3/2/16

 

8900.1 CHG 446

VOLUME 3  General Technical Administration

CHAPTER 58  ManAgement of aviation fatigue

Section 1  Review and Acceptance of Fatigue Risk Management Plans (FRMP)

3-4564    GENERAL. On August 1, 2010, the President signed Public Law (PL) 111-216, Airline Safety and Federal Aviation Administration Extension Act of 2010 (the Act), which focuses on improving aviation safety. Section 212(b) of the Act requires each air carrier conducting operations under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 121 to develop, implement, and maintain a Fatigue Risk Management Plan (FRMP). An FRMP is an air carrier’s management plan outlining policies and procedures for reducing the potential effects of day-to-day flightcrew member fatigue and improving flightcrew member alertness. The FRMP should be tailored to the air carrier’s specific kind and type of operations. For the purpose of this section, the term “operations” means the kind of operations (e.g., domestic, flag, and supplemental) and the type of operations (e.g., multiple segments, continuous duty overnights, night vs. day operations, cargo vs. passenger operations, short-haul vs. long-haul, etc.).

3-4565    STATUTORY REQUIREMENT. PL 111-216, § 212(b) requires each air carrier conducting operations under part 121 to submit its FRMP to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for review and acceptance. Each air carrier must update its FRMP at least once every 24 calendar-months and submit it to the FAA for review and acceptance. The FAA will issue operations specification (OpSpec) A317, Acceptance of a Fatigue Risk Management Plan (FRMP), to indicate acceptance of the air carrier’s FRMP.

3-4566    SUBMITTAL PROCESS. Each part 121 air carrier must develop its FRMP in a manner acceptable to the FAA. Following initial acceptance, each part 121 air carrier must submit an update to its FRMP to the FAA every 24 calendar-months. The air carrier will electronically submit the FRMP, along with a completed FRMP Checklist (see Figure 3-170), to the Air Transportation Division (AFS-200) via email at 9-AFS-200-FRMP-FRMS@faa.gov. The air carrier will also provide its principal operations inspector (POI) with a copy of the FRMP. AFS-200 will acknowledge receipt of the FRMP to the sender via email and copy the respective POI and regional Flight Standards division (RFSD).

3-4567    REVIEW PROCESS. AFS-200 will review the air carrier’s FRMP to ensure the plan addresses each required element. The air carrier may elect to incorporate more information in its FRMP than currently outlined in the FRMP elements. However, this information may not conflict with the required FRMP elements.

A.    Developing and Submitting an FRMP. The air carrier should develop an FRMP so it is easily understood, relevant to its operations, and easily updated. The air carrier should submit its FRMP with a completed FRMP Checklist (see Figure 3-170), which identifies the location of the applicable policies and procedures within the applicant’s FRMP.

B.    FAA Review of an FRMP. AFS-200 personnel will review the FRMP in two steps: preliminary review and in-depth review.

1)    Preliminary Review. Upon receipt of the proposed FRMP, AFS-200 personnel will perform a preliminary review to ensure each required component has been addressed. If AFS-200 determines that any of the FRMP components are missing, AFS-200 will return the FRMP to the air carrier within 10 business days from receipt, along with a letter outlining which components were not addressed. If an FRMP is returned to the air carrier, the FAA will terminate the review process until a new FRMP is submitted.
2)    In-Depth Review. Once AFS-200 determines that each required component has been addressed in the FRMP, AFS-200 will perform a detailed analysis of the FRMP to determine if the content is sufficient and applicable to the air carrier’s operations. If AFS-200 determines the air carrier’s FRMP is unacceptable, AFS-200 will return the FRMP to the air carrier with suggested modifications to make the FRMP acceptable. If an FRMP is returned to the air carrier, the FAA will terminate the review process until a new FRMP is submitted. Once AFS-200 determines that the FRMP is acceptable, the acceptance process commences.

3-4568    ACCEPTANCE PROCESS.

A.    Original Acceptance of FRMP. Once AFS-200 has determined the FRMP is acceptable, AFS-200 will send a memo to the POI, through the respective RFSD, authorizing the POI to issue OpSpec A317 to the air carrier. The memo will include any nonstandard text to be included in the OpSpec, as appropriate. The POI is responsible for issuing OpSpec A317 upon receiving authorization from AFS-200. The POI must incorporate any nonstandard text into the OpSpec as specified in the authorization memo. The maximum duration of OpSpec A317 is 24 calendar-months from the date of issuance and will be reflected on the air carrier’s OpSpec A317.

B.    FRMP Updates. PL 111-216 requires each part 121 air carrier to submit an updated FRMP to AFS-200 for review and acceptance every 24 calendar-months. Additionally, as the air carrier’s operations change, the air carrier’s FRMP must be amended to include the appropriate fatigue mitigation strategies necessary to reduce the effects of fatigue and improve flightcrew members’ alertness in that operation.

C.    Amendment of an Accepted FRMP. The air carrier may amend, or the FAA may require an amendment to, its FRMP. When the FAA requires an amendment to an air carrier’s FRMP, the FAA will advise the air carrier of the recommended modification necessary. Regardless of whether the amendment is driven by the air carrier or the FAA, the air carrier must submit their amended FRMP to AFS-200 for review and acceptance.

D.    Reissuance of OpSpec A317. Each time an air carrier’s FRMP is reviewed and accepted by AFS-200, the FAA will reissue OpSpec A317 to include the changes and a new expiration date of 24 calendar-months from the date of issuance.

3-4569    DIFFERENCES BETWEEN AN FRMP AND A FATIGUE RISK MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (FRMS). Distinct differences exist between an FRMP and FRMS. This guidance specifically applies to procedures for reviewing and accepting an FRMP. While the FRMP provides a basic foundation for the development of an FRMS, the contents of an FRMP do not meet all the requirements for an FRMS. Unlike an FRMP, an FRMS is an optional fatigue mitigation tool that minimizes the acute and chronic sources of fatigue and the resultant effects of fatigue. An FRMS is a data-driven and scientifically based process that allows for continuous monitoring and management of safety risks associated with fatigue-related error (see the current edition of Advisory Circular (AC) 120-103, Fatigue Risk Management Systems for Aviation Safety).

3-4570    FRMP STRUCTURE. An FRMP framework is composed of individual components. The components interact to achieve the objective of the FRMP. Each component may have multiple elements. The interaction of the individual elements provides a method to evaluate the effectiveness of the overall plan.

3-4571    FRMP COMPONENTS. The components of an FRMP provide the organization with the appropriate authority, policies and procedures, controls, reporting vehicles, education resources, monitoring, and performance evaluation tools necessary for the FRMP to be effective. The following components must be addressed in each FRMP by the respective part 121 air carrier:

·    Senior level management commitment to reducing fatigue and improving flightcrew alertness.

·    FRMP scope and fatigue management policies and procedures.

·    Current flight time and duty period limitations.

·    Rest scheme consistent with limitations.

·    Fatigue reporting policy and system.

·    Fatigue education and awareness training program.

·    Fatigue incident reporting process.

·    Fatigue monitoring system for monitoring flightcrew fatigue.

·    FRMP evaluation process.

A.    Senior Level Management Commitment. A vital component of any FRMP is a written commitment from senior level management to manage and mitigate fatigue during day-to-day operations. This written commitment facilitates corporate buy-in among all employees directly responsible for safety of flight issues including flightcrew members, dispatchers, individuals involved in the scheduling of flightcrew members, individuals involved in operational control, and any employee providing management oversight of those areas. Employees are more likely to report fatigue-related issues, knowing that senior level management is an advocate for fatigue mitigation.

B.    FRMP Scope and Policies and Procedures. The FRMP should define the scope and objectives of the plan and include policies and procedures to implement it. A policy is based on a proactive objective, while a procedure is the method by which the objective will be met using the resources available to the air carrier.

C.    Flight Time, Duty Limitations, and Rest Schemes. The air carrier must establish flight time, duty limitations, and a rest scheme at least as restrictive as the requirements of the regulations. If fatigue reporting or monitoring yield data that do not support the limitations or the rest scheme, the FRMP policies and procedures should be amended to include new fatigue mitigations, which may result in changes to the air carrier’s flight and duty limitations and/or rest scheme.

D.    Fatigue Reporting Policy and System. A fatigue reporting system provides the means to subjectively report fatigue-related occurrences. Fatigue reporting supports the evaluation of the effectiveness of the FRMP. To be effective, the fatigue reporting policy must encourage employees to report fatigue-related occurrences without fear of reprisal. The air carrier’s fatigue reporting system should encourage voluntary disclosure, which has proven to be an excellent vehicle for conveying safety information to those individuals who have the authority to change policy. Information collected from fatigue reports should serve as the trigger to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the FRMP and drive changes to the policies and procedures and associated education and awareness training program. An effective fatigue reporting system also contributes to an air carrier’s safety culture.

E.    Fatigue Education and Awareness Training Program. The training program should provide employees with information on the effects of fatigue on the safety of flight, causes of fatigue, and countermeasures to prevent or mitigate fatigue. The training program should also cover the FRMP policies and procedures. As data are collected through the fatigue reporting and monitoring processes, the elements of the education and awareness program may serve as useful tools to amend policies and procedures. The current editions of AC 120-100, Basics of Aviation Fatigue, and AC 120-103 provide background material to develop a training program. The training program must be accomplished annually by each flightcrew member, and may be incorporated into the air carrier’s recurrent training program.

F.    Fatigue Incident Reporting Process. The air carrier’s fatigue incident reporting process should clearly state how the air carrier will collect and respond to the data received from these reports. The report should contain sufficient details to determine the root cause of a fatigue occurrence. The reporting system is vital in evaluating the overall effectiveness of the FRMP; driving changes to existing FRMP policies and procedures; effecting changes to existing flight, duty, and rest schemes; and potentially driving changes to the fatigue education and awareness training program. Other data sources that may be considered for documenting fatigue occurrences include procedural errors, flightcrew member deviations, flight exceedances, the Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP), and flight operations quality assurance (FOQA) reports.

G.    Fatigue Monitoring System. The FRMP should outline a system for monitoring flightcrew member fatigue in day-to-day operations. The FRMP should contain operational procedures to follow when one identifies or suspects fatigue risk in oneself or others. The FRMP should define how an event is evaluated for potential fatigue involvement as well as define the methodology used for conducting a detailed Root Cause Analysis (RCA) of the event. The FRMP should outline a process to capture all relevant information, such as the schedule leading up to the fatigue event, the actions of the employee to obtain rest, subjective and objective evidence of fatigue, environmental conditions that may have contributed to fatigue, specific actions related to the incident, and what, if any, communications occurred prior to and during the event.

H.    FRMP Evaluation Process. The FRMP must outline a systematic process for evaluating the effectiveness of the organization’s FRMP. The FRMP must define a method to continually assess the effectiveness of the FRMP, including the effectiveness of the FRMP to improve alertness and to mitigate performance errors. The FRMP must have a process to amend the air carrier’s FRMP when it is determined that a policy or procedure is no longer effective in managing fatigue.

3-4572    FRMP ELEMENTS. The FRMP policies and procedures should focus on the air carrier’s specific kind of operations (e.g., domestic, flag, and supplemental) and the type of operations (e.g., continuous duty overnights, night versus day operations, cargo versus passenger operations, short-haul versus long-haul, etc.). The following are the individual elements of each FRMP component.

A.    Senior Level Management Commitment.

1)    Incorporate a letter from senior level management acknowledging their commitment to managing and mitigating fatigue and improving flightcrew alertness.
2)    Establish and incorporate the air carrier’s concept of a corporate “just culture” or “safety culture.”
3)    Establish and incorporate an open communication policy for reporting fatigue-related issues.
4)    Establish and incorporate a fatigue reporting system.
5)    Define how to evaluate an event for potential fatigue involvement and an overview of how to conduct a detailed RCA.
6)    Provide for protection of privacy and methods to protect the employee from adverse actions that would discourage fatigue reporting.

B.    FRMP Policies and Procedures.

1)    Clearly describe each element of the FRMP.
2)    Define the scope and objectives of the air carrier’s FRMP.
3)    Identify the kind of operations and the type of operations conducted by the air carrier.
4)    Incorporate the air carrier’s policies and procedures to mitigate and manage the effects of fatigue and improve flightcrew alertness.
5)    Define safety objectives and expectations of the air carrier’s FRMP.

C.    Current Flight Time and Duty Period Limitations.

1)    Incorporate the flight time and duty limits used by the air carrier based upon the kind of operations and type of operations.
2)    The limitations may be those contained in the regulations or the limitations in a collective bargaining agreement (CBA).

D.    Develop a Rest Scheme Consistent with such Limitations that Enables Fatigue Mitigation.

1)    Develop and incorporate a rest scheme to improve pilot alertness consistent with the type and kinds of operations conducted by the air carrier.
2)    Include rest periods of adequate duration to mitigate the effects of fatigue due to scheduled vs. unscheduled operations, domestic and international operations, day vs. night operations, and operations through multiple time zones.
3)    Develop and incorporate a rest scheme for those pilots assigned or scheduled for reserve assignments.
4)    For those air carriers that conduct operations with augmented flightcrew, develop a rest scheme to mitigate fatigue and improve pilot alertness.

E.    Fatigue Reporting Policy and System.

1)    A fatigue reporting system permits crewmembers and other employees to report subjective fatigue and request relief from duties because of fatigue, as needed.
2)    Develop and implement a fatigue reporting system that encourages the reporting of fatigue-related events as part of the overall FRMP.
3)    Fatigue reports contain valuable data, especially when coupled with objective data about conditions which may contribute to fatigue, such as the work schedule prior to the report. Fatigue reports should be data sources for use by the air carrier to develop new and amended fatigue mitigation strategies.

F.    Fatigue Education and Awareness Training Program.

1)    The training program should contain:
a)    Review of FAA flight, duty, and rest regulatory requirements.
b)    Content of the FRMP, including policies and procedures, and the responsibilities of management and employees to mitigate or manage the effects of fatigue and improve pilot flight deck alertness.
c)    Basics of fatigue, including sleep fundamentals and circadian rhythms.
d)    Causes and awareness of fatigue.
e)    Effects of fatigue on pilot performance.
f)    Fatigue countermeasures, prevention, and mitigation.
g)    Influence of lifestyle, including nutrition, exercise, and family life on fatigue.
h)    Familiarity with sleep disorders.
i)    Effects of fatigue as a result of commuting.
j)    Pilot responsibility for ensuring adequate rest and fitness for duty.
k)    Effects of operating through multiple time zones.
l)    Operational procedures to follow when one identifies, or suspects, fatigue risk in oneself or others.
m)    Lessons learned regarding the effects of fatigue and mitigation initiatives relative to the air carrier’s operation.
2)    The training program should include a method to continually assess the effectiveness of the program.

G.    Fatigue Incident Reporting Process to Mitigate Performance Errors.

1)    Develop and implement a system for pilots to report performance errors attributable to fatigue, similar to crew reports that can serve as a mechanism for obtaining all relevant data regarding fatigue contributions to an incident.
2)    Develop procedures to review and respond to reports of events that may be attributable wholly or in part to fatigue. These reports can also be data sources for use by the air carrier to develop new and amended fatigue mitigation strategies.
3)    Other sources of data on the effects of fatigue include reports of procedural errors, pilot deviations (PD), flight exceedances, ASAP, or Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) reports and FOQA data. These data sources may provide objective documentation of fatigue.

H.    Fatigue Monitoring System.

1)    Develop a process to capture fatigue-related information in event reports, such as the work schedule prior to the incident, the actions of the employee to obtain rest, subjective and objective evidence of fatigue, environmental conditions that may have exaggerated or contributed to fatigue, relevant health or medical conditions, specific actions related to the event, and communications prior to and during the event.
2)    The policy must protect privacy and protect the employee from adverse actions that would discourage reports of fatigue. The air carrier will develop and implement a process for reviewing reports and the actions taken to reduce flightcrew fatigue exposure.
3)    The policy should define how an event is evaluated for potential fatigue involvement as well as how to conduct a detailed RCA.
4)    Incorporate operational procedures to follow when one identifies, or suspects, fatigue risk in oneself or others.

I.    FRMP Evaluation Process.

1)    Develop and implement a systematic process for evaluating the effectiveness of the air carrier’s FRMP.
2)    Develop and implement a method to continually assess the effectiveness of the FRMP, including the effectiveness of the FRMP to improve alertness and to mitigate performance errors.
3)    Develop and implement a process to amend the FRMP, as appropriate, when it is determined that the FRMP policies and procedures are no longer effective in managing fatigue events.

3-4573    REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References (current editions):

·    AC 120-59, Air Carrier Internal Evaluation Programs.

·    AC 120-66, Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP).

·    AC 120-82, Flight Operational Quality Assurance.

·    AC 120-92, Safety Management Systems for Aviation Service Providers.

·    AC 120-100, Basics of Aviation Fatigue.

·    AC 120-103, Fatigue Risk Management Systems for Aviation Safety.

·    Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 09014, Concepts for Fatigue Countermeasures in Part 121 and 135 Short-Haul Operations.

·    Information for Operators (InFO) 10017, Fatigue Risk Management Plans (FRMP) for Part 121 Air Carriers—Part Two.

·    InFO 10017SUP, Fatigue Risk Management Plans (FRMP) for Part 121 Air Carriers—Part Two.

·    Figure 3-170, Fatigue Risk Management Plan Checklist.

B.    Forms. None.

C.    Job Aids. Figure 3-171, Fatigue Risk Management Plan Review and Acceptance Job Aid.

Figure 3-170.  Fatigue Risk Management Plan Checklist

 

Air Carrier:

 

Date:

Air Carrier Certificate Number:

 

 

ELEMENT AND TASK

REFERENCED IN FATIGUE RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN (FRMP)

A.

Senior Level Management Commitment to Reducing Fatigue and Improving Flightcrew Alertness.

 

 

i. Does the FRMP have a letter from senior level management describing their acknowledgement and commitment to managing and mitigating fatigue and improving flightcrew alertness?

 

 

ii. Does the corporate policy define how an event is evaluated for potential fatigue involvement as well as define an overview of the methodology for conducting a detailed Root Cause Analysis (RCA)?

 

 

iii. Does the FRMP define “Just Culture” or “Safety Culture?”

 

 

iv. Does the FRMP have an open communications policy for reporting fatigue-related issues?

 

 

v. Does the FRMP have a fatigue reporting system?

 

B.

FRMP Scope and the Organization’s Fatigue Management Policy and Procedures.

 

 

i. Are the scope and objectives of the organization’s FRMP clearly defined?

 

 

ii. Are the organization’s policies and procedures adequate to mitigate and manage the effects of fatigue and improve flightcrew alertness?

 

 

iii. Is each element of the FRMP clearly defined?

 

 

iv. Are the organization’s FRMP safety objectives and expectations clearly defined?

 

C.

Flight Time and Duty Period Limitations.

 

 

i. Does the FRMP contain the current flight time and duty limits that will be used by the organization based upon their kind of operations? These limitations can be either the CFR limitations or the hours of service limitations observed in the pilot’s collective bargaining agreement (CBA).

 

D.

Rest Scheme Consistent with such Limitations that Enable Fatigue Mitigation.

 

 

i. Does the FRMP incorporate the organization’s rest scheme consistent with the kinds of operations and the type of operations conducted by the air carrier?

 

Figure 3-170.  Fatigue Risk Management Plan Checklist (Continued)

 

ii. Does the rest scheme consider the length of rest periods required to mitigate the effects of fatigue for scheduled vs. unscheduled operations, domestic and international operations, day vs. night operations, and operations through multiple time zones, etc.?

 

 

iii. Is there a rest scheme for those flightcrew members assigned or scheduled for reserve assignments?

 

 

iv. If applicable, is there a rest scheme for augmented flightcrew operations to mitigate fatigue and improve flightcrew member alertness?

 

E.

Fatigue Reporting Policy.

 

 

i. Does the FRMP have a fatigue reporting system that encourages the reporting of fatigue related events as part of the overall FRMP?

 

 

ii. Does the fatigue reporting system permit crewmembers and other employees to report subjective fatigue and, from time to time, request relief from duties because of chronic fatigue?

 

 

iii. Are there provisions in the FRMP for these reports being used as data sources by the organization in developing new and amended fatigue mitigation strategies?

 

F.

Fatigue Education and Awareness Training Program.

 

 

i. The education and awareness training program should be a comprehensive educational program essential for providing the foundation in the management and mitigation of fatigue.

 

 

ii. The frequency of the Fatigue Education and Awareness Training Program is 12 calendar-months.

 

 

iii. A review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight, duty, and rest regulatory requirements.

 

 

iv. Content of the FRMP program, including fatigue-related policies and procedures, and the responsibilities of management and employees to mitigate or manage the effects of fatigue and improve flightcrew member flight deck alertness.

 

 

v.   The basics of fatigue, including sleep fundamentals and circadian rhythms.

 

 

vi.   The causes and awareness of fatigue.

 

 

vii.   The effects of fatigue relative to flightcrew member performance.

 

 

viii.   Fatigue countermeasures, prevention, and mitigation.

 

 

ix.   The influence of lifestyle, including nutrition, exercise, and family life on fatigue.

 

 

x.   Familiarity with sleep disorders.

 

 

xi.   The effects of fatigue as a result of commuting.

 

Figure 3-170.  Fatigue Risk Management Plan Checklist (Continued)

 

xii.   Flightcrew member responsibility for ensuring adequate rest and fitness for duty.

 

 

xiii.   The effects of operating through multiple time zones.

 

 

xiv.   Operational procedures to follow when one identifies, or suspects, fatigue risk in oneself or others.

 

 

xv.   Incorporate lessons learned regarding the effects of fatigue and mitigation initiatives relative to the air carrier’s operations.

 

 

xvi.   Use a methodology that continually assesses the effectiveness of the training program.

 

G.

Fatigue Incident Reporting Process.

 

 

i.   Does the FRMP have detailed procedures for reviewing and acting upon reports of events that may be attributable wholly or in part to fatigue which are similar to crew reports, and can serve as a mechanism for obtaining all relevant data regarding fatigue contributions to the incident?

 

 

ii.   Does the FRMP consider other data sources such as procedural errors, flightcrew member deviations, flight exceedances, Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP), or Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) reports and Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA) data helpful to the air carrier to objectively document fatigue?

 

H.

System for Monitoring Flightcrew Fatigue.

 

 

i.   Does the FRMP have a process to capture all relevant information, such as the schedule leading up to the fatigue event, the actions of the employee to obtain rest, subjective and objective evidence of fatigue, environmental conditions that may have contributed to fatigue, relevant health or medical conditions, specific actions related to the incident, and communications prior to and during the event?

 

 

ii.   Does the FRMP have a corporate policy for the protection of privacy and methods to protect the employee from adverse actions that would discourage reports of fatigue?

 

 

iii.   Does the FRMP define how an event is evaluated for potential fatigue involvement as well as defining the methodology used for conducting a detailed RCA?

 

 

iv.   Does the FRMP contain operational procedures to follow when one identifies, or suspects, fatigue risk in oneself or others?

 

I.

The Organization’s FRMP Evaluation Program.

 

 

i.   Does the FRMP have a systematic process for evaluating the effectiveness of the organization’s FRMP?

 

Figure 3-170.  Fatigue Risk Management Plan Checklist (Continued)

 

ii.   Does the FRMP define use of a methodology that continually assesses the effectiveness of the FRMP, including the effectiveness of the FRMP to improve alertness and to mitigate performance errors?

 

 

iii.   Does the FRMP have a process for determining the need for amending the FRMP, as appropriate, when it is determined that the FRMP is a policy or procedure that is no longer effective in managing a fatigue event?

 

Figure 3-171.  Fatigue Risk Management Plan Review and Acceptance Job Aid

Air Carrier:

 

Date:

 

Certificate No.

 

 

 

 

ELEMENT AND TASK

Yes

No

Referenced in Fatigue Risk Management Plan (FRMP)

A.

Senior Level Management Commitment to Reducing Fatigue and Improving Flightcrew Alertness.

 

 

 

 

i.   Does the FRMP have a letter from senior level management describing their acknowledgement and commitment to managing and mitigating fatigue and improving flightcrew alertness?

 

 

 

 

ii.   Does the corporate policy define how an event is evaluated for potential fatigue involvement as well as define an overview of the methodology for conducting a detailed Root Cause Analysis (RCA)?

 

 

 

 

iii.   Does the FRMP define “Just Culture” or “Safety Culture?”

 

 

 

 

iv.   Does the FRMP have an open communications policy for reporting fatigue-related issues?

 

 

 

 

v.   Does the FRMP have a fatigue reporting system?

 

 

 

B.

FRMP Scope and the Organization’s Fatigue Management Policy and Procedures.

 

 

 

 

i.   Are the scope and objectives of the organization’s FRMP clearly defined?

 

 

 

 

ii.   Are the organization’s policies and procedures adequate to mitigate and manage the effects of fatigue and improve flightcrew alertness?

 

 

 

 

iii.   Is each element of the FRMP clearly defined?

 

 

 

 

iv.   Are the organization’s FRMP safety objectives and expectations clearly defined?

 

 

 

C.

Flight Time and Duty Period Limitations.

 

 

 

 

i.   Does the FRMP contain the current flight time and duty limits that will be used by the organization based upon their kind of operations? These limitations can be either the CFR limitations or the hours of service limitations observed in the pilot’s collective bargaining agreement (CBA).

 

 

 

D.

Rest Scheme.

 

 

 

 

i.   Does the FRMP incorporate the organization’s rest scheme consistent with the kinds of operations and the type of operations conducted by the air carrier?

 

 

 

 

ii.   Does the rest scheme consider the length of rest periods required to mitigate the effects of fatigue for scheduled vs. unscheduled operations, domestic and international operations, day vs. night operations, operations through multiple time zones, etc.?

 

 

 

 

iii.   Is there a rest scheme for those flightcrew members assigned or scheduled for reserve assignments?

 

 

 

Figure 3-171.  Fatigue Risk Management Plan Review and Acceptance Job Aid (Continued)

 

iv.   If applicable, is there a rest scheme for augmented flightcrew operations to mitigate fatigue and improve flightcrew member alertness?

 

 

 

E.

Fatigue Reporting Policy.

 

 

 

 

i.   Does the FRMP have a fatigue reporting policy that encourages the reporting of fatigue-related events as part of the overall FRMP?

 

 

 

 

ii.   Does the fatigue reporting policy permit crewmembers and other employees to report subjective fatigue and, from time to time, request relief from duties because of chronic fatigue?

 

 

 

 

iii.   Are there provisions in the FRMP for these reports being used as data sources by the organization in developing new and amended fatigue mitigation strategies?

 

 

 

F.

Fatigue Education and Awareness Training Program.

 

 

 

 

i.   The frequency of the Fatigue Education and Awareness Training Program is every 12 calendar-months. Does the Fatigue Education and Awareness Training Program require recurrency every 12 calendar-months?

 

 

 

 

ii. A review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight, duty, and rest regulatory requirements.

 

 

 

 

iii.   Awareness of the FRMP program itself, including fatigue-related policies and procedures, and the responsibilities of management and employees to mitigate or manage the effects of fatigue and improve flightcrew member flight deck alertness.

 

 

 

 

iv. The basics of fatigue, including sleep fundamentals and circadian rhythms.

 

 

 

 

v. The causes and awareness of fatigue.

 

 

 

 

vi.   The effects of fatigue relative to flightcrew member performance.

 

 

 

 

vii.   Fatigue countermeasures, prevention, and mitigation.

 

 

 

 

viii.   The influence of lifestyle, including nutrition, exercise, and family life on fatigue.

 

 

 

 

ix.   Familiarity with sleep disorders.

 

 

 

 

x.   The effects of fatigue as a result of commuting.

 

 

 

 

xi.   Flightcrew member responsibility for ensuring adequate rest and fitness for duty.

 

 

 

 

xii.   The effects of operating through multiple time zones.

 

 

 

 

xiii. Operational procedures to follow when one identifies, or suspects, fatigue risk in oneself or others.

 

 

 

 

xiv. Incorporate lessons learned regarding the effects of fatigue and mitigation initiatives relative to the air carrier’s operations.

 

 

 

 

xvi.   Use of a methodology that continually assesses the effectiveness of the training program.

 

 

 

Figure 3-171.  Fatigue Risk Management Plan Review and Acceptance Job Aid (Continued)

G.

Fatigue Incident Reporting Process.

 

 

 

 

i.   Does the FRMP have detailed procedures for reviewing and acting upon reports of events that may be attributable wholly or in part to fatigue which are similar to crew reports, and can serve as a mechanism for obtaining all relevant data regarding fatigue contributions to the incident.

 

 

 

 

ii.   Does the FRMP consider other data sources such as procedural errors, flightcrew member deviations, flight exceedances, Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP), or Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) reports and Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA) data helpful to the air carrier to objectively document fatigue?

 

 

 

H.

System for Monitoring Flightcrew Fatigue.

 

 

 

 

i.   Does the FRMP have a process to capture all relevant information, such as the schedule leading up to the fatigue event, the actions of the employee to obtain rest, subjective and objective evidence of fatigue, environmental conditions that may have contributed to fatigue, relevant health or medical conditions, specific actions related to the incident, and communications prior to and during the event?

 

 

 

 

ii.   Does the FRMP have a corporate policy for the protection of privacy and methods to protect the employee from adverse actions that would discourage reports of fatigue?

 

 

 

 

iii.   Does the FRMP define how an event is evaluated for potential fatigue involvement as well as defining the methodology used for conducting a detailed RCA?

 

 

 

 

iv.   Does the FRMP contain operational procedures to follow when one identifies, or suspects, fatigue risk in oneself or others?

 

 

 

I.

The Organization’s FRMP Evaluation Program.

 

 

 

 

i.   Does the FRMP have a systematic process for evaluating the effectiveness of the organization’s FRMP?

 

 

 

 

ii.   Does the FRMP define use of a methodology that continually assesses the effectiveness of the FRMP, including the effectiveness of the FRMP to improve alertness, and to mitigate performance errors?

 

 

 

 

iii.   Does the FRMP have a process for determining the need for amending their FRMP, as appropriate, when it is determined that the FRMP is a policy or procedure that is no longer effective in managing a fatigue event?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3-171.  Fatigue Risk Management Plan Review and Acceptance Job Aid (Continued)

 

Status:  Accepted  Unacceptable  Returned to Air Carrier

Remarks:

 

Inspector:

Date:

Indicates new/changed information. RESERVED. Paragraphs 3-4574 through 3-4589.