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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION

National Policy

ORDER

1800.56U

 

Effective Date:

6/20/20

SUBJ:  National Flight Standards Work Program Guidelines

1.    Purpose of This Order. This order restates current Flight Standards Service (FS) policy for personnel to use as they develop and execute annual surveillance work programs, incorporates organizational changes and policy division changes, updates previous guidance work activities, National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) recommendations, Inspector General (IG) recommendations, and congressional mandates.

2.    Audience. This order pertains to FS personnel who use annual surveillance work programs. This order excludes surveillance conducted under the Safety Assurance System (SAS).

3.    Where You Can Find This Order. You can find this order on the MyFAA employee website at https://employees.faa.gov/tools_resources/orders_notices. Inspectors can access this order through the Flight Standards Information Management System (FSIMS) at https://fsims.avs.faa.gov. Air carriers (operators) can find this order on the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) website at https://fsims.faa.gov. This order is available to the public at https://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/orders_notices.

4.    What This Order Cancels. This order cancels FAA Order 1800.56T, National Flight Standards Work Program Guidelines, dated July 31, 2019.

5.    Explanation of Policy Changes.

a.    Editorial Changes.

(1)    Editorial changes throughout to include SAS Phase 3 Integration.
(2)    Use the SAS Assistance, Feedback, or Enhancement (SAFE) process to report errors, or recommend changes regarding this order.

b.    New Surveillance Requirements. Added new surveillance requirements for Supplemental Passenger Restraint System (SPRS) for individuals and operators that hold this authorization via a Letter of Authorization (LOA) issued in accordance with FAA Order 8900.4, Emergency Order of Prohibition Pertaining to “Doors-Off” Flight Operations for Compensation or Hire.

c.    Appendix A Changes.

(1)    Subparagraph 4e. Added wording clarifying Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 129 National Flight Standards Work Program Guidelines (NPG) requirement concerning U.S.-registered aircraft. Previously located at subparagraphs 5(a)4(b), 5(a)4(e), and 5(a)4(f).
(2)    Subparagraph 4e(3). Added Aircraft Network Security Program (ANSP) to the “National Use” Field for § 129.14 and part 125 airworthiness. Previously located at subparagraph 5a(2)(j).
(3)    Paragraph 11. Inspections requirement has been increased from 30 percent to 50 percent of the air tour operators. Previously located at subparagraph 5(a)(14).
(4)    Paragraph 12. Added 14 CFR part 91 “Doors-Off” operations—Operations and Airworthiness inspection requirements.
(5)    Subparagraph 13a. Added a note that 14 CFR part 65 code 3678 needs to be added locally. Previously located at subparagraph 5a(15).
(6)    Subparagraph 13a. Added a note of clarification for SPORTJUMP in the “National Use” Field. Previously located at subparagraph 5a(15).
(7)    Paragraph 16. Removed the operations section for designees (except for Organization Designation Authorization (ODA)). Removed from subparagraph 5a(18).
(8)    Paragraph 16. Added 14 CFR part 183 Operations Activity Code for recording ODA Observation. Combined paragraph with part 183 airworthiness ODA and renamed “Part 183 ODA.” Previously located at subparagraph 5a(19).
(9)    Paragraph 18. Updated Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) information and requirements. Previously located at subparagraph 5(a)(20) and Appendix C.
(10)    Removed suspected unapproved parts (SUP) inspection requirements for 14 CFR parts 125 and 91 subpart K (part 91K). Inspections are included under other surveillance.

d.    Appendix B Changes. None.

e.    Appendix C Changes. Updated UAS NPG Activity procedures.

f.    Appendix D Changes. Updated acronyms and abbreviations list.

6.    Effective Date. This order becomes effective on October 1, 2020.

7.    Background.

a.    Statutory Authority. Title 49 of the United States Code (49 U.S.C.) and 14 CFR provide the statutory and regulatory authority for NPG, respectively. Title 49 U.S.C. is broad in scope and contains the codified provisions of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (FA Act), which prescribes the powers and authorities of the FAA. Title 14 CFR is prescriptive in nature and contains specific requirements to obtain a certificate holder operating or Air Agency Certificate and standards for conducting related operations. NPG is not a separate safety standard and does not impose additional requirements on certificate holders. The NPG Order provides aviation safety inspectors (ASI) with standardized protocols to evaluate certificate holder programs required by regulations to be approved or accepted.

b.    Policy Statement of the FAA as It Pertains to Promoting Aviation Safety for Certificate Holders. SAS is a system safety approach to oversight based on FAA policy. The FAA follows regulatory policy, which recognizes the obligation of the certificate holder to maintain the highest possible degree of safety. NPG implements this order by providing safety controls (i.e., regulations and application) of business organizations and individuals who fall under FAA regulations. Under NPG, our primary responsibilities are to:

(1)    When the environment changes, conduct assessments to verify and/or validate that the certificate holder/operator’s programs continue to meet regulatory requirements.
(2)    Validate the performance of a certificate holder/operator’s approved and accepted programs for the purpose of Continued Operational Safety (COS).
(3)    Identify regulatory noncompliance or safety issues and correct them as effectively, quickly, and efficiently as possible.
(4)    Use the most effective means to return an individual or entity that holds an FAA certificate, approval, authorization, or license to full compliance and to prevent recurrence.

c.    SAS Integration. Beginning in June 2020, the next phase of SAS Phase 3 will be deployed at key site locations, while the rest of the offices will begin the deployment process starting in October 2020. The October 2020 deployment includes the first inclusion of the NPG in SAS:

    Planning and recording NPG surveillance will use SAS Phase 3 automation.

    New SAS terminology “NPG Activities” combines and replaces the legacy NPG/Program Tracking and Reporting Subsystem (PTRS) Required Items (R-Items) and Planned Items (P-Items).

    The Safety Analysis and Promotion Division will create, revise and annually publish NPG automation rules per the requirements found in this order. SAS automation will add NPG Activities to the appropriate FS Office Workload List (OWL).

    For NPG planning, the OWL enhances and replaces the legacy Regional Automated Modular Planning System (RAMPS) and Assessment and Planning Tools (APT).

    Employees and management review, modify, and add additional NPG Activities to support their NPG work program in the OWL.

8.    Accomplishment of FS Work Activities. The NPG represent system-wide identification of areas that have proven safety risks. This order identifies work activities that FS personnel must complete. A local analysis of certificate holders will also identify additional safety risks. Principal inspectors (PI) and Front Line Managers (FLM) must assess risks when developing work programs. FS offices should create work programs based on the highest areas of risk and document decisions that may cause them to deviate from keeping the Required Surveillance Work Activities. FS offices and International Field Offices (IFO) are to use available resources as they plan and perform these work activities to accomplish the FAA’s mission. FS offices and IFOs use existing directives and guidance to implement the program. The completion of these work activities are essential to ensure that the aviation community complies with regulations, standards, and safe operating practices.

9.    Conducting Surveillance.

a.    NPG Activities. NPG Activities are planned activities added to FS OWLs through SAS automation or added by an employee per this order. Database and automation errors may prevent generation of NPG Activities through SAS automation. If NPG Activities generation does not occur due to an automation error, the required surveillance and work activities specified in this order still apply. In those cases, add the NPG Activity locally. Refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 10, Chapter 3, Section 3, Safety Assurance System: Office Workload List (OWL) Activity and Task Planning. FS offices must complete, terminate, or identify Resource Not Available (RNA) each NPG Activity by September 30 each year.

b.    Appendix Description. Appendix A, Work Program Activities, contains a description of specific, nationally identified NPG Activities an FS office must accomplish. FS considers the number of NPG Activities this order requires as a minimum. The Safety Analysis and Promotion Division will revise the surveillance requirements in Appendix A as necessary to ensure that FS maintains a dynamic and appropriate surveillance program to address emerging issues across all areas of the aviation environment and community.

c.    Inspection Timing. Do not leave required inspections of certificate holders that have seasonal, irregular, or infrequent operations until the end of the fiscal year (FY) when the lack of ASI resources or the business operations of the certificate holder make an inspection impossible.

10.    Risk and Safety Assessment. In continuing support of the FAA’s overall safety objectives and goal to reduce accidents, FS requires all PIs to target their safety surveillance on risk and/or safety assessment. The baseline NPG Activities found in this order represent risk identified by the policy divisions, NTSB recommendations, IG recommendations, congressional mandates, and other sources. These risk assessments represent national risk, which may differ from local risk assessments. Offices must consider these items as a priority. However, if critical risk events occur during the year, offices must address these new risks. If resource shortfalls prevent the completion of NPG Activities, managers must capture the resource shortfall and provide justification. Managers and FLMs should identify projections of resource shortfalls as early in the FY as possible and communicate resource needs as they determine appropriate.

11.    Reporting Procedures and Data Collection.

a.    Enhanced Vital Information Database (eVID). The FAA maintains data in the eVID regarding certificate holders. The FAA frequently uses the eVID to report statistical information about FS to internal and external organizations. The FAA also uses this data for work program planning, for the follow-on analysis of work activities, and for defining the environmental complexity at all levels within FS.

(1)    Environmental eVID Records. The responsible Flight Standards office, or IFO, as applicable, is responsible for the maintenance of eVID environmental records for their assigned 14 CFR part 121 or 135 air carriers, or part 129 foreign air carriers.
(2)    Responsible Flight Standards Office. The responsible Flight Standards office that issues operations specifications (OpSpecs) and/or holders of OpSpecs are responsible for the accurate and timely entry of environmental data into the eVID for all certificate holders operating at domestic and foreign airports. The responsible Flight Standards office may request that another FS office maintain an air carrier environmental record. This request and coordination will be at the office manager level.
(3)    IFO Responsibilities. IFOs that issue OpSpecs and/or holders of OpSpecs are responsible for maintaining environmental data in the eVID for part 129 air carriers conducting scheduled operations at U.S. airports. An IFO may request that another FS office maintain the foreign air carrier environmental record. This request and coordination will be at the office manager level.

b.    Analysis of Data. Analysis and evaluation of the data is necessary to identify trends that may negatively affect aviation safety. In addition, appropriate corrective actions and followup activities are essential to ensure the success of the annual surveillance work program. Quality data facilitates accurate risk assessment, which results from data analysis. Refer to Order 8900.1, Volume 10, Chapter 3, Section 3.

c.    Identification of Surveillance Work Functions. The FAA identifies FS surveillance work functions by four-digit activity numbers and the associated 14 CFR part, to allow data entry into Activity Recording (AR). FS office managers and FLMs must ensure prioritization of surveillance activities based on risk.

d.    Follow-Up Action. Inspectors should correctly record follow-up actions in AR to monitor corrective actions by an aviation organization. Aviation safety inspector (ASI) opinion codes that require a comment should reflect factual data, and inspectors should accurately record them as “I,” information; “P,” potential; or “U,” unacceptable. Correctly recording U’s and P’s provides valuable information about the certificate holder. Refer to Order 8900.1, Volume 10, Appendix 10-1, for more information on AR codes. If an ASI identifies an area of risk that an aviation organization must address, the ASI should initiate corrective actions with the aviation organization. The ASI should then plan surveillance activities within the current work program to ensure that the aviation organization has successfully implemented any corrective actions. The ASI will incorporate additional surveillance activities on that certificate holder into the new FY planning cycle.

e.    Annual Work Program Closeout Procedures.

(1)    The NPG work program is continuous throughout the year. FS offices must complete, terminate, or identify Resource Not Available (RNA) NPG Activities by September 30 each year. NPG Activities are mandatory unless the activity is terminated or identified RNA; justification is necessary.
(2)    If an ASI identifies an area of risk that a certificate holder must address during the fourth quarter, the ASI should initiate corrective actions with the certificate holder. The ASI should then plan surveillance activities to ensure that the certificate holder has successfully implemented any corrective actions. The ASI will incorporate additional surveillance activities on that certificate holder into the new FY planning cycle.

12.    Distribution. The FAA will distribute this order to the Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety (AVS-1), the program director of the FAA Academy’s the Regulatory Standards Division (AMA-200) at the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (MMAC), and all FS divisions and offices.

13.    Directive Feedback Information. Use the SAFE process to report errors or recommend changes regarding this order. For questions regarding your SAFE submission, submit your request to 9-AFS-900-SAFE@faa.gov.

ORIGINAL SIGNED by

/s/ Robert C. Carty

Deputy Executive Director, Flight Standards Service

Appendix A. Work Program Activities

Purpose. This appendix provides a structure for the development of annual work programs and requirements for National Flight Standards Work Program Guidelines (NPG) Activities performed each fiscal year (FY) by Flight Standards Service (FS). This appendix also contains recommendations for adding NPG Activities that aviation safety inspectors (ASI) should consider when preparing a total surveillance work program. For more information on how to include additional NPG Activities to the Office Workload List (OWL), refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 10, Chapter 3, Section 3, Safety Assurance System: Office Workload List (OWL) Activity and Task Planning.

Required Work Activities.

1.    Title 14 CFR Part 125—Operations.

a.    Main Base Inspection (1616). Conduct one inspection on each FAA-certificated operator (responsible Flight Standards office).

b.    Ramp Inspection (1622). Conduct one inspection on each FAA-certificated operator (responsible Flight Standards office).

c.    Manual Procedures (1621). Conduct one inspection on each FAA-certificated operator (responsible Flight Standards office).

2.    Title 14 CFR Part 125—Airworthiness.

a.    Conduct the following inspections on each make and basic model aircraft for each FAA-certificated operator (responsible Flight Standards office):

(1)    Ramp (one 3627 or one 5627).
(2)    Spot (one 3628 or one 5628).
(3)    Aircraft Records (one 3634 or one 5634).
(4)    Inspection Program (one 3637 and one 5637).
(5)    Airworthiness Directive (AD) Compliance Inspection (one 3649 and one 5649).
(6)    Approved Weight and Balance (W&B) (one 3639).
(7)    Ramp Cargo Check (two 3623).

b.    Conduct the following inspections on each FAA-certificated operator (responsible Flight Standards office):

(1)    Fuel Tank Flammability Reduction (FTFR) program requirements (4635 and 6635), as applicable. Enter the acronym “FTFR” (without quotation marks) into the “National Use” Field.
(2)    Manual Procedure (5626) to verify compliance with Aircraft Network Security Program (ANSP), as applicable. Enter “ANSP” in “National Use” Field, without quotation marks.

3.    Title 14 CFR Part 125 Deviation Holder—Operations and Airworthiness. Conduct the following inspections on each FAA-certificated operator (responsible Flight Standards office):

a.    Part 125 Deviation Holder (1683).

b.    FTFR program requirements (4635 and 6635), as applicable. Enter the acronym “FTFR” (without quotation marks) into the “National Use” Field.

4.    Title 14 CFR Part 129 Foreign Air Carriers—Operations and Airworthiness. Inspectors should refer to the appropriate chapter and section of Order 8900.1, Volume 12, International Aviation, for information prior to conducting the surveillance required by this paragraph. Refer to Order 8900.1, Volume 12, Chapter 4, Section 10, Ramp Inspections for Part 129 Foreign Air Carriers, for inspector training requirements. This requirement applies to foreign air carriers engaged in common carriage operations within the United States to whom the FAA issues part 129 operations specifications (OpSpecs).

a.    Conduct at least one of each of the following inspections on each scheduled passenger and/or cargo part 129 foreign air carrier at each airport of operation:

(1)    Ramp (1622).
(2)    Ramp (3627 or 5627).

b.    Conduct at least one of each of the following inspections on each nonscheduled foreign air carrier utilizing aircraft type certificated (TC) for 10 or more seats that operates within the geographical area approved by OpSpec A001, Issuance and Applicability, and Reports. The responsible International Field Office (IFO) will generate these activities:

(1)    Ramp (1622).
(2)    Ramp (3627 or 5627).

c.    Conduct at least one of each of the following inspections on each nonscheduled foreign air carrier utilizing aircraft TC’d for 9 or fewer seats at least once every 3 years within the geographical area approved by OpSpec A001. The responsible IFO will generate these activities:

(1)    Ramp (1622).
(2)    Ramp (3627 or 5627).

d.    When the responsible IFO receives notification on nonscheduled flight operations, as required by foreign OpSpec A001, see Appendix B, subparagraph 3c to process a geographic request.

Note:  For those scheduled air carriers also performing nonscheduled operations, principal inspectors (PI) are responsible for reviewing and assessing the proposed nonscheduled operation to determine if a geographic surveillance request is necessary.

e.    For Part 129 Operators, Operating U.S.-Registered Aircraft.

(1)    Conduct a desk audit annually of each operator’s FAA-approved maintenance inspection program (3637 and 5637) (responsible IFO).
(2)    Conduct one of each surveillance activity on each operator’s FTFR program requirements (4635 and 6635) (responsible IFO). Enter the acronym “FTFR” (without quotation marks) into the “National Use” Field.
(3)    Conduct a desk audit annually of each ANSP procedures (5626) including the annual security risk assessment. Enter “ANSP” (without quotation marks) into the “National Use” Field.

f.    Heightened Surveillance List (HSL). For additional guidance, refer to Order 8900.1, Volume 12, Chapter 4, Section 13, International Security—Heightened Surveillance List, and the HSL.

(1)    IFO PIs responsible for part 129 operators must periodically review the HSL for accuracy. The FS office with geographic responsibility for the airport to which the part 129 carrier operates has the responsibility for inspector assignment and conducting the HSL inspections. You can find this list at https://my.faa.gov/content/myfaa/en/org/linebusiness/avs/offices/afx/divisions/afs/afs50.html.
(2)    Operators appearing on the HSL will receive two additional ramp inspections. Conduct one Operations Ramp inspection (1622) and one Airworthiness Ramp inspection (3627 or 5627) quarterly at each airport of operation until the FAA removes them from the HSL. The FS office with geographic responsibility for the airport will generate these mandatory inspections locally. Enter the inspection into the Activity Recording (AR) Record, and enter the acronym “HSL” (without quotation marks) into the “National Use” Field.

5.    Title 14 CFR Part 133 Operator.

a.    Operations. Conduct a Ramp (1622) or a Site (1623) inspection and an operator main base (1616) or manual procedures (1621) inspection on a minimum of 10 percent of the certificated operators (responsible Flight Standards office). Rotate surveillance of these operators year to year.

Note:  Always include operators that perform human external cargo (HEC) when selecting the 10 percent of certificated operators. Include the site (1623) and manual procedures (1621) for these selected HEC operators. Select HEC from the options in the “National Use” Field.

b.    Airworthiness. Conduct a Ramp (3627 or 5627) or Spot (3628 or 5628) inspection and aircraft records inspection (one 3634 and one 5634) on a minimum of 10 percent of certificated operators (responsible Flight Standards office). Rotate surveillance of these operators year to year.

6.    Title 14 CFR Part 137 Operator—Operations. Conduct one of the following inspections on at least 20 percent of the certificated operators (responsible Flight Standards office). Rotate surveillance of these operators from year to year.

a.    Main Base (1616).

b.    Ramp (1622).

c.    Site (1623).

d.    Facility (1635).

7.    Title 14 CFR Part 137 Operator—Airworthiness. Conduct one of the following inspections on at least 20 percent of the certificated operators (responsible Flight Standards office). Rotate surveillance of these operators from year to year.

a.    Ramp (3627 or 5627).

b.    Spot (3628 or 5628).

c.    Aircraft Records (3634 or 5634).

8.    Title 14 CFR Part 91 Subpart K (Part 91K)—Fractional Ownership Operations (Airworthiness and Operations). These requirements apply to fractional ownership program managers designated as such by management specification (MSpec) A001, subparagraph a.

Note:  Part 91K AR items may be terminated when the fractional ownership operator is also a part 135 air carrier. Do not terminate part 91K NPG Activities unless all the part 91K aircraft and flightcrews are included in the 14 CFR part 135 Air Carrier Certificate.

a.    Aircraft Configuration Control.

(1)    Ramp (1622). Conduct one inspection on each make and basic model aircraft for each fractional ownership program manager authorized via MSpecs (responsible Flight Standards office).
(2)    Ramp (3627 or 5627). Conduct one inspection on each make and basic model aircraft for each fractional ownership program manager that has authorization via MSpecs (responsible Flight Standards office).

b.    Manuals—Manual/Procedures (1621). Conduct one inspection on each fractional ownership program manager that has authorization via MSpecs (responsible Flight Standards office).

c.    Flight Operations.

(1)    Crew Records (1627). Conduct one inspection on each fractional ownership program manager that has authorization via MSpecs (responsible Flight Standards office).
(2)    Flight Following/Scheduling/Flight Locating (1636). Conduct one inspection on each fractional ownership program manager that has authorization via MSpecs (responsible Flight Standards office).

d.    Personnel Training and Qualifications.

(1)    Training Program (1626). Conduct one pilot ground or pilot flight inspection on each fractional ownership program manager that has authorization via MSpecs (responsible Flight Standards office).
(2)    Training Program (1626). Conduct one flight attendant (F/A) inspection on each fractional ownership program manager that has authorization via MSpecs, if applicable (responsible Flight Standards office).

e.    Route Structures.

(1)    Main Base Inspection (1616). Conduct one inspection on each fractional ownership program manager that has authorization via MSpecs (responsible Flight Standards office).
(2)    Maintenance Facility Inspection (one 3619 or one 5619). Conduct one inspection on each fractional ownership program manager that has authorization via MSpecs (responsible Flight Standards office).

9.    Part 91K—Airworthiness. The requirements apply to any fractional ownership program manager that maintains his or her aircraft under the Continuous Airworthiness Maintenance Program (CAMP).

a.    Aircraft Configuration Control. Ramp (3627 or 5627) or Spot (3628 or 5628) Inspections. Conduct two, in any combination, on each make and basic model aircraft for each fractional ownership program manager authorized via MSpecs (responsible Flight Standards office). Choose these two inspections from any combination of the following AR activities: 3627, 5627, 3628, or 5628 (responsible Flight Standards office).

b.    Aircraft Records (one 3634 and one 5634). Conduct one inspection on each make and basic model aircraft for each fractional ownership program manager who maintains these records (responsible Flight Standards office).

c.    Continuing Analysis and Surveillance System (CASS) (one 3635 and one 5635). Conduct one inspection on each fractional ownership program manager’s CAMP (responsible Flight Standards office).

d.    Inspection Program (one 3637 and one 5637). Conduct one inspection on each make and basic model aircraft for each fractional ownership program manager’s CAMP (responsible Flight Standards office).

e.    Structural Spot (3647). Conduct two inspections on each make and basic model aircraft for each fractional ownership program manager who performs structural inspections of that basic make and model (M/M) (responsible Flight Standards office).

Note:  Termination of this activity is allowed if the structural inspection requirement is not applicable to a basic M/M.

f.    AD Compliance Inspection (one 3649 or one 5649). Conduct one inspection on each make and basic model aircraft. Conduct one inspection for each fractional ownership program manager (responsible Flight Standards office).

(1)    Manuals—Manual/Procedures (one 3626 and one 5626). Conduct one inspection on each fractional ownership program manager (responsible Flight Standards office).
(2)    Personnel Training and Qualifications. Training Program Records (one 3633 and one 5633). Conduct one inspection on each fractional ownership program manager’s CAMP (responsible Flight Standards office).
(3)    Route Structures—Maintenance Facility Inspection (one 3619 and one 5619). Conduct one of each activity on each fractional ownership program manager’s maintenance facilities (responsible Flight Standards office).

10.    Part 91K—Airworthiness. These requirements apply to any fractional ownership program manager who does not maintain aircraft under a CAMP.

a.    Aircraft Configuration Control. Conduct 2 of the following 10 inspections (Items (1) through (5) below) on each fractional ownership program manager that is authorized via MSpecs (responsible Flight Standards office). One inspection must be a maintenance inspection and the other must be an avionics inspection. The inspections may be different types (e.g., one Maintenance ramp inspection and one Avionics spot inspection).

(1)    Maintenance Facility Inspection (3619 or 5619).
(2)    Ramp (3627 or 5627).
(3)    Spot (3628 or 5628).
(4)    Aircraft Records (3634 or 5634).
(5)    Inspection Program (3637 or 5637).

b.    Manuals—Manual/Procedures (one 3626 and one 5626). Conduct one inspection on each fractional ownership program manager (responsible Flight Standards office).

c.    Personnel Training and Qualifications. Training Program Records (one 3633 and one 5633). Conduct one inspection on each fractional ownership program manager (responsible Flight Standards office).

11.    Part 91 Air Tour—Operations and Airworthiness. These requirements apply to any operator conducting air tour operations under § 91.147. Conduct each of the following inspections on 50 percent of the air tour operators that have authorization via a Letter of Authorization (LOA) (responsible Flight Standards office).

a.    Ramp (1661).

b.    Ramp (3627 or 5627).

c.    Spot (3628 or 5628).

d.    Aircraft Records (3694 or 5694).

e.    AD Compliance Inspection (3696 or 5696).

Note:  Ensure the following AR entries are used:

    “91AIRTOUR” (without quotation marks) in the “National Use” Field;

    Part 91 LOA identification number in the “Local Use” Field; and

    Name of the operator in the “Non-Cert” Field.

12.    Part 91 “Doors-Off” Operations—Operations and Airworthiness. These requirements apply to any operator conducting “Doors-Off” operations under part 91 and in accordance with FAA Order 8900.4, Emergency Order of Prohibition Pertaining to “Doors-Off” Flight Operations for Compensation or Hire. Conduct each of the following inspections on 50 percent of the operators that have been given authorization via a Letter of Authorization (LOA) issued in accordance with FAA Order 8900.4 (responsible Flight Standards office).

Note:  Issued LOAs and a table of FS office assignments can be found in FSIMS under the “Publications” tab, “Other Documents” section. Select the plus sign for “Supplemental Passenger Restraint Systems.” Please direct any questions related to SPRS LOAs to SPRS@faa.gov.

a.    Ramp (1661).

b.    Ramp (3627 or 5627).

c.    Spot (3628 or 5628).

d.    Aircraft Records (3694 or 5694).

e.    AD Compliance Inspection (3696 or 5696).

f.    Request SPRS LOA.

g.    Review that the operator is following and complying with the Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM) or pilot’s operating handbook (POH) as required by part 91.

Note:  Part 91 “Doors-Off” Operations and Airworthiness Activities must be created locally by the office. Ensure the following AR entries are used:

    “SPRSLOA” (without quotation marks) in the “National Use” Field;

    Part 91 LOA tracking number in the “Local Use” Field (bottom left of LOA); and

    Name of the operator (LOA holder) in the “Non-Cert” Field.

13.    Part 91 Parachute Operations—Operations and Airworthiness. These requirements apply to part 91 parachute operations conducted in accordance with 14 CFR part 105.

a.    Conduct each of the following inspections per year on each parachute operator:

(1)    Ramp (1661).
(2)    Ramp (3627 or 5627).
(3)    Parachute Jumps (1696).
(4)    Spot (3681 or 5681).
(5)    Aircraft Records (3694 or 5694).
(6)    Title 14 CFR Part 65 Rigger (senior or master) (3678).

Note:  The 3678 Code must be generated locally by the office.

Note:  Inspectors will identify any surveillance associated with this activity by entering “SPORTJUMP” (without quotation marks) in the “National Use” Field of the Activity Record.

Note:  Part 65 Rigger (3678) activities may be terminated when a part 65 Parachute Rigger is not working with the operator.

Note:  Parachute operations associated with aviation events are excluded from this requirement. Refer to Volume 6, Chapter 11, Section 10, Surveillance of an Aviation Event. The activities may be terminated for those parachute operators that are Certificate of Authorization (COA) Holders.

b.    Inspector comments in the applicable NPG Activity Record report should cover, as applicable, pilot certification and medical certificate, aircraft maintenance/inspection, aircraft fueling procedures, and aircraft configuration for sport skydiving operations. When performing parachute harness and reserve pack inspections, verify Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C23, Personnel Parachute Assemblies and Components, harness and reserve parachute marking compliance.

14.    Part 91 Banner Tow Operations—Operations and Airworthiness. These requirements apply to any towing operation conducted under § 91.311. Conduct two of the following three inspections per year on each tow operator located within the responsible Flight Standards office’s jurisdiction. One inspection must be an Airworthiness inspection and the other must be an Operations inspection.

a.    Ramp (3627) or Spot (3681).

b.    Surveillance (1684).

Note:  Inspectors will identify any surveillance associated with this activity by entering “BannerTow” (without quotation marks or space) in the “National Use” field of the Activity Record.

15.    Title 14 CFR Part 61 Flight Schools. Conduct one inspection for each flight training device (FTD) located at each flight school and satellite school (responsible Flight Standards office) that uses a Level 4 or 5 FTD in its flight training. Generate this inspection locally: FTD (Level 4 or 5) (1630) if approved for use.

16.    Title 14 CFR Part 183 ODA. Conduct one onsite surveillance activity, either Operations (2677) or Airworthiness (4677 or 6677) for each ODA that has an FAA Organization Management Team (OMT) member assigned to an FS office.

a.    ASIs will record “SUPV” in the “National Use” Field of the Activity when they comply with annual supervision procedures found in FAA Order 8100.15, Organization Designation Authorization Procedures, chapter 5, paragraph 5-4. ASIs will record “DOIP” (without quotation marks) in the “National Use” Field of the Activity Record when they comply with 24-month delegated organization inspection program procedures found in Order 8100.15, Chapter 6, Delegated Organization Inspection Program.

b.    Do not use AR codes 4677 and 6677 for aircraft certification package reviews.

17.    Part 65 Airmen—Operations. Conduct one onsite surveillance activity (1667) for each approved aircraft dispatcher certification course (responsible Flight Standards office).

18.    Government Aircraft. Government aircraft operators that hold any type of FAA certification are included in the normal surveillance activities, such as spot inspections of the aircraft and aircraft records. This includes any aircraft exclusively leased to the Federal Government. Any aircraft or operation certificated by the FAA is subject to this surveillance, regardless of whether they are operating as public or civil. Government-owned aircraft operators who are conducting public aircraft operations (PAO) must be included in the FS office’s annual planned surveillance activities to verify their PAO status remains unchanged. For more information, refer to Order 8900.1, Volume 3, Chapter 14, Section 2, Public Aircraft Operations and Surveillance Government Aircraft Operations Versus Civil Aircraft Operations.

Note:  All oversight (surveillance) activities are recorded under activity codes 1470, 3470, and 5470. The X6XX series activity codes are not to be used (refer to Order 8900.1, Volume 3, Chapter 14, Section 2).

19.    Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). Add the following UAS NPG Activities locally when applicable (responsible Flight Standards office):

a.    Conditional NPG Activity. Conduct one UAS site visit (1623, 3631, or 5631) when each 5 actionable UAS investigations occur within Class B, C, or D airspace, or each 10 actionable investigations occur in any airspace.

b.    Reports. Locally analyze the reports that trigger the required surveillance for root cause and common elements (e.g., locations, times, and events) that yield the best surveillance opportunities. Investigations include occurrences, incidents, near midair collisions (NMAC), accidents, complaints, Mandatory Occurrence Reports (MOR), and Compliance and Enforcement actions, but exclude nonactionable reports. A report is considered actionable if it contains information such as locations and times that show a pattern, and/or includes key information such as registration number, operator identity, etc., which would enable additional actions such as interviews, site visits, or compliance actions. Nonactionable reports are those with little or no tangible information that would lead to identifying a UAS or UAS operator.

c.    Targeted NPG Activity. Conduct one UAS site visit (1623, 3631, or 5631) when notified by the responsible Flight Standards office manager.

d.    UAS Sightings. The Safety Analysis and Promotion Division will notify the responsible Flight Standards office manager through quarterly-generated reports of UAS sightings near U.S. airports. When an airport experiences 10 or more UAS sightings in the quarter, the division will notify the responsible Flight Standards office manager, who will in turn assign the surveillance to the FS office point of contact (POC). One Targeted NPG Activity surveillance is required for each 10 UAS sightings for each airport listed in the report. Targeted NPG Activity surveillances must be complete by the end of the quarter in which the report was received. General Aviation Safety Assurance leadership will be copied on each notification to the FS office manager provided by the Safety Analysis and Promotion Division.

e.    FAA Order 2150.3, FAA Compliance and Enforcement Program. Conduct one UAS site visit (1623, 3631, or 5631) when supporting enforcement actions against any UAS operations that interfere with wildfire, law enforcement, or emergency response. FS office personnel will coordinate with the Office of Security and Hazardous Materials Safety (ASH) Law Enforcement Assistance Program (LEAP) agents and local law enforcement for activities during wildfires and well-known rescue/emergency response efforts to support as needed.

Note:  Actionable investigations include occurrences, incidents, NMACs, accidents, complaints, MORs, and Compliance and Enforcement actions, but exclude nonactionable sightings. Nonactionable sightings are those reports with little or no tangible information that would lead to identifying a UAS or UAS operator.

f.    AR. Accurate AR Record entries are important for UAS data analysis. Inspectors must use the following format for entries in the Comments Section of the AR Record:

    Location of surveillance,

    Class of airspace,

    Duration of surveillance,

    Observation,

    Airman name and certificate (if applicable),

    Waivers, or Exemptions held by operator (if applicable),

    Specific regulation violated,

    Identified hazards or ineffective risk controls,

    Result of Root Cause Analysis (RCA), and

    Type of action initiated.

g.    AR. Accurate AR entries are important for UAS data analysis. Ensure the Activity Records contain (as applicable):

    Title 14 CFR part,

    Location,

    Airmen’s names,

    Related certificates,

    Waivers or exemptions held,

    Enforcement number,

    Surveillance start and end times, and

    A clear description of actions taken.

(1)    Certificated Operators. For certificated operators, enter the appropriate regulation (e.g., part 137) in the “14 CFR” Field.
(2)    Noncertificated Operations. For noncertificated operations, enter “part 107” for small UAS (under 55 pounds) in the “14 CFR” Field.
(3)    Noncertificated or Recreational Operators. For noncertificated/recreational operators, enter “part 107” for small UAS (under 55 pounds) in the “14 CFR” Field. In the “Local Use” Field, enter “44809” to identify recreational operations that fall under Section 349 of the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.
(4)    “National Use” Field. Enter the code specified in Order 8900.1, Volume 16, Chapter 1, Section 4, Flight Standards Divisions/ASI Interface, Tasks/Flows, and PTRS, to properly document whether the surveillance was a Conditional or a Targeted NPG Activity, the size of the UAS and whether the UAS was used for public, civil, or military purposes. Enter “C” for Conditional or “T” for Targeted, as applicable, a hyphen followed by UAS, a hyphen, followed by type of operator (Public (P), Civil (C), or Military (M)), a hyphen, followed by the size (Large (L) or Small (S)). For example:

    C-UAS-M-L = UAS, Military operator, Large aircraft (55 pounds and over).

    T-UAS-P-L = UAS, Public operator, Large aircraft.

    C-UAS-C-S = UAS, Civil operator, Small aircraft.

    T-UAS-U-S = UAS, Unknown operator, Small aircraft.

(5)    UAS Activity Observed. If UAS activity is observed during a surveillance, enter code UAS-OBSV in the “Misc” Field.
(6)    No UAS Activity Observed. If no UAS activity is observed during a surveillance, enter code UAS‑NOT-OBSV in the “Misc” Field.
(7)    The “Non-Cert” Field. The “Non-Cert” (“Non-Certificated”) Field is an optional field in the AR and shall be used if the UAS has a registration number that begins with “FA.”
(8)    “Point of Departure” Field. Investigations triggered by UAS sightings near airports should include the airport code of the reporting aircraft or tower.
(9)     “Division Use” Field (Formally the “Regional Use” Field of a PTRS Record in eFAS). The “Division Use” Field is an optional data field in AR but is required to be populated for UAS when sightings reports have little or nontangible information that would lead to identifying a UAS or UAS operator. Enter code “NON” without quotations in the “Division Use” Field and close the AR as a nonactionable investigation.

20.    Geographic Program Requirements.

a.    The geographic program found in Appendix B requires FS offices to incorporate PI work program requirements into the development of the geographic work program to ensure it meets overall certificate management goals. These orders also require flexibility as the local qualified inspectors develop the surveillance plan to allow for the incorporation of ongoing changes to inspection requirements forwarded from the FS office/IFO.

b.    FS offices will accept geographic NPG Activities transferred from other FS offices. Transferred NPG Activities are either accomplished or recorded as Resources Not Available (RNA).

c.    The responsible Flight Standards office/IFO uses the surveillance needs of the certificate holder to help determine where to target geographic NPG Activities. The targeted FS office location for the surveillance may be unrelated to the Enhanced Flight Standards Automation System (eFSAS) environmental file that generated the NPG Activity.

d.    Coordination is required to ensure that targeted geographic NPG Activities meet the requirements of the FS office/IFO.

e.    FS office/IFO FLMs must consider the risk of geographic surveillance requests when developing office surveillance plans. The highest risk surveillance, regardless of the source, must be accomplished with due regard to office resource limitations.

(1)    FS office managers will address resource shortfalls, which may result from the assignment of geographic NPG Activities, using the RNA process.
(2)    Coordinate nonscheduled air carrier inspections across FS office geographic boundaries. PIs must inform other FS offices of any certificate holder operating in that FS office’s geographic area and the nature of the certificate holder’s operation (scheduled or nonscheduled).

21.    Surveillance of FAA Aircraft. In accordance with FAA Order 4040.9, FAA Aircraft Management Program, the FAA must provide regulatory oversight, to include a surveillance and inspection program, for all FAA flight program operations conducted in FAA aircraft (owned, leased, and rented). The FAA has assigned a flight program certificate management unit (CMU) to provide regulatory oversight of FAA flight programs and FAA flight program participants. The CMU will maintain accurate information in the eVID for the development of a required annual work program. The surveillance and inspection program must be consistent with applicable regulatory requirements and agency directives that set forth standards for FAA flight programs. The surveillance and inspection program should also be equal in scope and detail to an operator of similar size, scope, and complexity.

22.    NPG Activity Terminations.

a.    You may only terminate work program items using a “T” in the “Results” Field of the NPG Activity Record for the following reasons:

Note:  Document the reason you terminated work program item in Comment Section of the NPG AR Record. Document FLM concurrence for the termination.

Note:  Risk is the basis of all NPG Activities. Continue to generate additional NPG Activities as needed, based on risk.

(1)    Changed Certificate. If the subject of the surveillance (e.g., operator or aircraft) has changed or is no longer active, FS office FLMs will work together to resolve any needed transfer of NPG Activities. Use keyword code 971 to indicate terminated NPG surveillance.
(2)    Surrendered or Revoked Certificate. If a certificate holder surrenders a certificate or revokes the certificate, then terminate the NPG Activity. The NPG Activity Record should indicate the date of the surrender or revocation. Use keyword code 971 to indicate terminated NPG surveillance.
(3)    Incorrect enhanced Vital Information Database (eVID). If incorrect information in the eVID generates an NPG Activity, the required NPG Activity comment should indicate that the PI has corrected the eVID. Use keyword code 971.
(4)    Change of Operating Regulation. For certificate holders that change their operating regulation (e.g., from part 91K to part 125), terminate the NPG Activities generated under the existing 14 CFR part. The required AR comment should include the change of operating 14 CFR part and the date the change occurred. Use keyword code 971. The responsible Flight Standards office will reenter these required inspections using locally added NPG Activities.
(5)    NPG Activity Created in Error. If an NPG Activity is created in error (e.g., duplicate Activities), the NPG Activity required comment should describe the error and reference the correct NPG Activity identification (if applicable). Use keyword code 971.
(6)    Part 91K. Part 91K NPG Activities may be terminated when the fractional ownership operator is also a part 135 air carrier. The comments section of the terminated part 91K NPG Activity must include the part 135 air carrier’s name and four-letter designator and state that equivalent surveillance is already included in the part 135 air carrier’s Safety Assurance System (SAS) oversight. Use keyword code 971. Do not terminate part 91K NPG Activity unless all the part 91K aircraft and flightcrews are included in the part 135 Air Carrier Certificate.

b.    FS office managers must monitor NPG Activity Records for appropriate termination activity and provide their division managers termination reports upon request.

23.    Resource Shortfalls. All NPG Activities must either be resourced or, if resources are not available, captured with a shortfall reason and justification. If resources are not available, the FLM must select a reason in the SAS automation, and provide justification for the shortfall. This information must be provided to the PIs for future planning.

24.    After Normal Duty Hours and Weekend Surveillance. Offices should accomplish at least 10 percent of the surveillance after normal duty hours, to include weekends. This surveillance would include both required and planned surveillance activities. Inspectors must enter “OFFHOUR” (without quotation marks) in the “National Use” Field of the Activity Record. If other guidance requires the use of the “National Use” Field, place “OFFHOUR” (without quotation marks) in the “Misc” Field.

Note:  Off-hour activities are activities that occur outside of normal FAA duty hours, which includes weekends. The responsible Flight Standards office and national guidance determine off‑hour activities and the hours that comprise off hours.

Appendix B. Flight Standards Service Geographic Surveillance Program for Part 129

1.    Purpose. This appendix provides information and guidance about the Flight Standards Service (FS) Geographic Surveillance Program for foreign air carriers operating in accordance with Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 129. This appendix applies to principal inspectors (PI) for part 129 foreign air carriers.

2.    Geographic Surveillance Program.

a.    Data Collection. Inspections carried out via the Geographic Surveillance Program occur at an increasing number of air carriers’ operating locations as this program has progressed through a series of implementation phases. Data collection from a wider range of operating locations will add to the overall quality of the data collection process, as well as identify hazards and associated risks not previously identified at some locations. Identification of previously unobserved hazards and associated risks is critical to ensure corrective action and risk mitigation.

b.    Foreign Air Carriers.

(1)    In March 2008, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Secretariat adopted amendment 32 to ICAO Annex 6, Operation of Aircraft, which strengthened the oversight of and requirements for foreign operators. This amendment became effective later that year and applicable on January 1, 2010. Annex 6, Part I, chapter 4, paragraph 4.2.2 contains the new standard. Specifically, paragraph 4.2.2.2 requires that “States shall establish a program with procedures for the surveillance of operations in their territory by a foreign operator and for taking appropriate action when necessary to preserve safety.” ICAO Doc 8335, Manual of Procedures for Operations Inspection, Certification and Continued Surveillance, part VI, discusses State responsibilities regarding commercial air transport operations by foreign operators. Part VI, chapter 1 addresses the principles of surveillance of foreign operators, and part VI, chapter 5 discusses continued surveillance of operators from other States.
(2)    IFOs have overall responsibility for regulatory activities pertaining to all part 129 operators within the United States. IFOs that issue OpSpecs for a subject part 129 operator are responsible for maintaining environmental data in the eVID for scheduled part 129 air carriers operating to domestic airports. The office with geographic responsibility for the airport to which the part 129 carrier operates has the responsibility for inspector assignment and conducting geographic inspections in accordance with FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 12, Chapter 4, Section 10, Ramp Inspections for Part 129 Foreign Air Carrier, and Section 1, Part 129 Operations Specifications Overview and Issuance. Geographic offices, assigned in eVID, have the primary responsibility for conducting part 129 ramp inspections. Offices must make inspector assignments, in the environmental record, to comply with this requirement.
(3)    IFO managers may send inspectors outside their local area to conduct inspections. However, IFOs may not send inspectors outside the United States to conduct ramp inspections of part 129 foreign air carriers.

3.    Part 129 Geographic Surveillance Procedures.

a.    PIs will accomplish a Geographic Surveillance Program review within 12 months from the last review, and at least annually, by the end of the fiscal year (FY). They are encouraged to update their review as many times as necessary during the year based on changes in risk. Use the Geographic Airport Data Display (GeoADD) and the Safety Performance Analysis System (SPAS) tools as aids to determine the type and location of geographic surveillance that you need. The GeoADD tool is located at http://aipo.avs.faa.gov/app/GeoADD/.

b.    Document the accomplishment of the review by entering one of the following Activity Recording (AR) codes: 1045, 3045, or 5045. Enter “GEOADD” (without quotation marks or spaces, capital letters) into the “National Use” Field of each record. A PI team review requires only one AR entry. Make a comment in the comments section of the record that states: “Accomplished as a PI team, one record for all part 129 assigned” (without quotation marks). Also, annotate the air carrier designators involved in the review. If doing the review individually, all three Activity Records are necessary.

c.    PIs at IFOs shall provide risk-based geographic surveillance requests and non-scheduled foreign air carrier geographic surveillance requests for part 129 ramp inspections to their managers. If IFO management concurs, they will forward the geographic surveillance request to the responsible Flight Standards office manager (General Aviation Safety Assurance and Air Carrier Safety Assurance). IFO managers shall copy the International Field Office Management Branch to facilitate tracking. Communication methods between the IFO, FS office, and the International Field Office Management Branch include email and memoranda. Choices for geographic surveillance include the following AR codes: 1622, 3627, and 5627.

Note:  Do not use the geographic surveillance procedures made through subparagraph c above in lieu of transferring AR Records in Safety Assurance System (SAS).

d.    If the receiving FS office manager determines that resources are available, the responsible Front Line Manager (FLM) will assign an inspector to accomplish the risk-based surveillance, including any specific PI instructions.

e.    If the receiving FS office manager determines that resources are not available, he or she will notify the requesting IFO. The requesting IFO must either respond “Resources Not Available (RNA)” to the surveillance in NPG Activity Record or seek additional resources through the International Field Office Management Branch. The International Field Office Management Branch will facilitate possible resources from one of the four IFOs.

Note:  In the event of resource requests requiring temporary duty travel (TDY), the IFO with oversight authority (initiating the resource request) will provide accounting data to cover TDY costs.

f.    Any inspector who has completed the electronic Learning Management System (eLMS) course “How to Conduct a 14 CFR Part 129 Ramp Inspection” and all required on-the-job training (OJT) may, based on work assignment, accomplish the surveillance.

g.    Upon completion of the surveillance, enter “GEOADD” without quotes or spaces, in capital letters, into the “National Use” Field of each NPG Activity Record.

h.    PIs will monitor and evaluate geographic surveillance results and will take followup actions as necessary. IFOs and the International Field Office Management Branch regularly review part 129 surveillance activity to evaluate geographic surveillance needs.

Appendix C. UAS NPG Activity Procedures

1.    Purpose. The information in this appendix lays out processes for triggering and conducting the conditionally required inspection items noted in Appendix A. Both items can be broken down into four phases per the instructions below. Guidance for the report section of each item is as follows:

2.    Conditional Required Surveillance Work Activity.

a.    Track. The Flight Standards Service (FS) office Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) point of contact (POC) will keep a running tally of UAS actionable investigations conducted from FS office personnel. When each 5 actionable investigations occur in Class B, C, or D airspace or when each 10 actionable investigations occur in any airspace, the FS office POC will alert the FS office manager that a Conditional UAS NPG Activity is required. The Conditional NPG Activity will be conducted on the investigation(s) determined, by the FS office manager, to be the highest risk to safety in the National Airspace System (NAS) of the actionable sighting investigation(s). The Conditional UAS NPG Activity(s) must be completed by the end of the quarter in which it was identified as a requirement.

b.    Plan. The FS office UAS POC will review the 5 or 10 investigations that triggered the required surveillance to determine common elements among the investigations that suggest a surveillance opportunity. Similarities to look for include repeating operators, locations, types of operations, and hours of operation. FS office UAS POCs are encouraged to reach out to the Safety Analysis and Promotion Division for assistance with analyses if needed, and to consult Air Traffic Organization (ATO) Mission Support Services (AJV) for data on UAS authorizations in the area. Also, when surveillance is planned to target certain operators, the FS office UAS POC is expected to reach out to the General Aviation and Commercial Division for assistance in tracking the operator and determining if the operator is in possession of a waiver or exemption.

3.    Targeted Activity Recording (AR).

a.    Track. The Safety Analysis and Promotion Division will generate quarterly reports of UAS sightings near U.S. airports. When an airport experiences 10 or more UAS sightings in the quarter, the division will notify the responsible Flight Standards office manager, who will in turn assign the surveillance to the FS office POC. One Targeted NPG Activity is required for each 10 UAS sightings for each airport listed in the report. Targeted NPG Activity must be completed by the end of the quarter in which the report was received. The Safety Analysis and Promotion division will copy General Aviation Safety Assurance leadership on each notification provided to the FS office manager.

b.    Plan. The FS office UAS POC will consult with analysts from the Safety Analysis and Promotion Division and review Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC) data to determine the best locations to establish surveillance opportunities near the targeted airport. The locations will be decided with available location data from the sightings reports and requested areas in LAANC. The surveillance areas are likely to be in community areas near approach and departure corridors for airports, not on the airports themselves, so no special access should be required to conduct the surveillance.

c.    Conduct. The assigned personnel from the FS office should conduct the surveillance activity as a locally created NPG Activity, and according to guidance established in Order 8900.1, Volume 16, Chapter 5, Surveillance/Compliance and Enforcement. The FAA Compliance Program should be applied as intended for all surveillance activities.

d.    Report. See Appendix A.

4.    Contacts.

General Aviation and Commercial Division

Safety Analysis and Promotion Division

Air Traffic Organization Mission Support Services (AJV)

Office of Security and Hazardous Materials Safety (ASH)

9-afs-800-part107waivers@faa.gov

afs-930-only-uas@faa.gov

9-ajv-115-uasorganization@faa.gov

Assigned Law Enforcement Assistance Program (LEAP) Special Agent or leap@faa.gov

Contact for: Policy guidance, checking waiver and exemption status for UAS operators.

Contact for: Data analysis questions and guidance for planning items.

Contact for: Information on approved UAS operations in local airspace.

Contact for: Obtaining registration information, assistance in working with local law enforcement.

Appendix D. Acronyms and Abbreviations

Acronym

Meaning

AD

Airworthiness Directive

AJV

ATO Mission Support Service

AFM

Aircraft Flight Manual

ANSP

Aircraft Network Security Program

AR

Activity Recording

ASH

Office of Security and Hazardous Materials Safety

ASI

Aviation Safety Inspector

ATO

Air Traffic Organization

CAMP

Continuous Airworthiness Maintenance Program

CASS

Continuing Analysis and Surveillance System

CFR

Code of Federal Regulations

CMU

Certificate Management Unit

COA

Certificate of Authorization

COS

Continued Operational Safety

eFSAS

Enhanced Flight Standards Automation System

eLMS

Electronic Learning Management System

eVID

Enhanced Vital Information Database

F/A

Flight Attendant

FA Act

Federal Aviation Act of 1958

FAA

Federal Aviation Administration

FLM

Front Line Manager

FS

Flight Standards Service

FSIMS

Flight Standards Information Management System

FTD

Flight Training Device

FTFR

Fuel Tank Flammability Reduction

FY

Fiscal Year

GeoADD

Geographic Airport Data Display

HEC

Human External Cargo

HSL

Heightened Surveillance List

ICAO

International Civil Aviation Organization

IFO

International Field Office

IG

Inspector General

LAANC

Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability

LEAP

Law Enforcement Assistance Program

LOA

Letter of Authorization

M/M

Make and Model

MOR

Mandatory Occurrence

MSpecs

Management Specifications

NAS

National Airspace System

NMAC

Near Midair Collision

NPG

National Flight Standards Work Program Guidelines

NTSB

National Transportation Safety Board

ODA

Organization Designation Authorization

OJT

On-the-Job Training

OMT

Organization Management Team

OpSpecs

Operations Specifications

OWL

Office Workload List

PAO

Public Aircraft Operations

Part 91K

Part 91 Subpart K

PI

Principal Inspector

POC

Point of Contact

POH

Pilot’s Operating Handbook

RAMPS

Regional Modular Planning System

RCA

Root Cause Analysis

RNA

Resources Not Available

SAFE

SAS Assistance, Feedback, or Enhancement

SAS

Safety Assurance System

SPAS

Safety Performance Analysis System

SPRS

Supplemental Passenger Restraint System

TC

Type Certificate

TDY

Temporary Duty Travel

TSO

Technical Standard Order

UAS

Unmanned Aircraft System

U.S.C.

United States Code

W&B

Weight and Balance