NOTICE

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION

N 8900.541

 

National Policy

Effective Date: 2/27/20

 

 

Cancellation Date: 2/27/21

 

SUBJ:

OpSpec/MSpec D076, Short-Term Escalation Authorization

1.    Purpose of This Notice. This notice announces a mandatory revision to operations specification (OpSpec)/management specification (MSpec) D076 for certificate holders conducting aircraft operations under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) parts 121, 121/135, and 135; and program managers conducting aircraft operations under 14 CFR part 91 subpart K (part 91K). This notice also announces changes to guidance for the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) responsible Flight Standards Safety Assurance offices, Principal Maintenance Inspectors (PMI), and Principal Avionics Inspectors (PAI) assigned to operators conducting aircraft operations under parts 91K, 121, 121/135, and 135.

2.    Audience. The primary audience for this notice is Flight Standards Safety Assurance offices’ PMIs and PAIs assigned to operators conducting aircraft operations under parts 91K, 121, 121/135, and 135. The secondary audience includes the Safety Standards and Foundational Business offices.

3.    Where You Can Find This Notice. You can find this notice on the MyFAA employee website at https://employees.faa.gov/tools_resources/orders_notices. Inspectors can access this notice through the Flight Standards Information Management System (FSIMS) at http://fsims.avs.faa.gov. Operators can find this notice on the FAA’s website at http://fsims.faa.gov. This notice is available to the public at http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/orders_notices.

4.    Explanation of Changes. The Aircraft Maintenance Division has revised the D076 templates to more accurately reflect the guidance information for short-term escalation authorizations contained in FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 3, Chapter 37, Section 1, Safety Assurance System: Evaluating Short-Term Escalation Procedures. We are making these changes as a result of comments received regarding unclear guidance and consistency issues with the existing D076 templates. This revision standardizes and revises the language used in each 14 CFR part-specific template to better reflect the regulatory language used in each applicable part of the regulation.

5.    Guidance. This notice contains the following:

    The sample MSpec D076 template in Appendix A applies to part 91K.

    The sample OpSpec D076 template in Appendix B applies to part 121.

    The sample OpSpec D076 template in Appendix C applies to part 121/135.

    The sample OpSpec D076 template in Appendix D applies to part 135.

6.    Action. This is a mandatory revision affecting Airworthiness principal inspectors (PI) responsible for issuing and amending OpSpec/MSpec D076. PIs should provide this notice to the operators for whom they are responsible. Affected operators must be issued the revised D076 within 90 calendar-days of the “HQ Control” date in the Web-based Operations Safety System (WebOPSS).

7.    Disposition. We will incorporate the information in this notice into Order 8900.1 before this notice expires. Direct questions concerning the information in this notice to the Aircraft Maintenance Division at 202-267-1675.

ORIGINAL SIGNED by

/s/ Robert C. Carty

Deputy Executive Director, Flight Standards Service

 

 

Appendix A.  Sample MSpec D076, Short-Term Escalation Authorization: 14 CFR Part 91K

a.    Subject to the following conditions, limitations, and prohibitions, the program manager is authorized to escalate scheduled maintenance intervals, on a short-term basis, for check packages, check package individual line items, or component time-change/task intervals.

b.    The conditions, procedures, and standards for the technical evaluation and implementation of short-term escalation of scheduled maintenance intervals must be defined in the program manager’s manual and must reflect the following policy:

(1)    The basis for a short-term escalation is the emergence of some unforeseen situation; however, the use of short-term escalations must be supported solely on a technical analysis. It cannot be used to compensate for marketing requirements, flight scheduling requirements, poor maintenance practices, or poor maintenance program management.

(2)    Short-term scheduled maintenance interval escalations must not be used on a large scale (i.e., escalating numerous aircraft at once) or on a repetitive basis to the extent that it results in a fleet interval extension.

c.    Short-Term Escalation Intervals. Scheduled maintenance tasks are authorized a maximum of 10 percent, not to exceed 500 hours of time in service. Any scheduled maintenance task short-term escalation that is more restrictive than the maximum times authorized must be listed in Table 1 below.

Table 1 Short-Term Escalation Limitations and Provisions

Aircraft M/M/S

Limitations and Provisions That Are More Restrictive Than the Maximum Authorization

 

 

d.    Special Considerations for Operations Under a U.S. Military Contract. This authorization does not permit use of a short-term escalation when the sole justification is a military contract requirement. In those cases, deviations to management specifications extending scheduled maintenance intervals must be specifically authorized by the FAA under the provisions and procedures of 14 CFR Part 119, § 119.55. However, during operations under a U.S. military contract, if unanticipated or unforeseen situations arise, the program manager may use this authorization as prescribed in their manual.

e.    Prohibitions. The following listed scheduled maintenance intervals must not be escalated under this authorization:

(1)    Intervals specified by FAA Airworthiness Directives (AD);

(2)    Life limits specified by Type Certificate Data Sheets (TCDS);

(3)    Certification Maintenance Requirements (CMR) (unless specifically allowed and designated by the CMR document);

(4)    Structural sampling periods imposed by Maintenance Review Boards (MRB);

(5)    Airworthiness Limitations (AL/AWL/ALI);

(6)    Critical Design Configuration Control Limitations (CDCCL);

(7)    Interval limitations specified by Minimum Equipment Lists (MEL) or Configuration Deviation Lists (CDL); and

(8)    Failure Effect Categories (FEC) 5 and 8 tasks identified or “tagged” in the MRB Report (MRBR) (or equivalent) as satisfying a Candidate CMR (CCMR). These tasks must not be escalated beyond the interval that would otherwise be required by the CMR. (Coordination with the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) may be required.)

 

Appendix B.  Sample OpSpec D076, Short-Term Escalation Authorization: 14 CFR Part 121

a.    Subject to the following conditions, limitations, and prohibitions, the certificate holder is authorized to escalate scheduled maintenance intervals, on a short-term basis, for check packages, check package individual line items, or component time-change/task intervals.

b.    The conditions, procedures, and standards for the technical evaluation and implementation of short-term escalation of scheduled maintenance intervals must be defined in the certificate holder’s manual and must reflect the following policy:

(1)    The basis for a short-term escalation is the emergence of some unforeseen situation; however, the use of short-term escalations must be supported solely on a technical analysis. It cannot be used to compensate for marketing requirements, flight scheduling requirements, poor maintenance practices, or poor maintenance program management.

(2)    Short-term scheduled maintenance interval escalations must not be used on a large scale (i.e., escalating numerous aircraft at once) or on a repetitive basis to the extent that it results in a fleet interval extension.

c.    Short-Term Escalation Intervals. Scheduled maintenance tasks are authorized a maximum of 10 percent, not to exceed 500 hours of time in service. Any scheduled maintenance task short-term escalation that is more restrictive than the maximum times authorized must be listed in Table 1 below.

Table 1 Short-Term Escalation Limitations and Provisions

Aircraft M/M/S

Limitations and Provisions That Are More Restrictive Than the Maximum Authorization

 

 

d.    Special Considerations for Operations Under a U.S. Military Contract. This authorization does not permit use of a short-term escalation when the sole justification is a military contract requirement. In those cases, deviations to operations specifications extending scheduled maintenance intervals must be specifically authorized by the FAA under the provisions and procedures of 14 CFR Part 119, § 119.55. However, during operations under a U.S. military contract, if unanticipated or unforeseen situations arise, the certificate holder may use this authorization as prescribed in their manual.

e.    Prohibitions. The following listed scheduled maintenance intervals must not be escalated under this authorization:

(1)    Intervals specified by FAA Airworthiness Directives (AD);

(2)    Life limits specified by Type Certificate Data Sheets (TCDS);

(3)    Certification Maintenance Requirements (CMR) (unless specifically allowed and designated by the CMR document);

(4)    Structural sampling periods imposed by Maintenance Review Boards (MRB);

(5)    Airworthiness Limitations (AL/AWL/ALI);

(6)    Critical Design Configuration Control Limitations (CDCCL);

(7)    Interval limitations specified by Minimum Equipment Lists (MEL) or Configuration Deviation Lists (CDL); and

(8)    Failure Effect Categories (FEC) 5 and 8 tasks identified or “tagged” in the MRB Report (MRBR) (or equivalent) as satisfying a Candidate CMR (CCMR). These tasks must not be escalated beyond the interval that would otherwise be required by the CMR. (Coordination with the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) may be required.)

 

Appendix C.  Sample OpSpec D076, Short-Term Escalation Authorization: 14 CFR Part 121/135

a.    Subject to the following conditions, limitations, and prohibitions, the certificate holder is authorized to escalate scheduled maintenance intervals, on a short-term basis, for check packages, check package individual line items, or component time-change/task intervals.

b.    The conditions, procedures, and standards for the technical evaluation and implementation of short-term escalation of scheduled maintenance intervals must be defined in the certificate holder’s manual and must reflect the following policy:

(1)    The basis for a short-term escalation is the emergence of some unforeseen situation; however, the use of short-term escalations must be supported solely on a technical analysis. It cannot be used to compensate for marketing requirements, flight scheduling requirements, poor maintenance practices, or poor maintenance program management.

(2)    Short-term scheduled maintenance interval escalations must not be used on a large scale (i.e., escalating numerous aircraft at once) or on a repetitive basis to the extent that it results in a fleet interval extension.

c.    Short-Term Escalation Intervals. Scheduled maintenance tasks are authorized a maximum of 10 percent, not to exceed 500 hours of time in service. Any scheduled maintenance task short-term escalation that is more restrictive than the maximum times authorized must be listed in Table 1 below.

Table 1 Short-Term Escalation Limitations and Provisions

Aircraft M/M/S

Limitations and Provisions That Are More Restrictive Than the Maximum Authorization

 

 

d.    Special Considerations for Operations Under a U.S. Military Contract. This authorization does not permit use of a short-term escalation when the sole justification is a military contract requirement. In those cases, deviations to operations specifications extending scheduled maintenance intervals must be specifically authorized by the FAA under the provisions and procedures of 14 CFR Part 119, § 119.55. However, during operations under a U.S. military contract, if unanticipated or unforeseen situations arise, the certificate holder may use this authorization as prescribed in their manual.

e.    Prohibitions. The following listed scheduled maintenance intervals must not be escalated under this authorization:

(1)    Intervals specified by FAA Airworthiness Directives (AD);

(2)    Life limits specified by Type Certificate Data Sheets (TCDS);

(3)    Certification Maintenance Requirements (CMR) (unless specifically allowed and designated by the CMR document);

(4)    Structural sampling periods imposed by Maintenance Review Boards (MRB);

(5)    Airworthiness Limitations (AL/AWL/ALI);

(6)    Critical Design Configuration Control Limitations (CDCCL);

(7)    Interval limitations specified by Minimum Equipment Lists (MEL) or Configuration Deviation Lists (CDL); and

(8)    Failure Effect Categories (FEC) 5 and 8 tasks identified or “tagged” in the MRB Report (MRBR) (or equivalent) as satisfying a Candidate CMR (CCMR). These tasks must not be escalated beyond the interval that would otherwise be required by the CMR. (Coordination with the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) may be required.)

 

Appendix D.  Sample OpSpec D076, Short-Term Escalation Authorization: 14 CFR Part 135

a.    Subject to the following conditions, limitations, and prohibitions, the certificate holder is authorized to escalate scheduled maintenance intervals, on a short-term basis, for check packages, check package individual line items, or component time-change/task intervals.

b.    The conditions, procedures, and standards for the technical evaluation and implementation of short-term escalation of scheduled maintenance intervals must be defined in the certificate holder’s manual and must reflect the following policy:

(1)    The basis for a short-term escalation is the emergence of some unforeseen situation; however, the use of short-term escalations must be supported solely on a technical analysis. It cannot be used to compensate for marketing requirements, flight scheduling requirements, poor maintenance practices, or poor maintenance program management.

(2)    Short-term scheduled maintenance interval escalations must not be used on a large scale (i.e., escalating numerous aircraft at once) or on a repetitive basis to the extent that it results in a fleet interval extension.

c.    Short-Term Escalation Intervals. Scheduled maintenance tasks are authorized a maximum of 10 percent, not to exceed 500 hours of time in service. Any scheduled maintenance task short-term escalation that is more restrictive than the maximum times authorized must be listed in Table 1 below.

Table 1 Short-Term Escalation Limitations and Provisions

Aircraft M/M/S

Limitations and Provisions That Are More Restrictive Than the Maximum Authorization

 

 

d.    Special Considerations for Operations Under a U.S. Military Contract. This authorization does not permit use of a short-term escalation when the sole justification is a military contract requirement. In those cases, deviations to operations specifications extending scheduled maintenance intervals must be specifically authorized by the FAA under the provisions and procedures of 14 CFR Part 119, § 119.55. However, during operations under a U.S. military contract, if unanticipated or unforeseen situations arise, the certificate holder may use this authorization as prescribed in their manual.

e.    Prohibitions. The following listed scheduled maintenance intervals must not be escalated under this authorization:

(1)    Intervals specified by FAA Airworthiness Directives (AD);

(2)    Life limits specified by Type Certificate Data Sheets (TCDS);

(3)    Certification Maintenance Requirements (CMR) (unless specifically allowed and designated by the CMR document);

(4)    Structural sampling periods imposed by Maintenance Review Boards (MRB);

(5)    Airworthiness Limitations (AL/AWL/ALI);

(6)    Critical Design Configuration Control Limitations (CDCCL);

(7)    Interval limitations specified by Minimum Equipment Lists (MEL) or Configuration Deviation Lists (CDL); and

(8)    Failure Effect Categories (FEC) 5 and 8 tasks identified or “tagged” in the MRB Report (MRBR) (or equivalent) as satisfying a Candidate CMR (CCMR). These tasks must not be escalated beyond the interval that would otherwise be required by the CMR. (Coordination with the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) may be required.)