6/25/18

 

8900.1 CHG 601

VOLUME 6  SURVEILLANCE

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CHAPTER 6  PART 137 INSPECTIONS

Section 5  Inspect Part 137 Maintenance Records

6-6-5-1    GENERAL.

A.    Purpose. This section provides guidance for inspecting maintenance records required by Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) parts 43 and 91. Part 91, § 91.417 establishes the recordkeeping responsibilities and requirements for the registered owner/operator of the aircraft, while part 43, §§ 43.9 and 43.11 establish the recordkeeping responsibilities and requirements for personnel who maintain the aircraft. These records must contain a description of the work performed and the name of the person performing the work.

B.    Scope. This guidance applies to all aviation safety inspectors (ASI) who conduct inspections of 14 CFR part 137 maintenance operations.

6-6-5-3    PROGRAM TRACKING AND REPORTING SUBSYSTEM (PTRS) ACTIVITY CODES.

A.    Maintenance: 3634, 3649.

B.    Avionics: 5634.

6-6-5-5    PROCEDURES.

A.    Current Airworthiness Directives (AD) Status. The owner/operator must keep a record showing the current status of applicable ADs.

1)    This record must include:

    The current status of ADs applicable to the aircraft, including the AD number and revision date,

    The method of compliance, and

    The time in service, or the cycles, and/or the date when the next action is required for a recurring AD.

2)    An acceptable method of compliance should include a reference to either (1) a specific portion of the AD, or (2) a manufacturer’s service bulletin (SB) if the bulletin is referenced in the AD.
3)    The document that contains the current status of ADs/method of compliance may be the same as the record of AD accomplishment. The record of nonrecurring ADs must be retained with the aircraft indefinitely. If selling the aircraft, the records must be transferred to the new owner.
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B.    Total Time-in-Service Records. Section 91.417 requires that the owner/operator retain the total time-in-service records for airframes, engines, rotors, and propellers. These records help owners schedule overhauls, retirement life limits, and inspections.

1)    Total time-in-service records may consist of:

    Aircraft maintenance record pages,

    Designated cards or pages,

    A computer listing, or

    Other methods accepted by the Administrator.

2)    Total time-in-service records must be retained with the aircraft indefinitely. If selling the aircraft, the records must be transferred to the new owner.

C.    Life-Limited Parts Current Status Records. Part 91 requires retention of certain records by the owner/operator for components of the airframe, engine, propellers, rotors, and appliances identified to be removed from service when the life limit has been reached.

1)    The current life-limited status of a part is a record indicating the life limit remaining before reaching the required retirement time of the component. This record must include any modification of a part according to ADs, SBs, or product improvements by the manufacturer or applicant.
2)    The following are not considered to be current life-limited status records:

    Work orders,

    Purchase requests,

    Sales receipts,

    Manufacturer documentation of original certification, and

    Other historical data.

3)    Whenever the current status of life-limited parts records cannot be established or has not been maintained—such as a break in current status—and the historical records are not available, the airworthiness of that product cannot be determined, and it must be removed from service.
4)    Current status of life-limited parts records must be retained with the aircraft indefinitely. If selling the aircraft, the records must be transferred to the new owner.

D.    Approval for Return to Service.

1)    Following maintenance, preventive maintenance, or alterations on an aircraft, each registered owner or operator shall keep a record of an approval for return to service.
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2)    Each registered owner or operator shall keep a record of the document approving/disapproving the return to service on the aircraft, airframe, engine, propeller, appliance, or component. The person performing the work must make an entry in the maintenance record that contains the following information:

    A description, or reference to data acceptable to the Administrator, of work performed,

    The date of completion of the work performed, and

    The signature, certificate number, and kind of certificate of the person approving the work.

E.    Overhaul Records. Each registered owner or operator shall keep a record made by a person performing maintenance when overhauling an item of aircraft equipment. The owner/operator must retain the record and make it available to the Administrator upon request. The overhaul records must be retained until the work is superseded by work of equal scope and detail. This record must include:

1)    A description of work performed or a reference to data acceptable to the Administrator,
2)    The date of completion of the work performed,
3)    The name of the person performing the work, if other than the person approving for return to service, and
4)    The signature, type of certificate, and certificate number of the person approving the aircraft/component for return to service.

NOTE:  A return to service tag does not constitute an overhaul record, but may be used to reference the overhaul records.

F.    Current Aircraft Inspection Status.

1)    The owner/operator must retain a record identifying the current inspection status of each aircraft. This record must show the time-in-service since the last inspection required by the inspection program under which the aircraft and its appliances are maintained.
2)    This record must be retained until superseded by work of equal scope and detail.

G.    Major Repair and Major Alteration Records. Owners/operators/program managers must retain the records (Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Form 337, Major Repair and Alteration) for each major repair/alteration made to an aircraft, including any work done on the following:

    Airframe,

    Engine,

    Propeller,

    Rotor, and

    Appliance.

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1)    The records for major repairs must be retained until the work is repeated or superseded, or for one year after the work has been performed.
2)    The records for major alterations must be retained with the aircraft indefinitely. If selling the aircraft, the records must be transferred to the new owner. Due to the unique nature of fractional ownership programs, the aircraft records are normally retained by the program manager and transferred with the aircraft when the aircraft is removed from the program and sold.

6-6-5-7    COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS. This task will require coordination with the owner/operator and the person performing the maintenance.

6-6-5-9    REFERENCES, FORMS, AND JOB AIDS.

A.    References (current editions):

    Title 14 CFR Part 39,

    Advisory Circular (AC) 39-7, Airworthiness Directives, and

    AC 43-9, Maintenance Records.

B.    Forms:

    FAA Form 8020-2, Aircraft/Parts Identification and Release Tag, and

    FAA Form 337, Major Repair and Alteration.

C.    Job Aids. GA JTA M2.2.2 (AW) and AT JTA M2.2.2 (AW).

6-6-5-11    PROCEDURES.

A.    Contact the Owner/Operator. Arrange to obtain the aircraft maintenance records for review. If custody of the records is to be temporarily transferred to the FAA, provide FAA Form 8020-2 to the owner/operator as a receipt. If there are any concerns, contact one of the principal ASIs for assistance.

B.    Review the Owner/Operator Maintenance Records. Determine whether the recordkeeping requirements of the regulations have been met.

1)    Ensure that the entries for maintenance include the following:

    A description of the work performed,

    The date of completion, and

    Signature and certificate number of the person approving the aircraft for return to service.

2)    Ensure that the entries for inspections, excluding progressive inspections, include:

    Type of inspection,

    Brief description of the extent of the inspection,

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    Date of the inspection,

    Total time in service for the aircraft,

    Signature, certificate number, and kind of certificate held by the person approving or disapproving the aircraft for return to service, and

    A statement certifying the airworthiness status of the aircraft.

3)    Ensure that the owner/operator/program manager has records containing:

    Total time in service for the airframe,

    The current status of life-limited parts of each airframe, engine, propeller, rotor, and appliance,

    Total time since last overhaul for those items installed on the aircraft that are required to be overhauled on a specified time basis,

    Current inspection status of the aircraft, including time since last inspection, as required by the program under which the aircraft and its appliances are maintained, and

    Copies of FAA Form 337 for each major alteration to airframe, engine, rotors, propellers, and appliances.

4)    Ensure that the owner/operator has records for the current status of each applicable AD, including:

    The method of compliance,

    The AD number and revision date, and

    The time and date of any recurring actions required by the ADs.

C.    Analyze Results. Bring any discrepancies to the attention of the owner/operator/program manager.

6-6-5-13    TASK OUTCOMES.

A.    Complete the PTRS Record.

B.    Complete the Task. After reviewing, return records to the owner/operator.

C.    Document the Task. File all supporting paperwork in the owner/operator file.

D.    Noncompliance. For all alleged, suspected, or identified instances of noncompliance, see Volume 14, Chapter 1, Section 2, Flight Standards Service Compliance Action Decision Procedure.

6-6-5-15    FUTURE ACTIVITIES. Routine surveillance.

6-6-5-17 through 6-6-5-29 RESERVED.