification

80.    General. An aircraft type rating may be added to a private, commercial pilot, or ATP certificate. However, type rating practical tests are conducted to a single standard for all certificate levels. Regardless of the grade of certificate held, an applicant must meet the standards for a type rating in the appropriate ATP and aircraft type rating PTS. All type ratings within category and class held on a superseded certificate or issued under the military competency provisions are carried forward to the new certificate level without further testing. Type ratings limited to VFR also may be upgraded to the ATP level without further testing. A type rating for a single‑place (single pilot station) airplane may not be upgraded to the ATP level.

a.    Flight Instructor Recommendation. The “Instructor’s Recommendation” section on FAA Form 8710-1 does not need to be signed for initial application for a type rating. However, an instructor’s recommendation is required for a retest.

b.    Flight Instructor Endorsement for Training Received. An applicant for a type rating must have an endorsement certifying accomplishment of the required training.

(1)    If the applicant is applying for a type rating to be added to an ATP certificate or for the original issuance of an ATP certificate in an airplane requiring a type rating, that applicant must have an endorsement in their logbook or training records from an authorized instructor certifying satisfactory completion of the training required by § 61.157(b).
(2)    If the applicant is applying for a type rating to be placed on a private or commercial pilot certificate, the airman must have an endorsement in their logbook or training records from an authorized instructor certifying satisfactory completion of the training required by § 61.63(d).

c.    Logbook Endorsements.

(1)    If a type rating is to be added to an applicant’s existing private or commercial pilot certificate or original issued private or commercial pilot certificate in an aircraft requiring a type rating, that applicant must have an endorsement in the applicant’s logbook or training record from an authorized instructor certifying that the applicant has been found competent in the aeronautical knowledge areas appropriate to the pilot certificate (i.e., private pilot or commercial pilot certificate level, as appropriate) for the aircraft category, class, or type rating sought.
(2)    An applicant for a type rating to be added to an existing private or commercial pilot certificate or for the original issuance of a private or commercial pilot certificate in an aircraft requiring a type rating must have an endorsement in the person’s logbook or training record from an authorized instructor that the applicant has been found proficient in the appropriate Areas of Operations (as listed in § 61.157(e)) required for the issuance of an ATP certificate for the aircraft category, class, or type rating sought.
(3)    Review the applicant’s logbook/training record to ensure that it has the appropriate solo flight endorsement(s), if applicable.
(4)    If an applicant fails a practical test, he or she may reapply after receiving the necessary training and logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor.

d.    Evaluator’s Record. The section noted as “Evaluator’s Record (Use for ATP Certificate(s) and/or Type Rating(s))” on FAA Form 8710-1 must be signed and dated by the examiner on the appropriate lines for each test segment conducted. The designee must complete the “Designated Examiner or Airman Certification Representative Report” section on FAA Form 8710-1.

e.    Medical Certificate. The applicant must hold at least a current third class medical certificate if the practical test is being conducted in an aircraft.

f.    Type Ratings Issued. The designee will enter the appropriate type rating on the Temporary Airman Certificate issued to the applicant. The type ratings are listed at http://registry.faa.gov/TypeRatings/. AFS-760 maintains this table.

g.    Type Rating Limited to VFR. A type rating bearing the limitation “VFR ONLY” may be added to an existing ATP certificate other than an ATPC under the provisions of § 61.63(e). This limitation may be added to an aircraft type rating not capable of instrument maneuvers or procedures required on a practical test. The practical test must be administered under the appropriate ATP PTS for an aircraft type rating limited to “VFR ONLY”. A type rating bearing the limitation “VFR ONLY” may be added to an existing ATP certificate under the provisions of § 61.157(g). There is no provision for taking an initial practical test for an ATP pilot certificate in an aircraft that would require a VFR limitation. The practical test must be administered under the appropriate ATP PTS for an aircraft type rating limited to “VFR ONLY”.

h.    Amphibian Aircraft. An amphibian type rating will bear the limitation “LIMITED TO LAND” or “LIMITED TO SEA,” as appropriate, unless the applicant demonstrates proficiency in both land and sea operations.

i.    Additional Testing Requirements. Currently, all aircraft that require a type rating are subject to completing a Flight Standardization Board (FSB). The FSB’s primary responsibilities are to determine the requirements for pilot type ratings, to develop minimum training recommendations, and to ensure initial flightcrew member competency in accordance with the current edition of AC 120-53, Guidance for Conduction and Use of Flight Standardization Board Evaluations. The FSB issues a report which may include specific training and testing recommendations for the specific type of aircraft. FAA-S-8081-5F, Practical Test Concept section, states, “Adherence to provisions of the regulations and the PTS is mandatory for the evaluation of airline transport pilot and type rating applicants. For some aircraft types, however, provisions of FAA Flight Standardization Board (FSB) Reports may specify special details as to how 14 CFR part 61 and this PTS apply to certain maneuvers, tasks, procedures, or knowledge areas.” Consequently, the testing recommendations in this report must be integrated into the practical test.

j.    Training Requirements. Some aircraft manufacturers have begun requiring stringent training programs via an AFM limitation. For example, the limitation section of the Eclipse Aviation Corporation’s EA500 AFM contains the following requirement: “All pilots operating the Eclipse EA500 must be trained and qualified in accordance with the FAA Accepted/Approved Eclipse Aviation training program or equivalent FAA Accepted/Approved training program.” The TCDS contains a similar limitation in the notes. Section 91.9(a) states, in part, that no person may operate a civil aircraft without complying with the operating limitations specified in the approved AFM or Rotorcraft Flight Manual (RFM). If the AFM or RFM contains a training requirement, the designee or inspector must verify that the applicant has successfully completed the approved training before administering the practical test.

81.    Pilot Type Rating That May Be Performed as Either a Single Pilot or With an SIC. Practical tests for pilot type ratings that may be performed as either a single pilot or with an SIC in accordance with § 61.43(b).

a.    General. This policy guidance shows how to record whether the pilot type rating practical test was performed as a single pilot, or with an SIC crewmember.

(1)    In a previous version of this order, the FAA had established policy that clarified the intent of § 91.531(a) and (b) for allowing practical tests for some pilot type ratings to be performed as either a single pilot or with an SIC.
(2)    This policy addresses performing pilot type rating practical tests as a single-pilot crew composition or with an SIC pilot crewmember in certain large airplanes that were certificated under Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 41, in which the airplane’s TC authorizes single-pilot operations. Although SFAR 41 expired on September 13, 1983, there are still many large airplanes that were certificated under SFAR 41 in active service (i.e., per § 91.531(a)(1)).
(3)    This policy also addresses performing pilot type rating practical tests as a single-pilot crew composition or with an SIC pilot crewmember in certain turbojet airplanes where the airplane’s TC authorizes single-pilot operations (i.e., per § 91.531(a)(2)).
(4)    This policy also addresses performing pilot type rating practical tests as a single-pilot crew composition or with an SIC pilot crewmember in certain commuter category airplanes that have a passenger seating configuration, excluding pilot seats, of nine seats or fewer where the airplane’s TC authorized single‑pilot operations (i.e., per § 91.531(a)(3)).
(5)    This policy addresses performing pilot type rating practical tests as a single-pilot crew composition or with an SIC pilot crewmember where the FAA may issue a COA letter for authorizing single‑pilot operations if that airplane is designed for and type certificated with only one pilot station (i.e., per § 91.531(b)).
(6)    To date, the FAA permits applicants to perform pilot type rating practical tests as a single pilot or with an SIC in the following airplanes:
(a)    Cessna 501.
(b)    Cessna 525.
(c)    Cessna 551.
(d)    Cessna 510 Series.
(e)    Raytheon 390.
(f)    Beech 300 that are certificated under SFAR 41 and the Beech B300 and B300C that are certificated in the commuter category.
(g)    Beech 1900 and Beech 1900C that are certificated under SFAR 41 and the Beech 1900D that is certificated in the commuter category.
(h)    Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica EMB 110 that is certificated under SFAR 41.
(i)    Beech 2000.
(j)    Fairchild Aircraft Corporation SA-227CC, SA-227DC, and other Fairchild commuter category airplanes on that same TC.
(k)    Eclipse 500.
(l)    Phenom 100.
(m)    Phenom 300.
(n)    Sino Swearingen SJ30-2.
(o)    Certain large airplanes that were certificated under SFAR 41 and have a TC that authorizes single-pilot operations.
(p)    Certain turbojet airplanes with a TC that authorizes single-pilot operations.
(q)    Certain commuter category airplanes that have a TC that authorizes single-pilot operations.
(7)    This policy addresses performing pilot type rating practical tests as a single-pilot crew composition or with an SIC pilot crewmember where the FAA has issued grants of exemption from §§ 91.9(a) and 91.531(a) to some training providers that give single-pilot training. If an applicant obtains a pilot type rating by accomplishing one of these approved single-pilot training programs and a pilot type rating practical test, that applicant will be issued a COA letter for single-pilot operations by the training provider. To date, the following training providers hold this kind of grant of exemption for the listed airplanes authorized under their grant of exemption:
(a)    Cessna Aircraft Company for its Cessna 550, Cessna S550, Cessna 552, and Cessna 560;
(b)    Fairchild Aircraft Corporation for its commuter category airplanes SA-227CC, SA-227DC, and other Fairchild commuter category airplanes on that same TC provided the airplane is configured with nine seats or fewer;
(c)    Sierra Industries, Inc. for the Cessna 500 series airplanes for serial Nos. 0001 through 0349 only that are equipped with Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) No. SA-8176SW or STC No. SA-09377SC and either STC No. SA-2172NM or STC No. SA-645NW;
(d)    M. Shannon and Associates for the Cessna 500, Cessna 550, and Cessna S550; and
(e)    Pan Am International Flight Academy for the Cessna 550, Cessna S550, Cessna 552, and Cessna 560.
(8)    When the airplane’s TCDS specifically requires the crew composition to be a single pilot, an applicant for that pilot type rating must perform the practical test as a single pilot. The applicant must be tested on all of the applicable PTS’s Areas of Operation and tasks as a single pilot. This requires the pilot to demonstrate, without assistance, the required PTS’s Areas of Operation and tasks as a single pilot.
(9)    Where the FAA has provided for either a single-pilot crew composition or an SIC, the applicant may elect to either use an SIC or perform as a single pilot during the practical test. The FAA has several ways of noting whether the practical test was performed as a single pilot or with an SIC. This provision is provided for in accordance with §§ 61.43(b) and 91.531.
(10)    Questions about what airplanes may be operated with a single-pilot crew composition or with an SIC pilot crew composition may be directed to the FAA’s General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS‑800), 800 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591.

b.    Cessna 500 Series Airplanes.

(1)    Cessna 501 or Cessna 551. An applicant for a CE-500 pilot type rating who accomplishes the practical test in a Cessna 501 or Cessna 551 may elect to accomplish the practical test as a single pilot or with an SIC pilot crewmember.
(a)    An applicant for a CE-500 pilot type rating who was tested as a single pilot in a Cessna 501 is entitled to act as a single PIC in the Cessna 501. After the applicant satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test as a single pilot in a Cessna 501, the examiner will issue the applicant a CE-500 pilot type rating on the pilot certificate, and record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the CE-500 pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Cessna 501.”
(b)    An applicant for a CE-500 pilot type rating who was tested in a Cessna 501 where an SIC crewmember was used will be issued a CE-500 pilot type rating with the limitation “Second-in-Command Required” (Figure 7-25). The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the CE-500 pilot type rating in a Cessna 501 with an SIC pilot crewmember.”
(c)    An applicant for a CE-500 pilot type rating who was tested as a single pilot in a Cessna 551 is entitled to act as a single pilot PIC in the Cessna 551. After the applicant satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test as a single pilot in the Cessna 551, the examiner will issue the applicant a CE-500 pilot type rating on the pilot certificate and record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the CE-500 pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Cessna 551.”
(d)    An applicant for a CE-500 pilot type rating who was tested in a Cessna 551 where an SIC crewmember was used will be issued a CE-500 pilot type rating with the limitation “Second-in-Command Required” (Figure 7-25). The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the CE-500 pilot type rating in a Cessna 551 with an SIC pilot crewmember.”
(e)    A Cessna 501 or Cessna 551 where a PIC and SIC crewmember are used may be used to satisfy the requirements of a § 61.58 PIC proficiency check for any series of Cessna 500 (i.e., Cessna 500, Cessna 550, Cessna S550, Cessna 552, or Cessna 560) requiring an SIC.
(f)    An applicant who obtains a pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Cessna 501 and 551 may serve as the PIC or SIC pilot crewmember in the Cessna 500, Cessna 550, Cessna S550, or Cessna 560, as appropriate.
(2)    Cessna 500, Cessna 550, Cessna S550, Cessna 552, or Cessna 560. An applicant for a “CE-500” pilot type rating who accomplishes the practical test in a Cessna 500, Cessna 550, Cessna S550, Cessna 552, or Cessna 560, as appropriate, may elect to accomplish the practical test as a single pilot if the person accomplished an approved single-pilot training program that was given by a training provider under a grant of exemption. The applicant may instead use the services of an SIC pilot crewmember.
(a)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes an approved single-pilot training course, successfully completes the CE-500 pilot type rating practical test in the Cessna 500, Cessna 550, Cessna S550, Cessna 552, or Cessna 560 as a single pilot, and uses a training provider who holds a grant of exemption from § 91.531 may operate as a single-pilot PIC in the Cessna 500, Cessna 550, Cessna S550, Cessna 552, or Cessna 560, as appropriate. The examiner will issue the CE-500 pilot type rating on the applicant’s pilot certificate. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the pilot’s logbook as “Satisfactorily accomplished the CE-500 pilot type rating training as a single pilot in an [appropriate Cessna model].” The applicant must receive a COA letter for single-pilot operations from the training provider. In accordance with the training provider’s grant of exemption, the pilot is also required to continue to receive the training provider’s recurrent single-pilot training and comply with the provisions of that training provider’s grant of exemption every 12 calendar-months to be reissued a COA letter for single-pilot operations.
(b)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes a CE-500 pilot type rating practical test in a Cessna 500, Cessna 550, Cessna S550, Cessna 552, or Cessna 560, as appropriate, and uses the services of an SIC pilot crewmember, will be issued a CE-500 pilot type rating. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as “Satisfactorily accomplished the CE-500 pilot type rating with an SIC crewmember in a [Cessna 500] [Cessna 550] [Cessna S550] [Cessna 552] [Cessna 560].” Since the Cessna 500, Cessna 550, Cessna S550, Cessna 552, and Cessna 560 type certification require an SIC crewmember, the applicant’s pilot certificate and CE-500 airplane type rating need not contain the limitation “Second‑in‑Command Required.”

Note:  The successful completion of a certification practical test in any of the Cessna 500 models listed in subparagraph 86b will qualify the applicant for a CE-500 pilot type rating.

c.    Cessna 525 Series Airplanes. An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in a Cessna 525 as a single pilot will receive a CE-525S pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the CE-525S pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Cessna 525.” The CE-525S pilot type rating indicates that the person accomplished the pilot type rating practical test as a single pilot. An applicant with a CE-525S pilot type rating is entitled to operate the Cessna 525 as either a single-pilot PIC or with an SIC.

(1)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in a Cessna 525 where an SIC crewmember was used will receive a CE-525 pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the CE-525 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in a Cessna 525.” The CE-525 pilot type rating on a pilot certificate indicates that the person accomplished the practical test with the use of an SIC pilot crewmember.
(2)    A Cessna 525 series airplane may be used to satisfy the requirements of the § 61.58 PIC proficiency check for the Cessna 525 series airplane.
(3)    An applicant who holds a CE-525S pilot type rating may serve as either the PIC or SIC pilot crewmember in the Cessna 525 series of airplane.

d.    Beech 2000 Airplanes. An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in a Beech 2000 as a single pilot will receive a BE-2000S pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the BE-2000S pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Beech 2000.” The BE-2000S pilot type rating on a pilot certificate indicates that the person accomplished the pilot type rating practical test as a single pilot. An applicant with a BE-2000S pilot type rating is entitled to operate the Beech 2000 as a single-pilot PIC or with an SIC.

(1)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in a Beech 2000 where an SIC crewmember was used will receive a BE-2000 pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the BE-2000 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in a Beech 2000.” The BE-2000 pilot type rating on a pilot certificate indicates that the person accomplished the practical test with the use of an SIC pilot crewmember.
(2)    A Beech 2000 may be used to satisfy the requirements of the § 61.58 PIC proficiency check for the Beech 2000.
(3)    An applicant who obtains a pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Beech 2000 may serve as either the PIC or the SIC in the Beech 2000 series of airplane.

e.    Raytheon 390 Airplanes. An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in a Raytheon 390 as a single pilot will receive an RA-390S pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the RA‑390S pilot type rating as a single pilot in a RA-390S.” The RA-390S pilot type rating on a pilot certificate indicates that the person accomplished the pilot type rating practical test as a single pilot. An applicant with a RA-390S pilot type rating is entitled to operate the Raytheon 390 as a single-pilot PIC or with an SIC.

(1)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in a Raytheon 390 where an SIC crewmember was used will receive an RA-390 pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the RA-390 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in a Raytheon 390.” The RA-390 pilot type rating on a pilot certificate indicates that the person accomplished the practical test with the use of an SIC pilot crewmember.
(2)    A Raytheon 390 may be used to satisfy the requirements of the § 61.58 PIC proficiency check for the Raytheon 390.
(3)    An applicant who obtains a pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Raytheon 390 may serve as either the PIC or the SIC in the Raytheon 390 series of airplane.

f.    Beech 1900 and 1900C Series of Airplane that was Certified Under SFAR 41. An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes a practical test in a Beech 1900 as a single pilot will receive a “BE-1900” pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the BE-1900 pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Beech 1900.”

(1)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes a practical test in a Beech 1900 or 1900C with an SIC crewmember will receive a “BE-1900” pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the BE-1900 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in a Beech 1900C.” The applicant’s “BE-1900” pilot type rating will be issued with the limitation “BE-1900 Second-in-Command Required.”
(2)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes a practical test in a Beech 1900D as a single pilot will receive a BE-1900 pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the BE-1900 pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Beech 1900D.”
(3)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes a practical test in a Beech 1900D with an SIC crewmember will receive a “BE-1900” pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the BE-1900 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in a Beech 1900D.” The applicant’s “BE-1900” pilot type rating will be issued with the limitation “BE-1900 Second-in-Command Required.”
(4)    Any Beech 1900C or D series of airplane may be used to satisfy the requirements of the § 61.58 PIC proficiency check for any series of Beech 1900 airplane that requires an SIC pilot crewmember.
(5)    An applicant who obtains a “BE-1900” pilot type rating as a single pilot in any Beech 1900 series of airplane may serve as either the PIC or SIC in any Beech 1900C or D series of airplane.

g.    Beech 300 Airplane that was Certified Under SFAR 41. An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes a practical test in a Beech 300 as a single pilot will receive a BE-300 pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the BE-300 pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Beech 300.”

(1)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes a practical test in a Beech 300 with an SIC crewmember will receive a “BE-300” pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the BE-300 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in a Beech 300.” The applicant’s “BE-300” pilot type rating will be issued with the limitation “BE-300 Second-in-Command Required.”
(2)    A Beech 300 may be used to satisfy the requirements of the § 61.58 PIC proficiency check for any series of Beech 300 that requires an SIC pilot crewmember.
(3)    An applicant who obtains a BE-300 pilot type rating as a single pilot may serve as either the PIC or SIC in the Beech 300 series of airplane.

h.    Fairchild Aircraft Corporation’s SA-227CC and SA-227DC. This section also applies to other Fairchild commuter category airplanes on the same type certificate that have a passenger seating configuration, excluding pilot seats, of nine seats or fewer, and have a TC that authorizes single-pilot operations.

(1)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes an approved single-pilot training program and a practical test as a single pilot in a Fairchild Aircraft Corporation SA-227CC, SA-227DC, or other Fairchild commuter category airplanes as detailed above, will receive an SA-227 pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the SA-227 pilot type rating as a single pilot.” The applicant must receive a COA letter for single‑pilot operations from the training provider. in accordance with the training provider’s grant of exemption, the pilot is also required to continue to receive the training provider’s recurrent single-pilot training and comply with the provisions of that training provider’s grant of exemption every 12 calendar-months in order to be reissued a COA letter for single-pilot operations.
(2)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes a practical test with an SIC crewmember in a Fairchild Aircraft Corporation SA-227 will receive an SA-227 pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the SA-227 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in a Fairchild Aircraft Corporation SA-227.” The SA-227CC, SA-227DC, and other Fairchild commuter category airplanes on the same TCDS require an SIC crewmember, so there is no need to list an SIC limitation on the applicant’s pilot certificate.

i.    Large Airplanes that were Certificated Under SFAR 41. An applicant for a pilot type rating in an airplane certificated under SFAR 41 may elect to accomplish the practical test as a single pilot or with an SIC pilot crewmember. An applicant who holds a pilot type rating in a large airplane that was certificated under SFAR 41, and who was tested in that airplane as a single pilot, is entitled to act as a single-pilot PIC in that airplane.

(1)    Examples of some large airplanes that were certificated under SFAR 41 and where the pilot type rating practical test may be performed as either a single pilot or with an SIC are: Beech 300, Beech 1900C and 1900D, and Embraer 110.
(2)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes a practical test as a single pilot in a large airplane that was certificated under SFAR 41 will receive a pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the [appropriate pilot type rating] as a single pilot.” The applicant’s pilot certificate will be issued with the appropriate pilot type rating.
(3)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes a practical test with an SIC crewmember in a large airplane that was certificated under SFAR 41 will receive a pilot type rating issued by the designee. The designee will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the [appropriate pilot type rating] with an SIC pilot crewmember.” The applicant’s pilot type rating will be issued with the limitation “Second-in-Command Required” (Figure 7-25).
(4)    A large airplane certificated under SFAR 41 that requires an SIC pilot crewmember may be used to satisfy the requirements of the § 61.58 PIC proficiency check.
(5)    An applicant who obtains a pilot type rating as a single pilot in a large airplane that was certificated under SFAR 41 may serve as either the PIC or SIC in that airplane.

j.    Cessna 510 Series Airplanes. An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in a Cessna 510 as a single pilot will receive a CE-510S pilot type rating issued by the designee. The designee will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the CE-510S pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Cessna 510.” The CE-510S pilot type rating indicates that the person accomplished the pilot type rating practical test as a single pilot. An applicant with a CE-510S pilot type rating is entitled to operate the Cessna 510 as either a single-pilot PIC or with an SIC.

(1)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in a Cessna 510 where an SIC crewmember was used will receive a CE-510 pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The designee will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the CE-510 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in a Cessna 510.” The CE-510 pilot type rating on a pilot certificate indicates that the person accomplished the practical test with the use of an SIC pilot crewmember.
(2)    A Cessna 510 series airplane may be used to satisfy the requirements of the § 61.58 PIC proficiency check for the Cessna 510 series airplane.
(3)    An applicant who holds a CE-510S pilot type rating may serve as either the PIC or SIC pilot crewmember in the Cessna 510 series of airplane.

k.    Sino Swearingen SJ30-2 Airplanes. An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in a Sino Swearingen SJ30-2 as a single pilot will receive an SJ30S pilot type rating issued by the designee. The designee will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the SJ30S pilot type rating as a single pilot in a Swearingen SJ30-2.” The SJ30S pilot type rating indicates that the person accomplished the pilot type rating practical test as a single pilot. An applicant with an SJ30S pilot type rating is entitled to operate the Swearingen SJ30-2 as either a single-pilot PIC or with an SIC.

(1)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in a Swearingen SJ30-2 where an SIC crewmember was used will receive an SJ30 pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The designee will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the SJ30 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in a Swearingen SJ30-2.” The SJ30 pilot type rating on a pilot certificate indicates that the person accomplished the practical test with the use of an SIC pilot crewmember.
(2)    A Swearingen SJ30-2 series airplane may be used to satisfy the requirements of the § 61.58 PIC proficiency check for the Swearingen SJ30-2 series airplane.
(3)    An applicant who holds an SJ30S pilot type rating may serve as either the PIC or SIC pilot crewmember in the Swearingen SJ30-2 series of airplane.

l.    Embraer - Empresa Brasileira De Aeronautica S.A.EMB-500 Airplanes. An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in an Embraer EMB-500 where an SIC crewmember was used will receive an EMB-500 pilot type rating plus a limitation that states “EMB-500 Second in Command required” issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the EMB-500 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in an Embraer EMB‑500.” The EMB-500 pilot type rating with the limitation on a pilot certificate indicates that the person accomplished the practical test with the use of an SIC pilot crewmember.

(1)    An applicant who satisfactorily completes the practical test in an Embraer EMB-500 as a single pilot will receive an EMB-500 type rating by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the EMB-500 pilot type rating as a single pilot in an Embraer EMB-500.” The EMB-500 pilot type rating, without a limitation, indicates that the person accomplished the pilot type rating practical test as a single pilot. An applicant with an EMB-500 pilot type rating is entitled to operate the Embraer EMB-500 as either a single-pilot PIC or with an SIC.
(2)    An Embraer EMB-500 series airplane may be used to satisfy the requirements of the § 61.58 PIC proficiency check for the Embraer EMB-500 series airplane.
(3)    An applicant who holds an EMB-500 pilot type rating as a single pilot may serve as either the PIC or SIC pilot crewmember in the EMB-500 series of airplane.

m.    Embraer - Empresa Brasileira De Aeronautica S.A.EMB-505 Airplanes. An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in an Embraer EMB-505 where an SIC crewmember was used will receive an EMB-505 pilot type rating plus a limitation that states “EMB-505 Second in Command required” issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the EMB-505 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in an Embraer EMB‑505.” The EMB-505 pilot type rating with the limitation on a pilot certificate indicates that the person accomplished the practical test with the use of an SIC pilot crewmember.

(1)    An applicant who satisfactorily completes the practical test in an Embraer EMB-505 as a single pilot will receive an EMB-505 type rating by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the EMB-505 pilot type rating as a single pilot in an Embraer EMB-505.” The EMB-505 pilot type rating, without a limitation, indicates that the person accomplished the pilot type rating practical test as a single pilot. An applicant with an EMB-505 pilot type rating is entitled to operate the Embraer EMB-505 as either a single-pilot PIC or with an SIC.
(2)    An Embraer EMB-505 series airplane may be used to satisfy the requirements of the § 61.58 PIC proficiency check for the EMB-505 series airplane.
(3)    An applicant who holds an EMB-505 pilot type rating as a single pilot may serve as either the PIC or SIC pilot crewmember in the EMB-505 series of airplane.

n.    Eclipse Aviation Corporation EA-500. An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in an Eclipse Aviation Corporation EA-500 as a single pilot will receive an EA-500S pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the EA-500S pilot type rating as a single pilot in an Eclipse Aviation Corporation EA-500.” The EA-500S pilot type rating indicates that the person accomplished the pilot type rating practical test as a single pilot. An applicant with an EA-500S pilot type rating is entitled to operate the Eclipse Aviation Corporation EA-500 as either a single-pilot PIC or with an SIC.

(1)    An applicant who satisfactorily accomplishes the practical test in an Eclipse Aviation Corporation EA-500 where an SIC crewmember was used will receive an EA-500 pilot type rating issued by the examiner. The examiner will record the results of the practical test in the applicant’s logbook as: “Satisfactorily accomplished the EA-500 pilot type rating with an SIC pilot crewmember in an Eclipse Aviation Corporation EA-500.” The EA-500 pilot type rating on a pilot certificate indicates that the person accomplished the practical test with the use of an SIC pilot crewmember.
(2)    An Eclipse Aviation Corporation EA-500 series airplane may be used to satisfy the requirements of the § 61.58 PIC proficiency check for the EA-500 series airplane.
(3)    An applicant who holds an EA-500S pilot type rating may serve as either the PIC or SIC pilot crewmember in the Eclipse Aviation Corporation EA-500 series of airplane.

o.    Removal of the “Second-In-Command Required” Limitation From a Pilot Type Rating on the Pilot Certificate. To remove the limitation, it is not necessary to complete the entire practical test as a single pilot.

(1)    All Areas of Operations/tasks approved for an FSTD may be accomplished in that FSTD for the purpose of removing the “Second-in-Command Required” limitation. However, this does not change any FSTD requirements for the original issuance of the pilot type rating.
(2)    Satisfactory completion of an approved single-pilot training program and end-of-course test of that approved single-pilot training program meet the requirements for removal of the “Second-in-Command Required” limitation.
(3)    The following tasks must be accomplished on the practical test as a single pilot in order to remove the “Second-in-Command Required” limitation:
(a)    Normal and crosswind takeoffs.
(b)    Powerplant failure on takeoff.
(c)    Maneuvering to a landing with a simulated powerplant failure.
(d)    One precision or nonprecision approach with a landing.
(e)    Specific flight characteristics.
(f)    Normal and abnormal procedures.
(g)    Emergency procedures.

82.    Procedures.

a.    Schedule Appointment. Advise the applicant to bring the following documents and records to the appointment:

(1)    FAA Form 8710-1 must be completed in ink or typewritten and signed by the applicant. The applicant must complete sections I, II, III, IV, and V. Section I must have parts A through O1 completed in their entirety. If a flight test is administered, section IIA(1) must indicate the aircraft used during the flight test and the “Total Time” in block 2a. (If tested in an FSTD, this section can be omitted.) The aircraft listed must match the aircraft listed in the designated examiner’s report. Section IIC must be completed when the applicant graduated from an FAA-approved course. Ensure the applicant has given the school name and location (city and state). Section IIE must be completed if the applicant applied through an Air Carrier Training Program. Per § 61.39(a)(7), the applicant must complete section III, Record of Pilot Time. As a special emphasis item, the examiner must review the applicant’s aeronautical experience recorded on FAA Form 8710-1 and in the applicant’s logbook/training record to ensure compliance with the appropriate aeronautical experience requirements for the certificate and/or rating sought. Section IV must be answered “YES” or “NO” if a practical test was administered. If “YES,” ensure the airman’s notice of disapproval is included with the approved application. If the applicant has lost the notice of disapproval, attach a statement to that affect. Section V must be signed and dated by the applicant.
(a)    In section III on FAA Form 8710-1, the applicant must list at least the aeronautical experience required for the airmen certificate and rating sought. Graduates of part 141 pilot schools or part 142 training centers must provide their aeronautical experience in section III even though the graduation certificate is evidence of having completed the course of training.
(b)    If aeronautical experience has no bearing on the airman certification action being sought, it is not necessary for an applicant to complete section III. For example, flight instructor renewal applications, flight instructor reinstatement applications, ground instructor qualification applications, and pilot type rating applications would be examples for which aeronautical experience would not have a bearing on the airman certification action; thus, the applicant would not be required to complete section III of the application. However, all applicants are encouraged to complete section III because it remains on file with the FAA and can be used to substantiate past aeronautical experience in the case of a lost logbook.
(2)    A private pilot, commercial pilot, or ATP certificate, appropriate to pilot certification and rating sought.
(3)    At least a current third class medical certificate and a SODA, if applicable.
(4)    A knowledge test report for the pilot certification level and rating sought, if applicable.
(5)    An FAA-approved pilot school graduation certificate, if applicable.
(6)    The applicant must present a pilot logbook or other acceptable and reliable record(s) as evidence of having met the required aeronautical experience for the certificate and rating sought that substantiates the aeronautical experience shown on FAA Form 8710-1.
(7)    The aircraft maintenance records.
(8)    The aircraft airworthiness certificate.
(9)    The aircraft registration.
(10)    The FCC aircraft station license, if applicable.
(11)    An acceptable form of photo identification.

b.    Applicant Arrives for Appointment. Collect and review the documents and records listed in subparagraphs 87a(1) through (11).

c.    Review Application. Verify that the information on FAA Form 8710-1 is accurate, legible, and complete.

(1)    In section I, ensure that the applicant has checked “ADDITIONAL AIRCRAFT RATING” and “PRIVATE,” “COMMERCIAL,” or “ATP,” as appropriate to the pilot certification level and rating sought. Ensure that the applicant has checked any other applicable boxes.
(2)    Ensure that the remainder of the applicant’s FAA Form 8710-1 is completed in accordance with the instructions attached to the application and the information in this order (see Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 26).
(3)    If the applicant is applying for a private or commercial certificate in conjunction with the type rating, ensure that the flight instructor has signed an endorsement within 60 calendar-days preceding the date of the practical test.

d.    Verify Applicant’s Identity. Inspect acceptable forms of identification to establish the applicant’s identity in accordance with the procedures described in this order (see Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 24).

(1)    Compare the identification with the personal information provided on FAA Form 8710-1.
(2)    When the applicant’s identity is verified, continue with the practical test.
(3)    If the applicant’s identity cannot be verified because of lack of identification or inadequate identification, explain what types of identification are acceptable. Advise the applicant to return with appropriate identification.
(4)    If the applicant’s identity appears to be different from the information supplied on his or her FAA Form 8710-1, or it appears that an attempt at falsification has been made, discontinue the application process and immediately report the matter to the managing FAA office.

e.    Establish Eligibility. Determine that the applicant meets the type rating requirements of § 61.63(d)(1) through (7).

(1)    If the applicant cannot read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, then the pilot/instructor certification process should be terminated unless the reason is because of a medical disability. If the reason for the applicant not being able to read, speak, write, and understand English is because of a medical disability (meaning a hearing impairment or speech impairment that is medically substantiated by a certified medical physician), the designee must refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.
(2)    Determine that the applicant meets the required prerequisite eligibility, aeronautical knowledge, and aeronautical experience/training requirements for the pilot certification level and rating sought.
(3)    Verify that the applicant holds at least a current third class medical certificate.
(4)    Inspect the medical certificate to ensure that it does not bear any limitation that would make a special medical flight test necessary.
(5)    Check the record of flight time in section III on FAA Form 8710-1 to determine that the applicant has the minimum flight experience required for the type rating/grade of pilot certificate sought.
(6)    If the applicant is applying for a test on the basis of graduation from an approved pilot school, inspect the applicant’s graduation certificate to ensure that it is dated within the 60 calendar-days preceding the date of the practical test.
(7)    Examine the applicant’s logbook and/or other reliable record(s) to verify that all aeronautical knowledge, aeronautical experience, and required instructor endorsements are recorded per the instructions in this order (see Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 23e).
(8)    If the applicant is upgrading a certificate or concurrently obtaining an instrument rating, examine the knowledge test report or test report from an approved school with knowledge test authority, as applicable.
(9)    If the applicant has checked the “YES” box of section IV on FAA Form 8710-1, verify that the applicant meets the requirements of § 61.49.

f.    Aircraft Requirements. The applicant will review the aircraft maintenance records, logbooks, airworthiness certificate, and aircraft registration for the purpose of demonstrating aeronautical knowledge about how to determine whether an aircraft is Airworthy and suitable for flight. Ensure that a type rating is required for the aircraft. Determine whether the aircraft’s TCDS establishes single pilot or has a provision for an SIC as the crew composition.

g.    Discrepancies. If a discrepancy that cannot be immediately corrected exists in any of the documents, return the applicant’s FAA Form 8710-1 and all documents to the applicant.

(1)    Inform the applicant of the reasons for ineligibility and explain how the applicant may correct the discrepancies.
(2)    Reschedule the appointment if requested to do so.

h.    Conduct the Practical Test. After determining that the applicant is eligible and meets all prerequisites for the type rating/certificate sought, accept the applicant’s FAA Form 8710-1 and conduct the practical test in accordance with the guidance in the appropriate ATP and Aircraft Type Rating PTS and Chapter 7, Section 2. If the practical test is not completed for reasons other than unsatisfactory performance, issue a letter of discontinuance to the applicant (see Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 16b).

i.    Unsatisfactory Performance. If the applicant did not meet the applicable standards for the certificate sought, inform the applicant of the reasons for the unsatisfactory performance.

(1)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-5 in accordance with the guidance in this order (see Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 32).
(2)    Sign, date, and check the appropriate boxes on the form. Give the applicant a copy of the notice of disapproval and retain the original for the certification file.
(3)    Retain the applicant’s FAA Form 8710-1 and return all other submitted documents to the applicant.
(4)    The examiner should sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the unsatisfactory outcome of the test, and the examiner’s designation number.

j.    Satisfactory Performance. When the applicant has satisfactorily met all requirements for the type rating/certificate sought, prepare FAA Form 8060-4 in accordance with the guidance in this order (see Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 30).

(1)    Enter all previous category, class, and type ratings held by the applicant.
(2)    Enter the type rating under the appropriate airman privileges.
(3)    Enter any required operating limitations such as “CVPBY5 LIMITED TO SEA” or “NB25 VFR ONLY.”
(4)    For type ratings in aircraft whose TCDS require single-pilot competency but allow for an SIC, if the test was demonstrated with an SIC, enter the limitation “SECOND-IN-COMMAND REQUIRED” (Figure 7-25).
(5)    Verify that all information on the form is correct. Sign the certificate and direct the airman to sign line VII of the form.
(6)    Retain the original for the file and give the applicant the copy of the Temporary Airman Certificate.
(7)    The designee should sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the successful outcome of the test, and the examiner’s designation number.

k.    Complete the Certification File. Complete the certification file in accordance with the guidance in this order (see Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 28).

(1)    Mail the completed certification file to the managing FAA office no later than 7 calendar-days after the completion of the test.
(2)    IACRA certification files may be sent directly to AFS-760.

Section 13. Procedures for Issuing a Second-in-Command Pilot Type Rating

83.    General. Designees shall refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 5 for tasks associated with the issuance of a second-in-command (SIC) pilot type rating.

Section 14. Conduct a Private Pilot Certification for Weight Shift Control and Powered Parachute, Including Additional Category/Class Ratings at the Private Pilot Certification Level

84.    General. The designee conducting the practical test ensures the applicant has the aircraft maintenance records, aircraft logbooks, airworthiness certificate, and aircraft registration to determine if the aircraft is Airworthy and suitable for the practical test.

85.    Eligibility Requirements. The applicant must meet the applicable requirements of part 61 subpart E.

a.    Graduate of an Approved Training Program. Under the provisions of § 61.71(a), an applicant who presents an appropriate graduation certificate within 60 calendar-days after the date of graduation from an approved pilot school, certificated under part 141, is considered to have met the prerequisite aeronautical experience requirements of § 61.109.

b.    Graduate of an Approved School with Examining Authority. Under the provisions of § 61.71(a), an applicant who graduated from an approved pilot school that holds examining authority is considered to have met the prerequisite eligibility requirements for the private pilot certificate if the applicant applies within 60 calendar-days of graduation and the school holds the appropriate examining authority. If not, the applicant must apply for the pilot certificate or rating under part 61 and meet all the applicable aeronautical experience requirements under part 61 for the pilot certificate or rating sought.

c.    Not a Graduate of an Approved School. If the applicant is not a graduate of an approved pilot school, or has not applied for a private pilot certificate within the times specified for approved school graduates, the applicant must meet all the applicable prerequisite eligibility requirements of part 61 subpart E.

d.    Aeronautical Knowledge. A private pilot knowledge test report or private pilot test report, from an approved school with knowledge test examining authority, is the only acceptable forms of evidence that the applicant has passed the private pilot knowledge test for a private pilot certificate.

(1)    The format of the knowledge test report from an approved school or computer testing designee must include an embossed seal in the lower right corner and the testing facility’s name and air agency designation number.
(2)    The holder of a category rating for powered aircraft is not required to take a knowledge test for the addition of another category rating to a private pilot certificate.

e.    Aeronautical Experience. The applicant must present a pilot logbook or other acceptable and reliable record(s) as evidence of having met the required aeronautical experience for the certificate and rating sought that substantiates the aeronautical experience shown on the FAA Form 8710-11.

(1)    If the examiner is unable to determine whether the records presented show clear evidence of the required aeronautical experience, the applicant must be referred to the managing FAA office or AFS-610.
(2)    An applicant for a private pilot certificate with a weight shift control or powered parachute rating must have received at least 3 hours of night flight training and an instructor endorsement in accordance with the appropriate provisions of § 61.109. Except as provided in § 61.110, the applicant’s records must indicate that all required night flight training has been received.

f.    Logbook Endorsements.

(1)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies the applicant has received and logged 3 hours of flight training within the 60 calendar‑days preceding the date of the application in preparation for the practical test.
(2)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies the applicant is prepared to pass the practical test. In addition, the applicant should have an FAA Form 8710-11 with the authorized instructor’s digital signature.
(3)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor that states the applicant has demonstrated satisfactory knowledge of the subject areas in which the applicant was deficient on the airman knowledge test.
(4)    An applicant for a private pilot certificate must have logged training and received a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor on the training required by § 61.107(b) that is appropriate for the private pilot rating sought.
(5)    Review the applicant’s Student Pilot Certificate and logbook to ensure they have the appropriate solo flight endorsement(s).
(6)    Review the applicant’s Student Pilot Certificate and logbook to ensure they have the appropriate solo cross-country endorsement(s).

86.    Limitations.

a.    Night Flying Limitations.

(1)    In accordance with § 61.110(a), a person who receives flight training in and resides in the State of Alaska:
(a)    May be issued a pilot certificate with a limitation, “NIGHT FLYING PROHIBITED.”
(b)    Must comply with the appropriate night flight training requirements of this subpart within 12 calendar-months after the issuance of the pilot certificate.
(2)    In accordance with § 61.110(c) a person who does not meet the night flying requirements in § 61.109(d)(2), (i)(2), or (j)(2) is issued a private pilot certificate with the limit “NIGHT FLYING PROHIBITED,” which may be removed by an examiner if the holder complies with the requirements of § 61.109(d)(2), (i)(2), or (j)(2), as appropriate.

b.    Cross-Country Limitations. The limitation, “PASSENGER CARRYING PROHIBITED ON FLIGHTS MORE THAN 10 NM FROM” [the appropriate island], will be entered on the certificate of an applicant whose cross-country experience qualifies under the provisions of § 61.111(c). The limitation, “HOLDER DOES NOT MEET THE CROSS-COUNTRY FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS OF ICAO”, must be entered on the certificate of an applicant whose cross-country experience qualifies under the provisions of § 61.111(c). Cross-country limitations may be removed by an examiner when the certificate holder has complied with the applicable solo cross-country requirements and has passed a practical test on cross-country flying.

c.    English Language. An applicant is required to read, speak, write, and understand the English language in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d. Applicants who are unable to meet one of these requirements due to medical reasons must be referred to the managing FAA office.

87.    Categories and Classes. The category of the aircraft used for the practical test is placed on a private pilot certificate.

a.    Weight Shift Control Class Ratings. The following class ratings are originally issued or added to private pilot weight shift control certificates.

(1)    WEIGHT SHIFT CONTROL LAND.
(2)    WEIGHT SHIFT CONTROL SEA.

b.    Powered Parachute Class Ratings. The following class ratings are originally issued or added to private pilot powered parachute certificates.

(1)    POWERED PARACHUTE LAND.
(2)    POWERED PARACHUTE SEA.

88.    Procedures.

a.    Schedule Appointment. Advise the applicant to bring the following documents and records to the appointment:

(1)    FAA Form 8710-11 must be used. FAA Form 8710-11 may be filled out in IACRA. A special emphasis item, the designee must review the applicant’s aeronautical experience recorded on the FAA Form 8710-11 and in the applicant’s logbook/training record to ensure compliance with the appropriate aeronautical experience requirements for the certificate and/or rating sought have been met. Per § 61.39(a)(7), the applicant is required to sign FAA Form 8710-11 and accurately and fully complete section III, Record of Pilot Time.
(2)    A Student Pilot Certificate, or an airman certificate if for an additional category/class rating.
(3)    At least a third class FAA Form 8500-9 or FAA Form 8420-2, if applicable.
(4)    A Private Pilot knowledge test report, if applicable.
(5)    An FAA-approved pilot school graduation certificate, if applicable.
(6)    The applicant must present a pilot logbook or other acceptable and reliable record(s) as evidence of having met the required aeronautical experience for the certificate and rating sought that substantiates the aeronautical experience shown on FAA Form 8710-11.
(7)    The aircraft maintenance records.
(8)    The aircraft airworthiness certificate.
(9)    The aircraft registration.
(10)    The FCC aircraft station license, if applicable.
(11)    An acceptable form of photo identification.

b.    Applicant Arrives for Appointment. Collect and review the documents and records listed in subparagraphs 96a(1) through (11).

c.    Review Application. Verify that the information on FAA Form 8710-11 is complete and presented accurately and legibly.

(1)    In section I on FAA Form 8710-11, ensure that the applicant has checked “PRIVATE.” If the applicant is seeking an additional aircraft rating, ensure that the applicant has checked “ADDITIONAL AIRCRAFT RATING” and the appropriate aircraft category/class.
(2)    Ensure the remainder of the FAA Form 8710-11 is completed in accordance with the instructions attached to FAA Form 8710-11 and the information in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 27.
(3)    Ensure that the flight instructor has signed an endorsement no more than 60 calendar-days before FAA Form 8710-11 was submitted.

d.    Verify Applicant’s Identity. Inspect acceptable forms of identification to establish the applicant’s identity in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 24.

(1)    Compare the identification with the personal information provided on the FAA Form 8710-11.
(2)    When the applicant’s identity is verified, continue with the practical test.
(3)    If the applicant’s identity cannot be verified because of lack of identification or inadequate identification, explain what types of identification are acceptable. Advise the applicant to return with appropriate identification.
(4)    If the applicant’s identity appears to be different from the information supplied on FAA Form 8710-11, or it appears that an attempt at falsification has been made, discontinue the task and immediately report the matter to the managing FAA office and AFS-610.

e.    Establish Eligibility. Determine if the applicant meets the specific eligibility, aeronautical knowledge, aeronautical experience, and flight proficiency requirements for certification as a private pilot.

(1)    If the applicant is applying for a powered aircraft rating, ensure that the applicant holds at least a current third class airman medical certificate.
(2)    If the airman medical certificate or a SODA, if any, bears any limitation that would make a special medical flight test necessary, refer the applicant to AFS-610.
(3)    Inspect the applicant’s Student Pilot Certificate for current solo and solo cross-country endorsements.
(4)    Check the record of aeronautical experience on FAA Form 8710-11, section III to determine if the applicant has the minimum aeronautical experience required for the certificate and rating sought (§ 61.109).
(5)    If the applicant is applying for a test on the basis of graduation from an approved training program, inspect the applicant’s graduation certificate to verify that the applicant is in compliance with the requirements of § 61.71.
(6)    If the applicant is a graduate of an approved pilot school, the designee should check the applicant’s graduation certificate to ensure that the practical test will be able to be passed within 60 calendar‑days from the date on the graduation certificate. If not, the applicant must apply for the pilot certificate or rating under part 61 and meet all the applicable aeronautical experience requirements under part 61 for the pilot certificate or rating sought.
(7)    Examine the applicant’s logbook and/or other reliable record(s) to verify that all aeronautical knowledge, aeronautical experience, and required instructor endorsements are recorded. (See Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 23e.)
(8)    If the applicant is located on an island from which the required flights cannot be accomplished without flying more than 10 NM over water, refer to § 61.111.
(9)    Examine the knowledge test report or test report from an approved school with knowledge test authority, as applicable.
(10)    If the applicant has checked the “YES” box of section IV of FAA Form 8710-11, verify that the applicant meets the requirements of § 61.49.

f.    Requirements for an Additional Category/Class Rating. The requirements are the same as in subparagraph 96e above, except the knowledge test is not required if the applicant already has a powered aircraft rating.

g.    Aircraft Requirements. Review the applicant’s aircraft maintenance records, logbooks, airworthiness certificate, and aircraft registration to determine if the aircraft is Airworthy and suitable for this practical test, and then return the documents to the applicant.

h.    Discrepancies. If a discrepancy exists in any of the documents and cannot be corrected immediately, return all documents to the applicant.

(1)    Inform the applicant of the reasons for ineligibility and explain how the applicant may correct the discrepancies.
(2)    Reschedule the appointment, if requested to do so.

i.    Conduct the Practical Test. After determining that the applicant is eligible and meets all the prerequisites for the certificate sought, accept the FAA Form 8710-11 and conduct the practical test in accordance with the guidance in the Private Pilot PTS and in Chapter 7, Section 2.

(1)    If the practical test is not completed for reasons other than unsatisfactory performance, issue a letter of discontinuance to the applicant. (See Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 16b.)
(2)    Return all submitted documents to the applicant with the original of the letter of discontinuance.
(3)    Explain how the applicant may complete the test at a later date and reschedule the test, if requested to do so.

j.    Unsatisfactory Performance. If the applicant did not meet the applicable standards for the certificate sought, inform the applicant of the reasons for the unsatisfactory performance.

(1)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-5 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 32.
(2)    Sign, date, and check the appropriate boxes on the FAA Form 8060-5. Give the applicant a copy of the FAA Form 8060-5 and retain the original for the certification file.
(3)    Send FAA Form 8710-11 and FAA Form 8060-5 to AFS-610 return all other documents to the applicant. The designee may complete FAA Form 8710-11 using the IACRA.
(4)    The designee should sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the unsatisfactory outcome of the test, and the designee’s designation number.

k.    Satisfactory Performance. When the applicant has satisfactorily met all requirements for the certificate sought, prepare FAA Form 8060-4 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 30.

(1)    Enter the correct limitations, if appropriate.
(a)    Enter “NIGHT FLYING PROHIBITED,” if appropriate.
(b)    Enter “PASSENGER CARRYING PROHIBITED ON FLIGHT MORE THAN 10 NM FROM [the appropriate island],” and “HOLDER DOES NOT MEET THE CROSS-COUNTRY FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS OF ICAO,” for an applicant whose cross-country aeronautical experience qualifies under § 61.111(c).
(2)    Verify that all information on FAA Form 8060-4 is correct. Sign FAA Form 8060-4 and direct the applicant to sign on line VII.
(3)    Complete FAA 8710-11 or use the IACRA and give the applicant the copy of the FAA Form 8060-4.
(4)    The designee should sign an entry in the applicant’s records after the practical test. That entry must show the type of test, the duration of the flight portion, the successful outcome of the test, and the designee’s designation number.

l.    Complete the Certification File. Complete the certification file in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 28.

Section 15. Conduct a Flight Instructor with a Sport Pilot Rating Practical Test for an Initial, Renewal, or Reinstatement

89.    General. AFS-610 will authorize SFIEs to conduct practical tests for the original issuance, renewal or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate. Field offices can add the authorization for existing DPEs within the jurisdiction of that field office.

a.    Eligibility Requirements. To be eligible for a flight instructor certificate, an applicant must be at least 18 years of age, hold at least a current third class airman medical certificate or a valid U.S. driver’s license, sport pilot certificate or higher, and meet the applicable requirements of part 61 subpart K.

b.    Airman Medical Certification Requirements. An applicant for an initial flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, renewal or reinstatement of an expired flight instructor certificate is required to hold at least a current third class airman medical certificate FAA Form 8500-9 or a valid U.S. driver’s license, if the practical test is conducted in an aircraft in flight (e.g., in an airplane, airship, gyroplane, weight-shift, or powered parachute). If the practical test does not involve use of an aircraft in flight, the applicant is not required to hold an airman medical certificate or a valid U.S. driver’s license.

Note:  If the airman medical certificate or valid U.S. driver’s license bears any limitation, which would make a special airman medical flight test necessary, refer the applicant to AFS-610.

c.    Category and Class Privileges. A flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating does not list aircraft category ratings. When the practical test for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating is successfully passed, a logbook entry will be required for all category privileges authorized.

90.    General Procedures Initial Certification.

a.    Logbook Endorsements. An applicant for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating must present a logbook with the following endorsements, as appropriate from an authorized flight instructor. The endorsement should be similar to the sample endorsement provided in the current edition of AC 61-65, Certification: Pilots and Flight and Ground Instructors.

(1)    Except as provided in § 61.407(c), an applicant for a flight instructor certificate must have logged training and received a logbook endorsement on the fundamentals of instruction listed in § 61.407(a).
(2)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies the applicant has received and logged some training within the 60 calendar-days preceding the date of the application in preparation for the practical test.
(3)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies the applicant is prepared to pass the practical test. In addition, the applicant must have an FAA Form 8710-11 with the authorized instructor’s signature.
(4)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor that states the applicant has demonstrated satisfactory knowledge of the subject areas in which the applicant was deficient on the airman knowledge test, as appropriate.
(5)    An applicant must have received flight instruction and a logbook endorsement by a flight instructor meeting the requirements of § 61.409 in the subjects appropriate to the flight instructor with a sport pilot rating.
(6)    An applicant for a flight instructor certificate must have logged training and received a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor on the training required by § 61.411 that is appropriate to the flight instructor with a sport pilot rating.
(7)    An applicant for a sport pilot flight instructor-airplane privileges or sport pilot flight instructor‑glider privileges must present a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor indicating that the applicant is competent and possesses instructional proficiency in stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery procedures in an airplane or glider, as appropriate.
(a)    Except in the case of a retest after a failure for the deficiencies stated in § 61.49(b), the designee may either accept the logbook endorsement or require the applicant to demonstrate competency and instructional proficiency in stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery procedures.
(b)    If a notice of disapproval was issued due to deficiencies in competency and instructional proficiency in stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery procedures, the applicant is required to spin the aircraft and demonstrate competency and instructional proficiency in stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery procedures on the retest.
(c)    The designee and the applicant are not required to wear parachutes for spin task demonstration during a flight instructor practical test.

b.    Aeronautical Knowledge. The applicant must meet the aeronautical knowledge requirements of § 61.405(a). The flight instructor knowledge examination consists of two tests: FOI and a test appropriate to the category privileges sought.

(1)    FOI Test Alternate Criteria. An applicant for the original issuance of a flight instructor certificate need not take the FOI test if the applicant meets certain alternate criteria. However, the applicant must present appropriate documentation to the FAA office or AFS-610 and obtain an authorization to use either of the following in lieu of the FOI test:
(a)    A current teacher’s certificate issued by a state, county, or city authorizing the applicant to teach at an educational level of the 7th grade or higher; or
(b)    Evidence of regular employment as a teacher at an accredited college or university.
(2)    Test for Flight Instructor with Sport Pilot Rating. If the applicant seeks to provide training in light-sport aircraft, the applicant must receive a logbook endorsement from the authorized instructor who trained him or her on the applicable Areas of Operation specified in § 61.409 certifying the applicant has met the aeronautical knowledge for the category and class flight instructor privilege sought.
(a)    Aeronautical Experience. The applicant must present acceptable evidence of meeting the minimum aeronautical experience requirements of § 61.411.
(b)    Aeronautical Skill. The original issuance of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating will be issued by an SFIE. The applicant must demonstrate aeronautical skill by satisfactorily completing the practical test prescribed by § 61.405(b). The test will be conducted in accordance with the appropriate Sport Pilot PTS. The designee may also require the applicant to demonstrate knowledge and skill from other PTSs that may include sport pilot certificate or private pilot certificate, if appropriate.

91.    General Procedures for Renewal or Reinstatement. An SFIE is authorized to conduct the renewal or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating. However, the basis for issuing the renewal or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate will be based on the applicant satisfactorily accomplishing a practical test (e.g., the oral and flight portions) as required by § 61.197(a)(1). The designee may require an applicant for the renewal or reinstatement to complete all or any portion of the flight instructor practical test that the designee deems necessary to determine the applicant’s competence to hold a flight instructor certificate. But as a minimum the designee will evaluate the Areas of Operation and task designated in the appropriate Sport Pilot PTS.

a.    Endorsement Not Required. A flight instructor endorsement is not required for the renewal or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate except in accordance with the provisions of § 61.49 for a retest.

b.    Expiration Date. A flight instructor certificate is renewed or reinstated with an expiration date 24 calendar-months after the date of the renewal or reinstatement.

c.    Examiner Qualifications for Renewal or Reinstatements of Applicants with Multiple Category Privileges. In order to conduct a practical test for the renewal or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate with more than one aircraft category privilege, a designee must be designated in at least one of the categories of aircraft to be renewed and hold SFIE authority.

d.    Renewal of All Flight Instructor Privileges. An applicant may renew all privileges for a current flight instructor certificate by satisfactorily completing one practical test. The satisfactory completion of a practical test for an additional flight instructor privilege constitutes the renewal of all flight instructor privileges listed on the certificate.

92.    Denial of Renewal or Reinstatement. If an applicant is unable to meet the requirements for renewal or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate by satisfactorily completing the applicable practical test, the designee issues the applicant FAA Form 8060-5. If renewal or reinstatement has been denied on the basis of the applicant’s piloting proficiency, the designee should document the deficiencies and contact AFS-610. AFS-610 may consider the need for possible recertification action.

93.    Gold Seal Flight Instructor Certificates. A qualified flight instructor may request the issuance of a gold seal flight instructor certificate when renewing his or her flight instructor certificate or at any time the flight instructor makes application upon meeting the requirements. Only an ASI is authorized to issue the initial gold seal on a flight instructor certificate. A designee who is authorized to conduct flight instructor renewal/reinstatement practical tests or renewal of a flight instructor certificate (i.e., FIRE) may renew/reinstate a gold seal on a flight instructor certificate.

a.    Gold Seal Requirements. A gold seal certificate may be issued to a flight instructor who holds a ground instructor certificate with a basic ground instructor rating; and has met one of the following criteria within the past 24 calendar-months:

(1)    Trained and recommended at least 10 applicants for an original certificate with at least 80 percent of those applicants recommended passing the practical test on his or her first attempt.
(2)    Conducted at least 20 certification practical tests as a designee or conducted 20 certification graduation tests as a chief flight instructor for an approved pilot school course.
(3)    A combination of the training and testing requirements listed in this section. (Two tests conducted equal one applicant trained and recommended.)

b.    Renewal of a Gold Seal Certificate. The holder of a gold seal flight instructor certificate is not required to meet the criteria for the gold seal again. A flight instructor who qualifies for a gold seal certificate is entitled to receive another gold seal certificate on all flight instructor certificate renewals and/or reinstatements.

94.    Category and Class Privileges for a Flight Instructor Certificate with a Sport Pilot Rating. The following privileges are by logbook endorsements for flight instructor certificate with sport pilot rating where applicable:

a.    Aircraft Categories.

(1)    AIRPLANE.
(2)    GYROPLANE.
(3)    WEIGHT-SHIFT CONTROL.
(4)    POWERED PARACHUTE.
(5)    LIGHTER-THAN-AIR.
(6)    GLIDER.

b.    Airplane Classes. SINGLE ENGINE.

95.    Procedures.

a.    Schedule Appointment. Advise the applicant to bring the following documents and records to the appointment:

(1)    An FAA Form 8710-11 must be completed. As a special emphasis item, the examiner must review the applicant’s aeronautical experience recorded on FAA Form 8710-11 and in the applicant’s logbook/training record to ensure compliance with the appropriate aeronautical experience requirements for the certificate, rating, or privilege sought have been met. Per § 61.39(a)(7), the applicant is required to sign FAA Form 8710-11 and accurately and fully complete section III, Record of Pilot Time. If the applicant is retesting after a failure, FAA Form 8710-11 must be endorsed on the back side of the form by the applicant’s flight instructor.
(2)    A pilot certificate.
(3)    A current or expired flight instructor certificate, if for renewal/reinstatement.
(4)    A current airman medical certificate or a valid U.S. driver’s license, if acting as PIC.
(5)    Knowledge test report(s) or authorization to use alternate criteria for the FOI test, if applicable.
(6)    An FAA-approved pilot school graduation certificate, if applicable.
(7)    The applicant must present a pilot logbook or other acceptable and reliable record(s) as evidence of having met the required aeronautical experience for the certificate, rating, or privilege sought that substantiates the aeronautical experience shown on the FAA Form 8710-11.
(8)    The aircraft maintenance records.
(9)    The aircraft airworthiness certificate and operating limitations or approved flight manual for each aircraft to be used.
(10)    The aircraft registration.
(11)    The FCC license, if required.
(12)    An acceptable form of photo identification.

b.    Applicant Arrives for Appointment. Collect and review the documents and records listed in subparagraphs 103a(1) through (12).

c.    Review Application. Verify that the information on the application is presented accurately and completely.

(1)    On FAA Form 8710-11, section I, ensure that the applicant has checked “SPORT PILOT FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR,” and noted “INITIAL,” “RENEWAL,” or “REINSTATEMENT,” as appropriate to the practical test being requested.
(2)    Ensure that the remainder of FAA Form 8710-11 is completed in accordance with the instructions attached to the form and the information provided in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 27.
(3)    If the applicant is applying for the original issuance of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, ensure that an authorized flight instructor has signed an endorsement within 60 calendar-days before the practical test.

d.    Verify Applicant’s Identity. Inspect acceptable forms of identification to establish the applicant’s identity in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 24.

(1)    Compare the identification with the personal information provided on FAA Form 8710-11.
(2)    When the applicant’s identity is verified, continue.
(3)    If the applicant’s identity cannot be verified because of lack of identification or inadequate identification, explain what types of identification are acceptable. Advise the applicant to return with appropriate identification.
(4)    If the applicant’s identity appears to be different from the information supplied on the application, or it appears that an attempt at falsification has been made, discontinue the task and immediately report the matter to the local managing FAA office and AFS-610.

e.    Establish Eligibility. For the original issuance of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, determine if the applicant meets the general eligibility, aeronautical knowledge, and flight proficiency requirements for the flight instructor certificate (§§ 61.403, 61.405, 61.407, 61.409, and 61.411).

(1)    Determine if the applicant holds at least a sport pilot certificate or higher with the appropriate category/class privilege or rating sought.
(2)    Verify that the applicant holds at least a current third class airman medical certificate or a valid U.S. driver’s license, if applicable.
(3)    Determine whether the applicant is able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d.
(4)    If the applicant is applying for a test on the basis of graduation from an approved pilot school, inspect the applicant’s graduation certificate to verify that the applicant meets the requirements of § 61.71(a) which requires the applicant’s graduation certificate is dated within 60 days of completion of the practical test.
(5)    Examine the applicant’s logbooks and/or other reliable record(s) to verify that all aeronautical knowledge and flight proficiency requirements are recorded. Verify the required endorsements for ground and flight instruction have been certified by an authorized flight instructor.
(6)    Have the applicant present evidence of satisfactory completion, of a course of instruction in the subjects listed in §§ 61.407 and 61.409 or an acceptable equivalent.
(7)    As applicable to the flight instructor privilege sought, inspect the applicant’s knowledge test report(s), test report(s) from an approved school with knowledge test examining authority, or authorization to use acceptable alternative criteria in lieu of the FOI test.
(8)    If a flight instructor is applying for renewal of his or her flight instructor certificate, determine whether the flight instructor certificate is still current. If the certificate is not current, advise the applicant that the flight instructor certificate is no longer current and that he or she must submit to a re-instatement practical test, in accordance with § 61.427.
(9)    If the applicant has checked the “YES” box of section IV of FAA Form 8710-11 entitled “HAVE YOU FAILED A TEST FOR THIS CERTIFICATE OR RATING,” verify that the applicant meets the requirements of § 61.49, if appropriate.

f.    Aircraft Requirements. Review the aircraft’s airworthiness certificate, aircraft registration, and aircraft maintenance records or logbooks for the last annual condition inspection, 100-hour inspection, if applicable, and compliance with applicable Airworthiness Directives (AD) and safety directives to determine if the aircraft is in a safe condition for flight and suitable for this practical test. Verify that the aircraft (airplane or glider) to be used is certificated for spins, if required. Aircraft used must meet the definition of light-sport aircraft in accordance with § 1.1. After reviewing the documents, return them to the applicant.

g.    Discrepancies. If a discrepancy that cannot be immediately corrected exists in any of the documents, return the application and all documents to the applicant.

(1)    Inform the applicant of the reasons for ineligibility and explain how the applicant may correct the discrepancies.
(2)    Reschedule the appointment, if requested to do so.

h.    Conduct the Practical Test. After determining that the applicant is eligible and meets all prerequisites for the flight instructor certificate and associated rating(s) or privilege(s) sought, accept FAA Form 8710-11 and conduct the practical test in accordance with the guidance in the appropriate PTS and Chapter 7, Section 2.

(1)    If the practical test is not completed for reasons other than unsatisfactory performance, issue a letter of discontinuance to the applicant. (See Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 16b.)
(2)    Return the application and all submitted documents to the applicant with the original of the letter of discontinuance.
(3)    Explain how the applicant may complete the test at a later date.

i.    Unsatisfactory Performance. If the applicant does not meet the applicable standards for the certificate or rating sought, inform the applicant of the reasons for the unsatisfactory performance.

(1)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-5 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 32.
(2)    Sign, date, and check the appropriate boxes on FAA Form 8060-5. Give the applicant a copy of the FAA Form 8060-5.
(3)    Send FAA Form 8710-11 and FAA Form 8060-5 to AFS-610. The examiner may use the IACRA.

j.    Satisfactory Performance. When the applicant has satisfactorily met all requirements for the flight instructor certificate, prepare FAA Form 8060-4 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 30.

(1)    Endorse the appropriate flight instructor privilege in the applicant’s logbook.
(2)    Place the following notation on line XIII of the FAA Form 8060-4. “VALID ONLY WHEN ACCOMPANIED BY PILOT CERTIFICATE NO. [enter number]. EXPIRES [enter date].”
(3)    If the applicant is eligible for a gold seal flight instructor certificate, enter the notation “GOLD SEAL CERTIFICATE” in the block containing the “Original Issuance/Reissuance” boxes on FAA Form 8060-4. (See Figures 7-30 and 7-30A.)

Note:  Only an ASI is authorized to issue the initial gold seal on a flight instructor certificate. A designee who is authorized to conduct flight instructor renewal/reinstatement practical tests or renewal of a flight instructor certificate (i.e., FIRE) may renew/reinstate a gold seal on a flight instructor certificate.

(4)    Verify that all information on the FAA Form 8060-4 is correct. Sign FAA Form 8060-4 and direct the applicant to sign Line VII.
(5)    Retain the original FAA Form 8060-4 for the certification file, and give the applicant a copy of the FAA Form 8060-4.

k.    Complete the Certification File. Complete the certification file in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 28.

Section 16. Conduct a Flight Instructor Practical Test for an Initial, Renewal, Reinstatement Certification, or an Additional Category/Class Rating to a Flight Instructor Certificate

96.    General. FAA offices authorize FIEs to conduct practical tests for the original issuance of a flight instructor certificate on a case-by-case basis only. However, if an FAA office is unable to schedule a flight instructor applicant who has completed training and is prepared to take the test with an ASI within two weeks from the date of the original request, then the Flight Standards Service (AFS) division and FAA office managers are encouraged to approve the designation of a local FIE to give initial flight instructor practical tests. Additionally, FAA offices authorize FIREs the authority to renew holders of a current flight instructor certificate provided that the renewal only involves an administrative process and no practical test is involved. (See Chapter 7, Section 20 for a detailed explanation of the eligibly and authority of a FIRE.)

a.    Authorization to Conduct Renewals and Reinstatements.

(1)    An FIE is authorized to conduct the renewal or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate. However, the basis for issuing the renewal or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate will be based on the applicant satisfactorily accomplishing a practical test (i.e., the oral and flight portions) as per § 61.197(a)(1).
(2)    A designee who holds a FIRE authority may renew holders of current flight instructor certificates provided that the renewal only involves an administrative process and no practical test is involved. A FIRE’s authority permits renewal of a current flight instructor certificate in accordance with the flight instructor renewal provisions set forth in § 61.197(a)(2)(i) and (iii) or in accordance with a flight instructor’s participation as a flight instructor in the FAA’s Pilot Proficiency Awards Program (WINGS). Specifically, a FIRE’s authority to renew holders of current flight instructor certificates involves the following kinds of renewal procedures only:
(a)    A FIRE may renew a holder of a current flight instructor certificate who applies to renew their flight instructor certificate on the basis of having a record of training students that shows, during the preceding 24 calendar-months, that the flight instructor has endorsed at least five students for a practical test for a certificate or rating and at least 80 percent of those students passed that test on the first attempt (i.e., § 61.197(a)(2)(i)).
(b)    A FIRE may renew a holder of a current flight instructor certificate who applies to renew their flight instructor certificate on the basis of having a graduation certificate that shows, within the preceding 3 calendar-months before the date of application, the applicant has successfully completed an approved flight instructor refresher course in accordance with § 61.197(a)(2)(iii).
(c)    A FIRE may renew a holder of a current flight instructor certificate who applies to renew their flight instructor certificate on the basis of having participated as a flight instructor in a phase of the FAA’s WINGS Program.

b.    Medical Certification Requirements.

(1)    An applicant for an initial, renewed, or reinstated flight instructor certificate or additional ratings is required to hold at least a current third class medical certificate if the practical test is conducted in an aircraft in flight (meaning in an airplane, rotorcraft, or powered-lift) with the applicant acting as PIC. If the practical test does not involve use of an aircraft in flight, the applicant is not required to hold a medical certificate.
(2)    If the applicant does not hold a medical certificate and the practical test will be conducted in an aircraft (airplane, rotorcraft, or powered-lift), the designee must agree to be the PIC. However, an examiner is not required to accept PIC responsibility for an applicant just because the applicant lacks the necessary medical certificate. The decision to conduct such a test rests solely with the designee. The FAA strongly discourages designees from agreeing to perform PIC duties during the practical test. Designees who agree to perform PIC duties during a practical test are advised to review § 61.47. Designees must understand that there are possible liability ramifications when agreeing to perform PIC duties during the practical test.

97.    Knowledge Test. The flight instructor knowledge examination consists of two tests: FOI and a test appropriate to the flight instructor rating sought. The FOI test is common to all flight instructor ratings and does not need to be repeated for a subsequent flight instructor rating if the applicant holds any flight instructor or ground instructor certificate.

a.    FOI Test Alternate Criteria. An applicant for the original issuance of a flight instructor certificate does not need to take the FOI test if the applicant meets certain alternate criteria. However, the applicant must present appropriate documentation to the managing FAA office and obtain an authorization to use either of the following in lieu of the FOI test:

(1)    A current teacher’s certificate issued by a State, county, or city authorizing the applicant to teach at an educational level of the seventh grade or higher; or
(2)    Evidence of regular employment as a teacher at an accredited college or university.

b.    Test for Flight Instructor Rating Sought. Except when adding an Airplane Single-Engine rating or Airplane Multiengine rating to an existing Flight Instructor—Airplane certificate, an applicant for a flight instructor certificate must pass the applicable knowledge test for each flight instructor aircraft rating sought. A knowledge test is required for the following ratings:

(1)    Flight Instructor—Airplane.
(2)    Flight Instructor—Rotorcraft Helicopter.
(3)    Flight Instructor—Rotorcraft Gyroplane.
(4)    Flight Instructor—Instrument Airplane.
(5)    Flight Instructor—Instrument Helicopter.
(6)    Flight Instructor—Instrument Powered-lift.
(7)    Flight Instructor—Glider.
(8)    Flight Instructor—Powered-lift.

98.    Practical Test. The designee will conduct the practical test for original issuance, additional ratings, renewal, and/or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate in accordance with the appropriate flight instructor PTS. The designee may also require the applicant to demonstrate knowledge and skill from other PTSs that may include private pilot certificate, commercial pilot certificate, or instrument rating PTS, appropriate to the rating sought.

Note:  A turbojet or fan jet will not be used for the original issuance of a flight instructor certificate for an Airplane Single-Engine rating or Airplane Multiengine rating. They may be used for added Airplane Single-Engine rating or Airplane Multiengine rating.

99.    Eligibility Requirements. A flight instructor applicant must hold either a commercial pilot certificate or an ATP airman certificate. A commercial certificate issued on the basis of a foreign pilot license does not satisfy this requirement. If the applicant holds a commercial pilot certificate, that applicant must also hold an instrument—airplane rating if applying for a flight instructor—airplane or a flight instructor instrument—airplane rating.

a.    English Requirement. If the applicant cannot read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, then the pilot/instructor certification process should be terminated unless the reason is because of a medical disability. If the reason for the applicant not being able to read, speak, write, and understand English is because of a medical disability (meaning a hearing impairment or speech impairment that is medically substantiated by a certified medical physician), the designee must refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.

b.    Medical Certificate. An applicant for a flight instructor certificate is not required to hold a current medical certificate. If the applicant is the PIC, then a current third class medical certificate is required.

c.    Logbook Endorsement. An applicant for a Flight Instructor—Airplane or Flight Instructor—Glider rating must present a logbook endorsement from an authorized flight instructor who indicates the applicant is competent and proficient in stall awareness, spin entry, spin, and spin recovery procedures in an aircraft of the appropriate category.

(1)    Except as provided in § 61.185(b), an applicant for a flight instructor certificate must have logged training and received a logbook endorsement on the fundamentals of instruction listed in § 61.185(a)(1).
(2)    The applicant's logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies the applicant has received and logged training within the 2 calendar-months preceding the date of the application in preparation for the practical test.
(3)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor who certifies the applicant is prepared to pass the practical test. In addition, the applicant must have a signed FAA Form 8710-1 with the authorized instructor’s signature.
(4)    The applicant’s logbook or training record must contain an endorsement from an authorized instructor that states the applicant has demonstrated satisfactory knowledge of the subject areas in which the applicant was deficient on the airman knowledge test.
(5)    An applicant for a flight instructor certificate must have logged training and received a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor on the training required by § 61.187(b) that is appropriate for the flight instructor rating sought.
(6)    An applicant for a Flight Instructor—Airplane or Flight Instructor—Glider rating must present a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor indicating that the applicant is competent and possesses instructional proficiency in stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery procedures in an airplane or glider, as appropriate.
(a)    Except in the case of a retest after a failure for the deficiencies stated in § 61.49(b), the examiner may either accept the logbook endorsement or require the applicant to demonstrate competency and instructional proficiency in stall awareness, spin entry, spin, and spin recovery procedures.
(b)    If FAA Form 8060-5 was issued due to deficiencies in competency and instructional proficiency in stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery procedures, the applicant is required to spin the aircraft and demonstrate competency and instructional proficiency in stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery procedures on the retest.
(c)    The designee and the applicant are not required to wear parachutes for spin task demonstration during a flight instructor practical test.
(7)    For first-time flight instructor applicants, both the instructor who provided all the required training and the recommending instructor making the endorsements must have met the requirements of § 61.195(h). This requirement does not apply to flight instructor applicants seeking an additional rating because those applicants are not considered first-time flight instructor applicants.

d.    Flight Proficiency Endorsement. An applicant must have received flight instruction by a flight instructor meeting the requirements of § 61.187(b) in the subjects appropriate to the flight instructor rating sought.

(1)    The applicant’s logbook must contain an endorsement from that flight instructor certifying that the applicant is competent to pass a test on those subjects.
(2)    Other flight instructors not necessarily meeting those requirements may have given the applicant instruction; however, some instruction in each subject and the appropriate logbook endorsement must have been given by a flight instructor meeting the requirements of § 61.187(b).

e.    Aeronautical Knowledge. The applicant must present evidence of meeting the requirements of § 61.185(a) and (b). The applicant may use the following items to show compliance with § 61.185(a):

(1)    A certificate of graduation from an appropriate pilot training course;
(2)    A certificate of graduation from an appropriate ground school course;
(3)    A certificate of graduation from an appropriate home study course;
(4)    A statement by an authorized ground or flight instructor certifying that the applicant has satisfactorily completed an appropriate home study course;
(5)    A statement by an authorized ground or flight instructor certifying that the applicant has satisfactorily completed an appropriate course of instruction given by an authorized ground or flight instructor; or
(6)    A certified college transcript or teaching certificate that lists the following items or their equivalents:
(a)    Educational psychology;
(b)    General psychology;
(c)    Tests and measurement;
(d)    Teaching methods in aviation or science;
(e)    Secondary school curriculum development and lesson planning; and
(f)    Practice teaching in a classroom or on the flight line.

f.    Flight Instructor Endorsements. An applicant may meet the requirements of § 61.185(b) without further instruction, provided the ground instruction required by §§ 61.105(a), 61.125(a), and 61.65(b), as applicable, was endorsed by an authorized ground and/or flight instructor.

(1)    The applicant may also present a flight or ground instructor’s endorsement certifying that the instruction required by § 61.185(a) has been accomplished. The endorsement should be similar to the sample endorsement provided in AC 61-65.
(2)    A graduate of an approved pilot school may present a record of training, certified by the approved school, which lists the subjects covered.

g.    Knowledge Test Report. The applicant must present the required knowledge test report(s) except when adding a single or multiengine class rating to an existing flight instructor certificate.

100.    General Procedures for Renewal or Reinstatement. The examiner may require an applicant for renewal or reinstatement to complete all or any portion of the flight instructor practical test that the examiner deems necessary to determine the applicant’s competence to hold a flight instructor certificate.

a.    Endorsement Not Required. A flight instructor endorsement is not required for the renewal or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate except in accordance with the provisions of § 61.49 for a retest.

b.    Expiration Date. A flight instructor certificate is renewed or reinstated with an expiration date 24 calendar-months after the month of renewal/reinstatement or the month of expiration of the current flight instructor certificate, provided the provisions of § 61.197(a) are accomplished within the 3 calendar-months preceding the expiration month of the current flight instructor certificate.

c.    Examiner Qualifications for Renewal Tests of Applicants with Multiple Category Ratings. In order to conduct a practical test for the renewal of a flight instructor certificate with more than one aircraft category rating, an examiner must hold FIRE authority or be designated in at least one of the categories of aircraft on the flight instructor certificate to be renewed.

d.    Renewal of All Ratings. An applicant may renew all ratings on a current flight instructor certificate by satisfactorily completing one practical test. Also, the satisfactory completion of a practical test for an additional flight instructor rating constitutes the renewal of a flight instructor certificate.

101.    Denial of Renewal or Reinstatement. If an applicant is unable to meet the requirements for renewal or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate or rating by satisfactorily completing the applicable practical test, the designee issues the applicant a Notice of Disapproval of Application. If renewal or reinstatement has been denied on the basis of the applicant’s piloting proficiency, the designee should document the deficiencies and contact the FAA office for possible recertification consideration.

102.    Gold Seal Flight Instructor Certificates. A qualified flight instructor may request the issuance of a gold seal flight instructor certificate when renewing his or her flight instructor certificate or at any time the flight instructor applies upon meeting the requirements. Only an ASI is authorized to issue the initial gold seal on a flight instructor certificate. A designee who is authorized to conduct flight instructor renewal/reinstatement practical tests or renewal of a flight instructor certificate (i.e., FIRE) may renew/reinstate a gold seal on a flight instructor certificate.

a.    Gold Seal Requirements. A gold seal certificate may be issued to a flight instructor who holds a flight instructor certificate and a commercial pilot certificate with an instrument rating; holds a ground instructor certificate with an advanced or an instrument ground instructor rating; and has met one of the following criteria within the past 24 calendar-months:

(1)    Trained and recommended at least 10 applicants for certificates or ratings with at least 80 percent of those applicants recommended passing the practical test on their first attempt.
(2)    Conducted at least 20 certification practical tests as an examiner or conducted 20 graduation tests as a chief flight instructor for an approved pilot school course.
(3)    Fulfills a combination of the training and testing requirements listed in subparagraphs 110a(1) and (2).

Note:  Two tests conducted equal one applicant trained and recommended.

(4)    Holds a master flight instructor certificate from the National Association of Flight Instructors (NAFI).

b.    Renewal of a Gold Seal Flight Instructor Certificate. The holder of a gold seal flight instructor certificate is not required to meet the criteria for the gold seal again. A flight instructor who qualifies for a gold seal is entitled to receive another gold seal on all flight instructor certificate renewals and/or reinstatements.

103.    Category, Class, and Instrument Ratings Placed on a Flight Instructor Certificate. The following ratings are placed on flight instructor certificates where applicable:

a.    Aircraft Category Ratings:

(1)    AIRPLANE.
(2)    ROTORCRAFT.
(3)    POWERED-LIFT.
(4)    GLIDER.

b.    Airplane Class Ratings:

(1)    SINGLE-ENGINE.
(2)    MULTIENGINE.

c.    Rotorcraft Class Ratings:

(1)    HELICOPTER.
(2)    GYROPLANE.

d.    Instrument Ratings:

(1)    INSTRUMENT—AIRPLANE.
(2)    INSTRUMENT—HELICOPTER.
(3)    INSTRUMENT—POWERED-LIFT.

104.    Limitations. There is no provision for an examiner or an inspector to issue operating limitations on a flight instructor certificate.

105.    Procedures.

a.    Schedule Appointment. Advise the applicant to bring the following documents and records to the appointment:

(1)    FAA Form 8710-1 must be completed in ink or typewritten and signed by the applicant. The applicant must complete sections I, II, IV, and V. Section I must have parts A through O1 completed in their entirety. If a flight test is administered, section IIA(1) must indicate the aircraft used during the flight test and the “Total Time” in block 2a. The aircraft listed must match the aircraft listed in the designated examiner’s report. Section IIC must be completed when the applicant graduated from an FAA-approved course (this does not include FIRCs). Ensure the applicant has given the school name and location (city and State). The applicant is not required to complete section III, Record of Pilot Time, but it is recommended. However, if the application is for an added flight instructor rating, then the applicant must show 15 hours of PIC time in the category and class of aircraft appropriate to the rating sought. Section IV must be answered “YES” or “NO” if a flight test was administered. If “YES,” ensure the airman’s notice of disapproval is included with the approved application. If the applicant has lost the notice of disapproval, attach a statement to that affect. Section V must be signed and dated by the applicant.
(a)    In section III on FAA Form 8710-1, the applicant must list at least the aeronautical experience required for the airmen certificate and rating sought. Graduates of part 141 pilot schools or part 142 training centers must provide their aeronautical experience in section III on FAA Form 8710-1 even though the graduation certificate is evidence of having completed the course of training.
(b)    If aeronautical experience has no bearing on the airman certification action being sought, it is not necessary for an applicant to complete section III on FAA Form 8710-1. For example, flight instructor renewal applications, ground instructor qualification applications, and pilot type rating applications would be applications where aeronautical experience would not have a bearing on the airmen certification action and thus the applicant would not be required to complete section III of FAA Form 8710-1. However, all applicants are encouraged to complete section III on FAA Form 8710-1. FAA Form 8710-1 remains on file with the FAA and can be used to substantiate past aeronautical experience if a person were to lose their logbook.
(2)    A commercial pilot certificate (with an instrument rating, if applicable) or an ATP airman certificate with instrument privileges (if instrument privileges are applicable).
(3)    A current or expired flight instructor certificate, if for renewal/reinstatement.
(4)    A current third class airman medical certificate, if any.
(5)    Knowledge test report(s) or authorization to use alternate criteria for the FOI test, if applicable.
(6)    An FAA-approved pilot school graduation certificate, if applicable.
(7)    A pilot logbook or other acceptable and reliable record(s) as evidence of having met the required aeronautical experience for the certificate and rating sought and to substantiate the aeronautical experience shown on FAA Form 8710-1.
(8)    The aircraft maintenance records.
(9)    The aircraft airworthiness certificate and operating limitations or approved flight manual for each aircraft to be used.
(10)    The aircraft registration.
(11)    The FCC aircraft station license.
(12)    An acceptable form of photo identification.

b.    Applicant Arrives for Appointment. Collect and review the documents and records listed in subparagraphs 113a(1) through (12).

c.    Review Application. Verify that the information on the application is accurate and complete.

(1)    In section I on FAA Form 8710-1, ensure that the applicant has checked “FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR” and noted “INITIAL,” “RENEWAL,” “REINSTATEMENT,” or “ADDITIONAL RATING(S) ON A FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR CERTIFICATE,” as appropriate to the practical test being requested.
(2)    Ensure that the remainder of FAA Form 8710-1 is completed in accordance with the instructions attached to the form and the information provided in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 26.
(3)    If the applicant is applying for the original issuance of a flight instructor certificate, ensure that an authorized flight instructor has signed an endorsement within 2 calendar-months preceding the practical test.

d.    Verify Applicant’s Identity. Inspect acceptable forms of identification to establish the applicant’s identity in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 24.

(1)    Compare the identification with the personal information provided on FAA Form 8710-1.
(2)    When the applicant’s identity is verified, continue.
(3)    If the applicant’s identity cannot be verified because of lack of identification or inadequate identification, explain what types of identification are acceptable. Advise the applicant to return with appropriate identification.
(4)    If the applicant’s identity appears to be different from the information supplied on the application, or it appears that an attempt at falsification has been made, discontinue the task and immediately report the matter to the managing FAA office.

e.    Establish Eligibility. If the applicant is applying for the original issuance of a flight instructor certificate, determine that the applicant meets the general eligibility, aeronautical knowledge, and flight proficiency requirements for the flight instructor certificate or rating sought (under §§ 61.183, 61.185, and 61.187).

(1)    If the applicant cannot read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, then the pilot/instructor certification process should be terminated unless the reason is because of a medical disability. If the reason for the applicant not being able to read, speak, write, and understand English is because of a medical disability (meaning a hearing impairment or speech impairment that is medically substantiated by a certified medical physician), the designee must refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.
(2)    Determine that the applicant holds at least a commercial pilot certificate or an ATP certificate with an aircraft rating appropriate to the flight instructor rating sought. If the applicant is seeking an airplane flight instructor or an instrument flight instructor rating, verify that the applicant has an instrument rating.
(3)    Verify that the applicant holds at least a current third-class airman medical certificate, if applicable. If the applicant does not hold a medical certificate and the test is to be conducted in an airplane or rotorcraft, decide whether to accept PIC responsibility in order to conduct the test.
(4)    If the applicant is applying for a test on the basis of graduation from an approved pilot school, inspect the applicant’s graduation certificate to verify that the applicant meets the requirements of § 61.71(a), which requires an applicant’s graduation certificate to be dated within 60 days of completion of the practical test.
(5)    Examine the applicant’s logbooks and/or other reliable record(s) to verify that all aeronautical knowledge and flight proficiency requirements are recorded. Verify that the required endorsements for ground and flight instruction have been certified by an authorized flight instructor (under §§ 61.185(a) and 61.187(a)).
(6)    Have the applicant present evidence of satisfactory completion of a course of instruction in the subjects listed in § 61.185(a), or an acceptable equivalent.
(7)    As applicable to the flight instructor rating sought, inspect the applicant’s knowledge test report(s), test report(s) from an approved school with knowledge test examining authority, or authorization to use acceptable alternative criteria in lieu of the FOI test.
(8)    If a flight instructor is applying for renewal of his or her flight instructor certificate and rating(s), determine whether the certificate is current. If the certificate is no longer current, advise the applicant that he or she must submit a reinstatement practical test, in accordance with § 61.199(a). Per § 61.199(b)(1), a holder of a flight instructor rating or a limited flight instructor rating on a pilot certificate is no longer valid and may not be exchanged for a similar rating or a flight instructor certificate. Per § 61.199(b)(2), the holder of a flight instructor rating or a limited flight instructor rating on a pilot certificate may be issued a flight instructor certificate with the current ratings, but only if the person passes the required knowledge and practical tests prescribed in this subpart for the issuance of the current flight instructor certificate and rating.
(9)    For an additional flight instructor rating, check the record of aeronautical experience in section III of FAA Form 8710-1 to determine that the applicant has the minimum aeronautical experience required for the additional flight instructor rating sought (under § 61.191). Ensure the applicant has passed the appropriate knowledge test for the additional rating, if applicable.
(10)    If the applicant has checked the “YES” box of section IV of FAA Form 8710-1, verify that the applicant meets the requirements of § 61.49, if appropriate.

f.    Aircraft Requirements. The applicant will review the aircraft maintenance records, logbooks, airworthiness certificate, and aircraft registration for the purpose of demonstrating aeronautical knowledge about how to determine whether an aircraft is Airworthy and suitable for flight. The examiner must verify that the aircraft (airplane or glider) to be used is certificated for spins, if applicable.

g.    Discrepancies. If a discrepancy that cannot be immediately corrected exists in any of the documents, return the application and all documents to the applicant.

(1)    Inform the applicant of the reasons for ineligibility and explain how the applicant may correct the discrepancies.
(2)    Reschedule the appointment if requested to do so.

h.    Conduct the Practical Test. After determining that the applicant is eligible and meets all prerequisites for the flight instructor certificate and associated rating(s) sought, accept the application (e.g., FAA Form 8710-1 or FAA Form 8710-11) and conduct the practical test in accordance with the guidance in the appropriate PTS and Chapter 7, Section 2. If the practical test is not completed for reasons other than unsatisfactory performance, issue a letter of discontinuance to the applicant (see Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 16b).

i.    Unsatisfactory Performance. If the applicant does not meet the applicable standards for the certificate or rating sought, inform the applicant of the reasons for the unsatisfactory performance.

(1)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-5 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 32.
(2)    Sign, date, and check the appropriate boxes on the form. Give the applicant a copy of the notice of disapproval and retain the original for the certification file.
(3)    Retain FAA Form 8710-1 and return all other submitted documents to the applicant.

j.    Satisfactory Performance. When the applicant has satisfactorily met all requirements for the flight instructor certificate and ratings sought, prepare FAA Form 8060-4 in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 30.

(1)    Enter the appropriate flight instructor ratings on line XII of the Temporary Airman Certificate.
(2)    Place on the Temporary Airman Certificate any flight instructor ratings not reinstated with the original date(s) of expiration from the superseded certificate.
(3)    Place the notation “VALID ONLY WHEN ACCOMPANIED BY PILOT CERTIFICATE NO. [enter number]. EXPIRES [enter date]” on line XIII of the Temporary Airman Certificate.
(4)    If the applicant is eligible for a gold seal flight instructor certificate, enter the notation “GOLD SEAL CERTIFICATE” in the block containing the Original Issuance/Reissuance boxes on the Temporary Airman Certificate. (See Figures 7-31 and 7-31A.)

Note:  Only an ASI is authorized to issue the initial gold seal on a flight instructor certificate. A designee who is authorized to conduct flight instructor renewal/reinstatement practical tests or renewal of a flight instructor certificate (i.e., FIRE) may renew/reinstate a gold seal on a flight instructor certificate.

(5)    Verify that all information on the form is correct. Sign the certificate and direct the airman to sign line VII of the form.
(6)    Retain the original for the certification file and give the applicant a copy of the Temporary Airman Certificate.

k.    Complete the Certification File. Complete the certification file in accordance with the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 28.

(1)    Mail the completed certification file to the managing FAA office no later than 7 calendar-days after the completion of the test.
(2)    IACRA certification files may be sent directly to AFS-760.

Section 17. Conduct Pilot Proficiency Checks as a Pilot Proficiency Examiner

106.    General. Where the FAA office determines need at a specific location, the FAA designates a PPE to conduct § 61.58 PIC proficiency checks in aircraft or FSTDs.

107.    Limitations. All proficiency checks are conducted in compliance with the ATP PTS [appropriate aircraft] and are subject to the following limitations:

a.    Category, Class, and Type Rating. A PPE will not conduct a proficiency check in any aircraft for which the examiner does not hold a category, class, and type rating.

b.    COA and/or COA Letter. A PPE will not conduct a proficiency check in a multiengine airplane, turboprop, or turbojet aircraft other than the make and model for which the PPE holds a COA and/or COA letter.

c.    Certification Practical Tests. A PPE will not conduct certification practical tests.

d.    Serve the Public. A PPE must be willing to serve the public outside the examiner’s organization upon reasonable request by an applicant.

e.    Certificates and Type Ratings. A PPE must hold an ATP certificate or a commercial pilot certificate with an instrument rating and, for PPEs authorized for aircraft, a type rating for the type of aircraft authorized.

f.    PIC Privileges. A PPE must hold PIC privileges for the type of aircraft authorized while acting in an official capacity as a PPE.

g.    Turbojet FSTD Authorization. A PPE who holds a turbojet FSTD authorization must hold a turbojet rating on his or her pilot certificate. However, the rating does not need to be in the same type aircraft that the FSTD represents.

h.    Turboprop Airplanes in FSTDs. A PPE who holds an authorization for turboprop airplanes in FSTDs only does not need to hold a turboprop type rating on his or her pilot certificate.

Note:  A PPE’s testing privileges are not limited to the examiner’s base of operations or the managing FAA office’s geographical area of responsibility.

108.    Experience Requirements for Designation as a PPE. To be eligible for designation as a PPE, a candidate must meet the following experience requirements, appropriate to the designation sought.

a.    PPE—Airplane. The candidate must have at least:

(1)    As PIC, 2,000 hours including 300 hours as PIC in large/turbine-powered airplanes, including 50 in each large/turbine-powered aircraft for which authorization is sought (for additional aircraft, 25 hours); and
(2)    Of instrument time, 150 hours including at least 50 hours in actual instrument conditions.

b.    PPE—Rotorcraft. The candidate must have at least:

(1)    As PIC, 2,000 hours including 300 hours as PIC in large/turbine-powered helicopters, including 50 in each large/turbine-powered helicopter for which authorization is sought (for additional helicopters, 25 hours); and
(2)    Of instrument time, 100 hours (actual or simulated), including 25 hours in helicopters.

c.    PPE—FSTD. The candidate must have at least:

(1)    As PIC, 2,000 hours including 150 hours of instrument time;
(2)    Of instructor time, 200 hours in the FSTD for which authorization is sought; and
(3)    Satisfactorily completed a formal ground school and FSTD program on the aircraft type for which an FSTD authorization is sought.

109.    Practical Test. The check for an initial designation as PPE will consist of an oral element and an aircraft element or FSTD element if appropriate to the designation sought. The testing elements will be to determine the candidate’s knowledge and flight proficiency regarding the requirements for PIC proficiency checks. Performance on the check will determine the candidate’s ability to effectively evaluate the proficiency of other pilots.

a.    Method of Testing. The ASI may elect to observe the designee applicant conducting a proficiency check for an actual applicant. The inspector will evaluate the candidate’s performance while the candidate evaluates the applicant’s performance.

b.    Practical Test Criteria. Practical test criteria stated in Chapter 7, Section 1, subparagraphs 3a through 3c should be applied to proficiency checks to the extent appropriate.

c.    Training. The inspector will provide training for the designee applicant on the procedures to be used in evaluating the performance of applicants for proficiency checks.

110.    COA Letter. Upon the PPE applicant’s satisfactory completion of all the testing elements and designation requirements, the managing FAA office will issue the PPE a COA letter stating the types of aircraft or FSTDs for which the designee is authorized to conduct proficiency checks. The COA letter is valid until the expiration date shown on the COA letter.

a.    FSTDs Only. The managing FAA office will substitute the word “FSTD” for the word “airplane” on the examiner’s COA if he or she is authorized to conduct proficiency checks in FSTDs only.

b.    Airplane and FSTD. A COA noting “airplane” also authorizes the PPE to conduct proficiency checks in an FSTD for the type of airplanes authorized.

111.    Additional Designations. An additional designation may be issued to a designee by completing the same procedures used for original designation.

a.    Demonstration of Competency. Each additional designation requires a demonstration of competency appropriate to the authorization sought. Upon satisfactory completion of the demonstration of competency, the additional authorization will be shown on the designee’s COA letter.

b.    PPE Holding DPE Authorization. A designee holding a COA for DPE privileges will be issued a second COA for the PPE designation only if the PPE privileges exceed those authorized by the DPE designation. Otherwise, the DPE designation automatically conveys PPE privileges for the aircraft authorized by the DPE COA letter.

112.    PIC Proficiency Check Procedures. The PPE will conduct all pilot proficiency checks in compliance with the applicable regulations, appropriate PTS, and ATC procedures. The PPE should observe recommended clearing procedures and good operating practices at all times. The PPE should emphasize to applicants that cockpit vigilance for other traffic is an important part of total pilot proficiency. The PPE will use the procedures prescribed in the AFM and observe the operating limitations of the aircraft used at all times.

a.    Pilot Proficiency Checks in Airplanes. The PIC proficiency check in airplanes required for each 24‑month period must be accomplished in the type of airplane in which the pilot acts as PIC. However, the pilot may elect to perform certain authorized maneuvers in an FSTD or training device.

(1)    In alternate 12-month periods in airplanes, the pilot has the option of performing all required maneuvers or procedures in an FSTD or a training device in lieu of an airplane.
(2)    Whether the pilot chooses to use an airplane, FSTD, or both, the required maneuvers and procedures are limited to those outlined in the schedule for the 12-month check.

b.    PIC Proficiency Checks in Other Aircraft. Provision for the use of FSTDs has been limited to proficiency checks in airplanes because devices having the capability for determining pilot proficiency for other kinds of aircraft are not readily available. Therefore, the proficiency checks required for other kinds of aircraft must include the maneuvers and procedures specified for the issuance of an original type rating in the aircraft used for each 12-month proficiency check.

c.    Application Form. An applicant for a PIC proficiency check applies by completing the top portion of FAA Form 8410-1. The PPE grades the required maneuvers and procedures as satisfactory (S), unsatisfactory (U), or waived (W). At the conclusion of the check, the PPE indicates “Approved” or “Disapproved” on the form and gives the original and one copy to the pilot. The PPE should retain the second copy of the form for the PPE’s records.

113.    Proficiency Check Records. A PPE will endorse the applicant’s logbook or flight record to show completion of the proficiency check or a portion of the check. The endorsement must contain the applicant’s name, the date, the type of aircraft or FSTD used, the PPE’s designation number and signature, and the result of the check. The PPE will keep a record of each proficiency check conducted. A list of the proficiency checks conducted must accompany the PPE’s application for annual renewal of the designation.

Section 18. Accomplish Designation/Issue Certificates as an ACR, Limited to Examining Authority under Part 141

114.    General. Approved pilot schools with examining authority under part 141 may request the designation of an ACR authorized to issue airman certificates to graduates after the school’s chief instructor determines that the applicants have satisfactorily completed the appropriate courses.

a.    ACR Privileges and Limitations. An ACR is authorized to accept applications for pilot certificates and/or ratings from the graduates of an approved pilot school holding appropriate examining authority under part 141. The ACR may accept applications only from eligible course graduates of the pilot school named on the designee’s COA and Certificate of Designation.

(1)    The ACR is authorized, after review of the applicant’s training records and eligibility, to issue pilot certificates and ratings without further testing.
(2)    An ACR is not authorized to conduct any knowledge or practical tests in connection with ACR duties.
(3)    If an ACR also holds DPE authority, that person must be issued separate ACR and DPE designations/COA letters.

b.    Record of Applications. An ACR will maintain a record of all certificate and rating applications processed, including those denied and returned to the pilot school for further action.

(1)    If an application is denied, the ACR will return the application, training records, and all attachments to the appropriate pilot school authorities for action.
(2)    An ACR is not authorized to issue FAA Form 8060-5.

115.    Selection of ACRs. The holder of an examining authority under part 141 subpart D, may request ACR designation for an owner, corporate officer, partner, or other responsible employee of that company. The pilot school requesting an ACR designation must hold examining authority for both flight and knowledge test privileges or flight test privileges only. Holders of knowledge test privileges only are not eligible for ACR designation.

a.    ACR Eligibility and Experience Requirements. In addition to the selection criteria in Chapter 2, paragraph 3, and Chapter 7, Section 1, paragraph 1, an ACR candidate:

(1)    Must hold a management or administrative position in the pilot school organization that is superior to the chief flight instructor designated for each course of training conducted under examining authority.
(2)    Must have been employed as the chief flight instructor of the pilot school or have held one of the other positions indicated in subparagraph (1) for at least 12 months immediately preceding the application for designation.

b.    Alternative Experience. The holder of a current DPE designation meets all eligibility and experience requirements for designation as an ACR. A current DPE is authorized to perform ACR duties and responsibilities (for any airman certificate or rating) without further need for approval or authorization from the managing FAA office.

c.    Exceptions. A recommendation for the designation of a candidate who does not meet all of the applicable eligibility and experience requirements is forwarded to the Regional Flight Standards Division Manager (RFSDM) for consideration. The recommendation should include a statement of all special circumstances affecting the designation. The division manager’s approval is required before any commitment is made or a COA is issued.

d.    Examination of the Designee Applicant. After determining that the applicant meets the eligibility and experience requirements, an inspector will conduct an oral examination to determine the designee applicant’s knowledge of:

(1)    Pilot school certification requirements.
(2)    Pilot school general operating rules.
(3)    Examining authority privileges and limitations.
(4)    Pilot certificate and rating requirements and procedures.
(5)    The standards and requirements of the pilot school represented.

e.    Training. If the inspector deems the designee applicant’s knowledge adequate for effective administration of the designation, the inspector will instruct the applicant on procedures to be used in evaluating airman applications and training records to determine the validity of the pilot school’s recommendations.

f.    Designation. The managing FAA office issues the new ACR a Certificate of Designation, a COA, and an initial supply of official materials appropriate to the authorization.

(1)    An inspector will instruct the ACR on how to correctly complete, check, and forward certification files to the managing FAA office.
(2)    IACRA certification files may be sent directly to AFS-760.

116.    Certification of Graduates. When the ACR issues a certificate and/or rating, the designee will complete and certify the appropriate information on the reverse side of FAA Form 8710-1. (See Figure 7-32.)

a.    Temporary Airman Certificate. The ACR will use the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 30 to prepare FAA Form 8060-4.

b.    Certification File. The ACR should use the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 28, to complete the certification file. FAA Form 8710-1 will clearly indicate that the applicant has been certificated as a graduate of a pilot school with examining authority.

Section 19. Accomplish Designation/Issue Certificates as an ACR Employed Solely by an FIRC Sponsor

117.    General. Sponsors of FAA-approved FIRCs may request the designation of an ACR authorized to issue flight instructor certificate renewals to eligible course graduates of the approved FIRC.

a.    ACR Privileges and Limitations. An ACR is authorized to accept applications for the renewal of a valid flight instructor certificate from FAA-approved FIRC graduates. The ACR may only accept an application from a holder of a flight instructor certificate who graduated from a FIRC that is named on the ACR’s COA and Certificate of Designation.

(1)    After reviewing the applicant’s attendance/training record and eligibility, an ACR is authorized to renew the flight instructor certificate of a FIRC graduate who meets the requirements of § 61.197(a)(2)(iii).
(2)    An ACR is not authorized to conduct any knowledge or practical tests in connection with ACR duties.

b.    Record of Applications. An ACR will maintain a record of all certificate renewal applications processed, including those not accepted and returned to the applicant.

(1)    If the ACR cannot act upon an application for the renewal of a flight instructor certificate, the ACR will return the application to the applicant and advise the applicant of the reasons for nonacceptance.
(2)    The ACR will maintain a record of all certificate renewal applications processed for at least the preceding 12 calendar-months.

118.    Selection of ACRs. Only the holder of an FAA-approved FIRC training course outline (TCO) may sponsor an applicant for ACR designation. Final approval of the TCO is a prerequisite for an ACR designation. The sponsor of an FAA-approved FIRC may request ACR designation for one or more responsible members or employees of that organization by submitting a letter to the managing FAA office where the applicant’s principal business office is located. The ACR designation will be issued by the managing FAA office with the notification and concurrence from the jurisdictional AFS regional office and AFS-800. If the jurisdictional flight standards regional office elects to deny the ACR candidate’s application, a letter of explanation will be sent to the managing FAA office and AFS-800.

a.    Prerequisites. The sponsor requesting an ACR designation will provide the following information:

·    The original date of FAA approval of the sponsor to conduct the FIRC;

·    The number of programs given in the 12-month period immediately preceding the request for an ACR designation;

·    The number of attendees issued graduation certificates, the number of graduation certificates denied, and the reasons for the denials; and

·    The number and location of programs scheduled and the expected number of attendees for the 12‑month period immediately following the date of request for designation.

b.    Specific Eligibility and Experience Requirements. In addition to the general eligibility requirements in Chapter 2, Section 3 and the requirements in Chapter 7, Section 1, paragraph 1, a candidate employed only by a FIRC sponsor who applies for designation as an ACR:

(1)    Must hold at least a commercial pilot certificate.
(2)    Must hold a flight instructor certificate with at least one aircraft category rating, or hold a ground instructor certificate with an advanced and instrument rating.
(3)    Must have been employed as a chief flight instructor, assistant chief flight instructor, or ground instructor of an FAA-approved FIRC, or have held a management or administrative position in a FIRC for at least 12 calendar-months immediately preceding application for designation as an ACR.
(4)    Must have a written recommendation from the FIRC sponsor when the candidate is a person other than the sponsor.

c.    Alternative Experience. The holder of a current DPE designation meets all eligibility and experience requirements for designation as an ACR. A current DPE is authorized to perform ACR duties and responsibilities (for any airman certificate or rating) without further need for approval or authorization from the managing FAA office.

d.    Exceptions. A recommendation for the designation of an ACR who does not meet all of the applicable eligibility and experience requirements is forwarded to the jurisdictional FAA RFSDM for approval before being sent to the AFS-800 Manager for concurrence. The recommendation should include a statement of all special circumstances affecting the designation. The jurisdictional FAA RFSDM’s approval and AFS-800 concurrence are required before a COA may be issued to the ACR candidate.

e.    Examination of the Candidate. After determining that the applicant meets the eligibility and experience requirements, an inspector will conduct an oral examination to determine the candidate’s knowledge of:

·    Airman certification requirements; and

·    The standards for processing applications submitted by FIRC graduates for renewal of flight instructor certificates.

f.    Training. If the inspector deems the candidate’s knowledge adequate for effective administration of the designation, the ASI will instruct the candidate on:

·    Procedures to be used in reviewing flight instructor renewal applications for proper completion; and

·    Procedures for evaluating the application and the applicant’s training attendance record to determine eligibility for renewal under the provisions of § 61.197(c).

g.    Designation. The managing FAA office issues the new ACR a Certificate of Designation, a COA, and an initial supply of official materials appropriate to the authorization.

(1)    An inspector will instruct the ACR on how to correctly complete, check, and forward certification files to the managing FAA office.
(2)    IACRA certification files may be sent directly to AFS-760.

119.    Flight Instructor Certificate and Ratings Issued on the Basis of Military Competence by an MCE. Per § 61.73(g), the FAA may accept applications for a flight instructor certificate and appropriate ratings from current and former U.S. military instructor pilots or U.S. military pilot examiners who meet the eligibility requirements as set forth in § 61.73(g). The requirement for a U.S. military instructor pilot or U.S. military pilot examiner is the passing of the Military Competency Flight Instructor aeronautical knowledge test (Military Comp-Instructor knowledge test) when applying for a flight instructor certificate and appropriate ratings on the basis of § 61.73(g). The FAA does not require a U.S. military instructor pilot or U.S. military pilot examiner who is applying for a flight instructor certificate and appropriate ratings on the basis of § 61.73(g) to take a practical test. The FAA does not require a U.S. military instructor pilot or U.S. military pilot examiner who already holds an FAA flight instructor certificate issued under part 61 subpart H to take the Military Comp‑Instructor knowledge test. The FAA flight instructor certificate issued under part 61 subpart H suffices for the aeronautical knowledge test. Additionally, U.S. military instructor pilots or U.S. military pilot examiners may apply for renewal of a flight instructor certificate on the basis of the new § 61.197(a)(2)(iv).

a.    FAA Flight Instructor Certificate Eligibility Requirements. For a current U.S. military instructor pilot or pilot examiner or a former U.S. military instructor pilot or pilot examiner to apply for a flight instructor certificate under the provision in § 61.73(g), the applicant must provide the following documents to an FAA office or designee:

(1)    A knowledge test that shows:
(a)    The applicant passed a Military Comp-Instructor knowledge test on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed under § 61.185(a) that are appropriate to the flight instructor rating sought, and
(b)    The applicant passed the knowledge test within the 24 calendar-months preceding the month of application.

Note:  If the U.S. military instructor pilot or pilot examiner already holds a flight instructor certificate, the FAA can accept that flight instructor certificate in lieu of the knowledge test report (refer to § 61.73(g)(3)(i)).

(2)    An official U.S. Armed Forces record or order documenting the individual’s current or past qualification as a U.S. Armed Forces military instructor pilot or pilot examiner for the flight instructor rating sought.
(3)    An official U.S. Armed Forces record or order documenting the individual’s completion of a U.S. Armed Forces instructor pilot or pilot examiner training course and receipt of an aircraft rating qualification as a military instructor pilot or pilot examiner that is appropriate to the flight instructor rating sought.
(4)    An official U.S. Armed Forces record or order documenting that the individual passed a U.S. Armed Forces instructor pilot or pilot examiner proficiency check in an aircraft as a military instructor pilot or pilot examiner that is appropriate to the flight instructor rating sought.

b.    FAA Flight Instructor Certificate Renewal Eligibility Requirements. A U.S. military instructor pilot or U.S. military pilot examiner who applies for renewal of a flight instructor certificate under the provisions of § 61.197(a)(2)(iv) must provide evidence of completion of an official U.S. Armed Forces military instructor pilot or military pilot examiner proficiency check within the 12 calendar-months preceding the month of application as an alternative method for renewing a flight instructor certificate and ratings. The FAA is offering this provision only to current U.S. military instructor pilots and current U.S. military pilot examiners. Former U.S. military instructor pilots and military pilot examiners who have left the military more than 12 calendar‑months prior to the month of application would not have completed an official U.S. military instructor pilot/examiner proficiency check within the preceding 12 calendar-months. Therefore, the flight instructor renewal provision of § 61.197(a)(2)(iv) is only offered to U.S. military instructor pilots and military pilot examiners who can show evidence of having completed an official U.S. military instructor pilot/examiner proficiency check within the preceding 12 calendar-months prior to the month of application. The FAA will require former U.S. military instructor pilots and military pilot examiners who left the military more than 12 calendar-months ago to comply with the other renewal requirements of § 61.197(a).

c.    Procedures for Conversion of U.S. Military Instructor Pilot Qualification to an FAA Flight Instructor Certificate. Per § 61.73(g), current U.S. military instructor pilots or U.S. military pilot examiners and former U.S. military instructor pilots or pilot examiners may apply for and be issued a flight instructor certificate with the appropriate ratings.

(1)    There is no time limit on being a “current” or “former” U.S. military instructor pilot or pilot examiner to apply for and be issued a flight instructor certificate with the appropriate ratings.
(2)    The FAA requires a U.S. military instructor pilot to only pass the Military Comp-Instructor knowledge test when applying for a flight instructor certificate and appropriate ratings on the basis of § 61.73(g).
(3)    The FAA does not require a U.S. military instructor pilot to take a practical test when applying for a flight instructor certificate and appropriate ratings on the basis of § 61.73(g).
(4)    The FAA does not require a U.S. military instructor pilot who already holds an FAA flight instructor certificate issued under part 61 subpart H to take the Military Comp-Instructor knowledge test. The FAA will accept the flight instructor certificate issued under part 61 subpart H in lieu of the aeronautical knowledge test (refer to § 61.73(g)(3)(i)).
(5)    DPEs and MCEs, in addition to ASIs and ASTs, may accept applications for a flight instructor certificate from U.S. military instructor pilots and U.S. military pilot examiners who apply for an initial or renewal flight instructor certificate under the provisions of § 61.73(g) or § 61.197(a)(2)(iv), as appropriate. However, DPEs and MCEs must receive § 61.73(g) training from the managing FAA prior to receiving authorization to issue flight instructor certificates to U.S. military instructor pilots and U.S. military pilot examiners.

d.    Military Comp-Instructor Knowledge Test. The Military Comp-Instructor knowledge test consists of 125 questions that cover the following subject areas (refer to § 61.185(a)):

(1)    The fundamentals of instructing, including:
(a)    The learning process,
(b)    Elements of effective teaching,
(c)    Student evaluation and testing,
(d)    Course development,
(e)    Lesson planning, and
(f)    Classroom training techniques.
(2)    The aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to the aircraft category for which flight instructor privileges are sought.
(3)    The aeronautical knowledge areas for the instrument rating applicable to the category for which instrument flight instructor privileges are sought.
(4)    The number of questions and breakdown of the Military Comp-Instructor knowledge test will consist of:
(a)    Fundamentals of instructing (50 questions).
(b)    Part 61 requirements as they apply to flight instructors, student pilots, and certificate/rating applicants (e.g., endorsements, training requirements, limitations, and certificate/rating requirements) (60 questions).
(c)    Attitude flying and basic flight instruments, from certified flight instructor-instrument (CFII) question bank (15 questions).

120.    Certification of Graduates. When the ACR issues a flight instructor certificate renewal, the examiner will complete and certify the appropriate information on the reverse side of FAA Form 8710-1.

a.    Temporary Airman Certificate. The ACR will use the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 30, as applicable, to prepare FAA Form 8060-4.

b.    Certification File. The ACR should use the guidance in Chapter 7, Section 2, paragraph 28 to complete the certification file. The examiner will clearly indicate on FAA Form 8710-1 that the applicant has been certificated as a graduate of an FAA-approved FIRC.

c.    A Special Emphasis Action for ACR’s Review. FAA Form 8710-1 must be completed in ink or typewritten and signed by the graduate. Per § 61.39(a)(7), the graduate must complete section III, Record of Pilot Time. As a special emphasis item, the examiner must review the aeronautical experience recorded on FAA Form 8710-1 and in the logbook/training record, including on applications for a renewal of a flight instructor certificate/rating(s).

(1)    In section III on FAA Form 8710-1, the applicant must list at least the aeronautical experience required for the airmen certificate and rating sought. Graduates of part 141 pilot schools or part 142 training centers must provide their aeronautical experience in section III on FAA Form 8710-1 even though the graduation certificate is evidence of having completed the course of training.
(2)    If aeronautical experience has no bearing on the airman certification action being sought, it is not necessary for an applicant to complete section III on FAA Form 8710-1. For example, flight instructor renewal applications, flight instructor reinstatement applications, ground instructor qualification applications, and pilot type rating applications would be applications where aeronautical experience would not have a bearing on the airmen certification action and thus the applicant would not be required to complete section III of FAA Form 8710-1. However, all applicants are encouraged to complete section III on FAA Form 8710-1. FAA Form 8710-1 remains on file with the FAA and can be used to substantiate past aeronautical experience if a person were to lose their logbook.

Section 20. Accomplish Designation/Conduct Functions as an MCE, FPE, GIE, and FIRE

121.    Background. This section explains designation as a DPE with special authorization to perform as:

a.    MCE. The MCE reviews a military pilot’s records, verifies computer test reports of the military competence knowledge test, and issues commercial pilot certificates and instrument ratings to qualified military pilot applicants as specifically authorized per § 61.73. The MCE may issue and/or upgrade pilot certificates bearing type ratings based on the applicant’s military pilot qualifications.

b.    FPE. An FPE may issue private pilot certificates on the basis of an applicant’s foreign license qualifications. The FPE reviews applicant records, verifies computer test reports for the Foreign Pilot Instrument knowledge tests, and issues private pilot certificates to qualified foreign applicants in accordance with § 61.75. The FPE may issue type ratings at the private pilot certificate level based on aircraft type ratings held on the applicant’s foreign pilot license qualifications. FPE’s may also issue commercial pilot certificates to applicants under the provisions of a BASA and IPL (currently only Canadian licenses). Designees must follow the guidance contained in FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 14, paragraphs 5-594, 5-606, and 5-607. A record of this training should be retained in the designee’s file.

c.    FIRE. An FIRE may renew holders of current flight instructor certificates on three flight instructor renewal procedures, only if the renewal involves an administrative process and no practical test is involved. A FIRE’s authority will be to renew the holder of a current flight instructor certificate in accordance with the flight instructor renewal provisions set forth in § 61.197(a)(2)(i) and (iii). Specifically, a FIRE’s authority to renew holders of current flight instructor certificates involves only the following kinds of renewal procedures:

(1)    For those flight instructors who apply to renew their flight instructor certificate on the basis of having a record of training students that shows, during the preceding 24 calendar-months, that the flight instructor has endorsed at least 5 students for a practical test for a certificate or rating and that at least 80 percent of those students passed that test on the first attempt (per § 61.197(a)(2)(i)).
(2)    For those flight instructors who apply to renew their flight instructor certificate on the basis of having a graduation certificate that shows, within the 3 calendar-months before the month of application, the applicant successfully completed an approved FIRC in accordance with § 61.197(a)(2)(iii).
(3)    For those flight instructors who apply to renew their flight instructor certificate on the basis of having participated as a flight instructor in a phase of WINGS.

d.    GIE. A GIE reviews a ground instructor applicant’s knowledge test report for a ground instructor certificate with the appropriate ratings (basic, advanced, or instrument). The GIE may issue a ground instructor certificate that bears the basic, advanced, or instrument rating to qualified ground instructor applicants, as specifically authorized (per §§ 61.213 and 61.215).

122.    General Information for MCE and FPE Designations. The FAA may designate a person to serve as an MCE to issue commercial pilot certificates and ratings in accordance with § 61.73 to U.S. military pilots. The FAA may designate a person to serve as an FPE to issue U.S. private pilot certificates and ratings under § 61.75 to foreign pilot license holders whose foreign country is a member state to the convention on international civil aviation. The designation of an MCE or FPE is authorized where the FAA has determined there is a need to conduct pilot certification activities where managing FAA office may not be able to meet the demand for such pilot certification activities under § 61.73 or § 61.75, as appropriate, in a timely manner.

a.    Designation as an MCE or FPE. When deemed appropriate, the managing FAA office may designate a former FAA ASI (Operations) or DPE (current or former) as an MCE or FPE, in accordance with the following criteria:

(1)    The managing FAA office will adequately train each MCE and FPE designated in that office’s jurisdiction and record the training given to that MCE or FPE.
(2)    The managing FAA office will review and check all airman certification files submitted by the MCE or FPE for accuracy before the files are forwarded to AFS-760.
(3)    The managing FAA office will inspect the MCE or FPE in accordance with the guidelines established for DPEs. The RFSD that has jurisdiction over the managing FAA office that maintains MCE and FPE designations will ensure that a current list of DPEs holding this special authorization is forwarded to AFS‑760.
(4)    Persons who are neither a former FAA ASI (Operations) or a DPE (current or former) may apply for waiver approval for an MCE or FPE designation through the managing FAA office to the RFSD.
(5)    A predesignation knowledge test is not required to apply for an MCE or FPE designation.
(6)    MCE and FPE applicants are not required to hold a medical certificate.

b.    Initial/Recurrent Standardization Training for MCE and FPE Designation.

(1)    The managing office is responsible for the initial training of MCEs and FPEs. Thereafter, the designee is required to attend the Administrative Pilot Examiner Standardization Course (Web-based only) every 24 calendar-months.
(2)    MCEs and FPEs, who also hold other pilot examiner designations must meet all pilot examiner standardization requirements in accordance with Chapter 3 and Chapter 7, Section 1.

c.    Authorizations of an MCE or FPE. An MCE may issue commercial pilot certificates and ratings on the basis of military competency under the provisions of § 61.73. An FPE may issue private pilot certificates on the basis of foreign pilot licenses under the provisions of § 61.75.

(1)    The MCE must review an applicant’s records and verify knowledge test report(s) for the military competence aeronautical knowledge test for persons applying for a commercial pilot certificate and ratings on the basis of military competency under the provisions of § 61.73 and as specifically authorized by the managing FAA office. The MCE may issue and/or upgrade pilot certificates bearing type ratings based on military competence.
(2)    The FPE must review an applicant’s records and verify knowledge test report for the foreign pilot instrument aeronautical knowledge test and issue a Temporary Airman Certificate under the provisions of § 61.75 and as specifically authorized by the managing FAA office.

d.    Limitations of an MCE or FPE. The holder of an MCE or FPE designation may not administer practical tests for pilot certification under his or her authority as an MCE or FPE.

(1)    The MCEs and FPEs authorization is limited to the managing FAA office’s geographical area of responsibility. However, an MCE or FPE may obtain approval from the managing FAA office to accept applications at other locations.
(2)    MCEs and FPEs must maintain a record of all certification functions conducted during the preceding 12 calendar-months. The record(s) will include the name of the applicant, the date, the certificate applied for, and the action taken on the application. Those records must be made available for review when requested by the managing FAA office.

e.    Documents Required.

(1)    The FPE must review an applicant’s foreign pilot license to ensure that license has been issued by a member state to ICAO. The FPE must review the applicant’s Verification of Authenticity of Foreign License letter from AFS-760 and compare it to the information on the foreign pilot license. The FPE must review the applicant’s foreign pilot license and ask whether his or her foreign pilot license is under an order of revocation or suspension by the foreign country that issued the foreign pilot license. The FPE should discuss with the applicant the part 61 recency of experience and flight review requirements.
(2)    The FPE will review the applicant’s medical certificate to ensure the applicant holds a current medical certificate issued under part 67 or a current medical certificate issued by the country that issued the person’s foreign pilot license. The FPE must discuss with the applicant the part 61 medical certification requirements.
(3)    The foreign pilot license and medical certification used as a basis for issuing a U.S. private pilot certificate must be written in English or accompanied by an English-language transcription signed by an official or representative of the foreign aviation authority that issued the foreign pilot license. An English-language transcription that has been signed by an official or representative from the applicant’s official embassy is also acceptable.
(4)    The FPE should ensure that the applicant completes and signs FAA Form 8710-1 in ink or typewritten. The FPE must ensure that the applicant completes section III on FAA Form 8710-1. Per § 61.39(a)(7), the requirement to complete section III includes foreign pilots who are applying for a private pilot certificate and ratings on the basis of § 61.75.

f.    English Language Requirement. If a foreign pilot who is applying for a U.S. pilot certificate and rating under § 61.75 cannot read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, then the pilot certification process should be terminated unless the reason is because of a medical disability. If the reason for the applicant not being able to read, speak, write, and understand English is because of a medical disability (meaning a hearing impairment or speech impairment that is medically substantiated by a certified medical physician), the designee must refer the applicant to the managing FAA office.

g.    Ratings and Limitations.

(1)    The FPE must inform the applicant who is being issued a U.S. private pilot certificate under § 61.75 that he or she is subject to the limitations and restrictions on his or her U.S. certificate and foreign pilot license when exercising the privileges of that U.S. pilot certificate in an aircraft of U.S. registry, whether operating within or outside the United States.
(2)    The FPE will inform the foreign pilot that any aircraft ratings listed on the person’s foreign pilot license, in addition to any issued after the applicant accomplishes the required knowledge and practical tests under the provisions of part 61, may be placed on that foreign pilot’s U.S. pilot certificate.
(3)    The FPE will inform the applicant that an aircraft and instrument rating(s) may be added to a pilot certificate issued on the basis of a foreign pilot license upon compliance with the appropriate pilot certification and rating requirements of part 61 (meaning accomplishment of the appropriate aeronautical knowledge and practical test(s)). Each rating added to the Temporary Airman Certificate on the basis of that pilot having accomplished must have the notation “U.S. TEST PASSED” immediately following the rating to which the notation applies. The applicant is required to show his or her aeronautical experience on the submitted FAA Form 8710-1. If a person only accomplished the Instrument Foreign Pilot (IFP) aeronautical knowledge test for an instrument rating, it is not appropriate to list it as “INSTRUMENT AIRPLANE—U.S. TEST PASSED” on the pilot certificate. If a person only accomplished the IFP aeronautical knowledge test for an instrument rating, the rating would be listed on the person’s pilot certificate as “INSTRUMENT—[AIRPLANE/HELICOPTER/ POWERED-LIFT],” as appropriate.
(4)    The designee should inform the applicant that it is permissible for an additional aircraft rating to be added to a pilot certificate on the basis of the applicant having complied with the appropriate pilot certification requirements of part 61 (i.e., “U.S. TEST PASSED” completion of the required practical test and the knowledge test). Furthermore, an applicant may also apply for an additional aircraft rating to be added to his or her restricted § 61.75 U.S. pilot certificate if that applicant has subsequently received an additional aircraft rating on the foreign pilot license. As per § 61.75, no knowledge or practical test would be required in this scenario.
(5)    The FPE should inform the applicant that if he or she holds an instrument rating, and that instrument rating was issued by a member state to ICAO, the instrument rating may be added to his or her U.S. pilot certificate if his or her foreign pilot license authorizes instrument privileges and the applicant has, within the preceding 24 calendar-months, passed the IFP aeronautical knowledge test.

h.    FAA Policy on Flight Reviews, Recent Flight Experience, and Proficiency Check Requirements for Applicants Who are Issued U.S. Pilot Certificates on the Basis of § 61.75. The FPE should inform the applicant who is being issued a U.S. private pilot certificate under § 61.75 that he or she is subject to the flight review, recent flight experience, and proficiency check requirements of part 61 when exercising the privileges of his or her U.S. pilot certificate. For example, a foreign pilot who is exercising his or her U.S. pilot certificate is subject to the flight review requirements of § 61.56 regardless of whether the flight is occurring inside or outside the United States. A foreign pilot who is exercising the privileges of his or her U.S. pilot certificate must have, within the preceding 24 calendar-months, accomplished a flight review and received a logbook endorsement from an FAA-authorized instructor (per § 61.183(a)) who gave the flight review certifying that the foreign pilot has satisfactorily completed a flight review.

123.    Pilot Certificates and Ratings Issued on the Basis of Military Competence by an MCE. A U.S. commercial pilot certificate and/or instrument rating may be issued to an applicant who meets the requirements of § 61.73. Aircraft category, class, type, and instrument ratings may be originally issued or added to a certificate based on military competency, if the applicant meets the appropriate requirements of § 61.73(d), (e), and (f), as appropriate.

a.    Documents Required for an Applicant to be Issued a U.S. Commercial Pilot Certificate and/or Instrument Rating. An MCE must have the applicant present the evidentiary documents required by § 61.73 before being issued a U.S. commercial pilot certificate and/or instrument rating.

b.    FAA Policy on Completion of the Required Airman Knowledge Test. An applicant for the original issuance of a commercial pilot certificate on the basis of military competence (per § 61.73) must satisfactorily complete the military competency aeronautical knowledge test for an airplane, powered-lift, or helicopter, as appropriate. Completion of the military competency aeronautical knowledge test is not required to add a rating on the basis of military competence to an existing U.S. pilot certificate. However, when an applicant who desires to add a powered aircraft rating (meaning either airplanes or helicopters) on the basis of military competence (per § 61.73), and the applicant already holds a U.S. pilot certificate with only a nonpowered aircraft rating (meaning either a glider or balloon rating or both), then that applicant must satisfactorily accomplish the military competence aeronautical knowledge test.

c.    Limitations to be Placed on an Airman Certificate. An MCE will use the guidance in Chapter 5 to determine the limitations, if any, to place on a Temporary Airman Certificate.

d.    Applicants not Meeting the Requirements. An applicant who does not meet the requirements of § 61.73 must meet the requirements of §§ 61.65(a) (for an instrument rating) and 61.123 (for commercial pilot certification), as applicable, and take the appropriate aeronautical knowledge and practical tests.

e.    A Special Emphasis Action for an MCE’s Review. FAA Form 8710-1 must be completed in ink or typewritten and signed by the applicant. The MCE should ensure that the applicant has completed section III of Form 8710-1 as required by § 61.39(a)(7). This requirement includes military pilots who are applying for airman certificates and ratings on the basis of § 61.73.

124.    Compliance with Other Provisions. In addition to complying with the guidance in this chapter, MCEs and FPEs will comply with the applicable provisions and procedures contained in Chapter 7, Sections 1 through 16, as appropriate to the pilot certification functions being conducted.

125.    Designation of an FIRE.

a.    FIRE Position. When selecting a designee for a FIRE position, the following criteria must be met:

(1)    The managing FAA office must have a need for an FIRE position, and the person selected must have voluntarily applied for the position.
(2)    The managing office is responsible for the initial training of a FIRE. Thereafter, the FIRE is required to attend the Administrative Pilot Examiner Standardization Course (Web-based only) every 24 calendar-months.
(3)    The FIRE applicant need not attend the FAA’s Initial Pilot Examiner Standardization Seminar.
(4)    After selection of a FIRE, the managing FAA office will issue the person an FAA Form 8000-5 and a COA letter. The description of the authority on the COA letter and FAA Form 8000-5 will be stated as Flight Instructor Renewal Examiner. The COA letter will state:

“Authority is limited to renewing a holder of a current flight instructor certificate in accordance with the flight instructor renewal provisions set forth in § 61.197(a)(2)(i) and (iii).”

b.    FIRE’s Authority. By establishing FIRE positions, the FAA will be extending authority to those selected to renew holders of current flight instructor certificates on three flight instructor renewal procedures, provided that the renewal only involves an administrative process and no practical test is involved. An FIRE’s authority will be to renew the holder of a current flight instructor certificate in accordance with the flight instructor renewal provisions set forth in § 61.197(a)(2)(i) and (iii).

126.    Designation of a GIE. The FAA may designate a former FAA ASI (Operations) or DPE (current or former) to serve as a GIE for the purpose of issuing a ground instructor certificate that bears the basic, advanced, or instrument rating to ground instructor applicants who qualify, in accordance with §§ 61.213 and 61.215.

a.    Designation as a GIE. When deemed appropriate, an FAA office may add the GIE designation to a current DPE’s designation, give GIE designation to a former FAA ASI (Operations), or give GIE designation to a former DPE in accordance with the following criteria:

(1)    The managing FAA office will train the GIE and record the training given.
(2)    The managing FAA office will review and check all airman certification files submitted by the GIE for accuracy before the files are forwarded to AFS-760.
(3)    The managing FAA office will inspect the GIE in accordance with the guidelines established for DPEs.
(4)    The managing FAA office must notify its RFSD when appointing a GIE, so the RFSD can notify AFS-760 which is the responsible FAA office for maintaining the current listing of designees.
(5)    The RFSD that has jurisdiction over the managing FAA office that maintains GIE designations will ensure that a current list of DPEs holding this special authorization is on file with AFS-760.
(6)    The applicant for a GIE designation is not required to hold a medical certificate.

b.    Initial/Recurrent Standardization Training for a GIE Designation. The managing office is responsible for the initial training of a GIE. Thereafter, the GIE is required to attend the Administrative Pilot Examiner Standardization Course (Web-based only) every 24 calendar-months.

c.    Authorizations of a GIE. A GIE may issue a ground instructor certificate that bears the basic, advanced, or instrument rating to qualified ground instructor applicants, as specifically authorized (per §§ 61.213 and 61.215).

d.    Limitations of a GIE. The holder of a GIE designation may not administer practical tests for pilot certification under his or her authority as a GIE.

(1)    The GIE’s authorization is limited to the managing office’s geographical area of responsibility. However, a GIE may obtain approval from the managing FAA office to accept applications at other locations.
(2)    The GIE must maintain a record of all certification functions conducted during the preceding 12 calendar-months. The record(s) will include the name of the applicant, the date, the certificate applied for, and the action taken on the application. Those records must be made available for review when requested by the managing FAA office.
(3)    Using the procedures in Chapter 5, MCEs and FPEs are required to verify and review the applicant’s identification, application, airman records, aeronautical knowledge test score(s), and issue Temporary Airman Certificates, as authorized by the MCE or FPE’s COA.

Section 21. Accomplish Issuance of a U.S. Pilot Certificate Based on a Foreign Pilot License

127.    General Information.

a.    General Process. Section 61.75 allows a person to be issued a U.S. pilot certificate with private pilot privileges based on a foreign pilot license that is at least equivalent to the U.S. private pilot certificate. The foreign pilot license must have been issued by a foreign Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) that is a member state to the ICAO and must be valid. The holder of a valid foreign pilot license issued by an ICAO member state may use that foreign pilot license as the basis for issuance of a U.S. pilot certificate even if the issuing country is now defunct (e.g., the Russian Federation). A list of ICAO member states may be found in the current edition of FAA Order 8900.1. Because of changes in world politics, situations, and previously established country boundaries, a country may be an ICAO member but not included on the list provided in the current edition of Order 8900.1. The most current listing of ICAO member states may be found at:
http://www.icao.int/about-icao/Pages/member-states.aspx. If there is a question about a country’s membership in ICAO, you may contact AFS-810 for clarification.

b.    Applicability. This section applies to the issuance of U.S. pilot certificates and ratings to persons who apply based on their foreign pilot licenses under the following rules within part 61:

(1)    Under § 61.29, for persons who request replacement of a certificate issued based on a foreign pilot license under § 61.75.
(2)    Under § 61.39(c)(1), for persons who hold a foreign pilot license issued by an ICAO member state, that authorizes at least the pilot privileges of the U.S. pilot certificate sought, and who apply for an equivalent U.S. pilot certificate.
(3)    Under § 61.65, for persons who apply for an instrument rating on a § 61.75 pilot certificate with the notation “U.S. TEST PASSED.”
(4)    Under § 61.75, for persons who apply for a § 61.75 private pilot certificate on the basis of holding a foreign pilot license at least equivalent to the U.S. private pilot certificate issued by an ICAO member state.
(5)    Under § 61.75(c), for persons who apply for the addition of an aircraft rating to a § 61.75 pilot certificate with the notation “U.S. TEST PASSED.”
(6)    Under § 61.75(d), for persons who apply for an instrument rating to a § 61.75 pilot certificate by accomplishing the IFP knowledge test.
(7)    Under § 61.123(h), for persons who apply for an unrestricted U.S. commercial pilot certificate on the basis of holding a § 61.75 pilot certificate.
(8)    Under § 61.153(d)(3), for persons who hold either a foreign airline transport pilot license with the appropriate aircraft rating or a foreign commercial pilot license (CPL) and an instrument rating with the appropriate aircraft rating (without limitations) who apply for a U.S. ATPC.

c.    English Language Requirements. Early in the process of issuing a private pilot certificate based on a foreign pilot license, an examiner must determine whether the applicant can read, speak, write, and understand the English language. The current edition of AC 60-28 explains how to determine English language abilities required for pilot certification in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d.

(1)    If the applicant cannot read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, then an examiner may not issue the U.S. pilot certificate unless the reason is due to a medical disability. If the reason is due to a medical disability, the applicant must be referred to the managing FAA office, because only the managing FAA office may issue a pilot certificate with a medical operating limitation.
(2)    If the reason for the applicant’s not being able to read, speak, write, or understand English is due to a medical disability (meaning a hearing impairment or speech impairment that is medically substantiated by a certified medical physician), only the managing FAA office may place an operating limitation on the pilot certificate. The operating limitation will require that the person be accompanied by another pilot who is qualified to serve as a PIC for the appropriate aircraft category, class, type (if class and type of aircraft is applicable), and operating privilege.
(3)    If a person is found not eligible for the U.S. pilot certificate because the person is unable to read, speak, write, or understand English in accordance with Chapter 7, Section 2, subparagraph 8d, for other than medical disability reasons, issue FAA Form 8060-5. If the reason the person is unable to read, speak, write, or understand English is because of medical disability reasons, refer the applicant to an FAA office for further evaluation. Only an ASI or AST may place an operating limitation on the pilot certificate that is due to a medical disability.

Note:  FAA Form 8060-5 needs to be issued so the failure will be recorded and on file with AFS‑760. Properly recording the failure is needed when and if the person reapplies for the U.S. pilot certificate (e.g., at another FAA office or with FAA representatives who are located in a U.S. embassy overseas).

d.    Obtaining a U.S. Pilot Certificate. A person may apply for a U.S. pilot certificate and associated ratings based on their foreign pilot license by one of the following methods:

(1)    Under § 61.39(c)(1). Section 61.39(c)(1) permits a person who holds a foreign pilot license issued by an ICAO member state which authorizes at least the pilot privileges of the U.S. pilot certificate sought to apply for an equivalent U.S. pilot certificate by accomplishing the required aeronautical experience and passing the appropriate knowledge test and practical test.
(2)    Under § 61.75. Section 61.75 permits a person who holds a foreign pilot license at least equivalent to the U.S. private pilot certificate issued by an ICAO member state to apply for a private pilot certificate by complying with the application and certification procedures contained in this chapter. A person may be issued a § 61.75 private pilot certificate based on a foreign pilot license as follows:
(a)    With no instrument privileges for which neither a knowledge nor a practical test is required.
(b)    With instrument privileges, provided the applicant has passed the IFP knowledge test and the applicant’s foreign pilot license has the equivalent instrument [Aircraft] rating. The IFP knowledge test focuses on part 91 subpart B areas of knowledge which relate to IFR operational procedures that tests the applicant’s knowledge on operating safely in the National Airspace System (NAS). The Instrument Rating Airplane (IRA) and Instrument Rating Helicopter (IRH) knowledge tests are not acceptable in lieu of the IFP knowledge test.
(c)    With an instrument airplane U.S. test passed rating for which the person meets the experience requirements, takes the standard instrument knowledge and practical tests for the appropriate instrument aircraft rating.
(3)    Without Using Foreign Pilot License. A person may obtain a U.S. pilot certificate without relying on his or her foreign pilot license by accomplishing the required training, instructor endorsements, aeronautical experience, and passing the appropriate knowledge test and practical test as required by the pilot certification requirements contained in part 61. However, if a person holds a standard U.S. pilot certificate (other than a Student Pilot Certificate or recreational pilot certificate), that person may not apply for a U.S. pilot certificate based on his or her foreign pilot license (refer to § 61.75(b)(3)).

Note:  A person who applies for a U.S. pilot certificate by accomplishing the appropriate pilot certification requirements of part 61 and also holds a pilot certificate issued under § 61.75 does not need to surrender that § 61.75 U.S. pilot certificate. There have been isolated incidences where examiners have mistakenly required a person to surrender their § 61.75 pilot certificate when applying for a standard U.S. pilot certificate. In this instance, it is permissible for a person to hold both a pilot certificate issued under § 61.75 U.S. pilot certificate and a standard U.S. pilot certificate.

(4)    A Commercial Pilot Certificate. A person who holds a commercial pilot certificate that was issued under § 61.75 before August 4, 1997, may continue to hold that pilot certificate; however, any additional ratings applied for on or after August 4, 1997, will be issued at the private pilot certification level only.
(5)    Under § 61.75(c). Persons may apply for an additional aircraft rating to a § 61.75 pilot certificate with the notation “U.S. TEST PASSED.”
(6)    Under § 61.75(d). Persons may apply for an instrument rating to a § 61.75 pilot certificate by accomplishing the IFP knowledge test.
(7)    Under § 61.65. Persons may apply for an instrument rating on a § 61.75 pilot certificate with the notation “U.S. TEST PASSED.”
(8)    Under § 61.73(h). Persons may apply for an unrestricted commercial pilot certificate based on a § 61.75 pilot certificate.
(9)    Under § 61.153(d)(3). Section 61.153(d)(3) permits a person who holds either a foreign airline transport pilot license with the appropriate aircraft rating or a foreign CPL and instrument rating with the appropriate aircraft rating (without limitations) issued by an ICAO member state to apply for a U.S. ATPC with the appropriate aircraft rating by accomplishing the required aeronautical experience, and passing the appropriate knowledge test and practical test.
(10)    Under § 61.73(c). “A person who is a military pilot in the Armed Forces of a foreign contracting State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation and is assigned to pilot duties in the US. Armed Forces, for purposes other than receiving flight training, may apply for”:

·    A commercial pilot certificate;

·    An aircraft rating in the category and class of aircraft for which that foreign military pilot is qualified;

·    An instrument rating with the appropriate aircraft rating for which that foreign military pilot is qualified; or

·    A type rating, if appropriate.

e.    Pilot Certificate Requirements.

(1)    Section 61.3(b). Section 61.3(b) permits foreign-registered aircraft to be operated within the United States by a pilot holding a valid foreign pilot license issued by the foreign country where the aircraft is registered.
(2)    Section 61.3(a). Section 61.3(a) permits a U.S.-registered civil aircraft to be operated within a foreign country by a pilot holding a foreign pilot license and with the appropriate aircraft rating issued by that foreign country. Or, a person who holds a U.S. pilot certificate with the appropriate aircraft rating may also operate a U.S.-registered civil aircraft in an ICAO member state. However, persons who operate a U.S.-registered civil aircraft in an ICAO member state country must be aware that some countries may have additional operational and pilot certification requirements. Each pilot must inquire with the foreign and practical tests for the appropriate instrument aircraft rating.
(3)    Without Using Foreign Pilot License. A person may obtain a U.S. pilot certificate without relying on his or her foreign pilot license by accomplishing the required training, instructor endorsements, aeronautical experience, and passing the appropriate knowledge test and practical test as required by the pilot certification requirements contained in part 61. However, if a person holds a standard U.S. pilot certificate (other than a Student Pilot Certificate or recreational pilot certificate), that person may not apply for a U.S. pilot certificate based on his or her foreign pilot license (refer to § 61.75(b)(3)).

Note:  A person who applies for a U.S. pilot certificate by accomplishing the appropriate pilot certification requirements of part 61 and also holds a pilot certificate issued under § 61.75 does not need to surrender that § 61.75 U.S. pilot certificate. There have been isolated incidences where examiners have mistakenly required a person to surrender their § 61.75 pilot certificate when applying for a standard U.S. pilot certificate. In this instance, it is permissible for a person to hold both a pilot certificate issued under § 61.75 U.S. pilot certificate and a standard U.S. pilot certificate.

(4)    A Commercial Pilot Certificate. A person who holds a commercial pilot certificate that was issued under § 61.75 before August 4, 1997, may continue to hold that pilot certificate; however, any additional ratings applied for on or after August 4, 1997, will be issued at the private pilot certification level only.
(5)    Under § 61.75(c). Persons may apply for an additional aircraft rating to a § 61.75 pilot certificate with the notation “U.S. TEST PASSED.
(6)    Under § 61.75(d). Persons may apply for an instrument rating to a § 61.75 pilot certificate by accomplishing the IFP knowledge test.
(7)    Under § 61.65. Persons may apply for an instrument rating on a § 61.75 pilot certificate with the notation “U.S. TEST PASSED.”
(8)    Under § 61.123(h). Persons may apply for an unrestricted commercial pilot certificate based on a § 61.75 pilot certificate.
(9)    Under § 61.153(d)(3). Section 61.153(d)(3) permits a person who holds either a foreign airline transport pilot license with the appropriate aircraft rating or a foreign CPL and instrument rating with the appropriate aircraft rating (without limitations) issued by an ICAO member state to apply for a U.S. ATPC with the appropriate aircraft rating by accomplishing the required aeronautical experience, and passing the appropriate knowledge test and practical test.
(10)    Under § 61.73(c). “A person who is a military pilot in the Armed Forces of a foreign contracting State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation and is assigned to pilot duties in the US. Armed Forces, for purposes other than receiving flight training may apply for”:

·    A commercial pilot certificate;

·    An aircraft rating in the category and class of aircraft for which that foreign military pilot is qualified;

·    An instrument rating with the appropriate aircraft rating for which that foreign military pilot is qualified; or

·    A type rating, if appropriate.

f.    Pilot Certificate Requirements.

(1)    Section 61.3(b) permits foreign-registered aircraft to be operated within the United States by a pilot holding a valid foreign pilot license issued by the foreign country where the aircraft is registered.
(2)    Section 61.3(a) permits a U.S.-registered civil aircraft to be operated within a foreign country by a pilot holding a foreign pilot license and with the appropriate aircraft rating issued by that foreign country. Or, a person who holds a U.S. pilot certificate with the appropriate aircraft rating may also operate a U.S.-registered civil aircraft in an ICAO member state. However, persons who operate a U.S.-registered civil aircraft in an ICAO member state country must be aware that some countries may have additional operational and pilot certification requirements. Each pilot must inquire with the foreign knowledge test and instrument rating practical test (refer to § 61.65).

Note:  If the applicant’s U.S. pilot certificate has not been issued with instrument privileges, then the examiner will advise the applicant that he or she may not serve as a required pilot crewmember of a U.S.-registered aircraft under IFR when exercising the privileges of that U.S. pilot certificate. When the applicant passes the IFP knowledge test, instrument privileges will be granted on the U.S. pilot certificate. Passage of the IFP knowledge test does not qualify a person for the notation “U.S. TEST PASSED” for the instrument rating.

(3)    To qualify for the notation “U.S. TEST PASSED” for the addition of an aircraft or instrument rating to a U.S. pilot certificate, the person must accomplish the appropriate aeronautical experience, pass the knowledge test (if applicable), and pass the practical test as required under part 61. Each rating added to the temporary U.S. pilot certificate will have the notation “U.S. TEST PASSED” following the rating to which the notation applies. The required aeronautical experience must be shown on FAA Form 8710-1. Do not indicate “U.S. TEST PASSED” on the temporary pilot certificate if only the IFP knowledge test was passed. All “U.S. TEST PASSED” ratings reflected on the restricted § 61.75 certificate will automatically be transferred when the applicant applies for an unrestricted pilot certificate.
(4)    When a type rating is shown on the U.S. pilot certificate (meaning a U.S. pilot certificate that was issued based on a foreign pilot license), that aircraft type rating will be limited to “VFR Only” if the person has not passed either the IFP knowledge test or the standard instrument rating knowledge test and the standard instrument rating practical test (refer to § 61.65).

Note:  Applicants who apply for a type rating with the notation “U.S. TEST PASSED” on their U.S. pilot certificate must have received the required training from the holder of an FAA flight instructor certificate with the appropriate ratings (refer to § 61.63(d) or § 61.157(b), as appropriate.) If the aircraft type rating is for an aircraft with a gross takeoff weight greater than 12,500 pounds, the applicant must also complete a Department of Justice Flight Training Candidate Checks Program form before beginning training for that type rating. However, the requirements on the Department of Justice Flight Training Candidate Checks Program are subject to change, so contact the FAA’s Certification Branch, Washington, D.C., for the most current requirements.

g.    Medical Endorsement or Certificate. A person applying for a U.S. pilot certificate must submit evidence that he or she currently meets the medical standards for the foreign pilot license on which the application for the pilot certificate is based (refer to § 61.75(f)). Some foreign CAAs enter periodic medical endorsements on their foreign pilot licenses, which affect their currency. Therefore, if the foreign pilot license must have a medical endorsement to make it valid, an FAA medical certificate alone will not satisfy the regulations. In cases when a medical endorsement is not used, a current medical license from the person’s foreign medical examiner or a current part 67 medical certificate will satisfy the requirement. If the person’s foreign pilot license shows a medical endorsement, the person should enter the word “endorsement” on FAA Form 8710-1, section I, block R, or the equivalent class of medical certificate. If using IACRA, enter the date of that endorsement in block S. If the name of the examiner who administered the medical endorsement is unknown to the applicant because the physical was administered by the foreign CAA, then simply state “CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY” in block T.

h.    Duration. A § 61.75 pilot certificate issued on the basis of a foreign pilot license remains in effect as long as the foreign pilot license used to obtain the U.S. pilot certificate is valid.

Note:  A prefix or suffix change in a foreign pilot license does require the reissuance of a U.S. pilot certificate. Some examples of countries that issue prefixes and suffixes on their pilot licenses are Canada, Germany, and Great Britain. For example, with a foreign pilot license issued by Great Britain, the prefix codes the grade level of the pilot license. In Germany, the suffix codes the grade level of the pilot license. In order for the U.S. pilot certificate to correctly identify the person’s foreign pilot license, if the person’s foreign pilot license has a change in its prefix/suffix code, it will require the U.S. pilot certificate to be reissued to reflect the person’s most current foreign pilot license number.

i.    Renewal. A § 61.75 pilot certificate issued based on a foreign pilot license before November 1, 1973, may be reissued at any time upon compliance with the appropriate requirements of § 61.75.

j.    Flight Instructor Certificates. A flight instructor certificate or an additional rating on a flight instructor certificate may not be issued based on any foreign flight instructor rating or certificate. A flight instructor certificate will only be issued to a person who meets the appropriate requirements of part 61 subpart H.

k.    Added Ratings. If a person requests that a rating be added to his or her U.S. pilot certificate based on meeting the appropriate pilot certification requirements of part 61 (i.e., the practical test and the knowledge test, if a knowledge test is applicable to the rating sought), those requirements must be accomplished before the issuance of that additional rating. However, if the person requests that a rating be added to the U.S. pilot certificate based on that rating having been added to his or her foreign pilot license, then no knowledge test or practical test is required.

l.    Flying Clubs. A foreign pilot license issued by a flying club under a specific delegation of the foreign CAA of an ICAO member state is acceptable for the issuance of a private pilot certificate under § 61.75. For example, several countries may delegate the authority to issue glider pilot certificates to members of their national gliding clubs.

m.    British Territories. The British Territories listed in FAA Order 8900.1 are authorized by the British Colonial Air Navigation Order of 1961, as amended, to issue their own pilot licenses (not British National pilot licenses). British territory pilot licenses usually bear the name of the territory where they were issued, and the British Territories are identified in the Colonial Air Navigation Order under the year of its most recent amendment. Pilot licenses issued by the British Territories are acceptable for the issuance of the U.S. pilot certificate based on a person holding a foreign pilot license.

n.    Joint Aviation Regulation (JAR)-Flight Crew Licensing (FCL). Since July 1, 1999, some member states of the European Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) have begun issuing pilot licenses entitled JAR‑flightcrew licenses. These pilot licenses are based upon new licensing regulations developed by JAA member states through the JAA and subsequently adopted by each JAA member state. JAR‑flightcrew pilot licenses do meet ICAO pilot licensing standards, and these JAA member states are also member states of ICAO.

(1)    It is important to note that a JAR-flightcrew license will be issued by a state’s CAA and not by the JAA itself.
(2)    A listing of JAA member states is contained in FAA Order 8900.1. Current listings of JAA member states may be found at the JAA Web site at http://www.jaa.nl.
(3)    The individual JAA member states are at varying levels of implementation of JAR-flightcrew license regulations, so some JAA member states may still be issuing their own national pilot licenses. Further, national pilot licenses issued by a JAA member state before a state’s implementation of JAR-flightcrew license may still be valid for use within that JAA member state and thus acceptable for issuance of a U.S. pilot certificate based on § 61.75, provided that such pilot licenses meet the appropriate FAA regulatory requirements for the pilot certificate being issued. Any questions concerning the JAR-flightcrew pilot license should be directed to the International Programs and Policy Division (AFS-50).
(4)    The format for a JAR-flightcrew pilot license is shown in FAA Order 8900.1.

o.    British National Pilot Licenses. The British issue both JAR-flightcrew pilot licenses, described above in subparagraph 135n, and British National pilot licenses. This subparagraph describes British National pilot licenses or variations listed on the JAR-flightcrew pilot license.

(1)    Both British National pilot licenses and JAR-flightcrew pilot licenses issued by the British CAA are all printed on white background security paper, but the color of the cover follows the ICAO Annex 1 convention. The private pilot license (PPL)(A) is light brown (tan), the CPL(A) is blue, and the Air Transport Pilot License (ATPL)(A) is green. The British National CPL(A) has the same blue cover as the CPL(A) but has a different title. Helicopter pilot licenses are also variously colored with PPL(H) light gray, CPL(H) dark gray, and ATPL(H) white. A flight engineer license has a dark brown cover. The data contained on each British National pilot license is identified numerically. The Roman numeral II describes the pilot license held. If an FAA office is asked to issue a U.S. pilot certificate based on a British National pilot license and it is not possible to determine which privileges are applicable, the person will be required to provide the necessary information before completion of the pilot certification process.
(2)    The British National CPL(A) and ATPL(A) issued before July 1, 1999, are the only British-issued CPLs equivalent to both the U.S. and ICAO pilot certification requirements. A private pilot certificate with the appropriate ratings may be issued on the basis of a British National CPL(A). With the implementation of JAR-FCL in the U.K., the British now issue a JAR-flightcrew license CPL. Further, the British now issue a JAR-flightcrew license CPL(A) or (H) restricted to British-registered aircraft. This is an acceptable ICAO pilot license, but the holder must meet certain British pilot licensing requirements rather than JAR-flightcrew pilot licensing requirements for issuance of the pilot license.
(3)    When issuing a private pilot certificate that is based on a British National CPL, a thorough examination of FAA Form 8710-1 must be made to determine the privileges and limitations on each pilot license. Those persons who hold a restricted or nonrestricted basic British National CPL(A) are qualified for the issuance of a U.S. private pilot certificate because both the restricted and nonrestricted British National CPL(A) licensing requirements meet or exceed the ICAO private pilot licensing standards. The restricted British National CPL(A) is no longer issued in the U.K. but may still be in use.
(a)    The restricted basic British National CPL(A) is limited to private pilot privileges only. This pilot license was introduced to allow existing British flight instructors and assistant flight instructors holding only PPLs to continue to instruct for remuneration without having to obtain a full British National CPL(A). The restricted British National CPL(A) requirements meet or exceed the ICAO PPL standards.
(b)    The nonrestricted British National CPL(A) was issued to pilots who wished to conduct flight instruction or other types of aerial work, except for public transport, for remuneration. This pilot license does not meet the requirements of a full-fledged British National CPL, a U.S. commercial pilot certificate, or ICAO pilot license standards. However, the British National CPL(A) requirement meets or exceeds the ICAO private pilot licensing standards.
(4)    The British CAA may issue an instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) rating. Holders of the British IMC privilege are not qualified to receive a U.S. instrument rating for the following reasons:
(a)    The IMC privilege is not as high a level of qualification as the instrument rating and confers no privileges for flights requiring compliance with IFR.
(b)    IMC privileges can be used only within the U.K. Therefore, a holder of the IMC privilege is not eligible to take the IFP knowledge test or be issued a U.S. instrument rating.
(5)    On August 1, 2002, the British CAA began issuing a PPL(A) for single-engine aeroplanes, motor gliders, and micro-light aircraft. This foreign pilot license does not meet ICAO standards. It is the equivalent of the U.S. recreational license only and does not require an ICAO medical license; only a declaration of health signed by the holder’s general practitioner is needed.
(6)    The British CAA issues JAR-flightcrew medical licenses for ATPL, CPL, and some PPL licenses. The British CAA issues a national medical license for commercial balloon pilot licenses and a declaration of health for its national PPL license, private level balloon license, and micro-lights. Both the JAR‑flightcrew medical and the national medical licenses meet ICAO medical standards. The declaration of health does not meet ICAO medical standards. The duration period for the U.S. medical certificate is addressed in § 61.23. When a person is exercising the privileges of his or her § 61.75 pilot certificate, that person must comply with the appropriate medical certification requirements of § 61.23.

p.    Other Known Differences of Some Foreign Pilot Licenses and Ratings.

(1)    The German glider pilot license requires a person to hold a medical license/endorsement when exercising the privileges of their German glider pilot license. That person must also comply with the German medical license/endorsement requirements when exercising the privileges of their § 61.75 pilot certificate for the glider rating (refer to § 61.75(e)(3)).
(2)    Holders of a Spanish IMC privilege are not qualified to receive a U.S. instrument rating because the Spanish IMC privilege does not meet the certification standards and qualification for a U.S. instrument rating and confers no privileges for flights requiring compliance with IFR. The Spanish IMC privilege is only authorized for use within Spain. Therefore, the holder of the Spanish IMC privilege is not eligible to take the IFP knowledge test or be issued a U.S. instrument rating.
(3)    Belgium issues some PPLs with the notation “Restricted.” This limitation restricts the person to Belgian airspace only. This pilot license parallels the U.S. recreational pilot certificate (i.e., the person has not met the cross-country aeronautical experience and training requirements of ICAO). Do not issue a § 61.75 private pilot certificate to a person who holds a Belgian PPL with the notation “Restricted” on it.
(4)    Some foreign pilot licenses contain a restriction that prohibits the person from operating an aircraft at night. As an example, some foreign CAAs require their citizens to hold an instrument rating and/or a night flying privilege in order to operate an aircraft at night. That person must also comply with that night operating restriction of their foreign pilot license when exercising the privileges of their § 61.75 pilot certificate (refer to § 61.75(e)(3)). A point of clarification: the FAA may not remove the night flying restriction. It is permissible for a foreign pilot who receives a U.S. pilot certificate based on his or her foreign pilot license to accomplish the required night flying training (for the appropriate grade level of U.S. pilot certificate held) from a holder of an FAA flight instructor certificate, and to receive a solo endorsement to exercise night flying privileges on his or her U.S. pilot certificate.
(5)    Some foreign CAAs (e.g., New Zealand and Australia) issue PPLs which specifically limit the pilot to a specific make and model of aircraft or specifically limit the pilot from carrying any passengers. Those persons must also comply with the make and model aircraft and passenger carrying restriction of their foreign pilot license when exercising the privileges of a § 61.75 pilot certificate (refer to § 61.75(e)(3)).
(6)    Some foreign CAAs have issued pilot licenses that do not identify the grade of pilot license. In those instances, do not issue a U.S. pilot certificate based on that kind of foreign pilot license. The holder of an SIC foreign pilot license does not meet ICAO standards for pilot certification.
(7)    Some foreign CAAs have issued pilot licenses which limit the person to SIC privileges only. Do not issue a U.S. pilot certificate based on that kind of foreign pilot license. The holder of that kind of foreign pilot license does not meet ICAO standards for pilot certification.
(8)    Some foreign CAAs issue Micro-Light Aircraft pilot licenses. A Micro-Light Aircraft pilot license does not meet ICAO standards for pilot certification of a private pilot certificate. Do not issue a private pilot certificate to a person who holds a Micro-Light Aircraft pilot license.
(9)    Mexico issues a type rating for each series of make and model of an aircraft. For example, they do not issue a DC-9 type rating that covers all the various series of DC-9. Mexico issues a specific rating, such as DC-915 or a Boeing 737-300. Therefore, when an examiner places a type rating on a U.S. pilot certificate based on a Mexican pilot license, he or she needs to specify the series as it appears on the Mexican license.

q.    Regulatory Basis for Denying Certification. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, the FAA is closely scrutinizing persons who are applying for a U.S. pilot certificate/rating and those who hold a U.S. pilot certificate/rating. However, the FAA has always had a regulatory basis for denying certification to foreign applicants, as per § 61.13(a)(3), the applicant “may be refused issuance of any U.S. airman certificate, rating, or authorization.” Additionally, per 49 U.S.C. § 44709(b), “the Administrator may issue an order amending, modifying, suspending, or revoking - (1) any part of a certificate issued under this chapter if - (A) the Administrator decides after conducting a reinspection, reexamination, or other investigation that safety in air commerce or air transportation and the public interest require that action.” The key language in 49 U.S.C. § 44709(b)(1)(A) is “other investigation that safety in air commerce or air transportation and the public interest require that action.”

(1)    The applicant may submit the required information using the form developed by AFS-760 (the form may be downloaded at the Web site below; also see Figure 7-32. The applicant may download the instructions for the initial application process and the optional verification of authenticity form from AFS-760’s Web site at: http://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/airmen_certification/foreign_license_verification/.
(2)    The applicant may submit a legible handwritten or typewritten letter with the specific information shown in subparagraph (3) below (at this time, the preapplication documents cannot be sent electronically). The letter should be faxed to AFS-760 at (405) 954-9922 or mailed to: FAA, Airmen Certification Branch (AFS-760), P.O. Box 25082 Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0082.
(3)    The information submitted to AFS-760 by the applicant must include the following information and documentation:
(a)    The name and DOB of the person.
(b)    The certificate number and ratings on the foreign pilot license.
(c)    The address where the person wishes AFS-760 to mail the verification of authenticity letter.
(d)    The country of issuance of the person’s foreign pilot license.
(e)    The location of the FAA office where the person intends to apply for his or her U.S. pilot certificate. The applicants will only be able to obtain his or her U.S. pilot certificate from the FAA office he or she specifies.
(f)    A statement that his or her foreign pilot license is not under an order of suspension or revocation or make the statement on the Verification of Authenticity of Foreign, Rating, and Medical Certification form.

Note:  AFS-760 requests a legible copy of the foreign pilot license and medical license/certificate be included with all requests for verification of authenticity of the foreign pilot license.

r.    Duties and Responsibilities of AFS-760. AFS-760 is responsible for:

(1)    Verifying the authenticity of the person’s foreign pilot license and medical license with the foreign CAA.
(2)    Ensuring the person’s foreign pilot license and medical license has not been surrendered, suspended, revoked, or expired.
(3)    Issuing the verification of authenticity letter to the managing FAA office and a copy to the applicant. (The verification of authenticity letter expires 6 calendar-months from the date on the letter.)

s.    Temporary Mailing Address. A temporary mailing address for delivery of the pilot certificate may be indicated on a separate statement attached to the preapplication letter. However, the address required for official record purposes as shown on FAA Form 8710-1 must represent the person’s actual permanent residential street address, including apartment number, etc., when appropriate.

(1)    A post office box, rural route, flight school address, personal mail box, commercial, or other mail drop can be used as the applicants preferred mailing, however, the applicant must also furnish a physical residential address, a map or written directions to the applicant’s physical address. This information must be included with the application. In special cases where the applicant resides on a boat, the name of the boat and the dock number should be included. If the applicant resides in an RV, the tag number, VIN number, and registration number should be included.
(2)    A temporary mailing address for delivery of the certificate may be indicated on a separate statement attached to the application. However, the address required for official record purposes as shown on an airman application for a certificate must represent the airman’s actual permanent residential street address, including apartment number, etc., as appropriate. An alternate mail delivery service address (commercial mail box provider), flight school, airport office, etc., is not acceptable. A post office box or rural route number is not acceptable as permanent residence on an application unless there are unavoidable circumstances that require such an address. An applicant residing on a rural route, in a boat or mobile (recreational) vehicle, or in some other manner that requires the use of a post office box or rural route number for an address must attest to the circumstances by signing a statement on a separate sheet of paper. The information provided must include sufficient details to ensure identification of the geographical location of the airman’s residence. If necessary to positively identify the place of residence, the applicant may be required to provide a hand-drawn map that clearly shows the location of the residence. When the residence is a boat or other mobile vehicle, the registration number, tag number, etc., and dock or park location must be provided. When applying for the practical test for an airman certificate, a post office address may be specified for use on the certificate issued. A signed request must be submitted with the application for this purpose. The permanent residence address must be shown in the manner specified above. The examiner attaches this paper to FAA Form 8710-1.

128.    Procedures.

a.    Applicant Arrives at the Designee’s Location. Determine whether the managing FAA office has received the verification of authenticity letter from AFS-760.

(1)    If there is no verification of authenticity letter on file, advise the applicant of the preapplication process per paragraph 135 above. Do not process FAA Form 8710-1 at this time.
(2)    If there is a verification of authenticity letter on file, proceed with the application process.

b.    Application Process of Person with Verification of Authenticity Letter.

(1)    Open the PTRS.
(2)    Verify that the authenticity letter is still valid (within 6 calendar-months of date on the letter).
(a)    If the authenticity letter is still valid, review the applicant’s FAA Form 8710-1.
(b)    If the authenticity letter is no longer valid (more than 6 calendar-months from the date on the letter), advise the applicant that he or she must pre-apply again with AFS-760. Close the PTRS.

c.    Review the Completed FAA Form 8710-1.

(1)    Ensure it is filled out accurately and legibly in ink. (The instructions for completing FAA Form 8710-1 are attached to the application.)
(2)    In section I, Application Information, ensure that the applicant has checked “PRIVATE.” If the applicant desires instrument privileges on the U.S. pilot certificate, assure that the applicant has also checked “INSTRUMENT.”
(3)    Ensure that section II, blocks A through E have been completed. If a flight test is administered, section IIA(1) must show the aircraft used and (2a) “Total Time” in the aircraft. Section IIC must be completed if the applicant graduated from an FAA-approved school. Section IID must always be completed on applications based on a foreign license. The ratings reflected in section IID(4) must be FAA equivalent. (e.g., ASEL, AMEL, Instrument Airplane (INSTA), CE-500) section IIE must be completed if the applicant applied through an Air Carrier Training Program.
(4)    Ensure the foreign pilot license information in block D accurately reflects the information on the foreign pilot license.
(5)    Ensure that sections IV and V have been completed. A foreign pilot applicant for a § 61.75 U.S. pilot certificate is not required to complete section III, Record of Pilot Time, on the FAA Form 8710-1 application when the basis of the application is the ratings held on the person’s foreign pilot license. If a foreign pilot applicant is applying for an additional aircraft rating that is being added to a § 61.75 U.S. pilot certificate on the basis of completion of a “U.S. TEST PASSED” (i.e., completion of the required aeronautical knowledge test and practical test, as appropriate), then it is required that the applicant complete section III, that shows at least the minimum aeronautical experience required for the pilot certification level and rating being applied for.
(6)    Have the applicant make any necessary corrections if any of the above items are not accurate or complete.

d.    Verify that Applicant has Proper Documents. Verify that the applicant has the following documents with the completed FAA Form 8710-1:

(1)    The person’s foreign pilot license. A legible English transcription of the foreign pilot license, if the foreign pilot license is not in English, is acceptable.
(2)    The person’s permanent home of record.
(3)    U.S. pilot certificate issued under § 61.75 (for reissuance).
(4)    Foreign medical endorsement/foreign medical license, as appropriate, or a part 67 medical certificate.
(5)    Knowledge test results, if applicable.
(6)    Verifiable and positive identification of the person (e.g., driver’s license, passport, or other acceptable means of identification with a photograph and physical description).
(7)    Attach the original verification of authenticity letter issued by AFS-760.

e.    Determine ICAO Member State Status.

(1)    Note the country in section II, block D1, of FAA Form 8710-1.
(2)    Compare the country listed with FAA Order 8900.1, to determine whether the country is an ICAO member state. If there is any question about a country’s status, check the listing of current ICAO member states located at: http://www.icao.int/about-icao/Pages/member-states.aspx.
(a)    If the country is not an ICAO member state, inform the applicant that the U.S. pilot certificate cannot be issued and return all submitted documents to the applicant.
(b)    If the country is an ICAO member state, verify the applicant’s identity.

f.    Verify the Applicant’s Identity.

(1)    Establish the person’s identity with some form of government-issued photo identification (driver’s license, passport, etc.).
(2)    Compare the identification with the information provided on FAA Form 8710-1.
(a)    If the person’s identity cannot be verified for lack of documentation or inadequate documentation, request that the person return with the appropriate identification.
(b)    If the person’s identity appears to be falsified, do not proceed.
(3)    Review the verification of authenticity letter that was sent to the applicant by AFS-760 and compare it to the information provided by the applicant on FAA Form 8710-1. Although the instructions state that the applicant must furnish the original verification of authenticity letter when making application for a U.S. pilot certificate/rating(s), a facsimile of the verification of authenticity letter from an FAA office or AFS-760 is considered an original verification of authenticity letter.

g.    Establish the Applicant’s Eligibility.

(1)    Review the applicant’s foreign pilot license for the following:
(a)    Ensure the information on the foreign pilot license is the same as the information provided in the person’s identification and in FAA Form 8710-1, section II(D).
(b)    Ensure the applicant holds the ratings he or she is applying for by comparing it to the ratings held on the foreign pilot license.
(c)    If the person is requesting an instrument rating, ensure that the applicant’s foreign pilot license authorizes instrument privileges that are equivalent to the U.S. instrument rating. If the applicant needs to take the IFP knowledge test, refer the applicant to a computer testing center and explain that he or she will have to reapply for the instrument privileges once that test has been passed.
(d)    Verify that the applicant has passed the IFP knowledge test.
(e)    Review the person’s medical endorsement/certificate to determine that it is valid.
(2)    If an applicant is not eligible for the U.S. pilot certificate and/or rating sought, or if a discrepancy exists in any of the items indicated above, return the FAA Form 8710-1 application and any submitted documents to the person. Inform the person why he or she is not eligible and explain how to obtain the pilot certificate and/or ratings sought.
(3)    If a person is found not eligible for the U.S. pilot certificate because the person is unable to read, speak, write, or understand English, issue FAA Form 8060-5.

Note:  FAA Form 8060-5 needs to be issued so the failure will be recorded and on file with AFS‑760. Properly recording the failure is needed when and if the person reapplies for the U.S. pilot certificate (e.g., at another managing FAA office or with FAA representatives who are located in a U.S. embassy overseas).

(4)    If the applicant is eligible for the U.S. pilot certificate, issue the pilot certificate.
(5)    Issue the private pilot certificate as follows:
(a)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-4 in duplicate, indicating the grade of pilot certificate in block IX.
(b)    Enter the equivalent of the foreign pilot license category, class, and type ratings (if applicable) in block XII (refer to § 61.5).
(c)    If the person is eligible for instrument privileges, enter the appropriate instrument rating:

1.    INSTRUMENT—AIRPLANE.

2.    INSTRUMENT—HELICOPTER.

3.    INSTRUMENT—POWERED-LIFT.

(d)    Under the ratings in block XII, enter “ISSUED ON THE BASIS OF AND VALID ONLY WHEN ACCOMPANIED BY [NAME OF COUNTRY] PILOT LICENSE NO. [NUMBER FROM FOREIGN PILOT LICENSE]. ALL LIMITATIONS AND RESTRICTIONS ON THE [NAME OF COUNTRY] LICENSE APPLY.”
(e)    Enter the following operational limitations (when and if appropriate) in block XIII:

1.    “NOT AUTHORIZED TO ACT AS A PILOT-IN-COMMAND” if the person does not read, speak, write, and understand English because of medical reasons, as permitted under § 61.75(b)(5).

2.    For a U.S. § 61.75 Commercial Pilot Certificate (except for the glider or lighter-than-air ratings) that was issued before August 4, 1997, continue to enter “NOT VALID FOR THE CARRIAGE OF PERSONS OR PROPERTY FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE OR FOR AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS.”

3.    Enter the limitation “VFR ONLY” following any type rating if the person has not passed either the IFP knowledge test or the standard instrument rating knowledge test and the standard instrument rating practical test (refer to § 61.65).

(f)    Sign, and have the applicant sign (in ink), the original and duplicate copy of FAA Form 8060-4.
(g)    Issue the duplicate copy to the applicant.
(h)    Inform the applicant that a permanent certificate will be sent to the permanent address. If the applicant wants the certificate to be mailed to a different mailing address, have the applicant complete a written request containing the mailing address. Attach the request to FAA Form 8710-1.
(i)    Return any submitted documents not needed for the certification package.
(6)    Advise the applicant about the rules and requirements contained in part 61 and part 91 (e.g., flight review requirements, recency of experience requirements, required logbook entries). As a point emphasis, make clear to the applicant that a flight review (refer to § 61.56) must be administered by a holder of an FAA flight instructor certificate with the appropriate ratings before he or she may exercise the privileges of his or her U.S. pilot certificate. The proficiency checks administered by a foreign flight instructor do not count for meeting the flight review requirements of § 61.56.
(7)    Complete the certification file as follows:
(a)    Complete the reverse side of FAA Form 8710-1 in the area noted as the “Designated Examiner or Airman Certification Representative Report” or “Evaluator’s Record (Use for ATP Certificate and/or Type Ratings),” as appropriate.
(b)    Check the boxes on the reverse side of FAA Form 8710-1 in the area noted as the “Designated Examiner or Airman Certification Representative Report” or “Evaluator’s Record (Use for ATP Certificate and/or Type Ratings),” as appropriate, and where applicable.
(c)    Date and sign on the reverse side of FAA Form 8710-1 in the area noted as the “Designated Examiner or Airman Certification Representative Report” or “Evaluator’s Record (Use for ATP Certificate and/or Type Ratings),” as appropriate, and where applicable.
(d)    Check the applicable boxes in the Attachments section.
(e)    Complete the Airman’s ID area of FAA Form 8710-1.
(f)    Attach the appropriate documents to FAA Form 8710-1, including the verification of authenticity letter.
(g)    Forward the completed pilot certification file to the managing FAA office or AFS-760, as appropriate.

Section 22. IACRA Process

129.    General. IACRA is a Web-based program that automates the airman certification process and electronically captures and validates the information required to complete the application and Temporary Airman Certificate. The application is accessible over the internet and integrates multiple FAA datamart data with IACRA. The IACRA process provides the following benefits to the designee:

a.    FAA Tracking Number (FTN). Assigns FTNs to all registered users.

b.    Immediate Validation Checks. Provides immediate validation checks of information entered on the application which eliminates errors and validates data.

c.    Electronic Application Sending. Speeds up the application process by sending applications electronically to the Civil Aviation Registry (AFS-700) in Oklahoma City.

d.    Digital Signature. Provides the ability to sign the application using digital signature, allowing the certification process to function in a paperless environment as mandated by the Government Paperwork Elimination Act.

e.    Continuous Access. Provides continuous access to the latest Web-based version of IACRA for registered users. This eliminates the time and expense of distributing IACRA compact disks with updates.

130.    Procedures.

a.    Complete Form 8710-1. The applicant completes FAA Form 8710-1 on the IACRA Web site at https://iacra.faa.gov/.

Note:  At the time of publication, IACRA is not able to process applications for a restricted privileges ATP certificate. Future updates to IACRA may allow for the processing of a restricted privileges ATP certificate online. Until such upgrade, FAA Form 8710-1 must be utilized for the application file.

b.    Instructor Review. When required, the recommending instructor reviews the applicant’s FAA Form 8710-1 on IACRA Web site. The recommending instructor digitally signs the application.

(1)    The recommending instructor/applicant schedules an exam with the certifying officer.

Note:  IACRA defines a certifying officer as a DPE, ASI, or AST.

(2)    At appointment, the certifying officer checks the applicant’s identification to verify identity.
(3)    The certifying officer logs on the IACRA Web site and selects applicant’s information. The certifying officer reviews the application.
(4)    The applicant logs into IACRA (through the certifying officer’s login) and digitally signs application.
(5)    The applicant takes a practical test with the certifying officer.
(6)    The certifying officer logs back into IACRA, retrieves the application and reviews it for errors before digitally signing. A results document is generated.
(7)    The signed, approved application and data are sent to AFS-700 electronically.

Figure 7-6.  ICAO Level 4 English Language Proficiency Criteria

1.    PRONUNCIATION. Assumes that English is not the applicant’s first language and that the applicant has a dialect or accent that is intelligible to the aeronautical community.

a.    Pronunciation, stress, rhythm, and intonation are influenced by the applicant’s first language, but only sometimes interfere with ease of understanding.

2.    STRUCTURE. Relevant grammatical structures and sentence patterns are determined by language functions appropriate to the task.

a.    Basic grammatical structures and sentence patterns are used creatively and are usually well controlled by the applicant. Errors may occur, particularly in unusual or unexpected circumstances, but rarely interfere with meaning.

3.    VOCABULARY.

a.    The applicant’s vocabulary range and accuracy are usually sufficient to communicate effectively on common, concrete, and work-related topics. The applicant can often paraphrase successfully when lacking vocabulary in unusual or unexpected circumstances.

4.    FLUENCY.

a.    The applicant produces stretches of language at an appropriate tempo. There may be occasional loss of fluency on transition from rehearsed or formulaic speech to spontaneous interaction, but this does not prevent effective communication. The applicant can make limited use of discourse markers or connectors. Fillers are not distracting.

5.    COMPREHENSION.

a.    Comprehension by the applicant is mostly accurate on common, concrete, and work-related topics when the dialect, accent, or variety used is sufficiently intelligible. When the applicant is confronted with a linguistic or situational complication or an unexpected turn of events, comprehension may be slower or require clarification strategies.

6.    INTERACTIONS.

a.    Responses by the applicant are usually immediate, appropriate, and informative. The applicant initiates and maintains exchanges even when dealing with an unexpected turn of events. The applicant deals adequately with apparent misunderstandings by checking, confirming, or clarifying.

Figure 7-7.  Sample FAA Form 8410-1, Airman Proficiency/Qualification Check

Figure 7-7. Sample FAA Form 8410-1, Airman Proficiency/Qualification Check

Figure 7-8A.  Pilot Examiner Test Guide

Figure 7-8A. Pilot Examiner Test Guide - Page 1

Figure 7-8A.  Pilot Examiner Test Guide (Continued)

Figure 7-8A. Pilot Examiner Test Guide - Page 2

Figure 7-8A.  Pilot Examiner Test Guide (Continued)

Figure 7-8A. Pilot Examiner Test Guide - Page 3

Figure 7-8A.  Pilot Examiner Test Guide (Continued)

Figure 7-8A. Pilot Examiner Test Guide - Page 4

Figure 7-8B.  Sport Pilot Examiner Test Guide

Figure 7-8B. Sport Pilot Examiner Test Guide - Page 1

Figure 7-8B.  Sport Pilot Examiner Test Guide (Continued)

Figure 7-8B. Sport Pilot Examiner Test Guide - Page 2

Figure 7-8B.  Sport Pilot Examiner Test Guide (Continued)

Figure 7-8B. Sport Pilot Examiner Test Guide - Page 3

Figure 7-8B.  Sport Pilot Examiner Test Guide (Continued)

Figure 7-8B. Sport Pilot Examiner Test Guide - Page 4

Figure 7-9A.  Sample Letter of Discontinuance (Pilot)

Figure 7-9A. Sample Letter of Discontinuance (Pilot)

Figure 7-9B.  Sample Letter of Discontinuance (Sport Pilot)

Figure 7-9B. Sample Letter of Discontinuance (Sport Pilot)

Figure 7-10.  Airman Knowledge Test Report

Figure 7-10. Airman Knowledge Test Report

Figure 7-10A.  Airman Knowledge Test Report

Figure 7-10A. Airman Knowledge Test Report

Figure 7-11.  Letter from Part 141 School with Knowledge Test Examining Authority

(SCHOOL LOGO)

Federal Aviation Air Agency Certificate Number: XXXX

This certifies that:

[Name]

[Address]

Has satisfactorily completed each required stage and the test for those stages in the program of study as prescribed in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 141, subpart D, Examining Authority. The applicant is issued this document as evidence of meeting the Federal Aviation Administration knowledge test requirements for pilot certification.

(If Applicable)

NOTE: Knowledge testing and grading for instructor certificates and ATP ratings was conducted in accordance with exemption number XXXX to 14 CFR § 141.65, dated XXXX.

FINAL EXAMINATION RESULTS:

Test: XXXXX

Date of Test: XXXXX

Expiration Date: XXXX

Take Number: XXXX

Grade: XXXX

Subject Areas Failed: XXXXXX

XXXXXX

XXXXXX

[Signature]

[Printed Name],

Chief Instructor

Figure 7-12.  Sample Transportation Security Administration Approval Letter

SAMPLE


Subject:

AFSP Training Request #123456: Final Approval Confirmation

Status:

Send Successful (2011-02-22 08:30:56)

To:

Jane.doe@yahoo.com

 

 

From:

afsp.help@dhs.gov

CC:

 

Message Type:

 

 

 


Based on information available at this time, the Transportation Security Administration grants Final Approval for the following flight training request:

Student: Jane Doe
User ID: Janedoe
Provider: Flight School Name
Training Request ID#: 123456
Training Request Course Name: Private Pilot
Training Request Aircraft Type: C172
Training Request Category: 3
Estimated Training Request Date: 04-01-2011 to 06-30-2011

The Flight Training Provider has been granted authority to initiate training. Training must begin within 180 days of this email being sent by TSA. Training must be completed within 365 days of this email being sent by TSA. If training is not completed with 365 days, the Candidate will need to submit a new training request. If TSA subsequently receives information indicating that the candidate poses a threat to aviation or national security, TSA will require the Flight Training Provider to cease training in accordance with 49 USC 44939 and 49 CFR part 1552.

If you require help with the AFSP process, please visit the Provider Frequently Asked Questions page at www.flightschoolcandidates.gov/provider_faq.htm.

If you need further assistance, please contact AFSP.help@dhs.gov or call (571) 203-8470.

Sincerely,
AFSP

This is an automated response. If you have received this email in error, please forward it to AFSP.help@dhs.gov.

Figure 7-13.  FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Front)

Figure 7-13. FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Front)

Figure 7-13A.  FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Back)

Figure 7-13A. FAA Form 8710 1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (Back)

Figure 7-14.  Sample of FAA Form 8710-11, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application—Sport Pilot (Front Side)

Figure 7-14. Sample of FAA Form 8710-11, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application—Sport Pilot (Front Side)

Figure 7-14A.  Sample of FAA Form 8710-11, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application—Sport Pilot (Reverse Side)

Figure 7-14A. Sample of FAA Form 8710-11, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application—Sport Pilot (Reverse Side)

Figure 7-15.  Sample FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Pilot)

Figure 7-15. Sample FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Pilot)

Figure 7-15A.  Sample FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Sport Pilot)

Figure 7-15A. Sample FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate (Sport Pilot)

Figure 7-16.  Center Thrust Limitation

Figure 7-16. Center Thrust Limitation

Figure 7-17.  Sample FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application (Pilot)

Figure 7-17. Sample FAA Form 8060 5, Notice of Disapproval of Application (Pilot)

Figure 7-17A.  Sample FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application (Sport Pilot)

Figure 7-17A. Sample FAA Form 8060 5, Notice of Disapproval of Application (Sport Pilot)

Figure 7-18.  Sample Application for a Part 141 Stage Check

Figure 7-18. Sample Application for a Part 141 Stage Check

Figure 7-19.  Sample FAA Form 8420-2, Medical Certificate __________ Class and Student Pilot Certificate

Figure 7-19. Sample FAA Form 8420-2, Medical Certificate __________ Class and Student Pilot Certificate

Figure 7-20.  Sample Student Pilot Certificate

Figure 7-20. Sample Student Pilot Certificate

Figure 7-21.  Sample Recreational Pilot Certificate

Figure 7-21. Sample Recreational Pilot Certificate

Figure 7-22.  Sample Private Pilot Certificate with Recreational Pilot Category Privileges

Figure 7-22. Sample Private Pilot Certificate with Recreational Pilot Category Privileges

Figure 7-23.  Sample Commercial Pilot Certificate

Figure 7-23. Sample Commercial Pilot Certificate

Figure 7-24.  Sample ATP Certificate with Instrument Privileges Shown

Figure 7-24. Sample ATP Certificate with Instrument Privileges Shown

Figure 7-25.  Sample Second-in-Command Limitation

Figure 7-25. Sample Second-in-Command Limitation

Figure 7-26.  Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Temporary Airman Certificate

The following is a sample of a completed Temporary Airman Certificate (FAA Form 8060-4) for the SIC pilot type rating:

Figure 7-26. Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Temporary Airman Certificate

Figure 7-27.  Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Application for Graduates of Approved Training Programs (Parts 141/142)

This is a sample of a completed FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (front page), for the addition of an SIC type rating when the airman graduated from an approved program either under part 141 or part 142 or completed an air carrier’s approved training program.

Figure 7-27. Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Application for Graduates of Approved Training Programs (Parts 141/142)

Figure 7-28.  Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Application for Graduates of Approved Training Programs (Parts 135/121)

This is a sample of a completed FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (front page), for the addition of an SIC type rating when the airman graduated from an Air Carrier’s approved training program either under part 121 or part 135.

Figure 7-28. Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Application for Graduates of Approved Training Programs (Parts 135/121)

Figure 7-29.  Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Application for § 61.55 Applicants

This is a sample of a completed FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (front page), for the addition of an SIC type rating when the airman applies under § 61.55.

Figure 7-29. Sample SIC Pilot Type Rating Application for § 61.55 Applicants

Figure 7-30.  SIC Pilot Type Rating Application Completed by an Authorized Designated Examiner or an APD

This is a sample of a completed FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application (back page), for the addition of an SIC type rating.

Figure 7-30. SIC Pilot Type Rating Application Completed by an Authorized Designated Examiner or an APD

Figure 7-31.  Sample Gold Seal Flight Instructor Certificate (Pilot)

Figure 7-31. Sample Gold Seal Flight Instructor Certificate (Pilot)

Figure 7-31A.  Sample Gold Seal Flight Instructor Certificate with a Sport Pilot Rating

Figure 7-31A. Sample Gold Seal Flight Instructor Certificate with a Sport Pilot Rating

Figure 7-32.  Verification of Authenticity Form and Instructions

Verification of authenticity of foreign pilot license, rating, and medical certification (application form can be downloaded at: http://registry.faa.gov/).

Note:  This form is not displayed in this chapter. This form is subject to revision, so the most current version of this form may be downloaded at the above Web site.

Instructions for completing the form can also be downloaded at: http://registry.faa.gov/.

Note:  The instructions for completing the form are not displayed in this chapter. Since this form is subject to revision, the most current version of the instructions for completing the form may be downloaded at the above Web site.

Chapter 8. Administrative Information

1.    Distribution. Distribute this order to the division level in the Flight Standards Service (AFS) and regional Flight Standards divisions (RFSD); to all Flight Standards District Offices (FSDO) and International Field Offices (IFO); and to all General Aviation (GA) airman designees.

2.    Deviations. It is necessary to adhere to procedures in this order to achieve uniform administration of this directive material. If a designee feels that a deviation is necessary, he or she should request the deviation in writing from the aviation safety inspector (ASI) at the managing Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) field office. The ASI should ensure the requested deviation is substantiated and documented before submitting it to the field office manager. If the field office manager concurs, then the deviation should be routed using the FAA automated document control process to the Designee Quality Assurance Branch (AFS-650) through the appropriate RFSD and the Regulatory Support Division (AFS-600). AFS-650 will ensure that the request is routed to the responsible policy division. The policy division will approve, in writing, any deviations. (See page 1-1.)

3.    Suggestions or Comments. AFS-650 welcomes and considers all of your suggestions or comments regarding this order.

a.    Use FAA Form 1320-19. For your convenience, use FAA Form 1320-19, Directive Feedback Information (the last page of this order), to submit suggestions or comments. Please use the “OTHER COMMENTS” block on FAA Form 1320-19 to provide a complete explanation of why the suggested change is necessary. You may correct, as necessary, a copy of the pertinent information, or provide a handwritten note for consideration.

b.    Contact AFS-650. You may address your suggestions or comments to the FAA, Attn: AFS-650, P.O. Box 25082, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. If an interpretation is urgently needed, please contact the policy holder for guidance. (See page 1-1.) Please use the attached FAA Form 1320-19 as a followup to any verbal conversation.

Appendix A. Acronyms and Abbreviations

This appendix contains acronyms and abbreviations for General Aviation terms that are used throughout this order. Inspectors and designees can refer to the following alphabetic listing of frequently used acronyms and abbreviations and their meanings when using this order.


49 U.S.C.

Title 49 of the United States Code

COA

Certificate of Authority

A

Airframe

CPL

Commercial Pilot License

AATD

Advanced Aviation Training Device

DME

Designated Mechanic Examiner

AC

Advisory Circular

DOB

Date of Birth

ACR

Airman Certification Representative

DPE

Designated Pilot Examiner

AD

Airworthiness Directive

DPRE

Designated Parachute Rigger Examiner

ADE

Aircrew Designated Examiner

EAA

Experimental Aircraft Association

ADM

Aeronautical Decision-Making

FAA

Federal Aviation Administration

AFM

Aircraft Flight Manual

FAAST

Federal Aviation Administration Safety Team

AFS

Flight Standards Service

FADEC

Full-Authority Digital Electronic Control

AM

Automation Management

FCC

Federal Communications Commission

AMA

Aviation Mechanic Airframe

FCL

Flight Crew Licensing

AME

Aviation Medical Examiner

FEE

Flight Engineer Examiner

AMEL

Airplane Multi-Engine Land

FIE

Flight Instructor Examiner

AMP

Aviation Mechanic Powerplant

FIRC

Flight Instructor Refresher Clinic

AMTS

Aviation Maintenance Technician School

FIRE

Flight Instructor Renewal Examiner

APD

Aircrew Program Designee

FITS

FAA/Industry Training Standards

APV

Approach Procedures with Vertical Guidance

FOI

Fundamentals of Instructing

ASEL

Airplanes Single-Engine Land

FP

Foreign Pilot

ASI

Aviation Safety Inspector

FPE

Foreign Pilot Examiner

AST

Aviation Safety Technician

FSTD

Flight Simulation Training Device

ATC

Air Traffic Control

FSB

Flight Standardization Board

ATP

Airline Transport Pilot

FSDO

Flight Standards District Office

ATPC

Airline Transport Pilot Certificate

FSIMS

Flight Standards Information Management System

ATP CTP

Airline Transport Pilot Certification Training Program