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VOLUME 5  AIRMAN CERTIFICATION

CHAPTER 8  CONDUCT A SPECIAL MEDICAL TEST—TITLE 14 CFR PART 67

Section 1  Issuance of a Medical Certificate and/or a Statement of Demonstrated Ability, or Letter of Evidence

5-1521    PROGRAM TRACKING AND REPORTING SUBSYSTEM (PTRS) ACTIVITY CODE. 1531.

5-1522    OBJECTIVE. The objective of this task is to conduct an applicant’s special medical flight test, report the results to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) medical personnel, and provide the Airmen Certification Branch with the file documenting the test and any pilot certificate limitations added, removed, or left unchanged. Upon receipt of the results, FAA medical personnel determine if an applicant is eligible for a Medical Certificate and/or Statement of Demonstrated Ability (SODA) or a Letter of Evidence (LOE). Refer to Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 67, § 67.401(b) for SODA information. Paragraph 5-1527 describes the purpose and use of an LOE.

5-1523    GENERAL.

A.    General Process. Special medical flight tests may or may not involve a flight. These tests may lead to the issuance of Medical Certificates under § 67.401 and are frequently required for applicants who do not meet certain medical standards. Only an aviation safety inspector (ASI) may conduct the associated flight test; however, an ASI or aviation safety technician (AST) may conduct certain tests described in this section not involving a flight. While personnel at a responsible Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) may add, remove, or leave unchanged specific operating limitations on pilot certificates based upon the results of a special medical flight test, only medical personnel may make changes to an applicant’s Medical Certificate. A special medical flight test may only occur after FAA medical personnel issue a Letter of Authorization (LOA) for the test.

B.    LOA Requirement. In accordance with 14 CFR part 61, § 61.13, when an applicant or pilot cannot comply with a practical test area of operation because of a physical limitation, the FAA may issue a certificate, rating, or authorization with appropriate limitations. This process cannot occur unless FAA medical personnel review the applicant’s medical records, and any applicant who takes or intends to take a special medical flight test must first receive an LOA for the test. This requirement applies whether or not the operational test requires the applicant to have a Medical Certificate. However, FAA medical personnel cannot issue an LOA for a special medical test flight unless the applicant applies for an FAA Medical Certificate as the means to provide his or her medical records. FAA medical and FSDO personnel must also determine that the applicant’s inability to perform the particular area of operation will not adversely affect safety.

C.    Solo, FAA Medical, and a Special Medical Flight Test. In accordance with § 61.53, a person who knows or has reason to know of any reason that would make the person unable to operate the aircraft in a safe manner is prohibited from acting as pilot in command (PIC) or as a required crewmember. Flight instructors and commercial pilots endorsing persons to solo in situations that do not require an FAA Medical Certificate should understand the possibility that a particular person may be unable to meet all areas of operation on a practical test for medical reasons or that person may be unable to operate safely for medical reasons. In either case, they should direct that person to seek out an FAA medical examiner and apply for an FAA Medical Certificate. Flight instructors must wait for that person to obtain a Medical Certificate, which may clear the person for solo on a medical basis. The person may need to apply for a special medical flight test, but may not do so until after making application for an FAA Medical Certificate. A person with a particular medical condition who does not require a Medical Certificate and demonstrates to an instructor the ability to perform to the required standard for certification may act as PIC without a Medical Certificate and without a special medical flight test.

D.    Obtaining and Complying With the LOA for a Special Medical Flight Test.

1)    FSDO personnel conduct these tests only after issuance of an LOA, as depicted in Figure 5-153, Sample Letter of Authorization for Medical Flight Test. Applicants seeking to have a special medical flight test must request an LOA from the Federal Air Surgeon, the manager of the Aerospace Medical Certification Division (AAM-300), or a Regional Flight Surgeon. The responsible FSDO must receive an FAA-generated copy of the LOA before scheduling an applicant’s appointment for the test.
2)    The LOA for a special medical flight test contains guidelines and usually a handbook reference to help the ASI evaluate whether the applicant is able to operate an aircraft safely. When comparing the applicant’s abilities to those of the ASI, the ASI possesses normal physical attributes. If there is any doubt as to the ASI’s qualifications to conduct a particular test, management assigns the test to another ASI. The ASI and his or her supervisor should discuss any issue of concern with medical office personnel issuing the LOA authorizing the test. The ASI must observe and evaluate the entire list of medical flight test items on the LOA. The ASI may add test items if necessary.
3)    The operational risk matrix first defined in Notice N 8900.442, Flight Standards Aviation Safety Inspector (Operations) Risk Management, dated November 2, 2017, which may now be found in Volume 1, Chapter 3, Section 8, includes a special medical flight test. When a flight in an aircraft is required for a special medical flight test, appropriate supervisory approvals are required within the Flight Standards Service in addition to the LOA. The inspector must meet the requirements listed on the inspector qualifications and currency matrix for this activity as listed in Volume 1, Chapter 3, Section 6 and be prepared to be PIC during flights if the applicant is not currently medically qualified. When acting as the PIC, the ASI must follow the guidance in Volume 5, Chapter 1, Section 2.

E.    Applicants for a Special Medical Flight Test Must Hold a Student Pilot Certificate or Other Part 61 Pilot Certificate When Taking the Test. The applicant for a special medical flight test must hold a Student Pilot Certificate or a higher-level certificate to take the special medical flight test. This requirement allows the Airmen Certification Branch to identify the applicant and to record any operating limitations in the pilot’s file. Remind applicants that the Airmen Certification Branch issues a Student Pilot Certificate without requiring the applicant to have a Medical Certificate, without regard to the applicant’s medical condition, and without a knowledge test. See Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 6.

F.    Standard Limitations for Applicants Who Cannot Speak or Understand the English Language Due to a Medical Condition. See Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 5 for operating limitations for certificate holders who cannot speak or understand English for medical reasons. ASIs and ASTs assign three specific operating limitations to these student pilot applicants without requiring an FAA Medical Certificate or a special medical flight test when issuing a Student Pilot Certificate.

G.    Combined Special Medical Flight Test and Practical Test for Certification and/or Ratings. If requested by the applicant, the ASI may administer a special medical flight test in combination with a practical test for a pilot certificate, provided the applicant meets all prerequisites for the pilot certificate sought. If administering a combined test, see the appropriate chapter and section in this order for the certificate or rating sought.

H.    Retest After Medical Portion Passed and Certification Test Failed. If an applicant fails the certification portion of a combined test but passes the medical portion, either an ASI or other non-ASI evaluator may conduct any retest. However, where the medical portion is dependent upon the demonstration of piloting skills, the decision to retest requires the ASI to consult with the Office of Aerospace Medicine (AAM) to verify that the applicant is able to operate without an adverse effect on safety.

I.    Defective Hearing Test. The ASI must note on the report whether the defective hearing test occurred in an open or a closed cockpit.

J.    Defective Color Vision.

1)    Applicants who fail the color vision screening test as listed in the Guide for Aviation Medical Examiners, but desire a Medical Certificate without the color vision limitation, “NOT VALID FOR NIGHT FLYING OR BY COLOR SIGNAL CONTROL,” may request an opportunity to take and pass additional operational color perception tests. The class of Medical Certificate requested determines the specific operational tests as shown in Figure 5-153A, Color Vision Testing Flowchart. Only ASIs conduct a flight test when authorized by an appropriate LOA (see Figure 5-153B, Sample Letter of Authorization for Operational Color Vision Test, and Figure 5-153C, Sample Letter of Authorization for Operational Color Vision Test and Color Vision Medical Flight Test). Applicants for a first- or second-class Medical Certificate are required to take and pass an Operational Color Vision Test (OCVT) and a Color Vision Medical Flight Test. Applicants for a third‑class Medical Certificate need to take and pass only the OCVT.
2)    The OCVT has two components, the Signal Light Test (SLT) and demonstration of the ability to correctly read and interpret certain features of aeronautical charts. See subparagraph 5-1526E6) for instructions on how to conduct the OCVT. ASIs or ASTs test applicants who have defective color vision initially in daylight conditions, and if specified in the LOA, the ASI or AST administers a nighttime test only after completing the daylight test.

K.    Completion of Medical Test. If during any of the special medical tests (with the exception of an SLT) the ASI determines that the applicant has failed to meet the test standard, the ASI should terminate the test before it is completed. However, the SLT must be completed before an assessment is made regarding success or failure of the test. After any special medical flight test, one or more operating limitations may need to be placed on an airman certificate. The ASI is responsible to ensure that all appropriate limitations are placed on the pilot certificate.

L.    Operating Limitations. A pilot certificate issued or reissued after a special medical flight test must bear any limitations the inspector who conducted the test finds necessary for safety. The ASI from the responsible FSDO must have determined that no operating limitations (such as “HAND CONTROLS ONLY”) are missing from a pilot certificate before an evaluator accepts an application from an applicant who has an SODA.

Indicates new/changed information.
1)    When the pilot passes a combined test, the ASI enters operating limitations on FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate, as depicted in Figure 5-154, Sample FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate—(Depicting Passing of a Medical Flight Test in Conjunction With a Practical Test With Appropriate Limitations Included). If the pilot fails the certification portion of the test but passes the special medical flight test, the ASI places operating limitations on FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application, as shown in Figure 5-155, Sample FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application, for a Combined Special Medical Flight Test and Certification Test—(Medical Portion Successful), and consults with the issuer of the LOA to determine if the applicant can fly safely and receive a subsequent practical test. An inspector or evaluator who gives a subsequent practical test refers to the Notice of Disapproval and copies the operating limitations over to the temporary certificate. After FSDO personnel review an application and sign the paper forms generated by a special medical flight test, FSDO personnel forward the application paperwork to the Airmen Certification Branch by first-class mail. At this time, the Integrated Airman Certification and Rating Application (IACRA) system does not process a special medical flight test or a certification test combined with a special medical flight test.
2)    Operating limitations required for pilots with particular physical deficiencies may restrict holders to certain aircraft types, special equipment or control arrangements, or special operating conditions. Examples are as follows:
a)    “LIMITED TO ERCOUPE 415 SERIES WITHOUT RUDDER PEDALS,” for an airman with an inability to use rudder pedals, possibly because of the loss of the use of the lower extremities, who takes the special medical test in an Ercoupe 415 series;
b)    “LIMITED TO AIRCRAFT WITH ALL CONTROLS BELOW SHOULDER LEVEL,” for an airman who is unable to use the upper extremities, possibly because of the loss of an arm;
c)    “NOT VALID FOR FLIGHTS WHICH REQUIRE THE USE OF ENGLISH,” for an airman who is speech- or hearing-impaired or both; and
d)    “LIMITED TO RECIPROCATING PISTON, NONREVERSING AIRCRAFT,” for an airman who has an arm prosthesis and is unable to use the reverse thrust function of a turbine aircraft. Also, consider aircraft with variable pitch propellers.
3)    The inspector must be mindful that physical limitation(s) may not be compatible with all flight deck configurations. A standard set of limitations exists to eliminate the need for subsequent special medical tests. In the interest of safety, specific limitations such as make and model of aircraft or specific assist devices may be appropriate.
4)    If a pilot is returning to flying after receiving a disabling injury, such as a loss of limb or an injury to a lower extremity, it may be necessary for the pilot to redemonstrate proficiency for each privilege authorized. Any rating not demonstrated that the inspector determines to be necessary must bear the limitation, “NOT VALID,” until such time when competency in that category and class is demonstrated.
5)    Deleting or amending an operating limitation requires an additional special medical flight test or qualification by the pilot for an appropriate Medical Certificate without waiver or exemption.
6)    If a student pilot takes a practical test for a pilot certificate and a medical flight test concurrently, the SODA will be issued by the medical office, provided the airman satisfactorily demonstrates the appropriate operational ability and the issuing medical office receives and reviews the appropriate documentation from the FSDO.
7)    If a student pilot fails the practical test for a pilot certificate but passes the medical test, the medical office may issue the SODA upon receipt and review of the documentation. The Notice of Disapproval of Application must indicate all appropriate operating limitations and areas of operation failed or not tested during the entire practical test.
8)    If a student pilot passes both the flight test and the medical test, the inspector must place all appropriate operating limitations on the Temporary Airman Certificate.
9)    During a combined test, it is not possible for an applicant to pass the practical test if the applicant’s special medical flight test results are unsatisfactory.

5-1524    PREREQUISITES AND COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS.

A.    Prerequisites. This task requires knowledge of the requirements of part 61 and FAA policies, and qualification as an ASI (Operations). An AST may administer the OCVT provided he or she has normal color vision as shown by having a current or expired FAA Medical Certificate without a limitation regarding color vision. An ASI or AST who had a special medical flight test for color vision should not administer the OCVT.

B.    Coordination. This task may require coordination with the airworthiness staff, air traffic, and the medical office issuing the authorization.

5-1525    REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References (current editions):

    Title 14 CFR Parts 1, 61, 67, and 91.

    LOA.

    PTRS Procedures Manual (PPM).

B.    Forms:

    Sample FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate—(Depicting Passing of a Medical Flight Test in Conjunction With a Practical Test With Appropriate Limitations Included) (Figure 5-154).

    Sample FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application, for a Combined Special Medical Flight Test and Certification Test—(Medical Portion Successful) (Figure 5-155).

    Sample FAA Form 8500-9, Medical Certificate____Class—(Not Issued by the ASI) (Figure 5-156).

Indicates new/changed information.

    Sample FAA Form 8500-13, Special Medical Flight Test Report (Figure 5-157). To access this form, use eForms (https://eformservice.faa.gov/).

    Sample FAA Form 8500-15, Statement of Demonstrated Ability—(Not Issued by the ASI) (Figure 5-158).

Indicates new/changed information.

    Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, for a Special Medical Flight Test Only (Page 1) (Figure 5-159).

    Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Failure of Medical Test—(No Notice of Disapproval Issued) (Page 2) (Figure 5-160).

C.    Job Aids:

    Operational Color Vision Test—Signal Light Test Job Aid (Figure 5-164).

    Sample letters and figures.

5-1526    PROCEDURES (EXCEPT SLT).

A.    Applicant Schedules Appointment.

1)    When the applicant schedules the appointment for a medical test, inquire whether the applicant has the required LOA.
a)    If the applicant does not have an LOA, advise the applicant that one is required before scheduling the appointment. Instruct the applicant to contact an issuing medical office to obtain an LOA. Advise the applicant that he or she must have applied for an FAA Medical Certificate in order to qualify for the LOA.
b)    If the applicant has an LOA, ask the applicant for the issue date of the letter. Check the appropriate office files for the following:

1.    Verify that the office has a copy. If there is not a copy of the LOA on file, determine who received it. Arrange to have the copy forwarded to the FSDO. Alternatively, contact the LOA issuer for a copy.

2.    Determine how long the LOA is valid and whether the medical test will occur within that time. If the test cannot be scheduled within the time allotted, call the issuing office for an extension. If unable to receive an extension, advise the applicant that the appointment cannot be scheduled at this time and suggest the applicant contact the medical authority responsible for the LOA.

2)    For a flight test:
a)    Determine the time of day to schedule the test, based on the recommendations in the LOA and the length of the test.
b)    Determine whether the test will be a combined special medical flight test and practical test for certification and/or ratings.
c)    If it is not a combined test, instruct the applicant to bring the following documents to the test:

    LOA;

    Medical Certificate (if applicable);

    Pilot certificate;

    Aircraft maintenance records;

    Airworthiness Certificate;

    Aircraft registration; and

Indicates new/changed information.

    FAA Form 8710-1 (see Figure 5-159).

d)    If it is a combined test, see the chapter and section in this volume for the certificate or rating sought and determine if any additional items are required. Instruct the applicant to bring all required documents to the appointment.

B.    Open a PTRS Record.

C.    Applicant Arrives for Scheduled Appointment. When the applicant arrives for the scheduled appointment, proceed as follows:

1)    Collect the applicant’s documents.
2)    Review FAA Form 8710-1 to determine if it is complete and accurate.
a)    In Part I, the applicant checks the “Medical Flight Test” box for a special medical flight test only. For a combination certification and special medical flight test, the applicant checks the “Medical Flight Test” box and the box(es) for the pertinent certificate or rating.
b)    In Part I, the applicant fills out items A through O, and checks item N as “NO,” since the ASI will evaluate an area concerning medical approval.
c)    Part II, item A must be completed.
d)    Part III is optional for a special medical test only. For a combination certification test and special medical test, the applicant must complete Part III.
e)    Parts IV and V must be completed.
f)    For a combination certification test and special medical test, the applicant must have an instructor’s or air agency’s recommendation on the reverse of FAA Form 8710-1.
3)    Verify the applicant’s identity by inspecting acceptable forms of identification.
a)    If unable to verify the applicant’s identity due to lack of documents or inadequate documents, request that the applicant return with appropriate identification.
b)    If the applicant’s identity appears falsified, do not conduct the special medical test (see Volume 14, Chapter 2, Section 2).
4)    Verify the applicant’s ability to meet the FAA Aviation English Language Standard (AELS) in accordance with Advisory Circular (AC) 60-28, FAA English Language Standard for an FAA Certificate Issued Under 14 CFR Parts 61, 63, 65, and 107. While an applicant’s medical disability affecting his or her English ability allows the issuance of an FAA pilot certificate without meeting the FAA AELS, any certificate issued must have appropriate limitations. See Volume 5, Chapter 2, Section 5 if the applicant has a medical reason for not meeting the FAA AELS.
5)    Verify that the applicant holds a part 61 pilot certificate. If the applicant is unable to provide the certificate, discontinue the test and return all documents. If the applicant holds no part 61 pilot certificate, assist the applicant to make an application for a Student Pilot Certificate. Advise the applicant to reschedule the appointment once in possession of the certificate.
6)    If possible, coordinate with the airworthiness staff to review the airworthiness documents and/or inspect the aircraft if the test requires a flight.
a)    If the aircraft documents are not complete and accurate, and remain uncorrected at the time of the appointment, terminate the appointment and inform the applicant that he or she must reschedule.
b)    Return all documents to the applicant if terminating the test for incomplete or inaccurate documents.
7)    If the test is a combined special medical flight test and practical test for certification, determine the applicant’s eligibility by consulting the appropriate chapter and section in this volume for the certificate or rating sought.
a)    If the applicant is not eligible for the practical test, ask the applicant if he or she wants to take only the special medical flight test at this time.
b)    If the applicant does not want to take the special medical flight test only, return all documents provided by the applicant and terminate the appointment.

D.    Determine Type of Medical Test.

1)    The LOA determines the type of special medical flight test administered.
2)    If administering a combined special medical flight and a practical test for a certificate or rating, the ASI should consult the appropriate chapter and section in this volume for the certificate or rating sought.

E.    Conduct Special Medical Flight Test. Determine whether operating limitations/restrictions as provided in subparagraphs 5-1523L1) and 2), applicable to the flight test being conducted, are necessary for safe operation to ensure that the applicant is able to perform the appropriate pilot functions critical to the impairment for the type of medical flight test being conducted, as follows:

1)    Observe an applicant with a hearing impairment, or an applicant seeking to have a hearing impairment limitation removed, demonstrate the following in an aircraft:

    The ability to hear radio, voice, and signal communications;

    The ability to understand a normal, conversational voice level with the engine on or off, on the ground or in the air, and with the engine at various power settings (ensure that the applicant is not lip reading by having the applicant only respond to questions while looking away from the ASI);

    The ability to estimate glide by sound in relation to speed; and

    The ability to recognize an approaching stall by change in sound related to a change in speed.

2)    Observe an applicant with a total hearing loss demonstrate the following:

    Recognition of engine power loss or engine failure by a change in vibration and by instrument scan;

    Recognition of approaching stall by aerodynamic buffet and visual cues; and

    Recognition of retractable gear emergencies (if applicable) by observation of gear warning lights.

3)    Observe an applicant with a deformity or with the absence of an extremity demonstrate the following in an aircraft:
a)    The ability to reach and operate effectively all controls which would normally require the use of that extremity (or those extremities). Note any unusual body position the applicant may use to compensate for the defect and what effect that position has on the applicant’s field of vision.
b)    The ability to satisfactorily perform emergency procedures relative to flight, such as recovery from stalls, and engine-out procedures (multiengine aircraft).
c)    If the pilot has an arm prosthesis and tests in turboprops, the ability to lift the power handles for reversing (including asymmetrical reversing).
d)    If the pilot has a deformity or absence of an extremity, determine whether the applicant should be restricted to the specific make and model of aircraft in which the medical flight test is accomplished, to a make and model within a series (e.g., Cessna 172), or to aircraft models with special equipment or control arrangements, and/or determine whether to impose special operating conditions, as necessary.
4)    Observe an applicant with a visual defect (one eye missing or one eye blind) demonstrate the following in an aircraft:

    The ability to select emergency landing fields at a distance, from high altitude, and preferably over unfamiliar terrain.

    The ability to simulate forced landings in difficult fields; note the manner of approach, rate of descent, and comparative distance at which obstructions (stumps, boulders, ditches, etc.) are recognized.

    The ability to recognize other aircraft (which may be present by prearrangement) approaching at a collision course (particularly aircraft approaching from the far right or far left).

    The ability to judge distances and to recognize landmarks (compared with the ASI’s estimate).

    The ability to land the aircraft.

    The ability to read aeronautical charts in flight and tune the radio to a predetermined station accurately and rapidly.

    The ability to read instrument panels (including an overhead panel, if any) quickly and correctly.

5)    Observe the applicant with a speech defect (one who stutters or who is trying to demonstrate recovery from muteness) demonstrate the ability to converse and be clearly understood in person and on the radio.
6)    Observe the applicant with a color vision defect.
a)    An applicant for a first- or second-class FAA Medical Certificate who has defective color vision must demonstrate the following:

1.    The ability to pass an OCVT, which includes:

    An SLT (see paragraph 5-1527); and

    The ability to read and correctly interpret aeronautical charts that contain print in various sizes, colors, and typefaces; conventional markings in several colors; and terrain coloration, and to do so without undue hesitation. Aeronautical chart reading may be performed under any light condition where the chart will normally be read. The ASI or AST must provide the aeronautical chart.

2.    The ability to pass a color vision medical flight test as described below:

a.    Must read and correctly interpret aviation instruments or displays, particularly those with colored limitation marks, and colored instrument panel lights, especially marker beacon lights, warning or caution lights, weather displays, etc., and do so without undue hesitation.

b.    Must recognize terrain and obstructions without undue hesitation; have the applicant select several emergency landing fields, preferably under marginal conditions; and describe the surface (e.g., sod, stubble, plowed field, presence of terrain roll or pitch, if any); and also describe how the conclusions were determined. Further, ask the applicant to identify obstructions such as ditches, fences, terraces, low spots, rocks, stumps, and, in particular, any gray, tan, or brown objects in green fields.

c.    Must visually identify the location and significance of aeronautical lights without undue hesitation. To minimize the effect of an applicant memorizing the color of a light associated with a particular light system, the ASI should make every effort not to name the light system during the flight, but rather to ask the applicant to identify the significance of as many of the following lights as possible:

    Colored lights of other aircraft in the vicinity.

    Runway approach lights, both the Approach Light System (ALS) and Visual Glide Slope Indicators (VGSI).

    Runway edge light system.

    Runway end identification lights (REIL).

    In-runway lighting (runway centerline (RCL) lights, touchdown zone (TDZ) lights, taxiway lead-off lights, land and hold short lights).

    Airport boundary lights.

    Taxiway lights (edge lights, centerline (CL) lights, clearance bar lights, runway guard lights, and stop bar lights).

    Red warning lights on television towers, high buildings, stacks, etc.

    Airport beacon lights.

d.    An applicant for a third-class airman Medical Certificate who has defective color vision must demonstrate the ability to pass the OCVT (see subparagraph a)1 above).

F.    Discontinuance of Test. If the test cannot be completed for reasons such as a mechanical issue, illness, or weather issue, return the application and any documents to the applicant. Reschedule the test if possible. Close out the PTRS record.

G.    Potential Test Outcomes. An unsuccessful special medical flight test combined with a successful practical test is not a possible outcome and is not included as an option in subparagraphs H through K.

H.    Medical Portion Administered Only—Unsuccessful Performance. If an applicant’s medical test performance is unsatisfactory, advise the applicant of the reasons. Do not initiate action to revoke the applicant’s pilot certificate. Proceed as follows:

1)    Complete FAA Form 8710-1 (see Figure 5-160).

    On the reverse side, fill in the “Special Medical Test Conducted” block.

Indicates new/changed information.

    Sign and date the application. Indicate the responsible Flight Standards office routing code.

2)    Prepare FAA Form 8500-13 (Figure 5-157) (access this form in eForms). In the “Description” section, include the following:

    Applicant’s defect;

    Type of test given;

    ASI’s recommendations;

    Appropriate alternate procedures deemed necessary by the ASI;

    Noteworthy physical attributes of the applicant in comparison to those of the ASI;

    Unusual applicant reactions;

    Marginal or simulated marginal conditions for the test;

    Applicant’s susceptibility to distraction from simultaneous tasks; and

    Necessary operating limitations for the pilot certificate concerned or statement of “NO LIMITATIONS” (if applicable).

3)    Send the LOA and the medical flight test report to the issuing medical office. The medical office will mail any required forms to the applicant after receipt and review of the Medical Flight Test Report, as applicable. Send the completed FAA Form 8710-1 application indicating an unsatisfactory medical test to the Airmen Certification Branch.

I.    Medical Portion Administered Only—Successful Performance. If an applicant’s medical test performance is successful, inform the applicant and proceed as follows:

Indicates new/changed information.
1)    Complete FAA Form 8710-1. See Figure 5-161, Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Passage of Medical Test Only—(“Approved” Line Through Temp Certificate Issued and Indicate Limitation Action in “Remarks”) (Page 2).
a)    On the reverse side, fill in the “Special Medical Test Conducted” block.
b)    Check the “Approved” box and line through “Temporary Certificate Issued,” if applicable. If there is any change in limitations to a Student Pilot Certificate, indicate the changes or “NO LIMITATIONS” in the “Remarks” section of FAA Form 8710-1. If changing, adding, or removing limitations on an applicant’s plastic Student Pilot Certificate, issue a temporary Student Pilot Certificate with the limitations and punch a hole through the hologram of the existing certificate. Include a copy of the temporary Student Pilot Certificate with the package to the Airmen Certification Branch. The Airmen Certification Branch will reissue the plastic certificate with limitations. Indicate any limitations or “NO LIMITATIONS” on the temporary certificate issued for any other part 61 pilot certificate.
Indicates new/changed information.
c)    Complete the Inspector’s Report in its entirety (Location of Test, Duration of Test, annotate “Medical Flight Test” under Certificate or Rating Being Applied for, Type of Aircraft Used, and the Registration No.).
Indicates new/changed information.
d)    Sign and date the application. Indicate the responsible Flight Standards office routing code and the inspector’s certificate number.
2)    Prepare FAA Form 8500-13 (Figure 5-157). In the “Description” section, include the following:

    Applicant’s defect;

    Type of test given;

    ASI’s recommendations;

    Appropriate alternate procedures deemed necessary by the ASI;

    Noteworthy physical attributes of the applicant in comparison to those of the ASI;

    Unusual applicant reactions;

    Marginal or simulated marginal conditions for the test;

    Applicant’s susceptibility to distraction from simultaneous tasks; and

    Necessary operating limitations for the pilot certificate concerned or statement of “NO LIMITATIONS” (if applicable).

3)    Forward the Flight Test Report to the Issuing Medical Office. The medical office will review the report and mail appropriate documents to the applicant. Forward the completed FAA Form 8710-1 and any temporary certificate to the Airmen Certification Branch.

J.    Combination Test Administered With Medical Portion Successful and Practical Test Disapproved.

Indicates new/changed information.
1)    Complete FAA Form 8710-1 (see Figure 5-162, Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Failure of Combination Test—(Medical Portion Passed) (Page 2)).
a)    On the reverse side under “Aviation Safety Inspector or Technician Report,” check “Disapproved—Disapproval Notice Issued.”
b)    On the reverse side, fill in the “Special Medical Test Conducted” block.
Indicates new/changed information.
c)    Sign and date the application. Indicate the responsible Flight Standards office routing code.
d)    Under the “Attachments” section, check the “Notice of Disapproval” box.
2)    Prepare FAA Form 8500-13 in the same manner as above (Figure 5-157).
3)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-5 (see Figure 5-155) per the instructions in Volume 5, Chapter 4, Section 5, Title 14 CFR Part 63 Aircraft Navigator Certificates. Include any limitations for the pilot certificate.
4)    Send the LOA and the medical flight test report to the issuing medical office. After receipt and review of the report, the issuing medical office will forward appropriate medical documents to the applicant, as applicable. Send the completed application and Notice of Disapproval of Application with the applicable limitations or “NO LIMITATIONS” to the Airmen Certification Branch.

K.    Combination Test Administered—Both Portions Passed.

Indicates new/changed information.
1)    Complete FAA Form 8710-1 (see Figure 5-163, Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Passage of Combination Test by an FAA Inspector—(Temporary Issued with Private ASEL Rating and Limitation) (Page 2)).
a)    On the reverse side, under Aviation Safety Inspector or Technician Report, check “Approved—Temporary Certificate Issued.”
b)    On the reverse side, fill in the “Special Medical Test Conducted” block.
Indicates new/changed information.
c)    Complete the Inspector’s Report in its entirety (Location of Test, Duration of Test, annotate “Medical Flight Test” under Certificate or Rating Being Applied for, Type of Aircraft Used, and the Registration No.).
Indicates new/changed information.
d)    Sign and date the application. Indicate the responsible Flight Standards office routing code and the inspector’s certificate number.
Indicates new/changed information.
e)    Under the “Attachments” section, check the “Temporary Airman Certificate” box.
2)    Prepare FAA Form 8500-13 in the same manner as above (Figure-5-157).
3)    Determine if any operating limitations are required on the certificate, or state “NO LIMITATIONS,” if applicable.
4)    Prepare FAA Form 8060-4 (Figure 5-154) as per the instructions in Volume 5, Chapter 4, Section 5. Include any limitations.
5)    Send the LOA and the medical flight test report to the issuing medical office. The medical office will review the report and mail appropriate documents to the applicant. Send the completed application and a copy of the Temporary Airman Certificate to the Airmen Certification Branch. Indicate the appropriate limitations or “NO LIMITATIONS” on the Temporary Airman Certificate.

L.    PTRS. Complete FAA Form 8000-36, PTRS Data Sheet, in accordance with the PPM.

5-1527    PROCEDURES FOR THE SLT ONLY.

A.    PTRS. Open PTRS file.

B.    Schedule Appointment. Schedule the appointment, during daylight conditions or as specified in the LOA. Instruct the applicant to bring the LOA and Medical Certificate to the appointment.

C.    Test Coordination. FSDO personnel verify the applicant’s ability to identify and/or differentiate aviation red, green, and white using the SLT. Accomplish this test at the responsible FSDO or the nearest air traffic control (ATC) tower, which has a tower signal light or handgun signal light. The operator of the equipment must ensure its proper maintenance and good working order prior to initiating the test. In addition, FSDO personnel make every effort to provide an environment that does not hamper the applicant’s ability to complete the test successfully (i.e., no mist, no fog, no dirty ATC tower windows, no Tower Cab shades drawn, not overcast, etc.). The signal light operator must not have the sun at his or her back. The ASI may not indicate the accuracy of the readings during the test. If the applicant does not call each color correctly within the 5 seconds that the light illuminates or within a 5-second grace period after the light illuminates, the applicant fails the test. However, the test continues until completion. In order to preclude an applicant from identifying light signal color through luminosity, the ASI should not identify any color nor give any clues during any illumination of the light gun. For example, this might occur prior to the test while verifying the applicant can see the signal. At least 3 minutes should pass between any pretest signal and the beginning of the actual test. The airman must be able to identify either the color shown or account for its operational significance. For example, the applicant could identify the lights in terms of position lights on an aircraft using the term “right wing” for green, “left wing” for red, and “tail” for white. The ASI and the applicant can work out what will be acceptable responses prior to the test. Keep in mind that this is an operational test to see if the applicant can identify and/or differentiate the light signals.

D.    Conduct SLT.

1)    The ASI must plan and pre-arrange the sequence of 10 lights shown to the applicant. The applicant observes from a point approximately 1,500 feet from the source. Each illumination of the light occurs for 5 seconds with a 1-minute interval between each illumination. Inform the light signal operator what sign or communication will be used (hand signal, radio, etc.) to indicate when to shine the light.
2)    The ASI must accompany the applicant to an area approximately 1,500 feet from the light operator and ask the applicant to respond to each of the 10 light signals by stating the light color shown or by stating the operational significance of the light. Instruct the applicant to respond while the light is being shown. The applicant may have up to a 5-second grace period to respond after the light is shown.
3)    The signal light operator should shine the light steadily for a period of 5 seconds followed by a 1-minute pause. This step is repeated 10 times with the order of colors as pre-arranged by the ASI or AST for each color—green, red, or white. Two of the colors will be shown three times and one of the colors will be shown four times in the pre-arranged sequence.
4)    Signal the light operator to begin the procedure.
a)    Using the job aid in Figure 5-164, record the color displayed and the applicant’s response.
b)    After a 1-minute interval, repeat the procedure until all 10 lights are shown. This should take approximately 10 minutes.
5)    Applicants who pass the OCVT and the Color Vision Medical Flight Test (see subparagraph 5-1523G) will be given an LOE valid for all classes of Medical Certificates and will have no limitation or comment made on the certificate regarding color vision, as they meet the standard for all classes. Applicants who only pass the OCVT will be given an LOE valid for a third-class Medical Certificate. Certificates for third-class will have a comment put in the limitation area of the certificate that reads, “3rd class letter of evidence.” This comment is necessary to avoid an upgrade in class without further testing.
6)    An applicant who fails the SLT portion of the OCVT during daylight hours may repeat the test at night. Should the airman pass the SLT at night, the restriction “NOT VALID FOR FLIGHT DURING DAYLIGHT HOURS BY COLOR SIGNAL CONTROL” must be placed on the replacement Medical Certificate by the issuing medical office or AAM-300. The airman must have taken the daylight hours test first and failed prior to taking the night test. The day test documentation must be combined with the night test documentation and sent to the issuing medical office.
7)    Should the applicant fail the SLT portion of the OCVT during daylight hours and at night, the restriction “NOT VALID FOR NIGHT FLYING OR BY COLOR SIGNAL CONTROL” will appear on any superseding Medical Certificate once the test report is reviewed by the appropriate medical office. Applicants who fail the daylight SLT are not eligible for a first- or second-class Medical Certificate, and may not be given an LOE or have the limitation removed or modified.

NOTE:  Airmen with this limitation should be advised that to minimize the effect of loss of radio communications, they should as a safety practice carry an extra radio, and in the event of ATC radio communication outage, consider in planning their flight the possibility to divert to another airport or to an uncontrolled airport.

E.    Unsuccessful Performance.

1)    Prepare FAA Form 8500-13 (Figure 5-157). In the “Description” section, include the following information:

    Applicant’s defect;

    Type of test given;

    ASI’s recommendations;

    Appropriate alternate procedures deemed necessary by the ASI;

    Noteworthy physical attributes of the applicant in comparison with those of the ASI;

    Unusual applicant reactions;

    Marginal or simulated marginal conditions for the test;

    Applicant’s susceptibility to distraction from simultaneous tasks; and

    Necessary operating limitations for the pilot certificate concerned.

2)    Send any superseded Medical Certificate and/or copy of the LOE if provided by the issuing medical office or AAM-300, the LOA, and the medical flight test report to the issuing medical office. After reviewing the report, the medical office will mail the applicant any required medical documents not provided in the package. Indicate any change in limitations in the “Remarks” section of FAA Form 8710-1 for a student pilot depending on whether the student pilot applicant failed the daytime test, the nighttime test, or both. For example, it is possible to change “NOT VALID FOR NIGHT FLYING OR BY COLOR SIGNAL CONTROL” to “NOT VALID FOR FLIGHT DURING DAYLIGHT HOURS BY COLOR SIGNAL CONTROL” when the applicant fails the daytime test but passes the nighttime test. For other part 61 certificated applicants, forward the completed application and any Temporary Airman Certificate showing the change in limitations, if applicable, to the Airmen Certification Branch.

F.    Successful Performance.

1)    Prepare FAA Form 8500-13 (Figure 5-157) in the same manner as above.
2)    Send the LOA and the medical flight test report to the issuing medical office. After reviewing the report, that office will mail any required documents to the applicant. If the applicant is a student pilot, indicate “NO LIMITATIONS” in the remarks section on page 2. For other part 61 certificate holders, indicate “NO LIMITATIONS” on the Temporary Airman Certificate.

G.    PTRS. Complete FAA Form 8000-36 in accordance with the PPM.

5-1528    TASK OUTCOMES. Completion of this task results in issuing one or more of the following:

    Medical Certificate;

    SODA;

    LOE;

    Temporary Airman Certificate; or

    Notice of Disapproval of Application.

5-1529    FUTURE ACTIVITIES.

    Applicant may return for an authorized retest.

    Applicant may return for removal of limitations.

    Possible investigation if the airman is involved in an accident, incident, or violation of the regulations or the operating limitations on his or her certificate.

Figure 5-153.  Sample Letter of Authorization for Medical Flight Test

RRMFTFSDO

Federal Aviation Administration

Supervisor FSDO

[FSDO Address]

Ref:       [PI#]

[APPLICANT ID#]

[Airman’s Name] has been authorized to arrange with you for a Medical Flight Test, [first, second, or third]-class, because of [state reason].

The appropriate test procedure is outlined in Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 8, Section 1, subparagraph 5-1526E [type one: 1) hearing impairment, 2) total hearing loss, 3) deformity or absence of extremities, 4) visual defect, 5) speech defect, 6) defective color vision]. Any other testing that would assist you in determining the applicant’s ability is authorized.

In accordance with Order 8900.1, you must return the test results to the issuing medical office.

INSPECTOR, PLEASE FAX THE RESULTS TO:

ATTENTION: SUPERVISOR

FAX: (405) 954-9445

After our office has reviewed the results and if the results indicate successful completion of the Medical Flight Test, our office will issue the corrected Medical Certificate and Statement of Demonstrated Ability (SODA).

Please destroy this authorization if no response is received from the applicant after 6 months from the above date.

Sincerely,

[AMCD MANAGER NAME]

[AMCD MANAGER TITLE]

Civil Aerospace Medical Institute

Enclosure: FAA Form 8500-13

[Your Initials]

Figure 5-153A.  Color Vision Testing Flowchart

Figure 5-153A. Color Vision Testing Flowchart

Figure 5-153B.  Sample Letter of Authorization for Operational Color Vision Test

RROCVTFSDO (3rd Class OCVT Only)

Federal Aviation Administration

Supervisor FSDO

[FSDO Address]

Ref:       [PI#]

[APPLICANT ID#]

[Airman’s Name] has been authorized to be tested with an Operational Color Vision Test (OCVT) (a combination of an Aviation Signal Light Test (SLT) during daylight hours or night hours and ability to read and identify colors on aeronautical maps and charts).

The appropriate test procedure is outlined in Federal Aviation Administration Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 8, Section 1, subparagraph 5-1526E6)b) (which refers to subparagraph 5-1526E6)a)1) and subparagraph 5-1527D.

In accordance with Order 8900.1, you must return all supporting documentation to the issuing medical office.

INSPECTOR, PLEASE FAX THE RESULTS TO:

ATTENTION: SUPERVISOR

FAX: (405) 954-9445

After our office has reviewed the results and if the results indicate successful completion of the Medical Flight Test, our office will issue the corrected Medical Certificate with appropriate limitations and Letter of Evidence (LOE) valid for third-class only.

Please destroy this authorization if no response is received from the applicant after six months from the above date.

Sincerely,

[AMCD MANAGER NAME]

[AMCD MANAGER TITLE]

Civil Aerospace Medical Institute

Enclosure: FAA Form 8500-13

[Your Initials]

Figure 5-153C.  Sample Letter of Authorization for Operational Color Vision Test and Color Vision Medical Flight Test

RROCVTAM (3rd Class OCVT only)

[AIRMAN’S NAME/ADDRESS]

Ref:       [PI#]

[APPLICANT ID#]

Dear [Mr. or Ms.]:

You are hereby authorized to take the Operational Color Vision Test (OCVT) during daylight hours.

To complete arrangements for the test, you should make an appointment with:

SUPERVISING INSPECTOR

FLIGHT STANDARDS DISTRICT OFFICE

[FSDO’s Full Address]

This letter should be retained by you and presented to the inspector when you appear for the test. You should also bring your current Medical Certificate and a form of identification with you to present to the Operations inspector who conducts the test. If you do not have this information with you, you will not be allowed to take the test.

If you do not meet the standard during the daylight test you may retake the OCVT at night. Upon successful completion of the OCVT at night, you may be presented with a corrected Medical Certificate “NOT VALID FOR FLIGHTS REQUIRING COLOR SIGNAL CONTROL DURING DAYLIGHT HOURS.” If you do not meet the standard during daylight hours or at night, the limitation on your Medical Certificate will remain “NOT VALID FOR NIGHT FLIGHT OR BY COLOR SIGNAL CONTROL.”

You may not take the OCVT at night without first taking the test during daylight hours.

Upon completion of the test, the inspector will return the test results to our office for further review and a decision. If you have successfully completed the OCVT and Medical Flight Test and the inspector’s comments are favorable, you may be issued a corrected Medical Certificate with the appropriate limitations and color vision Letter of Evidence (LOE) valid for third-class only.

The LOE will permit you recertification at the same class as long as your physical defect does not become greater than presently reported.

[PI#]

[MID#]

[APP ID#]

[AIRMAN’S NAME]

The Authorization is valid for six months from the date of this letter.

Sincerely,

[AMCD MANAGER NAME]

[AMCD MANAGER TITLE]

Civil Aerospace Medical Institute

[Your Initials]

Figure 5-154.  Sample FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate—(Depicting Passing of a Medical Flight Test in Conjunction With a Practical Test With Appropriate Limitations Included)

Figure 5-154. Sample FAA Form 8060-4, Temporary Airman Certificate-(Depicting Passing of a Medical Flight Test in Conjunction With a Practical Test With Appropriate Limitations Included)

NOTE:  An airman with the limitations shown above is not necessarily prohibited from making solo takeoffs and landings at a domestic airport with an operating control tower. If the airman contacts the control tower in advance, obtains permission for the operation, and is able to receive a clearance based upon light signals or other acceptable means, the operation may be permitted.

Figure 5-155.  Sample FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application, for a Combined Special Medical Flight Test and Certification Test—(Medical Portion Successful)

Figure 5-155. Sample FAA Form 8060-5, Notice of Disapproval of Application, for a Combined Special Medical Flight Test and Certification Test-(Medical Portion Successful)

Figure 5-156.  Sample FAA Form 8500-9, Medical Certificate____Class—(Not Issued by the ASI)

Figure 5-156. Sample FAA Form 8500-9, Medical Certificate____Class-(Not Issued by the ASI)

Figure 5-157.  Sample FAA Form 8500-13, Special Medical Flight Test Report

Indicates new/changed information.

NOTE:  To access this form, use eForms (https://eformservice.faa.gov/).

Figure 5-157. Sample FAA Form 8500-13, Special Medical Flight Test Report

Figure 5-158.  Sample FAA Form 8500-15, Statement of Demonstrated Ability—(Not Issued by the ASI)

Figure 5-158. Sample FAA Form 8500-15, Statement of Demonstrated Ability-(Not Issued by the ASI)

Figure 5-159.  Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, for a Special Medical Flight Test Only (Page 1)

Figure 5-159. Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, for a Special Medical Flight Test Only (Page 1)

Figure 5-160.  Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Failure of Medical Test—(No Notice of Disapproval Issued) (Page 2)

Figure 5-160. Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Failure of Medical Test-(No Notice of Disapproval Issued) (Page 2)

Figure 5-161.  Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Passage of Medical Test Only—(“Approved” Line Through Temp Certificate Issued and Indicate Limitation Action in “Remarks”) (Page 2)

Figure 5-161. Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Passage of Medical Test Only-(Approved Line Through Temp Certificate Issued and Indicate Limitation Action in Remarks) (Page 2)

Figure 5-162.  Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Failure of Combination Test—(Medical Portion Passed) (Page 2)

Figure 5-162. Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Failure of Combination Test-(Medical Portion Passed) (Page 2)

Figure 5-163.  Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Passage of Combination Test by an FAA Inspector—(Temporary Issued with Private ASEL Rating and Limitation) (Page 2)

Figure 5-163. Sample FAA Form 8710-1, Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application, Depicting Passage of Combination Test by an FAA Inspector-(Temporary Issued with Private ASEL Rating and Limitation) (Page 2)

Figure 5-164.  Operational Color Vision Test—Signal Light Test Job Aid

Aeronautical Chart Reading:

Demonstrates ability to correctly read and interpret colors on aeronautical charts without undue hesitation: Yes/No

Signal Light Test Job Aid:

DAY Signal Light Test

Color Displayed

Color Response from Applicant

1,500 Feet From Light

1.

1.

2.

2.

3.

3.

4.

4.

5.

5.

6.

6.

7.

7.

8.

8.

9.

9.

10.

10.

NIGHT Signal Light Test

Color Displayed

Color Response from Applicant

1,500 Feet From Light

1.

1.

2.

2.

3.

3.

4.

4.

5.

5.

6.

6.

7.

7.

8.

8.

9.

9.

10.

10.

I certify these results for:

Airman _____________________________________, PI # __________

Aviation Safety Inspector: ________________________________________

Date: ___________

RESERVED. Paragraphs 5-1530 through 5-1545.